Skip to main content

Psychology (Woods College) Courses (ADPS) Woods College of Advancing Studies


Subject Area Course # Course Title Semester Credit Hours Expand
ADPS 1100 Introductory Psychology Fall 4
Course Description

An introduction to the science of human behavior examining such areas as child development, social psychology, personality, psychological disorders, neuroscience, sensation, perception, cognition and states of consciousness, and psychotherapy.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPS 1101 Theories of Personality Fall 4
Course Description

New developments and increasingly sophisticated technology inform and expand our understanding of the brain and human nature, personality and individual differences. The course takes a fresh look at the similarities and differences that key figures, and key research have attributed to human nature. How do genetic inheritance, environment and social factors interact to affect personality? Is personality stable or changing? How can modern psychology reconcile individual needs with those of the community? Readings consider theories of key figures and such factors as temperament, resilience, parenting, education, psychotherapy, gender, and attachment.


Instructor(s): Donnah Canavan

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPS 1119 Preventing Youth Violence Fall 4
Course Description

Violence by our young people has become a national public health epidemic. Youthful assailants have moved from misdemeanors to major crimes of homicide, rape, robbery and assault. When violence occurs, the community asks why were there no warning signs of impending trouble and what can be done to prevent such problems in the future? This course examines the warning signs, which are usually many and protracted; it looks at related theories of development, attachment and adjustment and then explores active strategies parents, teachers, counselors, law enforcement and others interested in young people can implement to prevent these violent outbursts.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPS 1126 Dynamics of Success Fall 4
Course Description

This course traces the origin of success in family dynamics and cultural heritages. It presents three major personal orientations to success: Fear of Success, Healthy or Integrative Success and Conventional Success. We explore the effects of these Orientations to Success on individuals' behavior in interpersonal, group, organizational and private settings. The concept of success is discussed in the broader contexts of well-being, happiness and effects in society


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPS 1129 Psychological Trauma Fall 4
Course Description

All of us learned on 9/11 about the impact of psychological trauma in the aftermath of terrorists events. Similarly, combat, physical and sexual abuse, family violence, family alcoholism, family breakup, sudden major illness, and other stressful life events may also result in psychological trauma. If left untreated, this acute state of psychological disorganization can evolve into a lifetime pattern of constricted behavior and social isolation known as Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). This course focuses on the causes and treatments of such traumatic states. Empirical research as well as clinical data are presented.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPS 1139 Abnormal Psychology Fall 4
Course Description

Students are introduced to the categories used to understand normal and abnormal behavior and adjustment in Euro-American contexts. The course focuses on the specific diagnoses that are recognized in the DSM-5 and by the general medical establishment in the United States. The course provides mainstream competencies concerning diagnostic nomenclature and medical descriptions of human suffering. It also provides tools to critically analyze this system of diagnosis and approach to human suffering. In-depth consideration of psychoanalytic theory and case studies are used.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPS 1145 Social Psychology of Health and Illness Fall 4
Course Description

What happens to the personality, thinking process, value system, the mind body when sickness strikes? What is disease and how does it impact the core of who we are, what we believe and how we act? How and why do people consider their health, change health practices and accept or reject new information. Class explores how classic and contemporary theory and research in social psychology apply to how people think about health and illness and its impact on the whole person.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPS 1153 Research Methods for the Social Sciences Fall 4
Course Description

This introductory course in research methodology examines issues underlying research from a theoretical and practical point of view. It explores the basic concepts and problems encountered in designing and conducting research and develops the practice of critically thinking about resources located in the research process. Focus is on the tenets of sound research practice to enable students to make reasonable judgments about research read and undertaken.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPS 1155 Health Psychology Fall 4
Course Description

Today’s age is one of intense stress. Health psychology acknowledges the mutual influence of the mind and body in the environmental context. Evidence suggests that rapid technological and social change may compromise physical and mental health. This course explores the nature of these stresses and the range of psychological means available to cope with them. Special areas of inquiry include stress arising from work, family, mobility, leisure and cultural lifestyles. Emphasis is on self-assessment and informed choice of improving the quality of one’s life.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPS 1156 Psychology of Risk Taking Fall 4
Course Description

The twenty-first century is a fast paced, ever changing environment. The opportunities and challenges, dangers and pitfalls presented to each of us - the risks of life - are different today. Who are the risk takers and risk adverse? What are the implications of avoiding risk or taking too much? How does risk present itself, how to evaluate it, when to embrace or abandon it? Course examines the personal, situational, genetic and cultural parameters which enable risks to be taken and life to be lived to its fullest.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPS 1160 Psychology of Emotions Fall 4
Course Description

Understanding the nature of human emotions, particularly how attachments and relationships develop and dissolve, suggests a closer look at concepts such as human needs, fear, aggression, love, guilt, family influence and friendship. Course examines these and related issues in the context of various literary accounts to develop a sense of the universal and changing questions of emotional development.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPS 1188 Statistics Fall/Spring/Summer 4
Course Description

Introduction to inferential statistics covering description of sample data, probability, binomial and normal distribution, random sampling, estimation, and hypothesis-testing,


Instructor(s): Professor Chambers

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ADMT1353

Comments:

ADPS 1202 Violence:Crimes without Boundaries Fall 4
Course Description

Violence, including terrorism, is increasing in frequency and severity in homes, worksites and communities. Offices, courts, schools, healthcare settings and public areas are no longer guarantors of safety. Course examines the nature and causes of violence; presents a range of risk management strategies to reduce the potential for violent acts; and reviews ways for dealing with psychological aftermath of aggressive acts.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPS 1203 Psychology of Health and Healing Fall 4
Course Description

Today’s health care increasingly interfaces with an emerging trend in alternative/complementary/integrative approaches to health and healing. As the role of mind-body interaction is studied and the impact of mind, awareness, consciousness and intention is better understood, we discover more options for health, healing and recovery. Students will explore the concepts and research underlying integrative medicine: mind-body influences; traditional and ethno medicine; diet and nutrition; structural, energetic therapies and bio-electromagnetic applications. Focus on skills to evaluate research supportive and challenging to these concepts.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPS 1218 Social Psychology:Behavioral Influences Fall 4
Course Description

Humans are social beings. Social psychology aims for a broad understanding of the social factors that influence how human beings think, act, and feel. In this course, we will take a scientific look at how people affect and are affected by others, investigating how social behavior impacts our daily lives.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPS 1246 Contemporary Perspectives on Family Fall 4
Course Description

A look at the family as a dynamic system; what constitutes a family; what are family values; how does diversity impact family formation. Course examines the individual’s experience in her/his family of origin, patterns of interaction and development, and the influence of economics, education, technology and culture on families.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPS 1261 Developmental Psychology Spring 4
Course Description

A look at general psychological issues as they relate to the developing child. Topics within the areas of personality, social, and cognitive development are considered along with the theoretical and practical implications of studying age differences in behavior.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Michael Moore

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPS 1346 Organizational Communication Fall 4
Course Description

To thrive in constantly transforming organizations, it is important to understand the factors which influence performance and satisfaction, and the dynamics critical to interacting with and managing others effectively. Reviews the major theories of management and considers how personality, motivation, communication, perception, group dynamics, leadership style and organizational culture affect productivity and personal and professional success.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPS 1365 Adolescent Development Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional changes that occur during adolescence. The role of family, peers, and school will be addressed. The course will also examine employment and career development and growth during the college years. Attention will be given to cohort effects and to the role of gender, socioeconomic status, and ethnic background.


Instructor(s): Karen Rosen

Prerequisites: PSYC2260.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPS 1390 Psychology in Law Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Understanding the relationship between law and psychology in the U.S. in integral to both disciplines. Both the law and psychology affect, and are affected by each other as well as other disciplines. The relationship has been and continues to be an evolutionary one. This course shall explore the law-psychology relationship through readings and cases. Complex issues with no easy solutions will challenge students. Just some of the topics to be covered will be jury selection and psychology, expert witnesses, eyewitnesses, and the use of scientific evidence.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPS 2206 Independent Study Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course offers students the opportunity to study a topic of personal interest, working independently under the supervision of a faculty member of his/her choice within the Department. The instructor, working with the student, decides on the nature of readings and related activities involved as well as the precise form of scholarly work required.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Registration for this course requires additional paperwork. See the Psychology website.

ADPS 2272 Cognitive Psychology Fall/Spring/Summer 4
Course Description

This course introduces the scientific study of mental function from an information processing perspective. The course examines how information is processed and transformed by the mind to control complex human behavior. Specific topics include an introduction to cognitive psychology, cognitive neuroscience, perception, attention, working memory, long-term memory, knowledge, visual imagery, language, and judgment/decisions/reasoning.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPS 3010 The History of Learning Theory Spring 4
Course Description

In this asynchronous online course, students will explore the history of learning theory in a modern-day context. Beginning briefly with Socrates and Plato, the course will transition to three types of learning theory: behaviorism, constructivism, and progressivism will a focus on theories Skinner, Piaget, Vygotsky, Dewey, and Montessori. There will be a focus on applying theory to a variety of practices and, in doing so, understanding learning processes and brain-based learning theory. Students can expect interactive discussions and project-based work. At the conclusion of the course, students will have a clear understanding of different learning theories and corresponding theorists, as well as a lens on the application of theory to practice.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Prerequisite--Introductory level psychology course - Intro, Developmental, etc.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Prerequisite: Introductory level psychology course - Intro, Developmental, etc.

ADPS 3222 Cognitive Psychology Spring 4
Course Description

TBA


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPS 3243 Counseling Theories and Interventions Fall/Spring/Summer 4
Course Description

What is psychotherapy and how does it work? What is the role of the therapist? What are the tasks of the therapist? What occurs in the relationship between therapist and patient? This course will address how various theories and perspectives address these and other questions. By comparing and contrasting different approaches to psychotherapy, students will better understand the history, theories, values, and techniques of the major schools of psychotherapy. Students will also appreciate how issues of ethics, religion/spirituality, and culture of the therapist and patient affect psychotherapy.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: ADPS1261 AND ADPS1100.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Prerequisites - Intro Psych and Developmental Psych

ADPS 3308 Applied Group Dynamics Fall/Spring 4
Course Description

TBA


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPS 4000 Psychology & the Other:Interdisciplinary Seminar Fall 4
Course Description

This course is an interdisciplinary course wherein students consider the shape of human subjectivity, experience, and identity from a variety of disciplinary, historical, clinical, and conceptual positions. Oriented around the scholarship and conversation taking place at the Psychology and the Other conference - featuring top thinkers in philosophy, theology, and psychology - this course addresses the many discourses, political imports, phenomenological markers, and philosophical heritages that underlie our understanding of and lived range in human experience. The course will emphasize socio-political and cultural dimensions of human experience, phenomenology of identity (gender, sexuality, self-other constitution), intersubjectivity and transformation/healing, intergenerational transmission of trauma, and psychological/theological/philosophical concepts of self and other relations. NOTE - In addition to the on-campus Saturday meetings, students registered for this course are required to attend the "Psychology and the Other" Conference in October: www.psychologyandtheother.com.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): David Goodman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPS 4187 Neuropsychology Fall 4
Course Description

This course in the Fundamentals of Human Neuropsychology approaches the study of the human brain from two organizational perspectives: biological and behavioral. The first third of the course covers the fundamentals (history, evolution, genetics and epigenetics, anatomy physiology, pharmacology, and methodology). The second third covers fundamental brain systems including sensory and motor systems, which illustrate basic circuitry and neuronal computation. The final third covers higher order cortical functions including language, cognition, social cognition, and neuropsychiatric disorders including traumatic, degenerative, and developmental disorders. Neuropsychological function is illustrated liberally with relevant case studies. Assessment consists of three objective (not essay) exams including a comprehensive final.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Must have completed Intro to Psychology and Developmental Psychology.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Prerequisites: Intro to Psych and Developmental Psych

ADPS 4200 Psychology and Politics Fall 4
Course Description

This course examines the ubiquitous presence of power and politics in the context of human relationships and society. Students will emerge from this course with greater knowledge about and curiosity concerning the social, economic, political, cultural and psychological processes that shape definitions of the self and identity and that contribute to the formation of subjectivities and behaviors within given governing systems, groups and political contexts. The relationships between and reciprocating impact of social, economic, and political forces are explored with emphasis placed on their implications for how we understand human identity, suffering, and freedom. This is an interdisciplinary course, and students will read and discuss works from the fields of psychology, political science, sociology, philosophy, anthropology and humanities.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: