Skip to main content

Slavic Languages Courses (SLAV) College of Arts and Sciences


Subject Area Course # Course Title Semester Credit Hours Expand
SLAV 1010 Writing Experience Spring 3
Course Description


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Thomas Epstein

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal:Enduring Questions
For Freshmen Only

SLAV 1121 Elementary Russian I Fall 4
Course Description

A course for beginners that stresses thorough training in Russian grammar accompanied by reading exercises and elementary composition. Additional conversation and language-laboratory work required. The course continues in the second semester as SLAV1122.


Instructor(s): Elena Lapitsky

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

SLAV 1122 Elementary Russian II Spring 4
Course Description

The second semester of a course for beginners that stresses thorough training in Russian grammar accompanied by reading exercises and elementary composition. Additional conversation and language-laboratory work required.


Instructor(s): Elena Lapitsky

Prerequisites: SLAV1121. SLAV1121 (SL003) Elementary Russian I, or equivalent.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

SLAV 1123 Elementary Russian Practicum Fall/Spring 0
Course Description

Required additional exercises and conversational practice to supplement Elementary Russian I/II.


Instructor(s): Elena Lapitsky

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

SLAV 1162 Saint Petersburg: Literary-Artistic Myths and Realities Summer 4
Course Description

Readings in the “Petersburg text of Russian literature” (from Pushkin to Andrey Bely and on to Mandelshtam and Brodsky, by way of Dostoevsky and Gogol) and an intense encounter with the city and environs of St Petersburg. Twelve classroom contact hours per week plus extensive walks in the city. Visits to the Russian Museum, the Hermitage, the literary museums for Dostoevsky, Blok, and Akhmatova. Operas at the Mariinsky Theater. Weekly excursions to the palaces (Tsarskoe Selo, Pavlovsk, Peterhof, Gatchina). Also a weekly guest lecture.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Thomas Epstein

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: A summer course, held in St Petersburg.

SLAV 1163 Teatral'naja masterskaja Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

A theatrical practicum intended for students with some knowledge of Russian (even if only very little) who are looking for an opportunity to learn and use Russian in a practical and artistic surrounding. The practicum emulates a Russian theatrical master class, helps students broaden their perspectives on things Russian, brings them face to face with Russian personalities, and works toward the actual production of several small dramatic pieces from the classical and modern Russian repertories. The master class offers motivated students, regardless of talent or linguistic ability, a very unusual and fascinating opportunity.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

SLAV 1165 Russian Cinema for Conversation Spring 1
Course Description

An opportunity for students to learn about Soviet and Russian cult movies in Russian while expanding their vocabulary. Requires active participation as students engage in discussions and role-playing. Students of all levels of proficiency in Russian, including beginners, are welcome.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Ekaterina Mironova

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

SLAV 1166 St. Petersburg: Dream & Reality Fall 3
Course Description

Founded in 1703 by Peter the Great on the barely inhabited headwaters of the Neva river, St. Petersburg quickly became one of Europe’s great modern cities and the site of several artistic and political revolutions. Torn between utopian aspirations and earthly realities, heaven and earth, Petersburg fascinated several of Europe's greatest authors: among them Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, and Bely. This course will survey the history and culture of St. Petersburg, including its fine arts and fabulous music, while concentrating on literary expression and social and philosophical reflection about the meaning of St. Petersburg for Russian and beyond.


Instructor(s): Thomas Epstein

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal: Enduring Questions
For Freshmen Only

SLAV 1700 Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian Language Workshop Spring 3
Course Description

An introductory study of the grammar and literature of Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian (BCS), the pluricentric and mutually intelligible official language of three ethnopolitical units of the former Yugoslavia. In addition to Linguists and Slavists, the course welcomes students with an interest in the sociopolitical climate of Eastern Europe and in the interaction of three major religious communities (Muslim, Catholic, Orthodox) under a single language complex.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

SLAV 1880 Bulgarian Language Workshop Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Introduction to Bulgarian culture and specialized study in modern Bulgarian language at various proficiency levels. Exercise work in reading, speaking, and translating on a small-group basis. Students who complete the two semesters of the course qualify for free tuition, room and board at the Summer Language and Culture Program at Sofia University, Bulgaria.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Mariela Dakova

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: May be repeated for credit
Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency core requirement.

SLAV 1881 Introduction to Bulgarian I Fall 3
Course Description

A course for beginners in standard modern Bulgarian intended to develop reading, writing, and speaking abilities as well as to introduce students to Bulgarian culture. The study of language structure is based on comparisons with English and Slavic languages. The course provides a basis for further work in translation and composition and continues in the second semester as SLAV1882 (SL036).


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Mariela Dakova

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

SLAV 1882 Introduction to Bulgarian II Spring 3
Course Description

Continuation of course work in modern Bulgarian with extensive practice in conversation and composition. Completion of this course qualifies students for the Summer Language and Culture Program at Sofia University, Bulgaria.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Mariela Dakova

Prerequisites: SLAV1881. Or equivalent.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

SLAV 2061 Eastern European Film Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

SLAV 2062 Exile and Literature Fall 3
Course Description

Vladimir Nabokov once stated: "All writers emigrate to their art and stay therein." Is this equally true for exiles from Eastern and Central Europe, Latin and North America, the Caribbean, India? What are some of the aesthetic, geopolitical, cultural, and spiritual conditions that define a writer in exile? We shall explore these questions by closely reading and discussing works of fiction, poetry, and memoir by such remarkable literary figures as Kundera, Nabokov, Naipaul, Sebald, I. B. Singer, Gertrude Stein and others. We shall pay special attention to questions of ethnic, religious, and sexual displacement that engender exilic writing.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Maxim D. Shrayer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: All readings and classes are in English

SLAV 2063 Jewish Literature in 20th Century North America Fall 3
Course Description

The cultural and historical experience of Jewish authors in 20-th century North America, with a focus on Anglophone Jewish writers. Prose, poetry, and drama by Woody Allen, Mary Antin, Abraham Cahan, Saul Bellow, Allen Ginsburg, Anthony Hecht, Emma Lazarus, Denise Levertov, Bernard Malamud, Arthur Miller, S. J. Perelman, Charles Reznikoff, Mordecai Richler, Adrienne Rich, Philip Roth, I. B. Singer, Gertrude Stein, Louis Zukofsky, Wendy Wasserstein and others, and selected criticism by Harold Bloom, Alfred Kazin, Cynthia Ozick, Lionel Trilling and others.


Instructor(s): Maxim D. Shrayer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Designated course as "cultural diversity"

SLAV 2064 Jewish Writers in Russia and America (in translation) Fall 3
Course Description

The experience of Jewish writers living in Russia and America from the 1880s until the present, examined through prose, poetry, drama, and memoirs written in English or translated into English from Russian, Yiddish, and Hebrew. The responses of Jewish writers to Zionism, the Russian Revolution, and the Holocaust with attention to anti-Semitism, emigration, limits of assimilation, and the future of Jews in Russia and America. The works of authors such as An-sky, Babel, Bagritskii, Bellow, Bialik, Erenburg, Malamud, Arthur Miller, Ozick, Philip Roth, Sholom Aleichem, and others.


Instructor(s): Maxim D. Shrayer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL2175

Comments: All readings and classes conducted in English

SLAV 2065 Society and National Identity in the Balkans Fall 3
Course Description

An overview of ethnic, cultural, and religious diversity among peoples of the Balkans (Albanians, Bosnians, Bulgarians, Croats, Greeks, Macedonians, Romanians, Serbs, Slovenes, Jews, Turks, and gypsies [Roma]). It is a study of what constitutes the various parameters of identity: linguistic typologies, religious diversity (Catholicism, Orthodoxy, Islam, and Judaism), culture, and social class. An analysis of the origins of nationalism, the emergence of nation-states, and contemporary nationalism as a source of instability and war in the Balkans will be considered.


Instructor(s): Mariela Dakova

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SOCY2280

Comments:

SLAV 2066 Conversion, Islam, and Politics in the Balkans Spring 3
Course Description

Through a study of fiction, works of scholarship, folklore, and movies, the course examines the conversion of Christians to Islam in Southeast Europe. It analyzes the most important cultural, social, and political implications of this change with the goal of identifying the various factors that promote cooperation or conflict among mixed Christian-Muslim communities.


Instructor(s): Mariela Dakova

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ICSP2250

Comments:

SLAV 2067 Gender & War in Eastern Europe Spring 3
Course Description

A study of the intersection of gender, ethnicity, and ideology in the World Wars in Eastern Europe and the recent Yugoslav wars. In World War I, women confronted their duties to the nation against the backdrop of an ongoing struggle for equality. In World War II, women in communist Eastern Europe were liberated by their nations' ideology to fight, on all fronts, against tradition. More recently, in former Yugoslavia, women, particularly Bosnian Muslim women, flouted tradition in a different way--by organizing and fighting for peace.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HIST2284

Comments: Undergraduate major elective

SLAV 2068 Literature and Revolution Fall 3
Course Description

This course will explore the encounter of Russian literature and culture with revolution and the impact of political and social changes on the Russian artistic imagination. The introductory part of this course will address the themes of social and political rebellion in nineteenth century literature in the works of Pushkin, Hertzen, and Turgenev. We will then consider the wild artistic experimentation of the Russian modernists during the period of revoltion and social upheaval in Russia that spanned the period from 1890 to 1930. The reading will include works by Akhmatova, Babel, Bely, Blok, Bulgakov, Mayakovsky, Platonov, Zamyatin, and others.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: All readings will be in English translation

SLAV 2069 Literature of the Other Europe Fall 3
Course Description

A survey of outstanding and influential works of and about the political and social upheavals of the twentieth century in Central and Southeastern Europe. A study of the often-shared themes of frontier and identity (political and religious), exile, and apocalypse in the works of selected leading writers, such as Witold Gombrowicz (Poland), Bruno Schulz (Poland), Bohumil Hrabal (Czech Republic), Milan Kundera (Czech), Dubravka Ugresic (Croatia), Mesa Selimovic (Bosnia), Muharem Bazdulj (Bosnia), and Emilian Stanev (Bulgaria).


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL2229

Comments: All readings in English translation

SLAV 2070 Novels of Social Reflection, 1800-2000 Fall 3
Course Description

Exemplary Continental and American novels from Romanticism to Post-Modernism. The readings include Amado, Camus, J. London, T. Mann, Marquez, Turgenev and V. Woolf.


Instructor(s): Maxim D. Shrayer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: All classes and readings are in English

SLAV 2071 War and Peace in Yugoslavia Spring 3
Course Description

A study of the numerous differences and affinities--ethnic, religious, historical, and linguistic--that have characterized the former Yugoslavia as an area situated at the crossroads of East and West, of their representation in various sources and media (official documents, historical accounts, folklore, literature, and film), and of the influence of these varying and conflicting representations during the wars of succession and in the aftermath.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

SLAV 2121 Intermediate Russian I Fall 4
Course Description

A review of major difficulties in Russian grammar with extensive practice in reading, translation, paraphrase, and analysis of selected Russian texts. This course continues in second semester as SLAV2122 (SL052).


Instructor(s): Elena Lapitsky

Prerequisites: SLAV1122. SLAV1122 (SL004) Elementary Russian II or equivalent.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

SLAV 2122 Intermediate Russian II Spring 4
Course Description

The second semester of a review of major difficulties in Russian grammar with extensive practice in reading, translation, paraphrase, and analysis of selected Russian texts.


Instructor(s): Elena Lapitsky

Prerequisites: SLAV2121. SLAV 2121 (SL051) Intermediate Russian I or equivalent.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency requirement.

SLAV 2160 Russian and Soviet Cinema: History, Theory, Practice Spring 3
Course Description

An overview of the main trends, films, and directors of Russian and Soviet cinema from the early 1900s to the early 1990s, with particular attention to structure, ideology and historical context as well as connections between film and literary texts. Works by Eisenstein, Kalatozov, Muratova, Protazanov, Pudovkin, Tarkovsky, Vertov and others along with a consideration of Soviet contributions to film theory. All lectures, discussions, readings, and papers in English.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Maxim D. Shrayer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: FILM2160

Comments:

SLAV 2162 Classics of Russian Literature (in translation) Fall 3
Course Description

A survey of selected major works, authors, genres, and movements in nineteenth-century Russian literature, with emphasis on the classic works by Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, and Chekhov.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Maxim D. Shrayer
Tony Lin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL2227

Comments: All readings and lectures in English. Undergraduate major elective. Russian Major requirement

SLAV 2163 Post-Soviet Russian Literature Fall 3
Course Description

Since the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991, dramatic cultural shifts have transformed Russian literature—writers no longer work under the “red pencil” of censorship, but like writers in the West, under the “censorship” of the marketplace. Crime fiction vies with more highbrow literature, and post-modern themes and devices prevail among a younger generation less influenced by a classical or Soviet heritage. Diversity (e.g., gender and ethnic identities), newly acquired tastes, and a predictable tension between Soviet and post-Soviet values characterize works by Boris Akunin, Valeriia Narbikova, Viktor Pelevin, Nina Sadur, Vladimir Sorokin, Olga Slavnikova, and Liudmila Ulitskaia.


Instructor(s): Maxim D. Shrayer
Tony Lin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL2224

Comments:

SLAV 2164 Russian Cinema Spring 3
Course Description

An overview of the main trends, films, and directors of Russian and Soviet cinema with particular attention to structure, ideology, and intent as well as to connections between filmic and literary texts. The course examines works by leading directors along with a consideration of Russian contributions to film theory.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Thomas Epstein

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HONR4464 FILM2277

Comments: Conducted entirely in English. All films with English subtitles

SLAV 2165 Russian Civilization Spring 3
Course Description

A survey of various parameters of Russian cultural identity, covering a period from approximately the year 800 to the present. Special attention will be paid to folklore, religion, literature, and intellectual history.


Instructor(s): Maxim Shrayer
Tony Lin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted Entirely in English Undergraduate Major Requirement - Russian

SLAV 2166 Russian Civilization&Western Cultural Tradition Fall 3
Course Description

This course will concentrate on two great, and extremely distinct, Russian writers of the 19th century: Ivan Turgenev and Nikolai Gogol. With the first we will explore Russia and the West, particularly the 'Hamlet question' and the Russianness of Russian life. With Gogol we will encounter the (Russian) absurd and its metaphysics. Along the way we will have occasion to read Pushkin, Shakespeare, Kafka, Camus, Chadaaev, Dostievsky, and end with the 1960s novel Moscow to the End of the LIne.


Instructor(s): Thomas Epstein

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HONR4943

Comments:

SLAV 2167 Russian Folklore (In Translation) Fall 1
Course Description

A study of fairy tales and other forms of pre-Christian rituals and tales in the Russian tradition, with reference to contemporary analyses of folk beliefs.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

SLAV 2168 Russian Literature of the Fantastic (in translation) Fall 3
Course Description

A study of grotesque, bizarre, surrealistic, supernatural, and fantastic themes in a wide range of Russian short stories and novels by writers such as Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevskij, Bulgakov, Zamiatin, Siniavskij, Pelevin, and Petrushevskaja within the context of the Western tradition of E.T.A. Hoffman, Poe, Kafka, and others.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: All readings in English translation

SLAV 2169 Slavic Civilizations Spring 3
Course Description

A survey of various parameters of Slavic cultural identity (religion, language, literature, and arts) from the time of Common Slavic history to the diaspora of the Slavs of Central, Eastern, and Southeastern Europe today.
Through works of scholarship, literature, and film, the course studies the Slavic social and intellectual history.
A selection of readings (all in English) illustrates some of the most prominent Slavic contributions to the culture of the world.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Mariela Dakova
Tony Lin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies undergraduate major

SLAV 2170 Specialized Readings in Russian Texts Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

SLAV 2171 The Contemporary Russian Novel (in translation) Fall 3
Course Description

An introduction, in English, to the highest achievements in the post-Revolutionary Russian novel, and an application of modern methods of critical analysis to the genre.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted entirely in English

SLAV 2172 The Russian Short Story (In English Translation) Spring 3
Course Description

The Russian short story from Tolstoy and Chekhov to the present. Exemplary short stories from the 19th and 20th centuries with emphasis on turbulent times in Russian and Soviet history. Works by Babel, Zamyatin, Nabokov, Bunin, Olesha, Platonov, Zoshchenko, Solzhenitsyn, Shalamov, Ulitskaya and others. Russian contributions to the theory of the genre (Formalism, Bakhtin, Semiotics).


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

SLAV 2173 Twentieth-Century Russian Literature (in translation) Spring 3
Course Description

Study of major landmarks of Russian literature in light of Russia's turbulent history in the twentieth century. Works by Akhmatova, Babel, Belyi, Berberova, Bunin, Venedikt Erofeev, Gladkov, Olesha, Platonov, Solzhenitsyn, Trifonov, and others.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Maxim D. Shrayer
Tony Lin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL2228

Comments: Readings and lectures in English. Undergraduate major elective. Russian major requirement.

SLAV 2174 Utopia Dystopia Soviet and Surreal Fall 3
Course Description

Lectures and readings in English, with optional readings in Russian. This course looks at literary responses to the experience of Soviet life: from futuristic nightmare to irony and the grotesque; from resistance to reconciliation.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HONR2174

Comments:

SLAV 2175 Women and Russian Literature (in translation) Fall 3
Course Description

A study of the representations of women in Russian literary works from the Kievan period to date, with a special emphasis on classical and post-modern literature. An exploration of the notions of the "strong woman" versus the "superfluous man", and of "terrible perfection", a discussion of the utility of these concepts in characterizing the literary representations.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL1153

Comments: All texts read in English translation

SLAV 2176 Chekhov's Plays and Stories (In Translat Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

SLAV 2177 Nabokov Fall 3
Course Description

The bilingual and bicultural achievement of Vladimir Nabokov. An examination of selected major works from Nabokov's Russian and English periods, with particular attention to connections between his aesthetics, ethics, and metaphysics and issues of gender, sexuality, authorship and exile. Readings include "Glory","The Defense","Invitation to a Beheading","The Gift", "Pnin", and "Lolita", as well as selected short stories, his autobiographical "Speak, Memory", and discursive writings.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Maxim D. Shrayer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted Entirely in English

SLAV 2178 The Novel in Russia and America Fall 3
Course Description

A comparative overview of landmark novels by Russian and American authors. Readings include Bunin, Dreiser, Hemingway, Malamud, Steinbeck, Pushkin and Tolstoy.


Instructor(s): Maxim D. Shrayer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: All classes and readings are in English

SLAV 2179 Tolstoy and Dostoevsky (in translation) Spring 3
Course Description

A comparative study of two giants of world literature and their opposing perceptions of reality, art, and civilization. A reading of their principal novels and short prose, with a focus on psychological, moral, and religious questions and in light of twentieth-century literary theory.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Maxim D. Shrayer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL3303

Comments: All readings in English translation.
Conducted entirely in English. For a Russian-language version of this course see SLAV3163 (SL308), when it is offered.

SLAV 2180 From Russia with Love: Russian Musical and Visual Culture Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

TBD


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

SLAV 2811 Continuing Bulgarian I Fall 3
Course Description

The course develops active language skills through intensive communication exercises and translation. It provides a review of major difficulties in Bulgarian grammar and broadens the work in translation by including a range of Bulgarian styles. The course continues in second semester as SLAV 2812 (SL046).


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Mariela Dakova

Prerequisites: SLAV1882. SLAV1882 (SL036) Introduction to Bulgarian II or equivalent.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

SLAV 2812 Continuing Bulgarian II Spring 3
Course Description

Advanced discussion of the complexity of Bulgarian structure, along with intensive practice in translation and communication.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Mariela Dakova

Prerequisites: SLAV2811. SLAV2811 (SL045) Continuing Bulgarian I or equivalent.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency requirement.

SLAV 3051 Early Slavic Linguistics and Texts Fall 3
Course Description


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): M J Connolly

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: LING3208

Comments:

SLAV 3054 Introduction to the South Slavic Languages Spring 3
Course Description

A grammatical and phonological study of a featured South Slavic language (Croatian/Serbian, Bulgarian, Slovenian or Macedonian), structural sketches of the other South Slavic languages, inductive readings in South Slavic texts.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Prior study of a Slavic language.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

SLAV 3055 Introduction to the West Slavic Languages Fall 3
Course Description

A grammatical and phonological study of a featured West Slavic language (Czech, Polish or Slovak), structural sketches of the other West Slavic languages, inductive readings in West Slavic texts.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Prior study of a Slavic language.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

SLAV 3061 Turning Points in Jewish History Fall 3
Course Description

Jewish history stretches from creation to today. This course will focus on the major turning points which shape today's Jewish world, focusing on major intellectual and theological trends, figures, and events from the development of rabbinic Judaism to the twentieth century. Through this, students will come to have a basic understanding of the outlines of Jewish religious and intellectual history, of the nature of the Jewish experience as a minority culture in the Christian and Muslim worlds, and of the shapes of contemporary Judaism.


Instructor(s): Ruth Langer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: THEO5371

Comments:

SLAV 3098 Senior Honors Project Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Supervised preparation of a senior paper for Honors Program students or for students working toward departmental honors.


Instructor(s): Maxim D. Shrayer
Cynthia Simmons
M.J. Connolly
Thomas Epstein

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: May be repeated for credit.

SLAV 3121 Third-Year Russian I Fall 3
Course Description

The development of active skills in contemporary standard Russian to beyond a high-intermediate level of proficiency in reading, writing, listening and speaking, with an emphasis on vocabulary building, composition, and pereskaz.


Instructor(s): Natalia A. Reed

Prerequisites: SLAV2122. SLAV2122 Intermediate Russian II or equivalent.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Russian.
Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency core requirement.

SLAV 3122 Third-Year Russian II Spring 3
Course Description

Continuing the development of active skills in contemporary standard Russian to beyond a high-intermediate level of proficiency in reading, writing, listening, and speaking, with an emphasis on vocabulary building, composition, and pereskaz.


Instructor(s): Natalia A. Reed

Prerequisites: SLAV3121. SLAV 3121 (SL157) Third-year Russian I or equivalent.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Russian. Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency core requirement.

SLAV 3151 The Structure of Modern Russian Fall 3
Course Description

A systematic review coverage of the phonology and grammar of Contemporary Standard Russian with attention to specific topics in the linguistic analysis of the language, especially phonological structure, accentuation, and morphological patterning. Open to upper-division students requiring a very intensive introduction to Russian, as well as to students in Linguistics or Slavic Studies looking to see what makes the language "tick."


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): M.J. Connolly

Prerequisites: Previous experience with an inflected language.

Cross listed with: LING3322

Comments:

SLAV 3160 Approaches to Russian Literature Fall 3
Course Description

The application to Russian literature of literary criticism and theory from Aristotle's Poetics up through traditional criticism, the Prague School, various types of structuralism, and deconstruction. The study of Russian literature in its native context receives special attention, with readings from Belinskij, Shklovskij, Baxtin, Lotman, and others.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL2250 ENGL3697

Comments: For undergraduates and non-Slavic graduate students, all readings are in English translation

SLAV 3162 Chekhov Fall 3
Course Description

A close examination of exemplary stories and of two plays by Anton Chekhov. Special attention to questions of structure and aesthetics, historical, religious and socio-political contexts, as well as to Chekhov's place at the crossroads of realism and modernism and Chekhov's influene on Anglo-American culture.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Maxim D. Shrayer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL4443

Comments: All readings in English. Open to undergraduate and graduate students.

SLAV 3163 Dostoevskij & Tolstoj Spring 3
Course Description

A study and analysis of realism in the works of two of Russia's most influential writers with readings and selected criticism.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Maxim D. Shrayer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Department permission required for undergraduate students.

SLAV 3164 Masterstvo Perevoda Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

SLAV 3165 Post-Soviet Russian Literature Fall 3
Course Description

Since the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991, dramatic cultural shifts have transformed Russian literature—writers no longer work under the "red pencil" of censorship, but like writers in the West, under the "censorship" of the marketplace. Crime fiction vies with more highbrow literature, and post-modern themes and devices prevail among a younger generation less influenced by a classical or Soviet heritage. Diversity (e.g., gender and ethnic identities), newly acquired tastes, and a predictable tension between Soviet and post-Soviet values characterize works by Boris Akunin, Valeriia Narbikova, Viktor Pelevin, Nina Sadur, Vladimir Sorokin, Olga Slavnikova, and Liudmila Ulitskaia.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

SLAV 3166 Pushkin and Gogol' Fall 3
Course Description

Close readings of the major works of Pushkin and Gogol' as well as related works of Lermontov are included. Individual literary techniques and styles are studied against the background of Russian romanticism and the transition to Russian realism.


Instructor(s): Cynthia Simmons
Maxim D. Shrayer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted entirely in Russian

SLAV 3167 Romantizm v russkoj literature Spring 3
Course Description

A study of Romanticism in Russian poetry, drama, and narrative literature of the 19th century. A close analysis of the features of this literary movement in works of Zhukovskij, Marlinskij, Pushkin, Lermontov and others. Romantic literature as a genre within a larger European framework.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Maxim D. Shrayer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted entirely in Russian

SLAV 3168 Russian Drama Fall 3
Course Description

A close study of selected works in this genre from Fonvizin through Tolstoj, Chexov, Blok and Majakovskij to the modern theater. The structure of the drama and the techniques of the romantic and the realists will be examined.


Instructor(s): Maxin D. Shrayer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Russian

SLAV 3169 Russian Literary Humor and Satire Fall 3
Course Description

A survey of the particularly significant role that satire and comedy have played in Russian literature throughout its history and of its various manifestations in canonical works in the genre, from such acknowledged masters as Gogol, Saltykov-Shchedrin, Zoshchenko, Ilf and Petrov, and Voinovich.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted entirely in English

SLAV 3170 Russian Poetry Fall 3
Course Description

Major developments across the three ages of Russian poetry, from the Middle Ages through the 1990s. Issues of lyrical addressing, gender and sexuality, reader-response, exile, and metaphysics. Extensive analytical reading of Russian poetry in the original, a study of formal versification, and an introduction to the theoretical perspectives of the Russian formalists and Surrealists.


Instructor(s): Maxim D. Shrayer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted entirely in Russian

SLAV 3176 Russian Literary Forms Spring 3
Course Description

This course will use the prism of literary form to explore some of the achievements of Russian literature. Poetry, drama, the novel, and the short story will be our examples. Pushkin, Lermontov, Mandelshtam, Brodsky, and Elena Shvarts in poetry; novels by Turgenev and Venedikt Yerofeev; short fiction from Gogol, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Kharms, Bunin, and Tolstaya; dramas by Chekhov, Bulgakov, and Petrushevskaia in theatre. The course will combine lectures outlining the history of literary forms in Russia and discussions of the assigned readings.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Thomas Epstein

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL2223

Comments:

SLAV 3490 Advanced Tutorial: Polish Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

A course of directed study in the reading and analysis of Polish texts intended solely for students who have exhausted present course offerings or are doing thesis work on advanced topics. The precise subject matter is determined by arrangement and need.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Barbara Gawlick

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

SLAV 4061 The Art and Craft of Literary Translation: A Seminar Spring 3
Course Description

Literary translation as an art. Discussion of the history and theory of literary translation in the West and in Russia, but mainly practice in translating poetry or artistic prose from Germanic, Romance, Slavic, or Classical Languages, into English.
Conducted entirely in English as a workshop.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Maxim D. Shrayer

Prerequisites: Knowledge of a Classical, Germanic, Romance or Slavic language beyond the intermediate level.

Cross listed with: LING4327

Comments: Permission of instructor required for undergraduates and for languages beyond those in the course description.

SLAV 4066 Conversion, Islam, and Politics in the Balkans Spring 3
Course Description

Tbd


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Mariela Dakova

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

SLAV 4090 Advanced Tutorial: Slavic Linguistics Fall 1
Course Description

A course of directed study on questions in Slavic Linguistics, intended solely for students who have exhausted present course offerings or are doing thesis work on advanced topics.

The precise subject matter is determined by arrangement and need.


Instructor(s): M.J. Connolly

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: May be repeated for credit

SLAV 4091 AB Comprehensive: Slavic Studies Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Required for senior majors in Slavic Studies

SLAV 4121 Advanced Russian I Fall 3
Course Description

Advanced-level work toward a thorough proficiency in all aspects of contemporary standard Russian, with an emphasis on original composition, syntax, and style, and through careful translation of advanced texts.


Instructor(s): Natalia A. Reed

Prerequisites: SLAV3122. SLAV3122 (SL158) Third-Year Russian II or equivalent.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Russian. Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency core requirement.

SLAV 4122 Advanced Russian II Spring 3
Course Description

Continuation of advanced-level work toward a thorough proficiency in all aspects of contemporary standard Russian, with an emphasis on original composition, syntax, and style, and through careful translation of advanced texts.


Instructor(s): Aleksey Berg

Prerequisites: SLAV4121. SLAV4121 (SL208) Advanced Russian I or equivalent.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Russian. Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency core requirement.

SLAV 4124 Advanced Practicum in Spoken Russian Fall 3
Course Description

Effective use of the spoken language, including an introduction to simultaneous interpreting and the monitoring and transcription of Russian speech; specialized vocabularies.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: SL 227 and SL 228 or equivalent.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted entirely in Russian in St Petersburg (Russia)

SLAV 4125 Advanced Russian Writing and Translation Spring 3
Course Description

A study of the subtleties of Russian syntax, vocabulary and style through extensive analytic reading and through imitative and original writing, the theory and practice of preparing refined translations both from and into Russian.


Instructor(s): Elena Lapitsky

Prerequisites: SLAV4122. Or equivalent.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted entirely in Russian

SLAV 4190 Advanced Tutorial: Russian Language Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

A course of directed study on Russian grammar and style, intended solely for students who have exhausted present course offerings or are doing thesis work on advanced topics.

The precise subject matter is determined by arrangement and need.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: May be repeated for credit.

SLAV 4192 AB Comprehensive: Russian Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Maxim D. Shrayer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Required for senior majors in Russian

SLAV 5061 Seminar: Exile Spring 3
Course Description

Vladimir Nabokov once stated "All writers emigrate to their art and stay therein". What are some of the historical, aesthetic, and spiritual conditions that define a writer in exile? We shall attempt to answer this question by closely examining works by Berberova, Brodsky, Kundera, Nabokov, Naipaul, Sebald, I.B. Singer, Gertrude Stein, and other twentieth-century authors along with selected theoretical perspectives on exile.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Maxim D. Shrayer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL7726

Comments: Instructor's permission required for undergraduates.

SLAV 5161 Jewish Literature in 20th Century North America Fall 3
Course Description

The cultural and historical experience of Jewish authors in 20th century North America, with a focus on Anglophone Jewish writers. Prose, poetry, and drama by Woody Allen, Mary Antin, Abraham Cahan, Saul Bellow, Allen Ginsburg, Anthony Hecht, Emma Lazarus, Denise Levertov, Bernard Malamud, Arthur Miller, S. J. Perelman, Charles Reznikoff, Mordecai Richler, Adrienne Rich, Philip Roth, I. B. Singer, Gertrude Stein, Louis Zukofsky, Wendy Wasserstein, and others, and selected criticism by Harold Bloom, Alfred Kazin, Cynthia Ozick, Lionel Trilling, and others.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Maxim D. Shrayer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

SLAV 5163 Seminar: Nabokov Fall 3
Course Description

The bilingual and bicultural achievement of Vladimir Nabokov. A polemical examination of Nabokov's writings, with particular attention to connections among his aesthetics, ethics, and metaphysics and to issues of gender, sexuality, authorship, and exile.
Readings include selected Russian and English novels and short stories, as well as poetic, autobiographic, and discursive works.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Maxim D. Shrayer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL7775

Comments: All readings are in English.
Instructor's permission required for undergraduates

SLAV 5164 Seminar:Post-Soviet Literature Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

SLAV 5166 Seminar: Russkaja Fantastika Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

SLAV 5167 Russkaja literatura XX-go veka: Seminar Spring 3
Course Description

Close readings of selected literary works that have not received sufficient attention in Western Slavic scholarship.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Maxim D. Shrayer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted entirely in Russian

SLAV 5169 Seminar: Klassicheskaja russkaja literatura Fall 3
Course Description

Close readings of selected literary works that have not received sufficient attention in Western Slavic scholarship.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Maxim D. Shrayer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted entirely in Russian.

SLAV 6060 Holocaust Literature: History, Memory, Legacy Spring 3
Course Description

A brief overview of the history and legacy of the Shoah (Holocaust) followed by an examination of the variety of literary responses by witnesses and survivors, as well as by writers removed from the wartime horrors by distance, time, country, and language. Questions of ideology, metaphysics, ethics, aesthetics, memory, and cultural theory as formulated and debated in poetry, fiction, nonfiction, journalism, and discursive writings. The readings include works originally written in Russian, Yiddish, Polish, German, Italian, French, and English by Ilya Selvinsky, Vasily Grossman, Avrom Sutzkever, Tadeusz Borowski, Paul Celan, Primo Levi, Theodor Adorno, Elie Wiesel, Vladimir Nabokov, Hannah Arendt, Arthur Miller, W.G. Sebald and others. All the readings will be in English translation.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Maxim D. Shrayer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL6601 HIST4294

Comments:

SLAV 7090 Slavic Studies: Reading and Research Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

SLAV 7190 Russian Literature: Reading and Research Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

A high-level course of directed research on a topic from Russian literature, intended solely for graduate and honors students who have exhausted present course offerings.

The precise subject matter is determined by the student's approved research program.


Instructor(s): Maxim D. Shrayer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: May be repeated for credit.