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University Courses Courses (UNAS) College of Arts and Sciences


Subject Area Course # Course Title Semester Credit Hours Expand
UNAS 1005 Applications of Learning Theory Fall 3
Course Description

This course is designed to help you to improve your grades and critical thinking skills. The course will include two linked parts: 2 weekly classroom meetings and one weekly one-on-one session with a teaching assistant. Students are taught a comprehensive method that includes instruction on lecture notes, readings, time management, test prep and more.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: For Freshman and Sophomores.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

UNAS 1010 Perspectives on Management Spring 3
Course Description

This course, taught by practitioners John Clavin (BC '84) and Jere Doyle (BC '87), provides BC students with an excellent opportunity to explore the functional disciplines of business from a real-world perspective. Using a combination of lectures, case studies, readings and outside speakers, the course provides students the opportunity to get grounded in each of the CSOM concentrations while gaining outside views on careers in related fields and industries. The course will also provide a framework to explore and discuss cross-functional issues that impact business strategy and execution. This is a highly interactive class that places a premium on both preparation and participation each week. The course is initially open to CSOM sophomores but normally has availability for juniors and seniors across all undergraduate majors


Instructor(s): Jere Doyle
John Clavin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: UGMG1010

Comments:

UNAS 1015 Career Exploration for MCAS Students Spring 1
Course Description

Guided by Ignatian principles of self-knowledge and discernment, Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences students will learn how to connect the value of their liberal arts education to their futures. Through self-assessment exercises, lively discussion and thought-provoking activities, students will identify and reflect upon their values, interests, and skills and then connect them to career options. In addition, students will explore the eight most desired skills valued by employers and learn how to develop those competencies during their BC careers. We will also discuss ways to research the varied career paths and learn targeted vocational search strategies to achieve meaningful professional goals.


Instructor(s): Amy Flynn, M.S.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Course is graded as Pass/Fail and targeted to freshmen and sophomore students in Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences.

UNAS 1016 Designing Your Career: An Exploration Course Fall 1
Course Description

In this hybrid course (combination of in-person and online sessions), students who are exploring their career interests will use self-assessment exercises, lively discussion and thought-provoking activities to identify and reflect upon their values, interests, and skills and then connect them to career options. Using a design thinking framework, students will explore the eight skills that are most desired by employers and discover how they are developing those competencies during their time at BC. We will discuss ways to research varied career paths and learn targeted strategies to achieve meaningful professional goals. Students who are considering such questions as In what academic discipline do I want to major? What kind of internship do I want to pursue? What sort of careers am I interested in? will all benefit from this course.


Instructor(s): Amy Flynn
Christiana Reynolds

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course is open to sophomores, juniors and seniors in the Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences, Woods College of Advancing Studies, and Applied Psych majors within the Lynch School of Education. Please note that this course is not open to freshman.

UNAS 1020 OTE First Year Success Seminar Fall 1
Course Description

The First Year Success Seminar will take place in the fall semester of every year, and will provide OTE Summer graduates with supplemental information on both the Thea Bowman AHANA and Intercultural Center and other Boston College resources, in-depth coverage of certain topics through interactive workshops, readings, videos, and group discussions. The First Year Success Seminar will also serve as the primary mode of communication between students and BAIC staff. Students can expect to participate in workshops presented by various organizations in the BC community focused on stress management, budgeting, time management, financial literacy, and effective studying techniques.


Instructor(s): INes Maturana Sendoya

Prerequisites: MUST have completed OTE Program in the previous summer.

Cross listed with:

Comments: MUST have completed OTE Program in the previous summer.

UNAS 1103 Community Praxis Fall 1
Course Description

This course will involve discussion of social identities, inequality, power, and environmental sustainability; a group project; and other activities related to community themes.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

UNAS 1104 Modernism and the Arts I/Perspectives II Fall 3
Course Description

This is a full-year course in the literature, music, and visual arts usually connected with the term modernism. The first eight weeks of the term will be devoted to literature, the last five of the first term and the first five of the second to music, and the last eight of the second term to the visual arts. Among the authors read during the literature segment will be Baudelaire, Dostoevsky, Ibsen, Eliot, Kafka, and Joyce. During the music segment the composers listened to will include Wagner, Debussy, and Stravinsky. There will also be at least one week of jazz.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This two-semester course fulfills the 6-credit Philosophy Core requirement, the 3-credit Literature Core requirement, and the 3-credit Fine Arts Core requirement.

UNAS 1105 Modernism and the Arts I/Perspectives II Fall 3
Course Description

See course description under UNAS1104.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: A two-semester sequence (UNAS1104-1105 and UNAS1106-1107) Total of 6 credits each term

UNAS 1106 Modernism and the Arts II/Perspectives II Spring 3
Course Description

See course description under UN 104.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: A two-semester sequence (UN 104-105 and UN 106-107) Total of 6 credits each term

UNAS 1107 Modernism and the Arts II/Perspectives II Spring 3
Course Description

See course description under UN 104.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: A two-semester sequence (UN 104-105 and UN 106-107) Total of 6 credits each term

UNAS 1109 Horizons of the New Social Sciences I/Perspectives III Fall 3
Course Description

This is a full-year course designed to lead the student to an understanding of the unity that underlies the diversity of the separate social sciences of economics, sociology, political science, and law from a viewpoint that does not prescind from the theological issues.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This two-semester course fulfills the 6-credit Philosophy core requirement and the 6-credit Social Science core requirement.

UNAS 1110 Horizons of the New Social Sciences I/Perspectives III Fall 3
Course Description

See course description under UNAS1109.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: A two-semester sequence (UNAS1109-1110 and UNAS1111-1112) Total of 6 credits each term

UNAS 1111 Horizons of the New Social Sciences II/Perspectives III Spring 3
Course Description

See course description under UNAS1109.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: A two-semester sequence (UNAS1109-1110 and UNAS1111-1112) Total of 6 credits each term

UNAS 1112 Horizons of the New Social Sciences II/Perspectives III Spring 3
Course Description

See course description under UNAS1109.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: A two-semester sequence (UNAS1109-1110 and UNAS1111-1112) Total of 6 credits each term

UNAS 1115 Writing Style: Sentence Mechanics Summer 1
Course Description

From a stylistic perspective, this course examines one of the building blocks of any piece of writing—sentences. Although writing a sentence is often taken for granted, in fact writing even a single sentence involves many choices. For any sentence, usually there isn’t only one way to grammatically structure it, isn’t only one way to arrange its parts, isn’t only one way to word it. This course unpacks important stylistic choices, demonstrating that how a sentence is written determines what meaning it conveys. To better appreciate sentence mechanics, students will analyze the writing style in published articles and posts, and will also complete short writing exercises and assignments and analyze their own writing style. Through this practice, students will learn how to write sentences that are clear and effective.


Instructor(s): Dustin Rutledge

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

UNAS 1119 New Scientific Visions I/Perspectives IV Fall 3
Course Description

Can the study of modern mathematics and the natural sciences prove to be a genuine liberation of the human spirit? This unusual question will form the central theme of this course. The course will explore major developments in the fields of mathematics, biology, physics, chemistry, and the earth and space sciences from ancient Greece, through the modern scientific revolutions of the seventeenth century, and into the twentieth century achievements and paradoxes of modern number theory, the discovery of DNA, relativity theories, quantum mechanics, and contemporary cosmologies.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This two-semester course may fulfill the 6-credit Philosophy core requirement and either the 6-credit Natural Science core or the 3-credit Mathematics core and 3 credits of the Natural Science Core.

UNAS 1120 New Scientific Visions I/Perspectives IV Fall 3
Course Description

See course description under UNAS1119.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: A two-semester sequence (UNAS1119-1120 and UNAS1121-1122) Total of 6 credits each term

UNAS 1121 New Scientific Visions II/Perspectives IV Spring 3
Course Description

See course description under UN 119.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: A two-semester sequence (UN 119-120 and UN 121-122) Total of 6 credits each term

UNAS 1122 New Scientific Visions II/Perspectives IV Spring 3
Course Description

See course description under UN 119.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: A two-semester sequence (UN 119-120 and UN 121-122) Total of 6 credits each term

UNAS 1123 The Writing Process: Writing About Inner Strength Summer 1
Course Description

This one-credit course seeks to increase your ability and confidence in writing at the college level. You’ll practice fundamental skills ranging from crafting sentences and constructing paragraphs to engaging sources and analyzing texts. But you’ll concentrate on the writing process, and this course will identify the characteristics of an effective writing process. You’ll acquire flexible strategies to develop and present ideas, using writing to think, communicate, and learn, enabling yourself to approach any college-level writing situation with success.


Instructor(s): Dustin Rutledge

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

UNAS 1124 The Writing Process: Writing About Unity Summer 1
Course Description

This one-credit course seeks to increase your ability and confidence in writing at the college level. You’ll practice fundamental skills ranging from crafting sentences and constructing paragraphs to engaging sources and analyzing texts. But you’ll concentrate on the writing process, and this course will identify the characteristics of an effective writing process. You’ll acquire strategies to develop and present ideas, using writing to think, communicate, and learn, enabling yourself to approach any college-level writing situation with success. You will write about unity, exploring this theme as it’s portrayed in two texts, the movie Moneyball (2011) and the play Circle Mirror Transformation (2010). What kinds of unity are there? How do individuals become united? Why is unity important? You’ll use the concept of unity to better understand writing. How does cooperation occur between writer and readers? What makes a piece of writing unified?


Instructor(s): Dustin Rutledge

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

UNAS 1162 Peaceful Conflict Resolution Methods Fall 3
Course Description

This course considers conflict resolution methods in several different types of contexts: personal and family, organizational and work, international peace-making. Among the methods analyzed and practiced in role playing exercises are: methods for resisting win-lose behaviors, methods for developing win-win solutions to conflicts, dialogic methods for developing creative solutions to conflicts, and third party facilitation, mediation, and arbitration methods. Personal skill development as well as careers in conflict resolution are explored. In addition, different types of personal philosophical and spiritual approaches to conflict resolution are considered.


Instructor(s): Richard Nielsen

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: THEO1341

Comments:

UNAS 1163 Peaceful Ethics: Social Action Leadership Methods Spring 3
Course Description

The course focuses on methods we can use individually and together in addressing ethics issues and in helping to build and maintain ethical communities and organizations within different types of political-economic environments and realities. Methods considered include: ethics reasoning, dialogue, and persuasion methods; win-win negotiating and incentive methods; win-lose, nonviolent forcing and compliance methods; internal due process and governance methods; and alternative institution building and social movement methods.


Instructor(s): Richard Nielsen

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: THEO1342

Comments:

UNAS 1164 Global Ethics and Pragmatic Solidarity Spring 3
Course Description

This interdisciplinary seminar offers participants an opportunity to critically reflect upon selected philosophical and social scientific readings and their lived experiences towards understanding multiple local and global systems and structures that give rise to and sustain social injustice. Specifically, you will begin by exploring your social positions at the intersection ‘race’, gender, social class, sexuality, ethnicity, language, abilities, etc. You will develop criteria for understanding the multiple local and global contexts in which you live towards exploring options for taking actions alongside individuals and communities directly affected by social injustices. You will also explore how action-reflection processes can contribute to clarifying your self-understanding and social position vis-à-vis each other and those with whom you act locally and globally.


Instructor(s): Brinton Lykes
Tomeu Estelrich

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

UNAS 1165 Global Service and Justice Seminar Fall 1
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

UNAS 1166 Global Service&Justice Sem:Contextualizing Service Fall 2
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

UNAS 1167 Global Service and Justice:Senior Seminar Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

UNAS 1199 Gateway to the Sciences Seminar I Fall 1
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

UNAS 1701 Oppression and Change in Contemporary United States: Sociocultural and Psychological Perspectives Fall 3
Course Description

This course engages the topic of social oppression and transformation from social and psychological perspectives. Using research, scholarship, and creative work from psychology, education, sociology, history, and popular culture, we will explore institutional, ideological, interpersonal, and individual aspects of oppression across four social locations — social class, gender, race, and sexual orientation. For each location, we will start with our own stories of privilege and oppression; move to an empathic engagement with the stories of others; broaden to understand the way that structural dynamics shape those stories; and finally, dive into specific social issues, including family poverty, violence against women, mass incarceration, and LGBTQ homelessness.


Instructor(s): Lisa Goodman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal: Enduring Questions
For Freshmen Only

UNAS 1702 Life, Liberty and Health: Policy, Politics and Law Fall 3
Course Description

If health is our “greatest happiness” (Thomas Jefferson), why is U.S. health care such a mess? We have rights to vote and free speech, but do we have a right to health? This course explores the role of policy, politics, and law in the pursuit of life, liberty and health. Topics include the history of our health care system; prescription drug costs; government-mandated vaccinations, the “right to try” unproven therapies; and the roles of law, medicine and money in creating and containing the growing problems of opioid abuse and concussion injuries in the NFL, college and youth sports.


Instructor(s): Mary Chirba-Martin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal: Enduring Questions
For Freshmen Only

UNAS 1703 Humans and Other Animals: Changing Perceptions of Humankind's Place in Nature Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines our changing relations with other animals over the last three hundred years. Has an assumption of mastery been replaced by a sense of kinship, and a right to exploitation by an obligation of stewardship? The scientific contributions to these possible changes will be considered, as will such cultural phenomena as pet-keeping and bird-watching. Emphasis will be placed on human relations with the great apes and on local interventions in the evolution, conservation, and animal rights debates. Ultimately, we will be considering humanity’s sense of itself through its relations with others: the ape is the mirror of ourselves.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Rory Browne

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal: Enduring Questions
For Freshmen Only

UNAS 1704 When Life Happens: Disability and the Stories We Tell Fall 3
Course Description

In this literature core course students will read stories of disability written by those who are disabled and those who love them or are interested in understanding their lives. We will read memoir, fiction, and essays that explore a range of physical and developmental disabilities. Questions of representation — who gets to tell the story, how disability has been represented historically at different times and in different cultures — will be considered in terms of literary analysis and disability theory.


Instructor(s): Clare Dunsford

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal: Enduring Questions
For Freshmen Only

UNAS 1705 When Life Happens: Psychology Views Disability Fall 3
Course Description

In this social science core course, we will explore the socially – constructed meaning of disability and the ability – disability continuum as viewed by both psychology and the social sciences more broadly. We will analyze contemporary and historical perspectives on disability both in the United States and globally, including stigmatization, false claims, and popular myths. In what ways has psychology both advanced and undermined our understanding of disability as part of the human condition?


Instructor(s): Penny Hauser-Cram

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal: Enduring Questions
For Freshmen Only

UNAS 1706 God and Love Spring 3
Course Description

Every human community — from the family to the society to the church to the state — regulates the love of its members, prescribing some loves and proscribing others. Often desires are satisfied or denied, allowed or prohibited, by reference to the divine — the will of the gods (or God), holy scripture, sacred tradition, or the eternal order of things. But what does the divine have to do with love? What is the divine? What is love? If there is more than one god, which should be obeyed? If there are no gods, is everything permitted? Is Love a god, or is God Love? What’s the difference?


Instructor(s): Christopher Constas

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal: Enduring Questions
For Freshmen Only

UNAS 1707 Modern Science & Ancient Faith: Neuroscientific Perspectives Spring 3
Course Description

The brain is an organ of adaptation and such plasticity allows humans the capacity to build and draw upon faith and reason. In this course neuroscience vocabulary and research will be introduced to examine larger questions of theology and philosophy at a biological level, and to reflect on how the these fields can inform and advance the natural sciences in innovative directions. Brain development throughout all life stages will be examined as we consider the following primary question: What does the field neuroscience help us to understand about faith and reason throughout the life span, and what does it leave out?


Instructor(s): Jessica Black

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal: Enduring Questions
For Freshmen Only

UNAS 1708 Coming of Age: Crisis and Calm Revealed through Literature Spring 3
Course Description

What does it mean to come of age? What experiences define us, as we make our journey through life? How do we process those moments of crisis and calm, so that we can become better prepared to engage effectively in all that life holds for us as adults? Exploring written narratives of the adolescent experience provides opportunities for personal growth, for understanding of this challenging transition, and for recognizing common patterns and bonds we all share. Through analysis of narrative techniques, students explore approaches to storytelling that create a pact between author and reader that encourages consideration of their stories


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Susan Michalczyk

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal: Enduring Questions
For Freshmen Only

UNAS 1709 Environmental Crisis: Sustainability, Resources & the Future Fall 3
Course Description

Today’s rapidly growing world is putting significant stresses on the environment and natural resources to an extent that some believe threatens long-term human survival. This class explores this “sustainability crisis” as it manifests in a variety of natural resource systems, such as agriculture, energy, water, and minerals and materials. What is it about the current functioning of these systems that makes them unsustainable? What needs to change to achieve balance between present and future needs? We will learn how technology, the environment, governance, economics, and even ethics interact to enable or preclude different environmental futures.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jonathan Krones

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal: Enduring Questions
For Freshmen Only

UNAS 2240 Public Relations Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course focuses on the complex relationship between an organization or individual and the public. Through commercial, corporate and nonprofit case examples, students will explore reputation positioning and management, audience and influencer research, messaging in support of specific objectives, and the importance of ethics and transparency across proactive and reactive communication. Students will develop targeted written materials and a comprehensive campaign proposal, using both traditional and social channels.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

UNAS 2241 Advanced Public Relations Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Public Relations is a field that demands of its practitioners excellent oral and written communications skills as well as effective problem-solving abilities. Advanced Public Relations will provide students with the skills needed to succeed in the field through extensive writing, media relations, problem solving, public speaking and institutional advocacy/defense tactics and strategies.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: UNAS2240 is preferred but not required.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

UNAS 2251 Mock Trial Practicum Fall 1
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): John J. Burns
Robert C. Moran
Mark C. O'Connor

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

UNAS 2252 Mcnair Program Internship Fall 1
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

UNAS 2254 Community Service Research Seminar Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

CRP is a two-semester program that offers leadership, research, and public policy training for students interested in working with communities of color in Massachusetts. In the fall, students will participate in a seminar to study the process of community-based research and its methodologies and begin to design a research proposal for an independent study with a faculty advisor for the spring semester research project. The seminar will also include a lecture series, in which academic researchers and community professionals will discuss their current work and experiences on issues related to four research-interest communities.


Instructor(s): Deborah Piatelli

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SOCY2254 AADS2248

Comments: Students should contact the Thea Bowman AHANA and Intercultural Center to obtain permission to register.

UNAS 2255 Advanced Community Service Research Seminar II Spring 1
Course Description

CRP is a two-semester program (SOCY2254 and SOCY2255) offering leadership, research, and public policy training for students interested in working with Latino, Asian American and/or African Diaspora communities. In fall, students in SOCY2254 learn the process of community-based research and its methodologies, and begin to design a proposal for an independent study for spring. In spring, students sign up for SOCY2255 in conjunction with a Readings and Research to conduct their projects. The Spring seminar complements the R&R serving as a forum for students to discuss their research and continue to develop their oral presentation skills.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Deborah Piatelli

Prerequisites: SOCY2254. SOCY2254.

Cross listed with: SOCY2255

Comments:

UNAS 2256 Environmental Law and Policy Spring 3
Course Description

The course introduces students to the structure, doctrines, and logic of environmental law and of the American legal system. Includes environmental protection issues of air and water pollution, toxics, parks, wildlife, energy, natural resources, historic preservation, environmental justice, and other timely issues. Covers virtually all elements of the legal system, including basic common law lawsuits, constitutional litigation, complex agency regulations, creation and enforcement of international legal norms, and ethics and policy issues.


Instructor(s): Zygmunt Plater

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENVS2256

Comments: This course is intended for undergraduates interested in environmental law, legal process, and environmental policy. For pre-law and non-pre-law students. The course is team-taught under the supervision of BC Law Professor Zygmunt Plater.

UNAS 2260 Bc Internship in Madrid Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

UNAS 2262 BC Internship in Prague Summer 1
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

UNAS 2263 Racing to Justice Spring 1
Course Description

This one-credit seminar will explore the social construction of race through the lens of whiteness and pathways for engaging in racial justice advocacy. By building a cognitive understanding of racism and critically reflecting upon ones life experiences in the context of privilege, this seminar will facilitate the development of a critical racial consciousness. Students will come prepared to discuss scheduled topics, but each session will provide opportunity for free-form discussion. In order to move from dialogue to action, each student will be asked to participate in an action of their choice and present their experiences engaging in racial justice advocacy.


Instructor(s): Deborah Piatelli

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

UNAS 2264 BC Internship in Hong Kong Summer 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

UNAS 2265 Museums of Life I:Cabinets to Natural Hs Museums Spring 3
Course Description

Museums of Life will examine the origins, history, changing purposes, and current practices of institutions devoted to the collection and exhibition of all forms of organic life, whether living or extinct. The course will consider the growth and development of botanic gardens, natural history museums, aquaria, and zoological gardens to the present day, with a special emphasis on local representations (the Arnold Arboretum, the Harvard Museums of Natural History and the Museum of Science, the New England Aquarium, and Franklin Park and Stone Zoos). Their particular histories and contemporary workings will be examined through original documents and possible site visits.


Instructor(s): Rory Browne

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: UNAS2265 runs from beginning of semester to Spring Break. It is followed by UNAS2266.

UNAS 2266 Museums of Life II:From Menageries to Zoos&Aquaria Spring 3
Course Description

Museums of Life will examine the origins, history, changing purposes, and current practices of institutions devoted to the collection and exhibition of all forms of organic life, whether living or extinct. The course will consider the growth and development of botanic gardens, natural history museums, aquaria, and zoological gardens to the present day, with a special emphasis on local representations (the Arnold Arboretum, the Harvard Museums of Natural History and the Museum of Science, the New England Aquarium, and Franklin Park and Stone Zoos). Their particular histories and contemporary workings will be examined through original documents and possible site visits.


Instructor(s): Rory Browne

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: UNAS2266 follows UNAS2265 and runs from after Spring Break to end of semester.

UNAS 2270 Bc Internship in Paris Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

UNAS 3300 McGillycuddy-Logue Fellows Senior Seminar Fall 3
Course Description

This course is the culmination of the McGillycuddy-Logue Fellows Program. It is intended to help students reflect and expand upon their experiences in the program, including both academics and service. The final product of the course will be an electronic book, to be made available to the Boston College community and beyond via O'Neill Library's Open Access system. Each student will contribute a chapter dealing with a global policy issue of particular interest and relevance to them.


Instructor(s): Jennie Purnell

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: The course is restricted to a cohort of students who have participated in the broader McGillycuddy-Logue Fellow's program.

UNAS 3320 Vertices:From Half-Time to Course-Times&Lifetimes Spring 1
Course Description

Vertices offers an opportunity to pursue lines of thought and practice suggested by your first two years at Boston College and the Halftime program. While it will involve reading and discussion, its intent is not to promote a theoretical understanding of faith and vocation. Rather, Vertices hopes to encourage the formation of habits, disciplines and practices that will be personally useful for the student as he or she plans for completion of undergraduate study and imagines venturing beyond it.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

UNAS 3325 Cross Sections: Sophomore and Transfer Student Seminar Spring 1
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Suzanne Barret

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

UNAS 3330 Cross Currents Seminar:Thinking About Race Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

The Cross Currents: Thinking About Race seminar explores the concept of race; the effects of race on individuals; the presentation and negotiation of race in society; and the role of race at Boston College. The topics covered in the course are not only important, but also complex and provocative. The seminar is an opportunity to have candid conversations with others who are also exploring race and its effects in society. The seminar will help develop your understanding and intellectually through discussions with other students.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Karl Bell

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

UNAS 3332 Cross Currents Seminar: Thinking About Economic Inequality and College Student Life Spring 1
Course Description

This seminar will look at the consequences of economic inequality in the lives of high financial need undergraduates studying at elite universities. Students will apply what they are learning in other classes to daily campus life. We will ask questions about the challenges of thriving at an affluent institution. The class includes readings from memoirs of low income students at Princeton, Vassar, Saint Michael’s, Stanford, and Boston College. This course is recommended for Montserrat students.


Instructor(s): Burton Howell

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

UNAS 3333 Cross Currents: Thinking About Law and Economics Fall 1
Course Description

This seminar will explore how economic theory applies to positive and normative analyses of law, legal issues and legal systems. It will investigate how traditional economists analyze the law and how behavioral economists have challenged and complemented traditional economic theories in several real world situations. This seminar may be attractive, not only to students who are interested in careers in law and economics, but also to a wider audience of students who are intellectually curious about how law, economics and the psychology of decision-making and choice influence our daily lives.


Instructor(s): Kenneth Felter

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

UNAS 3334 Cross Curr: Thinking about Jesuit Spirituality Spring 1
Course Description

Thinking about Jesuit Spirituality will ask students to encounter Jesuit Spirituality as a tool for navigating the wide array of academic, social, and spiritual decisions facing them in contemporary life. Students will explore the history and themes of Jesuit spirituality and have an opportunity to engage with practical elements of this 500 year old tradition. Through readings, conversations, prayer and reflective writing, students will link the themes of Jesuit Spirituality and its practices to their daily lives, and explore their utility in forming conscience and guiding choices in modern, pluralistic society.


Instructor(s): Brian Regan
Jessica Graf

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

UNAS 3335 Cross Currents Seminar:Thinking About Leadership Fall 3
Course Description

Thinking about Leadership seminar is based on the Social Change Model of Leadership Development. Students will have the opportunity to grow as individuals with a social mission and be more prepared to serve as change agents in their roles at BC and beyond. This discussion seminar will expose students to leadership as an empowerment tool that inspires people to take responsibility in their communities. This seminar will help students to better understand the goal of leadership as impacting social change. As students learn to discern their own values, they will build confidence, be prepared for and have courage to stand up for what is right and to make responsible decisions.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Kathryn Daly
Maria Dichiappari

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

UNAS 3340 Cross Currents Seminar: Thinking about Sustainability I Fall 1
Course Description

This seminar style course examines the topic of sustainability from an interdisciplinary lens. The course is the first part of a year-long curriculum and focuses on the following areas of sustainability theory and practice: Systems Thinking, Catholic Social Teaching, Agriculture and Food, Water, and Economics. Student participants can expect to engage in dialogue, interact with expert faculty speakers, and complete a culminating action based group project at the end of the year-long course.


Instructor(s): Anya Villatoro
Daniel DiLeo

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Students taking UNAS3340 in the Fall MUST take UNAS3342 in the Spring.

UNAS 3341 Cross Currents Seminar:Thinking About Gender Fall 1
Course Description

This seminar course will ask students to discuss the social construction of gender and how it relates to their lives. Discussions will examine how gender is developed in contemporary social, cultural, and political structures. Students will recognize ways in which gender and other dimensions of identity intersect and how gender role conflict emerges within people’s lives. Through readings, conversations, and reflective writing, students will link their academic experience to their personal lives by reflecting on gender roles, sexuality, faith, and the life of a college student. The seminar will culminate with the writing of a gendered history.


Instructor(s): Kathryn Dalton
Michael Sacco

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

UNAS 3342 Cross Currents Seminar: Thinking about Sustainabiity II Spring 1
Course Description

This seminar style course examines the topic of sustainability from an interdisciplinary lens. The course is the second part of a year-long curriculum and focuses on the following areas of sustainability theory and practice: Climate Change, Environment and Race, Environment and Health, and Advocacy and Activism. Student participants can expect to engage in dialogue, interact with expert faculty speakers, and complete a culminating action based group project.


Instructor(s): Anya Villatoro
Daniel DiLeo

Prerequisites: UNAS3340.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

UNAS 3343 Cross Currents Seminar:Thinking about Intercultural Competency Spring 3
Course Description

Students entering the workforce today, no matter what profession or field of study, need to be equipped with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to successfully interact with colleagues, clients, customers and communities who are different from themselves. This seminar will help students develop their knowledge and skills through intentional exposure to relevant theoretical materials, meaningful and structured interactions with diverse groups of people, and reflection on the impact of these experiences on their own identities and their relationships with others. Experience with domestic and international diverse populations will be explored.


Instructor(s): Ines Maturana-Sendoya
Adrienne Nussbaum

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

UNAS 3344 Cross Currents Seminar: Thinking About Successful Teams Spring 1
Course Description

This seminar studies strategies for working with and building successful teams in contexts like education, athletics, business, health care, government. Students discuss stages of team development and defined roles found on high-functioning teams. Katzenbach and Smith define a team as “a small number of people with complementary skills committed to a common purpose, performance goals, and approach for which they hold themselves mutually accountable.” We utilize team-based theories to reflect on students' team experiences, connect discussions to their coursework, and think creatively about their impact as productive team players in the future.


Instructor(s): Caitriona Taylor
Adrienne Dumpe

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

UNAS 3345 CROSS CURR: Thinking about Health Spring 1
Course Description

The goal of this course is to apply Health Promotion theory to enhance the communal well-being of college students. Students will be exposed to important health topics, national health guidelines, data, and key messages about stress and time management, healthy sleep, eating, and exercise habits, and decision-making around alcohol and drugs. This seminar will enhance the student experience by discussing health behaviors, knowledge, attitudes, and skills to become healthier, grow as individuals, and impact the Boston College community.


Instructor(s): Elise Phillips
Makayla Davis

Prerequisites: With permission of the Instructor.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

UNAS 3346 CROSS CURR: Thinking about Inequalities of Class Spring 1
Course Description

This seminar aims for students to: Develop personal narratives of self within larger social settings of family, home, school and community. Explore the “new experience” of college and come to terms with differences in backgrounds and opportunities. Reach a higher thinking beyond race, race relationships, sexuality, gender, faith, disability and critically analyze Class (haves, have not’s, and those trying to get there) and how it is perceived and impacts society. Discover how to manage self in an evolving society. Identify how people experience trudging through a discombobulated society. Analyze the interconnection of Social Class & Classism.


Instructor(s): Patricia Birch
Jen Kentera

Prerequisites: With permission of the Instructor.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

UNAS 3354 Culture,Identity and Asian-American Experience Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar explores self and identity as products of shared culture and history as well as individual life experience and development. It focuses specifically on the complexities of ethnic and racial identity among Asian Americans drawing on contributions from psychology, nineteenth and twentieth century Asian American history, and Asian American literary works. Students are also introduced to current social issues that are especially relevant to Asian-American communities.


Instructor(s): Ramsey Liem

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PSYC3354

Comments: PS35401/UN35401 satisfy Cultural Diversity Core Requirement. Required for the Asian-American Studies concentration.

UNAS 3360 Globalization,Culture&Identity:Res/Global Context Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

UNAS 3500 Biomedical Research Ethics Fall 3
Course Description

Biomedical research aims to understand the underlying causes of disease in order to alleviate human suffering and to deepen our knowledge of the inner workings of biological processes. Advances in these areas have brought numerous successes, saving many lives and greatly contributing to our understanding of biology, physiology, and anatomy at multiple levels. However, these advances have also brought related questions about biomedical research's aims, scope, methods, and consequences. How have these advancements changed our understanding and treatment of disease and illness? Are there limits to what biomedical research should pursue? How are the needs of the present held in tension with the demands of the future? This course will examine these questions by drawing upon history, literature, and ethics to examine the growth and development of biomedical research and its effects, which continue to shape society's future direction.


Instructor(s): Jiin-Yu Chen

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Juniors and Seniors only please.

UNAS 4471 Psychological Responses to Humanitarian Crises Fall 3
Course Description

This course develops a critical framework for understanding the psychological and social effects of selected natural and unnatural disasters and current responses to them. Course goals include: the development of a critical understanding of gendered oppression in contexts of war and humanitarian crises; an analysis of selected psychosocial interventions in the context of development and humanitarian aid; a critical analysis of international human rights as potential resources; and, the formulation of programmatic responses for mental health and human rights workers seeking to creatively respond to women and child survivors in collaboration with community-based indigenous workers and advocates.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Brinton Lykes

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: APSY7471

Comments:

UNAS 4942 Faith, Peace, and Justice Senior Project Seminar Spring 3
Course Description

This course provides the finishing touch for students in the program for the Study of Faith, Peace, and Justice. Students enrolled in the seminar work closely with a faculty project advisor from the department of their major and present the preliminary results of their project study in the seminar. Students and faculty responses to the presentation will help shape the presenter's project into a finished form. The seminar provides a unique opportunity for the individual student to integrate several years of study in the Program while at the same time learning about an interesting range of issues from fellow students.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Completion of FPJ requirements.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Open only to senior students in the FPJ Program.

UNAS 5538 Capstone: Passages Fall 3
Course Description

In our passages through this enigmatic world we reflect on the vision of St. Theresa of Avila, "All things pass; only God remains." Life embraces us in paradox. Through novel, poetry, short story and essay the many writers considered in this Capstone, including Ann Tyler, Willa Cather, Judith Guest, Marcus Aurelius, Emily Dickinson and Robert Frost, will share their insights with us and help us to appreciate the Capstone ideals of wholesome relationships, generous citizenship, spiritual development and joy in work.


Instructor(s): Robert Farrell, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL4630

Comments:

UNAS 7461 Human Rights Interdisciplinary Seminar Spring 3
Course Description

The study of human rights defies disciplinary boundaries. This seminar, sponsored by the Center for Human Rights and International Justice (CHRIJ), provides a rare space to examine human rights from an interdisciplinary perspective. The seminar brings together faculty affiliated with the Center, students from across the university, visiting scholars and guest speakers, to examine issues of human rights and international justice. The Spring 2019 seminar will begin with an overview and brief historical review of human rights instruments and then explore a series of complexities for those seeking to engage in human rights scholarship, advocacy, and activism. We seek to engage critically with human rights discourse and actions as they intersect with gender, culture/ethnicity, race, class, and other categorizations. More details on the 2019 seminar at http://www.bc.edu/bc-web/centers/chrij/academics/seminar.html.


Instructor(s): Daniel Kanstroom
M. Brinton Lykes

Prerequisites: With permission of the Instructor.

Cross listed with: LAWS7461

Comments: Registration by permission only. The Center invites applications from students enrolled in a graduate professional degree in any of Boston College's divisions. Undergraduate seniors will be considered, space permitting. To apply, students must submit a brief statement (no longer than one page, single-spaced) to humanrights@bc.edu with the subject line "Human Rights Interdisciplinary Seminar application." Please include your Eagle ID and academic discipline in the application. The application deadline is Friday, November 9, 2018.