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International Studies Courses (INTL) College of Arts and Sciences


Subject Area Course # Course Title Semester Credit Hours Expand
INTL 1221 Reflections on Being Abroad Fall 2
Course Description

This on-line course is designed for students of all majors who are currently abroad and are committed to reflecting more deeply on their study abroad experience. The course permits students to consider where they are in life, what they hope to gain from their time abroad, and how their current experiences may shape their future personal, academic, and professional trajectories. The course also trains students to observe and document the culture(s) in which they are studying, and in turn to produce an interactive, mixed media presentation, which captures one aspect of their host setting. From the course, students will gain valuable insight and skills which will benefit them well beyond their study abroad experience.


Instructor(s): Nick Gozik

Prerequisites: Restrictions: Open to Students studying abroad during the current semester.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Students wishing to take this course should contact the Office of International Programs. OIP will register students later in the semester once abroad status has been verified (students must be studying at a BC sponsored program). OIP will keep a spreadsheet of students who wish to take this course. Once a student's abroad status has been verified, he or she will be notified if they have been granted a spot in the course.

INTL 1224 Turkey at the Crossroads Summer 3
Course Description

This month-long summer course will examine a wide array of issues at the intersection of religion and public life in Turkey today. We begin with historical background crucial to understanding contemporary debates about Turkish culture, identity and politics. The core of the course is a focused study of the recent transition from strict secularism to what many describe as “moderate Islamism” as the dominant cultural and legal norm; we will investigate this transition in law, education, religion and politics. We close the course with case studies that illustrate the challenges Turkey faces in managing this transition while dealing with transitions in the European Union, the MENA region, and its relationship with the United States and Israel.


Instructor(s): Erik Owens

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: THEO1224

Comments:

INTL 1226 Religion, Racial Justice, and Reconciliation in South Africa Summer 3
Course Description

We will begin the course in Cape Town and then move to Pretoria for the remainder of the course. We will cover the following topics: key points in the history of South Africa; religious perspectives on apartheid; intellectual and armed conflict; fifty years of American foreign policy toward South Africa; Desmond Tutu and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission; reparations, forgiveness, trauma and healing; economic empowerment, gender. justice and religion; refugees, migrants, and xenophobia; HIV/AIDS; Christians-Jews-Muslims in South Africa; community organizing and economic justice


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: THEO1226

Comments: The course requirements and evaluations are based on the following: daily journal and reflection pieces; class participation; and a final paper. For the duration of the program, the class will meet from 9:00 am to approximately 1:00 pm in the arranged classroom followed by lunch and an afternoon excursion.

INTL 2200 Where on Earth: Foundations in Global History, Culture, & Society Fall 4
Course Description

This course invites International Studies majors to investigate the meaning of “place” as the basic building block of our globalizing world, from geographical location to cyberspace. The specificity of a place--how it is experienced and how it fits into overall world structures--is historically and socially constituted and therefore subject to change and contestation. Moving between local, regional, and global scales, the course examines the interplay between the built and natural environments; spatial connections via the movement of people, goods, and technology; the geographical structures of socio-economic inequalities; and the ways in which individuals form identities in relation to “place.”


Instructor(s): Brian Gareau

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Rising Sophmores (Class 2021) only for AY 2018_2019

INTL 2202 Where on Earth, Reflection/Discussion Fall 0
Course Description

Where on Earth, Reflection/Discussion Group


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

INTL 2203 Where on Earth: Leadership Seminar Fall 3
Course Description

Where on Earth: POD Leadership Seminar


Instructor(s): Brian Gareau
Franziska Seraphim

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

INTL 2251 Food, Power,&Politics Summer 3
Course Description

This course will seek to provide an intellecttual and analytical-driven framework around the question of food as an integral part of any human experience, but particularly our experience with food through across cultures. We each have a unique opportunity to understand better the role of food in each of our lives as we move through this summer program by examining our own cultural and political assumptions and those of others from a new point of view. We can appreciate the lenses brought by other individuals, cultures and places to the acts of eating and producing food. Finally, we can express the human experience of food in ways that represent our understandings, experiences and vision for a healthy, just and pleasurable relationship to food in ways that can be shared and appreciated by others. In eating and producing food, we exist simultaneously in a deeply personal and communal place, a place of the present, past and future in which we are never more and less than human.


Instructor(s): Hiroshi Nakazato

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HIST2851 POLI2251

Comments:

INTL 2253 International Law of Food Summer 3
Course Description

This course, one of the few if not the only in the world to address this critical subject matter, identifies and analyzes contemporary international legal and policy issues related to food including supply, safety, security, subsidies, and trade. Students will master legal and structural analytical tools for addressing these increasingly important challenges of concern to all global citizens, including in particular undergraduates potentially interested in attending law school seeking an introduction to legal method. Field trips include visits to the European Food Safety Authority and the UN Food and Agriculture Organization in Rome. The course stresses the development of skills to enable students effectively to grapple with new and emerging issues in this ever-changing and expanding field.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: LAWS5253 POLI2253

Comments:

INTL 2260 International Environmental Science and Policy Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines both the science underlying today's international environmental problems and the policy decisions that drive human actions and responses. The natural environment underlies every other human system: economic, political, cultural/religious, etc., and when it is perturbed, every system above it feels the effects. We will study the science behind climate change, deforestation, ocean/wildlife issues, and food security and look at how U.S. domestic laws, international treaties and conventions, international organizations like UNEP, and NGOs shape the way humanity deals with these problems.


Instructor(s): TBD

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: While no specific science classes are required as prerequisites, students should be familiar with basic scientific methods and principles.

INTL 2262 Online Communication and Global Society Fall 3
Course Description

This course offers a critical look at the history of the Internet and the ways in which online communication technologies are shaping our world. Merging conceptual approaches from the disciplines of Cultural Studies, Globalization theory and International Relations, the class will consider the role that new media is playing in shaping the art, entertainment, politics and economics of the new century. Case studies will include close looks at websites such Twitter, Facebook, World of Warcraft, Match.com and Alibaba.com, as well as considerations of social movements such as Occupy Wall St. and the the Arab Spring.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

INTL 2286 Philosophy of Peace and Hospitality Summer 3
Course Description

This course will introduce students to the dynamics of conflict and the challenges involved in bringing about reconciliation among groups divided by distrust and enmity. By drawing on recent thinkers and artists who have reflected on the encounter between self and other and upon the risks and challenges involved in opening oneself to the stranger, the course will propose a hermeneutics of hospitality as a means to overcome prejudice based violence and bring about reconciliation among divided groups. The central feature of this hermeneutic will be the art of exchanging narratives—between religions, ethnicities, cultures, and persons. Various approaches will be examined—including artistic expression, organized dialogue, and community building efforts—in order to better understand the way in which the exchange of narratives plays a vital role in reconciliation. Students will also learn to notice the way similar conflict dynamics are present in their own social and political circumstances. They will become better equipped to examine tendencies to exclusion and violence in their own lives, to develop hospitable practices and attitudes that lead to peace, and to engage in effective peacemaking activities back home. This examination takes place in one of Europe’s oldest conflict zones(Croatia & surrounding countries),at the crossroads between the political and religious systems of the east and west (Islam and Christianity, Ottoman and European Monarchies, Communism and Capitalism).


Instructor(s): Richard Kearney

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL2286

Comments:

INTL 2310 The US Intelligence Community in the Trump Era Fall 3
Course Description

What has been the shape and mission of the US Intelligence Community since 9/11, and what will it confront in the Trump era and beyond? Terrorism has defined the US Intelligence Community for twenty years. Now, an irredentist Russia, the explosion of cyber threats, a rising China, and persisting concerns about nuclear proliferation will all challenge the US Intelligence Community, as the Pax Americana recedes and as Donald Trump engages in an historic retreat of the United States from its role as driver of multilateral norms - and undermines the credibility of the Intelligence Community itself. This courses will examine how the US Intelligence Community's mission and structures have changed to meet national security threats, and the challenges it will face during the Trump administration and beyond.


Instructor(s): Glenn Carle

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

INTL 2311 Intelligence, Covert Action and National Policy Spring 3
Course Description

The US has engaged in "covert action" since the founding of the Office of Strategic Services (OSS), the CIAs predecessor, and it has often overshadowed the CIAs core mission of intelligence collection. Yet its utility and morality have been vigorously challenged. This course will examine how covert action fits into the US Intelligence Community's mission, what covert action is, why it is used, and will examine a number of covert action missions, such as the Bay of Pigs operation, the overthrow of Chilean president Allende, the overthrow of the Arbenz government in Guatemala, the attempt to overthrow the Sandinista regime, the overthrow of the Mossadegh government in Iran, the efforts to undermine Communism in Eastern Europe, and the invasion of Afghanistan post - 9/11.


Instructor(s): Glenn Carle

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

INTL 2430 The Challenges of Development Summer 3
Course Description

The process of economic development is more than simply getting particular economic policies right. In addition to economic policy, developing economies are tied to their history, social and cultural norms, institutions as well as local and regional politics. Using Vietnam as a case-study, this Summer Seminar is intended to introduce students to some of the many complex challenges of development. In particular, the Seminar will consider the role of institutions and the ‘rule of law’ including both formal and informal arrangements for dispute resolution in the development process. Students will write a series of short reflection papers while in Vietnam as well as a longer paper upon their return to the U.S.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Brian JM Quinn

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Summer Seminar for BC undergrads in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, Summer 2015

INTL 2432 Democracy and Development Fall 3
Course Description

At the close of the twentieth century, a wave of democratization transformed the international landscape, toppling repressive regimes in the Soviet bloc, apartheid South Africa, Latin America, and East Asia. The arc of history, it seemed to many, was bending toward democracy. Today, however, optimism about democracy’s prospects has turned to pessimism. Democratic transitions have proven difficult to sustain. Authoritarianism and right wing nationalism are resurgent, while foreign interventions and popular protests in the name of freedom have often produced not democratization, but strife, radicalism, and instability. This course examines democratization from a global perspective, providing students with theoretical and historical frameworks to understand democratization’s recent history and to evaluate its future prospects. Through a series of case studies, including post-World War II Germany and Japan, post-communist Russia, post-apartheid South Africa, post-1982 Mexico, China since 1989, and the Arab Spring, students will explore how diverse actors all over the world have conceptualized and sought to promote democratization at home and abroad, analyzing the causes of their successes and failures.


Instructor(s): Kate Geoghegan

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

INTL 2450 Latin American Politics through Popular Culture Spring 3
Course Description

Popular culture is not created in a vacuum. Music, cuisine, sports, and media exist in particular historical contexts.This course analyzes the ways in which Latin American political economy and international relations can be studied through the lens of popular culture. For example, by tracing how musical genres are copied and adapted in different countries, we can identify patterns of migration and the economic forces that affect the movement of people across national boundaries. And by examining international sporting events, we can see how populist governments exploit specific expressions of culture to promote their agendas. At the conclusion of this class, students will be able to connect the production and consumption of cultural artifacts to the theories and meta-narratives developed to understand pivotal trends in Latin America.


Instructor(s): Rodolfo Fernandez

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

INTL 2475 Kuwait:Politics and Oil in the Gulf Summer 3
Course Description

This seminar addresses the comparative and international politics of the Gulf States, with emphasis on Kuwait and Saudi Arabia. It analyzes state formation, state-society relations, democratization, the rise of Islamism and regime stability, foreign policies, regional politics, and the politics of OPEC and international oil markets. It assesses the effects of oil on domestic and foreign policy. Finally, it highlights pressures for political liberalization and growth in civil society. Students visit sites of political, religious, and historical significance throughout Kuwait and the Gulf, attend presentations at the National Assembly and Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and meet with English-speaking Kuwaiti students.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ICSP2475

Comments:

INTL 2500 Introduction to International Studies Spring 4
Course Description

This course provides an introduction to international studies. It is required for international studies majors and assumes no prior coursework in related disciplines. The course lays the theoretical and empirical groundwork for understanding the ways in which international influences shape the world's economies, polities, societies, and cultures and the consequences for global conflict and cooperation.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

INTL 2504 Discussion Group: Introduction to International Studies Spring 0
Course Description

Discussion group for INTL2500: Introduction to International Studies.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

INTL 2505 Discussion Group: Introduction to International Studies Spring 0
Course Description

Discussion group for INTL2500: Introduction to International Studies.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

INTL 2531 Politics of Energy and Climate in the U.S. and International Perspective Spring 3
Course Description

Why is energy and climate policy fundamentally political, deeply entwined with human, national, and international security, and critical to global stability and well-being? Major course units assess the main actors and institutions in energy; including OPEC and international markets; contrast the primary challenges confronting energy policy in the exporting and importing states; evaluate the implications of climate disruption and the solutions across the sixty largest greenhouse gas emitting states; and analyze how energy and climate politics shapes global security and sustainability. Class members will also conduct a global climate negotiation and study in depth the regional security and political economy of the (Persian) Gulf states.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): David A. Deese

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: POLI2531

Comments:

INTL 2533 Global Climate Politics Spring 3
Course Description

This course addresses the main pillars of climate governance: mitigation (reducing greenhouse gas emissions); adaptation (coping with the impacts of climate change) and the emerging pillar - loss and damage regulation. It examines how responsibilities, burdens, benefits and risks for addressing climate change should be divided between countries and people. We will discuss issues like: what is the role of justice in UN climate negotiations? How to balance fairness with political effectiveness? Is it possible to sue major emitters (states or businesses) for climate change? What are the responsibilities of rising powers for addressing their emissions? Who should pay for adaptation to climate change? Who are climate refugees and where can they go? This course looks for answers to such questions by examining various conceptual and empirical approaches to climate governance from a justice perspective and linking them to practical solutions, illustrated in case studies from around the world.


Instructor(s): Anna Schulz

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

INTL 2534 International Political Economy Spring 3
Course Description

International politics and economics are inextricably linked. Economic policies like interest rates are deeply embedded in political institutions and can have major political repercussions. Governments’ political decisions like how to organize international trade can significantly affect the economic well being of citizens in both their own country as well as those in other countries. Not only are economics and politics tightly wedded; they are also hugely important. Pretty much everyone pretty much everywhere is deeply influenced by international political economy. This course is an introduction into the contours of that intersection between international politics and economics.


Instructor(s): Gary Winslett

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: POLI2534

Comments:

INTL 2546 World Politics: Conflict and Cooperation Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines the principle sources of the behavior of countries in international politics, including the nature of the international system and the decision-making process within states. It examines such issues as the sources of power, the causes and implications of the security dilemma, the dynamics of alliances, the causes of war, international political economy, and the dilemmas of world order.


Instructor(s): TBD

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies Foundation I requirements for the International Studies minor.
Course may be used as an elective for certain IS minor concentrations (ICC, IPE, EISJ).
Students with INTL2500 Introduction to International Studies may not take the class.

INTL 2547 Discussion Group/World Politics Spring 0
Course Description

Discussion group for INTL2546, World Politics.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

INTL 2854 Colonial Korea and its Legacies Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores Korea's experience under Japanese colonial rule (1910-1945) as well as how this experience was remembered and represented in the post-colonial era. Students will explore the three phases of Japanese rule: military rule (1910-1919); cultural rule (1919-1931), and wartime mobilization (1931-1945) and how each of these phases have shaped and continue to shape Korean national identity and politics, socioeconomic development, and memory culture. The course draws on historical and literary texts as well as film and other visual sources. This course combines lecture with active student discussion and presentations.


Instructor(s): Ingu Hwang

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HIST2854

Comments:

INTL 2871 Industrialization and Democratization in Korea Fall 3
Course Description

This introductory course surveys the political and economic transformation of South Korea from decolonization through the high growth era to today's global neo-liberal age. It traces how a war-ravaged country became a prosperous and industrialized nation. In exploring this transformation, it also examines the relationship between Korea's industrialization and its democratization: How did US Cold War modernization impact the Korean state's economic strategy and it's political development? Why and how did Korean society campaign for social and political justice during the economic high growth era? The course also considers the reconfiguration of South Korea's political economy sine the 1990s.


Instructor(s): Ingu Hwang

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HIST2871 ECON2871

Comments:

INTL 3371 International Trade Spring 3
Course Description

This course is an analysis of the foundations of trade and the principle of comparative advantage leading to a sophisticated study of protectionism. Current U.S. protectionist issues will be illuminated, as well as economic warfare, control of international factor movements, and interaction of trade and economic development.


Instructor(s): James Anderson (Spring)

Prerequisites: ECON2201. ECON2201 or ECON2203.

Cross listed with: ECON3371

Comments: Not open to students who have taken ECON2271

INTL 3372 International Finance Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

International financial markets, international trade and balance of payments issues will be studied by using analytical models of the open economy. Topics of particular interests are exchange rate determination, capital flows, trade flows, and other international linkages between economies. The course will apply the analytical tools of international economics to address macroeconomic aspects of current policy issues such as the global impact of the financial crisis, exchange rate policy, sovereign debt crises, and persistent trade deficits and international indebtedness.


Instructor(s): Rosen Valchev

Prerequisites: ECON2201. ECON2201 and ECON2202.

Cross listed with: ECON3372

Comments: Not open to students who have taken ECON2271

INTL 3374 Development Economics and Policy Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines development economics and development policy. The purpose is to understand the lives of the poor and the economies of poor countries in order to understand what—if anything—can be done to improve their lives. We will consider what might be holding the poor back including population growth, lack of education, poor health, corruption, and institutional impediments such as poorly developed or tightly constrained markets. This course is appropriate for economics majors as well as for majors in international studies with the appropriate prerequisites.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): S Anukriti

Prerequisites: ECON2201 and ECON1151.

Cross listed with: ECON3374

Comments: Enrollment limited; significant writing/research component.
Fulfills cultural diversity core requirement.

INTL 3375 Economic Growth & Development Spring 3
Course Description

This course introduces students to Economic Growth. Our starting point is the question of why societies did not experience economic growth for most of human history. Indeed, growth is a very recent economic concept dating back to the XIX century. We will then study what drives growth. Examples include the introduction of electricity, telephone, and airplanes. In general, we will study how technology, capital accumulation, human capital, and innovation helped humanity to increase its well being. Finally we will cover the impact of growth on our lives. For example, how life expectancy has changed over the past century.


Instructor(s): Pablo Guerron

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

INTL 3376 International Economic Relations Fall 3
Course Description

This course introduces the study of economic relations among countries. It combines material contained in ECON3371 and ECON3372, and substitutes for both those courses. Primarily designed for international studies majors, it is also appropriate for economics and other social science majors, with the proviso that the comprehensive coverage of the course implies that the workload is heavy and expectations for students are high. Topics include the determinants of trade in goods, services, and capital; the economic policies that nations use to influence such trade; the theory and practice of international macroeconomics; and problems of coordinating macroeconomic policies among countries. The course features the usefulness (and limitations) of game theory for explaining international economic interactions.


Instructor(s): James Anderson

Prerequisites: Must meet all of the following: • ECON2201 or ECON2203, and ECON2202 or ECON2204.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

INTL 3388 Economic Policy Analysis in Turbulent Times: Europe and Turkey Summer 4
Course Description

See course description in the Economics Department.


Instructor(s): CAN ERBIL
CHRISTOPHER BAUM

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ECON3388

Comments:

INTL 3510 Globalization Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines the political, economic, social and cultural implications of the increasingly integrated world system. The course focuses on conflicting assessments of international institutions (IMF, World Bank, WTO) and political governance; the impact of economic integration; and the effects of globalization on state sovereignty, democracy, and social cohesion. Specific case studies will include: globalization and the environment; globalization, gender, and work; globalization and immigration/migration; globalization and the illicit economy, and anti-globalization social movements and activism.


Instructor(s): Paul Christensen

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: POLI3510

Comments:

INTL 3521 International Law Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the role of international public law (the "law of nations") in the world today. It takes as its starting point the academic (and practical) debate about the utility of international law in world politics. From there, we consider the philosophical foundations of law, the sources of international law, and the application of international law in different arenas. In particular, the course will focus on how international law deals with a number of issues, including the connection between domestic and international law and the laws on territory, jurisdiction, human rights, and security, as well as other relevant topics.


Instructor(s): Hiroshi Nakazato

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: POLI3521

Comments:

INTL 3540 Research Methods in International Studies Fall 3
Course Description

This course is designed specifically for students in the Political Science and the History, Culture, and Society (HCS) tracks of the International Studies major. It lays the groundwork for understanding qualitative research methods in the social sciences. Students interested in quantitative research methods are urged to take additional courses offered in other departments to augment the material covered here. This course complements and supplements IN 497 Senior Thesis, but the two courses are independent.


Instructor(s): Hiroshi Nakazato

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

INTL 3930 Seminar:Selected Topics in International Studies Spring 3
Course Description

The Political Economy of Global Climate Change: Global climate change is one of this century's most pressing challenges and affects virtually all countries. Responding to it effectively will require both government action and properly aligned market incentives. Thus, understanding international political economy is crucial to understanding the collective response to this threat. Moreover, societies' responses to that challenge are, and will continue to be, shaped by economic and political dynamics. This course examines those dynamics and addresses how civil society activists and businesses influence states' environmental policies and how states' climate change policies interact with each other. It also investigates states' different policy options and what the political economy implications of those policies are.


Instructor(s): Gary Winslett

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course content will vary depending on which faculty member will teach the course.

INTL 4022 Human Rights and Democratic Transitions in South Korea Spring 3
Course Description

This course introduces students to the historical evolution of human rights talk, activism, norm and politics during the democratic transition in Korea. Who appropriated the language of human rights? Why did they do so? How did local causes and issues become global human rights issues or vice versa? How did human rights language, ideas, norms, and practices affect domestic and international politics on socio-economic, political, and cultural issues in Korea? Along with these questions, this course will examine multilateral and contentious interactions between global and local state and non-state actors. In pay attention to the role of human rights, the course discusses a series of crucially interrelated topics on self-determination, economic development, political liberalization, humanitarianism, and global justice during the Cold War and post-Cold War period.


Instructor(s): Ingu Hwang

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HIST4022

Comments:

INTL 4429 Globalization and the Media Fall 3
Course Description

This class examines the cultural impact of globalization on the traditional centers and peripheries of media production. The course will cover topics such as the shifting definitions of cultural imperialism; the role of the United Nations in regulating cultural products; the latest transnational media mergers; the strategies of global television programmers such as CNN, MTV, or Discovery; the increasing commercialization of media systems around the world; and the role of media in relation to war and terrorism. This writing-intensive seminar is open to juniors and seniors.


Instructor(s): Matt Sienkiewicz
Marcus Breen

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: COMM4429

Comments: Satisfies one of two writing intensive courses required within the Communication major. Restricted to Juniors and Seniors.

INTL 4454 Global Mediated Public Spheres Spring 3
Course Description

This course considers the relationship between communication technology and rational debate from the creation of the printing press to advent of Twitter. Beginning with the ideas of Jurgen Habermas and his critics, the course takes a theoretical and historical look at the concept of the public sphere, considering the roles played by advancing forms of media. The course ultimately considers the extent to which new technologies such as social media and mobile devices may serve to both help and hinder the expression and evaluation of well-considered ideas at a global level.


Instructor(s): Matt Sienkiewicz

Prerequisites: Satisfies one of two writing intensive courses required within the Communication major.

Cross listed with: COMM4454

Comments:

INTL 4503 Global Englishes: Literature and Transnational Flows Fall 3
Course Description

How and why did English become the language of international business and culture in the world today? Given that Asia will soon have the largest English speaking population in the world, what is the relation of the English language to the process of globalization and transnational cultural flows? How have former British colonies like India and Nigeria appropriated the English language to engender new national literatures in English? We shall study the dominance of the English language in relation to the British Empire and the US as a super power by sampling writings from under-represented parts of Asia such as the Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, as well as Mexico and Latin America.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kalpana Seshadri

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL4503

Comments:

INTL 4911 Independent Study Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

A student and professor may propose a course involving readings and research designed to study an issue not covered in the standard course offerings.


Instructor(s): Hiroshi Nakazato

Prerequisites: With permission of the Department. Dept. Permission Required.

Cross listed with:

Comments: By Arrangement

INTL 4941 International Studies Senior Seminar Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This seminar is required of seniors majoring in International Studies. It provides participants with a common vocabulary for analyzing the current international environment politically, economically, and socially. It also examines how to integrate cultural questions and expression into the discipline. Students will explore possibilities for future global relationships in an informed and constructive way and exchange their views, questions, and research in an atmosphere of mutual respect and trust.


Instructor(s): DEPT

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SOCY4942

Comments: Open only to Seniors majoring in International Studies

INTL 4951 Senior Honors Research Fall 3
Course Description

Weekly seminar/workshop for IS seniors writing a senior thesis.


Instructor(s): Hiroshi Nakazato

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: By arrangement.

INTL 4952 Senior Honors Thesis Spring 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Hiroshi Nakazato

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: By Arrangement.

INTL 5539 Human Rights, Humanitarian Crises, and Refugees: Ethical, Political, and Religious Responses Fall 3
Course Description

This course will explore the protection of human rights in the face of contemporary humanitarian crises, focusing on the relation between such crises and warfare, political oppression and economic injustice It will investigate the ethical perspectives that should guide responses by political, religious and civil communities. The issue of the forced migration that results from such crises will receive particular attention.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): David Hollenbach, S.J.

Prerequisites: Preference for theology and international studies majors.

Cross listed with: THEO5539

Comments: Registration is limited.

INTL 5561 Ethics, Religion, and International Politics I Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

An examination of the role of religion in international politics and of ethical approaches to international affairs. Special emphasis will be given to religion as a source of conflict, religious communities as transnational agents for justice, protection of human rights, and peace; the historical development and contemporary formulations of ethical norms for the use of force; and ethical and religious contributions to reconciliation and solidarity.


Instructor(s): Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL5567 THEO5567

Comments: Major Restricted. See International Studies, Philosophy, or the Theology Department for registration approval. Preference to Theology and International Studies majors and minors.

INTL 5562 Disc Group/Ethics Religion and Int'l Politics Fall/Spring 0
Course Description

Discussion Group for INTL 556301, Eth,Rel&Int'l Pols


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Required for INTL 556301, Ethics, Rel & Int'l Pols

INTL 5563 Ethics, Religion, and International Politics Fall/Spring 4
Course Description

An examination of the role of religion in international politics and of ethical approaches to international affairs. Special emphasis will be given to religion as a source of conflict, religious communities as transnational agents for justice, protection of human rights, and peace; the historical development and contemporary formulations of ethical norms for the use of force; and ethical and religious contributions to reconciliation and solidarity.


Instructor(s): Dept

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL5563 THEO5563

Comments: Major Restricted for IS. See International Studies, Philosophy or the Theology Department for registration approval. Preference to Theology and International Studies majors and minors.

INTL 5564 Disc Group/Ethics Religion and Int'l Politics Fall/Spring 0
Course Description

Discussion Group for INTL556302 "Eth,Rel&Int'l Pols


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Required for INTL 556302, Eth,Rel&Int'l Pols

INTL 5601 Advanced Independent Research Fall/Spring 6
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Hiroshi Nakazato

Prerequisites: With permission of the Department. Dept. Permission Required.

Cross listed with:

Comments: By Arrangement