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Systematic and Historical Theology Courses (TMST) School of Theology and Ministry


Subject Area Course # Course Title Semester Credit Hours Expand
TMST 2004 Introduction to Latin I Fall 3
Course Description

This elementary course in Latin presumes no prior study of the language. Basic principles of Latin phonology, morphology and syntax will be treated in classes and reinforced by regular homework exercises and their review in class. Emphasis will be placed on the vocabulary that is proper to the various theological disciplines. This course is highly intensive and requires significant weekly work and a fair measure of independent learning.


Instructor(s): James Conn, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 2005 Introduction to Latin II Spring 3
Course Description

This is the second part of the Introduction to Latin course offered in the STM. Its objective is to enable the students to read theological, liturgical, biblical (Vulgate), and canonical texts with the help of a lexicon. It begins with unit 20 of A Primer of Ecclesiastical Latin by John F. Collins and completes the study of the textbook. The course presumes some previous study of Latin.


Instructor(s): James Conn, S.J.

Prerequisites: Intro to Latin I or equivalent.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the Latin requirement for the S.T.L. degree

TMST 2006 Intermediate Greek I Fall 3
Course Description


Instructor(s): Nicholas King, S.J.

Prerequisites: Prerequisite - A minimum of one year of basic Greek.

Cross listed with:

Comments: In this course we shall have an attentive reading of the Greek text of a range of New Testament documents with a view to hearing what they say.

TMST 2008 Introductory Latin: Summer Intensive Summer 6
Course Description

This elementary course in Latin presumes no prior study of the language. Basic principles of Latin phonology, morphology and syntax will be treated in classes and reinforced by regular homework exercises and their review in class. Emphasis will be placed on the vocabulary that is appropriate to the various theological disciplines. This course is highly intensive and requires significant weekly work and a fair measure of independent learning. Students will be expected to master the basic grammar and most common vocabulary.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Maria Kakavas

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This STM 6-credit summer course meets June 12-August 3 (Monday-Thursday) from 8:45 a.m - 11:45 a.m. Note: Given the brevity of these courses, it is essential that students come prepared to engage in learning the very first day. To facilitate this, each course has 'Pre-Class' work to complete. This generally includes reading and often requires a written essay to be submitted before or on the first day of class. See the summer course webpage: http://www.bc.edu/schools/stm/summer/summercourses.html for more information.

TMST 3351 Faith Elements in Conflicts: The Role of Theological Positions in the Fomenting or Resolution of Conflict Spring 3
Course Description

Religious differences often appear to figure in the dehumanization of enemies and rationalization of violence. This course will look at the way key concepts, such as revelation; election; and universality in various religions, especially in sectarian guise, affect the origins and progress of violent conflicts and will ask to what extent employment of these concepts betrays the religions themselves. It will also examine how far the institutional interests of religious bodies make them vulnerable to manipulation by other parties engaged in any given conflict, and how the religious elements and loyalties relate to other interests that figure in such conflicts.


Instructor(s): Raymond Helmick, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: THEO5351

Comments:

TMST 3352 Israelis and Palestinians: Two Peoples, Three Faiths Fall 3
Course Description

In 1993 the parties in the Middle Eastern Conflict came to a watershed agreement, which had eluded them earlier, to recognize one another's legitimacy as peoples. The agreement has been difficult to maintain and to withdraw and has figured massively into the turbulent events in the region since that time. This course examines how, in the whole history of the conflict, the elements of ethnicity and faith have contributed to the hatreds and resentments of these peoples and the extent to which mutual acceptance and respect at these levels of faith and ethnicity can contribute to healing the conflict.


Instructor(s): Raymond Helmick, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: THEO5352

Comments:

TMST 5554 Prophetic Tradition and Inspiration: Exploring the Hadith Fall 3
Course Description

Using English translations, this seminar surveys the ways the corpus of Prophetic hadith has inspired every area of Islamic life, including spiritual devotions and practices; theology, cosmology, and eschatology; family, social, and economic life; models of proper behavior; the interpretation of the Qur'an and sacred history; and later disciplines of Arabic learning. Seminar focuses on acquiring familiarity with the structure, contents, and uses of major Sunni hadith collections (but including representative Shiite sources) as well as later influential short collections (Nawawi, Ibn Arabi).


Instructor(s): James Morris

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: THEO5544

Comments: Supplemental Arabic reading session available.

TMST 7009 Fundamental Theology Fall 3
Course Description

The resources and methods of theology provide the framework for this course. A primary focus will be on the relationship between revelation, faith, and theology, which includes the role of the Bible and the church's doctrine. The course will also survey past and present methods in 'doing theology,' and consider the connection between theology and spirituality.


Instructor(s): Richard Lennan and Neto Valiente

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: There will be two sections of this course offered in Fall 2017 taught by Richard Lennan and Neto Valiente.

TMST 7010 Doctrine of God Fall 3
Course Description

Using classical authors and contemporary approaches, this course considers how the Christian experience and understanding of God can be authentically (re)interpreted in the context of religious pluralism and contemporary challenges to religious faith, including science and the "new atheism" and the problem of suffering and evil. Topics include the nature of religious experience and faith, the development of doctrine, divine agency, the relationship between religion and science, and Ignatian spirituality. Readings from Catherine LaCugna, Elizabeth Johnson, Karl Rahner, John Haught, J-B. Metz, John Paul II, Jon Sobrino, William Barry, and Roger Haight.


Instructor(s): Randy Sachs, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 7016 Development of Trinitarian Doctrine Fall 3
Course Description

A survey of the development of the classical Christian doctrine of God as one being who is Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Departing from the Scriptual witness, it will center on patristic documents and debates from the beginning of the second century (Origen) to the end of the fourth century (the Cappadocian Fathers and Augustine), and end with modern appropriations of classic Trinitarian doctrine in the Roman Catholic theologian, Walter Kasper, and the Orthodox theologian, Dumitru Staniloae.


Instructor(s): Khaled Anatolios

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: School of Theology and Ministry course WJ Req: Systematics

TMST 7020 The Church Fall/Spring/Summer 3
Course Description

The ecclesial dimension of Christian faith is the focal point of this course. The course will locate the church within both a Trinitarian theology and a theological anthropology. Specific topics for exploration include the place of the church in the Creed, the sacramentality of the church, a theology of mission, and of structure and authority. The course will also explore current issues shaping the church's life and its place in the wider culture.


Instructor(s): Margaret Guider, OSF and Richard Lennan

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This 3-credit course will be offered summer 2017, July 17-August 3, 2017 (Monday-Thursday) from 8:45-11:45 a.m. by Rev. Richard Lennan. This course will be offered fall 2017 by Rev. Richard Lennan and spring 2018 by Margaret Guider, OSF. Please note for summer: Given the brevity of these courses, it is essential that students come prepared to engage in learning the very first day. To facilitate this, each course has 'Pre-Class' work to complete. This generally includes reading and often requires a written essay to be submitted before or on the first day of class. See the summer course webpage: http://www.bc.edu/schools/stm/summer/summercourses.html for more information.

TMST 7024 Christology Spring/Fall/Summer 3
Course Description

This course seeks to clarify what it means to confess that Jesus of Nazareth is the Christ, and why this is a significant claim. The course examines the New Testament, the early councils of the Church, the writings of early and medieval Christian theologians, the dogmatic teachings of the Church and the contributions of contemporary theologians. Two main questions will be addressed: Who is Jesus? How does Jesus save us? Note for summer 2017: the last day to drop the course is Friday, May 26, 2017.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Barbara Radtke, Nancy Pineda-Madrid and Richard Lennan

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course will be taught summer 2017 online by Barbara Radtke. Note for Summer: each course has 'Pre-Class' work to complete, which generally includes reading and often requires a written essay to be submitted before or on the first day of class. See the summer course webpage: http://www.bc.edu/schools/stm/summer/summercourses.html for more information. This course will be taught fall 2017 by Nancy Pineda Madrid and spring 2018 by Neto Valiente.

TMST 7025 Spirituality and Justice: Twentieth Century Writings Spring 3
Course Description

This course will survey spiritual writings from the twentieth century, examining the generative themes that are suggestive for our time and foundational in the construction of a contemporary spirituality. Authors will include Thomas Merton, Evelyn Underhill, Teilhard de Chardin, Dorothy Day, Annie Dillard, Johannes Baptist Metz, and Martin Buber. The course is taught with an eye toward leadership in spiritual formation.


Instructor(s): Colleen Griffith

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 7031 Consecrated Life in the 21st Century Fall 3
Course Description

What precisely is the role and function of Consecrated Life in the church and world today in terms of its significance and influence? What are the contemporary concerns, innovations, and tensions shaping the witness, commitment and identity of consecrated persons at the present time? The course begins with a careful analysis of the evolution of classical forms of religious life and the emergence of ecclesial movements and new communities. Using ecclesial documents, theological resources, and case studies, the course examines the meaning, practice, and interpretation of the essential and distinguishing elements of various forms of Consecrated Life.


Instructor(s): Margaret Guider, O.S.F.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: School of Theology and Ministry course

TMST 7035 Root, Rite and Reason: Understanding the sacraments of the Church Fall 3
Course Description

Following an introductory section on the Catholic principle of sacramentality, this course considers, in turn, each of the seven sacraments in an attempt to appreciate the role that these Spirit-filled actions play in the Church's saving mission to witness to Jesus Christ and to proclaim the Kingdom of his God and Father until he comes again. Participants in the course will be introduced to the texts of significant authors on sacramental theology, particularly from the period following the Second Vatican Council. Course evaluation will be linked to a number of short reflection papers presented during the semester.


Instructor(s): Liam Bergin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: THEO5565

Comments:

TMST 7039 Mariology Fall 3
Course Description

How are we to account for the upsurge in interest regarding Mary both within and beyond Christian churches around the world? Mindful of this question, the course surveys the origins and development of Marian doctrine and devotion using a fourfold method of theological inquiry (dogmatic, historical, social scientific, aesthetic). Conscious of the interactive dynamics of religion, culture, politics and social change, the course examines selected themes, claims, and controversies that pertain to the contemporary study of Mary. The course also explores the significance of Marian art, music, literature, film and sites of pilgrimage for spirituality and theological imagination.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Margaret Guider, O.S.F.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 7044 The Church and Vatican II Fall 2
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 7045 Grace Spring 3
Course Description

A historical and textual examination of how some Christian thinkers have described and conceptualized the experience of grace. After considering New Testament sources, the class will examine, through lecture and discussion, the following approaches: patristic (e.g. Irenaeus, Augustine, Pelagius), medieval (Aquinas), reformation (Luther, Calvin, Trent, John of the Cross), and modern (Congar, Rahner, Balthasar, Lonergan, liberation theology). Themes to be explored include sin, forgiveness, and healing; divine initiative and human freedom; sanctification; the relationship between nature and grace; social dimensions of grace; and theologies of the Spirit.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Dominic Doyle

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 7048 The Spirituality of Liberation Summer 2
Course Description

This course will aim to clarify the meaning of the term "spirituality" as it has been developed by Peruvian theologian Gustavo Gutiérrez. For him, Christian spirituality is another term for discipleship, that is, for the particular way in which individuals and ecclesial communities decide to follow Christ. In this course we will pay special attention to the link between spirituality and (1) evangelization, (2) the transformation of human history, and (3) the struggle of justice.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): James Nickoloff and Gustavo Gutiérrez, O.P.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: In Week 1, James Nickoloff will explore the socio-historical context in which the contemporary spirituality of liberation has arisen. In Week 2, Gustavo Gutiérrez and James Nickoloff will examine the biblical figures of the prophets and Jesus as well as Church figures from more recent times who stand as witnesses to such a spirituality. School of Theology and Ministry Summer course.

TMST 7049 Spirituality of Liberation II Fall 1
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 7051 Development of Christological Doctrine Spring 3
Course Description

Jesus' question to his disciples, "Who do you say that I am?" (Mk 8:29) received a definitive response in Church doctrine only through a long and tumultuous process of development. In seeking to formulate our own responses to this question, we need to appropriate the contents of this process. The project of this course is to integrate contemporary questions with those that generated the development of christological doctrine so that we may delve deeper into the mystery of the human-divine identity of Jesus Christ.


Instructor(s): Brian Dunkle, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 7054 Introduction to Liturgy Fall 3
Course Description

To introduce the basics of liturgical theology, the course is divided into three parts: liturgical history and sources; ritual studies including art, music and environment; and liturgical practice, planning and celebration.


Instructor(s): John Baldovin, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 7056 Theological Anthropology Fall 3
Course Description

What is the Christian vision of humanity? This course examines key aspects of human life in the light of Christian revelation including: the human person as created in the image of God; finitude, suffering, and sin; forgiveness and sanctification; grace and nature; gender and sexuality; community; and Ignatian spirituality. Readings from Rahner, Balthasar, Ernest Becker, Lisa Cahill, Anne Carr, Mary Aquin O'Neill, David Kelsey, Roger Haight, Michelle Gonzalez and others.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Dominic Doyle

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 7057 Theological Foundations in Practical Perspective Fall/Summer 3
Course Description

Summer: This course covers fundamental issues and themes in the practice of Christian theology. It explores diverse theological methodologies and considers concepts such as revelation, scripture, tradition, sense of the faithful, magisterium and their roles in the transmission and reception of the Christian faith. Fall: Taught from a pastoral perspective, this course offers an overview of contemporary Christian theology, introducing basic theological themes reflected in Co-Workers e.g. the cultural context in which we do theology, God, being human, Jesus, reign of God, Church. It considers theological methods and investigates the sources that contribute constructions of theological positions.


Instructor(s): Colleen Griffith and Nancy Pineda-Madrid

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This 3-credit summer course will meet June 26-July 13, 2017(Monday-Thursday) from 8:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. It will not meet on Tuesday, July 4. M. Nancy Pineda-Madrid will teach summer 2017. Colleen Griffith will teach fall 2017. Note in the summer: Given the brevity of these courses, it is essential that students come prepared to engage in learning the very first day. To facilitate this, each course has 'Pre-Class' work to complete. This generally includes reading and often requires a written essay to be submitted before or on the first day of class. See the summer course webpage: http//www.bc.edu/schools/stm/summer/summercourses.html for more information.

TMST 7058 Sacraments in the Life of the Church Summer 3
Course Description

After exploring sacrament in its broadest sense, the meaning of sacramentality, and other fundamental elements of Roman Catholic sacramental theology, we will examine each sacrament both in its role in the life of the church as well as its role in each individual's faith journey. We will address historical background and contemporary issues about the Sacraments of Initiation, Baptism, Confirmation and Eucharist, the Sacraments of Healing, Reconciliation and the Sacrament of the Sick; and Sacraments at the Service of Communion, Marriage and Holy Orders.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Liam Bergin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This 3-credit summer 2017 course will be offered July 17-August 3, 2017 (Monday-Thursday) from 8:45-11:45 am. Note Given the brevity of these courses, it is essential that students come prepared to engage in learning the very first day. To facilitate this, each course has 'Pre-Class' work to complete. This generally includes reading and often requires a written essay to be submitted before or on the first day of class. See the summer course webpage http://www.bc.edu/schools/stm/summer/summercourses.html for more information.

TMST 7059 The Theological Virtues Spring 3
Course Description

The Church is often described as a community of faith, hope, and love. This course explores how some Christian thinkers have understood these central theological virtues. After considering New Testament sources, we will examine the following periods and thinkers: patristic (e.g. Augustine), medieval (Aquinas), reformation (Calvin), early modern (John of the Cross), and modern (Rahner, Lonergan, liberation theology). While special attention will be paid to the systematic thought of Aquinas, the goal of this course is to present a broad range of thinkers so that students can articulate their own account of these characteristic marks of Christian life.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Dominic Doyle

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 7065 Disputed Questions in Contemporary Theology Spring 3
Course Description

An introduction to contested issues in contemporary Christian theology, such as the role of biblical criticism, the relationship between science and faith, the encounter with world religions, theories of atonement, divine impassibility, and the possibility of faith in a consumer culture. The goals of this course are: (1) to map out the basic elements of each problematic area, (2) to register some popular yet unsatisfactory answers (e.g. creationism and reductionism as responses to the question of science and faith), and (3) to consider more authentic and theologically persuasive responses.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Dominic Doyle

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 7068 The Eucharist: re-creating a new world in memory of Christ Spring 3
Course Description

The Eucharist is the liturgical enactment of the saving mystery of Christ. It is a ritual that can transform the community that celebrates it to be a source of life in a broken and fragile world. This course examines the biblical roots of the Eucharist in the meal traditions of the Jewish people, in the table fellowship of Jesus, in his death on the Cross. It looks at how the Christian community has variously responded to the Lord's command to "do this in memory of me" until he comes again. The impact of historical controversies of contemporary debate is discussed.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Liam Bergin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 7069 God and the Crucified People Fall 2
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 7070 Theology for Mission&Ministry:50 Years/Vatican II Fall 2
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 7072 Religious Life:Vocation In&For the People of God Fall 1
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 7074 Finding God in All Things: Ignatian Spirituality in Theory and Practice Summer 3
Course Description

This course has three parts. First, it explores Ignatius Loyola's context and life as sources for his spirituality and introduces his writings and key spiritual themes such as inner freedom. "contemplation in action," service of others, discernment and "finding God in all things." The course will then focus particularly on the Spiritual Exercises in contemporary context - their purpose, structure and dynamic, their teaching on prayer, discernment and choice, and their approach to spiritual guidance. Finally the course will relate Ignatian spirituality to some critical issues in Church and world: social justice, gender and sexuality, global cultures, inter-religious dialogue, the environment, the future Church.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Timothy Muldoon

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course meets June 26-July 13 (Monday-Thursday) from 5:45-9:00 p.m. Note: Given the brevity of these courses, it is essential that students come prepared to engage in learning the very first day. To facilitate this, each course has 'Pre-Class' work to complete. This generally includes reading and often requires a written essay to be submitted before or on the first day of class. See the summer course webpage: http://www.bc.edu/schools/stm/summer/summercourses.html for more information.

TMST 7075 The Sacraments: A Theological Perspective Fall 2
Course Description

This course will assist participants in developing the sacramental dimension of their pastoral perspective. After exploring sacrament in its broadest sense and other fundamental elements of Roman Catholic sacramental theology, we will examine each sacrament both in its role in the life of the church as well as its role in each individual's faith journey. We will address historical background and contemporary issues about the Sacraments of Initiation - Baptism, Confirmation and Eucharist; the Sacraments of Healing - Reconciliation and the Sacrament of the Sick; and Sacraments of Vocation - Marriage and Holy Orders.


Instructor(s): Barbara Anne Radtke

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: School of Theology and Ministry course

TMST 7081 Writing and Research for Theology and Ministry Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

This course provides an introduction to writing and research for students engaged in STM degree programs. Through a series of workshops, the course will introduce students to the basics of research, developing a thesis statement, and the use of sources, as well as the different kinds of writing that STM faculty require (research papers, biblical exegeses, theological reflection papers). With an individual tutor, students will work on developing research paper that has been assigned in the current semester.


Instructor(s): Christopher Welch

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This is a year long course. Students register both fall and spring semesters and will receive 1-credit in the spring semester.

TMST 7082 Theology of Liberation Spring 3
Course Description

Latin American liberation theology traces its origins to the grassroots Christian communities that struggled for social justice in the 1960s. This course explores the distinctive way in which Latin American liberation theologians correlate their interpretation of their social context with the Christian tradition and praxis in a mutually-critical manner. We will critically examine their fundamental presuppositions, their contribution to theology, and their efforts to articulate the Christian message as an effective response against oppression and on behalf of a full human liberation. We will also incorporate some of the liberationist voices that emerge from other social and cultural situations.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Ernesto Valiente

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 7084 Classics of Early Christian Theology Spring 3
Course Description

A close study of some classic texts of early Christian theology, from the Latin, Greek, and Syriac traditions (in English translation) with attention to historical context, methodology, doctrinal contents, and relevance for contemporary theological discussion.


Instructor(s): Khaled Anatolios

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 7088 Theology of Culture Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores the relationship between theology and culture through the following questions: How do particular cultures shape Christian faith? How has the Church, for better or worse, changed (or failed to change) the various cultures into which it has been received? How are rapid advances in technology shaping culture and how should the Church respond? How do theologians navigate between their local context and global economic realities that influence all locales? How does the study of culture, which integrates the various branches of inquiry into human meaning, challenge and invigorate theological reflection?


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Dominic Doyle

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 7091 Eucharistic Theology Spring 3
Course Description

This course will reflect on the theology of the Eucharist as it has developed throughout the history of the Church, and will seek a contemporary understanding of traditional doctrines in light of Vatican II and the reformed ritual for the Eucharistic liturgy.


Instructor(s): John Baldovin, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 7094 Sacraments of Initiation Fall 3
Course Description

A scriptural, historical, theological, and pastoral study of baptism, confirmation, and first Eucharist in the Catholic and other Christian traditions.


Instructor(s): John Baldovin, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 7097 Mahayana Buddhism in East Asia Spring 3
Course Description

The bodhisattva--a wise and compassionate being dedicated to the salvation of all sentient beings--is arguably the model for and model of Buddhist practice in China, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, and, more recently, North America and Europe. This course will explore the cultic dimensions of Buddhism in East Asia--the modes of self-cultivation and worship that have revolved around the figure of the bodhisattva. Close readings of texts and images will challenge Western assumptions about what Mahayana Buddhism has been all about, and by extension, how we imagine the general categories "theology" and "religion."


Instructor(s): David Mozina

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL5387 THEO5387

Comments:

TMST 7098 Exploring the Theology of Abraham Joshua Heschel Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 7099 Faith & Conflict: Religion & Social Change in Latin American Societies Fall 3
Course Description

Liberalism was a major political influence in most of the new Latin American republics during the 19th century. During most of the 20th century, the church stood itself against modernity and fought against progressive and liberal positions. However, during the Sixties, a very important renewal in theology took place in the church. This renewal had political consequences in Latin America, where wide portions of the faithful and clergy supported progressive theology. The seminar will study the progressive theological ideas and their impact in Latin America. We will frame this discussion in the debate about secularization and modernity in the continent.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Gustavo Morello

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SOCY3342

Comments:

TMST 7100 Genocide and Film Fall 3
Course Description

An historical overview of the twentieth century tragedy of genocide and ethnic cleansing as depicted in feature films as well as documentaries. Through analysis of a series of poignant films the plight of Native Americans, the controversial Armenian Genocide, the Holocaust and its legacy, the Killing Fields of Cambodia, the Hutu-sponsored massacres in Rwanda will help grasp the driving mechanism of genocide and ethnic cleansing.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): John Michalczyk and Ray Helmick, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: FILM3343 THEO3343

Comments:

TMST 7101 Directed Reading Fall/Spring 3
Course Description


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 7102 Advanced Directed Reading Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 7103 Music and the Jesuit Tradition Spring 3
Course Description

This course views the broad and ongoing tradition of the Jesuits and music by means of a team-taught approach and including historical/archival considerations, analysis, and performance. A rich tradition with music accompanies the Jesuit mission since the founding of the Society of Jesus in 1540. Most research has concentrated on the Baroque period, but recently the late Renaissance tradition has undergone scrutiny by such scholars as Michael Noone.The course will look at many of the prominent composers who worked for the Jesuits, including a modern revival of this tradition manifested in the compositions of several Boston College composers.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): T. Frank Kennedy, S.J., Michael Noone and Christopher Willcock

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: MUSA2405

Comments:

TMST 7106 Comparative Religion: History and Methods Fall 3
Course Description

The comparative study of religions has evolved through different stages of methodological reflection since its establishment as an autonomous discipline over a century ago. Questions concerning the nature and goal of comparison and the possibilities and limits of understanding individuals belonging to other religions remain at the heart of any engagement with religious pluralism. We will explore these questions through a study of the theories of early phenomenologists of religion such as Gerardus Van der Leeuw, through the work of Mircea Eliade and his critics, and up to the contemporary approaches of figures such as Jonathan Z. Smith.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Catherine Cornille

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: THEO7443

Comments:

TMST 7108 Contextual Theologies:Faith, Praxis,and Culture in Dialogue Spring 3
Course Description

For the past half century theological reflection has been uniquely enriched by the particular contributions of U.S. Hispanic, Asian-American, and African-American Catholic theologians. Their voices successfully address major traditional questions that have driven Christian theological thought (e.g., God, Jesus, Church) in light of their particular socio-cultural circumstances and the lived experience of their communities. This course introduces students to an intercultural conversation among scholars from these three groups (who together constitute the majority of Catholics in the U.S.) on key theological questions while envisioning practical implications of their theologies for the life of the Church and its educating in faith.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Hosffman Ospino

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

TMST 7109 20th Century Jesuit Intellectual Tradition Fall 3
Course Description

A Survey of the writings of Jesuit scholars who lived and/or were published in the 20th centruy such as: Gerard Manley Hopkins; Henri Bremond; George Tyrrell; Pierre Teilhard de Chardin; Alfred Delp; Yves de Montcheuil; Karl Rahner; Henri de Lubac; William F. Lynch; Walter J. Ong; Michel de Certeau; John W. O'Malley; Roger Haight. After an initial introduction to the problem of Jesuits in Modernity, we will closely read primary texts. WJ Req: Church History


Instructor(s): Stephen Schloesser, SJ

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: School of Theology and Ministry course

TMST 7111 Jews and Christians: Understanding The Other Spring 3
Course Description

Interreligious dialogue requires interreligious understanding. This course will build a foundation for genuine dialogue between Jews and Christians by posing fundamental theological questions in a comparative context. Students will gain an understanding of the other tradition while also deepening their understanding of their own, discussing such matters as the human experience of God, the purpose of human existence, the nature of religious community, and the ways that the communities respond to challenges, both contemporary and ancient.


Instructor(s): Ruth Langer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: THEO5474

Comments: This course is an exercise in interreligious learning sponsored by the Boston College's Center for Jewish-Christian Learning.

TMST 7114 The Crisis of Confidence in the Catholic Church Spring 3
Course Description

The Catholic Church in the United States and Europe has seen declining numbers both in regular attendance and in clergy and religious life. Scandals have torn at people's allegiance, and feelings of disappointment, disillusion, and anger have become widespread. Church authorities have seemed reluctant to acknowledge or address these problems and have responded with vexation to those who raise them from the Right or Left. This course will examine the roots of this crisis of confidence in light of the nature of the Church community, its institutional structure, and the historical experiences that have brought it to this pass.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Raymond Helmick, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: THEO5519

Comments:

TMST 7115 Theology of Religions/Comparative Theology Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar will focus on the various theological positions which have been developed with regard to the reality of religious pluralism as well as on the relationship between theology of religions and comparative theology. While we will focus mainly on the works of Christian theologians, we will also pay attention to analogous developments in other religious traditions.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Catherine Cornille

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: THEO7507

Comments:

TMST 7124 Buddhist Philosophy and Spirituality Fall 3
Course Description

Focusing on early and Mahāyāna Buddhist philosophies of India with connections between concepts and spiritual practices. Buddhist versions of theological anthropology, ontology, epistemology, ethics, and soteriology are related to practices of meditation, ritual, phenomenological investigation, and philosophical analysis. Readings from classical and contemporary Buddhist writings.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): John J. Makransky

Prerequisites: Prerequisites: For undergrads, at least one prior course in philosophy or theology, and a B+ or higher average in prior humanities (non-science) courses.

Cross listed with: PHIL3503 THEO3505

Comments:

TMST 7126 Discipleship&Mission:Unfolding Futures in Ministry Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 7136 Israel in Jewish Theologies Spring 3
Course Description

Israel, both the people and the land, are central to Jewish theology as concrete manifestations of God’s covenants. This course will explore the evolving meanings of these concepts from the Bible to today, looking at themes like peoplehood, life in the land, exile from it, and (messianic) return. The second part of the course will focus specifically on the theologies of a range of modern Jewish thinkers, with the goal of helping students to understand aspects of contemporary Israel and its meaning to world Jewry.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Ruth Langer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: THEO5349

Comments:

TMST 7137 A History of the Society of Jesus Fall 3
Course Description

Since its inception in the 16th century, the Society of Jesus has emerged as a leading force in the Catholic Church, bringing about a new thrust in spirituality and religious life, and putting also its imprint on education, science and culture. We will explore the timeline of the worldwide history of the Jesuits from the foundation to our days, including the Suppression (1773) and Restoration (1814). Throughout this journey, we will encounter Ignatius Loyola, Francis Xavier, Jean de Brébeuf, Mateo Ricci, Jan Philipp Roothaan, Pedro Arrupe, as well as the themes of education, mission, inculturation, and Vatican II among others.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Andre Brouillette, SJ

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: TMHC7137

Comments:

TMST 7147 Ignatius the Theologian: An Introduction to Ignatian Spirituality Fall 3
Course Description

Ignatius Loyola did not write theological treatises, but his experience of God and its practical implications in his life and that of others reveal in his writings a coherent theological vision. Through the study of Ignatius’ works (Spiritual Exercises, Diary, Autobiography, Constitutions, Letters), and the works of later Ignatian spiritual authors and theologians (e.g., Rahner, Cusson, Barry, Arrupe), we will unravel key theological themes operative within Ignatian spirituality.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Andre Brouillette, SJ

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 7151 Introduction to Patristic Theology Fall 3
Course Description

This course presents the methods and insights of patristic treatments on the topics of theology through a study of major figures and texts. After an overview of the culture and context of the early church, we will treat patristic reflection on: Scripture, faith and reason, Christ, Trinity, the church, liturgy, ethics, and prayer. Authors and literature include, but are not limited to: Ignatius of Antioch, Justin Martyr, Irenaeus, Clement of Alexandria, The Martyrdom of Perpetua and Felicity, Origen, Tertullian, Athanasius, Basil of Caesarea, Gregory of Nazianzus, Gregory of Nyssa, Hilary of Poitiers, Ambrose, Augustine, and John Chrysostom.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 7153 Theology and Literature Fall 3
Course Description

A study of major works of Christian literature as sources for theology. We study hymns and verse from the early church, including the Odes of Solomon, the works of Ephrem, and the hymns of Ambrose, before examining the literature of the Middle Ages, including selections from Dante’s Inferno, and the poets and playwrights of the Renaissance. We conclude with major Christian novelists of recent decades, including Flannery O’Connor and Marilynne Robinson. There will be discussion on issues of form and content in theology as well as special attention to literary approaches to Christian doctrine and mystery.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Brian Dunkle, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 7158 The Trinity in the Early Church Spring 3
Course Description

An introduction to early Christian Trinitarian theology and its enduring pertinence to the Church’s worship of God as one and three, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Treating authors from Justin Martyr to John of Damascus, we explore the scriptural and philosophical features of, among other issues, the “Cappadocian solution,” the “psychological analogies” of Augustine, the roots of the filioque, and the challenge of Islam. We will consider the retrieval of patristic Trinitarian theology by recent authors, especially in light of debates on ontotheology, the immanent and the economic Trinity, and social analogies for divine perichoresis.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Brian Dunkle, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 7159 Power and Authority in the Church Summer 3
Course Description

The people of God are empowered by the Holy Spirit to participate in the church’s mission in the world. When that power is legitimate and trustworthy it yields authentic exercises of authority in service of Christian freedom. Sadly, there are too many instances in the church when power is abused and the authority proper to followers of Jesus becomes authoritarian. This course will explore the nature, scope, limits and structures of authority in the church. We will consider, in particular, the authority of the magisterium (pope and bishops), the sense of the faithful, and theologians.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Richard Gaillardetz

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This STM 3-credit summer course will meet June 27 - July 14 (Monday-Thursday) from 6:00 p.m - 9:00 p.m. Class will not meet on July 4.

TMST 7168 Philosophy of Theologians Fall 3
Course Description

This course has two aims: (1) critical study of philosophical texts that have been important in the development of Christian theological reflection; (2) investigate relations between philosophy and theology from the Classical epoch into the late 20th century. This course is designed especially for students of Theology, Ministry, and the joint MA program in philosophy and theology, but is open to all students.


Instructor(s): Brian Dunkle

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL6637

Comments:

TMST 7175 The Church and Interreligious Dialogue Spring 3
Course Description

Dialogue between religions has become one of the urgent yet intractable challenges of our time. In this course, we will focus on the engagement of the Catholic Church and Catholic theologians in interreligious dialogue. The first part of the course will deal with topical issues, such as the history of, and the theological foundations for dialogue, intermonastic dialogue, scriptural reasoning, etc. The second part will focus on the particular dialogues between Christianity and Islam, Christianity and Judaism, Christianity and Hinduism, and Christianity and Buddhism


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Catherine Cornille

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 7178 The Mystery of the Trinity Fall 3
Course Description

The course will offer the Scriptural sources, the dogmatic development and the works of contemporary theologians that have contributed to the Church’s reflection on God, One and Triune, as revealed through the life and praxis of Jesus of Nazareth. This fundamental path will permit us to offer a systematic Trinitarian theology of God as Mystery of salvation and liberation of all.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Rafael Luciani

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 7728 Contemporary Spirituality:Spirituality/Simplicity Fall 1
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 7729 Contemporary Spirituality: An Adventure in Questions Fall 1
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 8000 Theological Synthesis Spring 3
Course Description

This is the second semester of the required, six-credit course for M.Div. students in their second year of residency. The course combines reading, lectures, written reports, and discussion groups on the following topics: the church;a broad examination that includes sacramentality and ministry; Christian moral life;and creation and eschatology. Students conclude the course by writing a short synthesis of the faith in collaboration with a faculty mentor; this paper serves as the basis of a one-hour oral examination by members of the faculty.


Instructor(s): Orfilio Valiente

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Enrollment limited. Qualified students in other programs may enroll as space allows.

TMST 8001 Theological Synthesis Fall 3
Course Description

This is a required six-credit course for M.Div. students in their second year of residency and presumes a background in scripture and historical theology. It is designed to mediate an integrated and holistic understanding of Christian faith in terms of the foundational doctrines. The course combines reading, lectures, written reports, and discussion groups. Students conclude the course by writing a short synthesis of the faith in collaboration with a faculty mentor which serves as the basis of a one-hour oral examination by members of the faculty.


Instructor(s): Ernesto Valiente

Prerequisites: Department permission required.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Qualified students in other programs may enroll as space allows. Students register for TMST8000 spring semester.

TMST 8010 Medievel Liturgy Fall 3
Course Description

Liturgy in the West from Gregory the Great to the eve of the Reformation. Focus will be on the Eucharist and the Liturgical Year. Knowledge of Latin is desirable.


Instructor(s): John Baldovin, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: School of Theology and Ministry course WJ Req: Systematics

TMST 8011 Creation and Eschatology Fall 3
Course Description

How does Christian faith invites us to imagine the relationship between "this world" and "the world to come"? How does that affect the way we live and work in the world? This course explores key biblical texts, Christian doctrine, and contemporary theologies. Special attention is given to the relationship between religion and science, especially biblical hermeneutics; evolution and theology; death, judgment, heaven, and hell; the significance of Christian faith in bodily resurrection; and the biblical and theological basis for concern for the environment and a creation-centered spirituality.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): John R. Sachs, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 8012 Liturgy and Time Spring 3
Course Description

An investigation of the history, theology and spirituality of the liturgical year and the liturgy of the hours.


Instructor(s): John Baldovin, SJ

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: School of Theology and Ministry course

TMST 8014 MTS Reflection Paper Fall/Spring 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Mary Jo Iozzio

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 8016 Seminar: Global Catholicism in the Twenty-First Century Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar traces the evolution of global Catholicism in the light of demographic shifts within the Roman Catholic Church from 1910-2010. Drawing upon insights and perspectives from church history, ecclesiology, theology, world mission studies, and post-colonial theory, the seminar examines the interactive dynamics of faith and culture as it explores the transformation of Roman Catholic ecclesial consciousness in the twenty-first century. Additional resources for research and analysis include the working documents, proceedings, and outcomes of recent Special Synods as well as international, regional, and national General Conferences of Episcopal Conferences, Assemblies of Conferences of Religious, and World Youth Days.


Instructor(s): Margaret Guider, O.S.F.

Prerequisites: Foundational course in ecclesiology

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 8017 Ecclesial Ministry Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores the theology, history, and spirituality of ministry in the church. The emphasis will be on the ecclesial foundations for ministry and the relationship between ministry and the mission of all the baptized. The course will examine current issues in the theology and practice of ministry as well as the implications of ministry for the faith and practice of the minister.


Instructor(s): Richard Lennan

Prerequisites: Previous enrollment in TMST7020 The Church course.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 8018 Seminar on the Theology of Johann Baptist Metz Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar will unfold by first examining Johann Metz's early relationship and subsequent break with the theology of Karl Rahner. Next we will explore Metz's critical dialogue with the thinkers of the Frankfurt school and the manner in which this encounter led to the formulation of Metz's early political theology. We will then turn to Metz's mature political theology as a "theology after Auschwitz." Some of the themes to be considered include Metz's assertion of the need for "anamnestic rationality," his focus on "the theodicy question," his apocalyptic eschatology, and his articulation of a mystical-political spirituality.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Ernesto Valiente

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 8021 Priesthood: Theology and Praxis Fall 3
Course Description

This Level Two course is open to all students and focuses on ordained ministry of the Roman Catholic priesthood in terms of its biblical & theological foundations, historical development, contemporary issues, pastoral practice, & priestly spirituality, especially as treated in the pertinent ecclesial documents. Also treated are the cooperation between laity and clergy and the roles of lay ecclesial ministry as well as both tensions and critiques arising out of the Church's reservation of the priesthood to males and mandatory celibacy. Ecclesiology is a prerequisite for counting this course for the Ecclesial Ministry requirement in the M.Div. curriculum.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): John Baldovin, S.J.

Prerequisites: Ecclesiology

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 8022 Seminar in Practical Theology Spring 3
Course Description

Christian theology at its best is marked by the pastoral interest of serving the life of the church in the world. Necessarily, the study of the church;specifically, its nature, purpose, and mission provides a framework within which to consider the task of practical theology. The methodology and issues that distinguish practical theology flow from this larger ecclesial context. This seminar will focus on models of the church, the art of doing theology in service of the church, and some foundational themes of practical theology (e.g., hermeneutics, praxis, culture and inculturation, and our post-modern context).


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Nancy Pineda-Madrid

Prerequisites: One semester of graduate courses in theology.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 8025 Seminar: Christ, Christians, and the Religions Fall 3
Course Description

How can Christians understand the world religions as part of God's providential will to draw all people into the fullness of divine life? What can we learn from the phenomenon of interreligiousness and multiple religious belonging? How does this bear on Christian identity and the Church's mission of evangelization? This course will examine Church teaching and contemporary theology since Vatican II in order better to understand the significance, opportunities, and challenges of religious pluralism in today's world.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): John R. Sachs, S.J.

Prerequisites: Christology

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 8032 Modern Christologies Spring 3
Course Description

This course will survey some of the major works on Christology produced since the 20th century by representative theologians of the Orthodox (Sergei Bulgakov), Catholic (Von Balthasar, Rahner) and Protestant (Bultmann, Barth) traditions. There will also be a focus on alternative approaches that have emerged in modern christology, such as liberation and feminist theology and the re-appropriation of Christology in the context of contemporary pluralism.


Instructor(s): Khaled Anatolios

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: School of Theology and Ministry course WJ Req: Systematics

TMST 8033 Modern Eastern Christian Theology Spring 3
Course Description

This course will survey some major works in the canon of modern Eastern Christian thought, ranging from literature (Dostoevsky, Bakhtin) to religious philosophy (Florensky, Soloviev, Yannaras) to liturgical theology (Schmemann) to Christology and Trinitarian theology (Bulgakov, Lossky).


Instructor(s): Khaled Anatolios

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: School of Theology and Ministry course WJ Req: Systematics

TMST 8036 Feminist Theologies and the Question of Salvation Spring 3
Course Description

A critical study of the challenges and contributions to the question of salvation being offered by major feminist theologians (Shussler Fiorenza, Ruether, Johnson, Williams, Gebara, and others). We will analyze how the soteriological task gets framed, particularly in relation to suffering, to the cross, to hope, and to emancipation, as well as to other developing themes. Attention will be given to the critique and appropriation of the Christian tradition.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Nancy Pineda-Madrid

Prerequisites: One Course in Systematic Theology

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 8041 Theological Anthropology and the Body Spring 3
Course Description

Issues of embodiment relating to theology, spirituality, and ministry form the substance of this course. We will probe understandings of the body found in the historical Christian tradition and draw insights regarding human bodiliness from contemporary theology, philosophy, psychology, and social theory. Finally, we will examine the role of the body in lived Christian faith with a particular emphasis on spirituality, education, and pastoral care.


Instructor(s): Colleen Griffith

Prerequisites: Foundations or Fundamental Theology

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 8042 Spirituality and the Christian Life: Historic Traditions and Contemporary Practice Fall 3
Course Description

This course will survey historical classics, examining the generative themes that are suggestive for our time and foundational in the construction of a contemporary spirituality. Authors will include Augustine, Benedict, Francis and Clare of Assisi, Julian of Norwich, Catherine of Genoa, Ignatius of Loyola, Teresa of Avila, and John of the Cross. Thematic questions will be brought to the reading of core texts.


Instructor(s): Colleen Griffith

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: School of Theology and Ministry course

TMST 8043 Historical Spiritual Classics in Theological Perspective Fall 3
Course Description

This course will survey historical classics, examining the generative themes that are suggestive for our time and foundational in the construction of a contemporary spirituality. Authors will include Augustine, Benedict, Francis and Clare of Assisi, Julian of Norwich, Catherine of Genoa, Ignatius of Loyola, Teresa of Avila, and John of the Cross. Thematic questions will be brought to the reading of core texts.


Instructor(s): Colleen Griffith

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed the Foundations of Theology or Fundamental Theology course

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 8044 Seminar: Theology, Education and Liberation Spring 3
Course Description

What does it mean to “teach as Jesus taught,” especially in situations where human dignity is threatened and compromised by vulnerability, catastrophe, terror, uncertainty, and misery? Using the writings of Brazilian theorist Paulo Freire as a point of reference for theological inquiry and critical reflection, this course sets Freire’s insights in conversation with those of contemporary biblical scholars, theologians, educators and philosophers who believe “another world is possible.” The course examines the interconnectedness of love, hope, faith, freedom, wonder, dialogue and moral agency in promoting the Gospel of life and counteracting the “culture of death.”


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Margaret Guider, O.S.F.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 8053 M.T.S. Thesis Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Mary Jo Iozzio

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 8054 Th.M. Thesis Fall/Spring 6
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Francine Cardman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 8056 Exploring Salvation Fall 3
Course Description

For Christians, salvation remains at once something evident... and a question. Christianity is a religion of salvation, Christ is the Savior, but what does it mean to be saved? and how are we saved? In this course, we will explore the richness of the Christian notion of salvation: the various images of Christ as Savior (rooted in the New Testament), the ‘boundaries’ and parameters of salvation, the tension between the Incarnation and the Cross, the role of the Trinity in salvation, as well as the place of a human response to the salvific offer from God.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Andre Brouillette, SJ

Prerequisites: Fundamental Theology

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 8061 Theological Approaches to the Holy Spirit Spring 3
Course Description

The 20th century has witnessed a renewed interest in the theological understanding of the Holy Spirit (i.e., pneumatology) in Western Christianity. Great theologians, such as Yves Congar, Jürgen Moltmann or Hans Urs von Balthasar, have devoted important works to this enterprise. Unlike Christ, who, as the Image of God, can more easily be represented and grasped, the Holy Spirit remains an elusive—though powerful—figure of God...


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Andre Brouillette, S.J.

Prerequisites: Fundamental Theology

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 8062 Seminar: Reconciliation in A World of Conflict Fall 3
Course Description

The twentieth century's legacy is marked by social conflict and war: more than 200 million people killed because of political repression, ethnic or religious wars. Enlisting a theological lens, this seminar examines the Christian resources and contribution to the problem of reconciliation. After examining the most important secular approaches to the problem of personal and social conflict, we will focus on the main Christian theologies of reconciliation, including the works of Robert Schreiter, Miroslav Volf, John de Gruchy, and Jon Sobrino. Their theologies will be examined through individual case studies of the Balkan region, South Africa, and El Salvador.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Ernesto Valiente

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 8065 Ellacuria, Sobrino, Romero Spring 3
Course Description

Oscar Romero, Ignacio Ellacuría, and Jon Sobrino represent three leading figures in Latin American liberation theology. This seminar explores their converging theological projects, which outline a major trajectory in Catholic Theology since the Second Vatican Council. After exploring the historical and cultural context that shaped the work of these three men, we will engage on a close reading and critical evaluation of their work. Because they influence one another, we will particularly attend to those theological themes in which crosspollination has taken place: Christology, ecclesiology, soteriology and spirituality.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Neto Valiente

Prerequisites: One course of systematic theology.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 8078 Global Citizenship: Interdisciplinary Seminar Fall 3
Course Description

Today’s world is a maelstrom of cultures, languages, races, issues, perspectives, hopes, and challenges. In this course, we will look at some burning issues of our time: e.g., poverty, ecology, migration, refugees. This exploration will be achieved in an interdisciplinary manner by combining the cross-perspectives of social work, law, and theology. Special attention will be given to 'agent' - the person called to face world issues through the existential notion of mission, values, and purpose/vocation. Consideration will be given to the situation of Haiti, where the whole class will travel over the winter break for a field trip.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Andre Brouillette, S.J., Margaret Lombe and Mary Holper

Prerequisites: Students who want to take this course and the field trip it entails will be interviewed. Requirement for STM students: one year of theological studies.

Cross listed with: SCWK7790 LAWS7078

Comments: Elective

TMST 8085 The Christology of Thomas Aquinas Fall 3
Course Description

This course provides an introduction to the Christology of Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274) primarily as set forth in the Summa theologiae. Through close reading of IIIa qq. 1-59 in English translation), we will consider Aquinas's teaching on the Incarnation and Christ's life and work. The sacraments as extensions of Christ's saving work throughout time and space will also be examined. Primary sources will be supplemented by modern scholarship on various aspects of Aquinas's Christology. Throughout the course we will attend particularly to Aquinas's sources and working method as a scholastic theologian.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Franklin Harkins

Prerequisites: Christology

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 8087 Eschatology and the Kingdom of God Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines the relationship between history and eschatology through the lens of the "Kingdom of God" that is central to Jesus' preaching. It proposes a hermeneutic that will take as point of departure the church´s eschatological statements. We will examine these statements within the framework of the human historical process and the pilgrimage of God's People towards the reign of God.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Rafael Luciani and Felix Palazzi

Prerequisites: Christology

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 8101 Masters Interim Study Fall/Spring/Summer 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 8105 Discipleship and Prophetic Imagination Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar is oriented by the following two questions: What does it mean to follow Jesus within the diverse contexts in which we find ourselves today? What currently informs our theological imaginations with regard to the challenges and exigencies of mission in 2014? Using the 2007 CELAM Document of Aparecida and the 2013 Post-Synodal Apostolic Exhortation Evangelii Gaudium as ecclesial points of reference in the contemporary study of discipleship and mission, the seminar will explore the biographies and writings of selected 20th and 21st century theologians who have reflected on these themes in the light of their own experiences of living out their own Christian vocations in the Church and the world.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Margaret Guider, O.S.F.

Prerequisites: New Testament Introduction and Church

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 8500 Seminar: Current Issues in Ecclesiology Spring 3
Course Description

This course will focus on key ecclesiological issues as expressed in relevant literature and the ongoing life of the church. The aim would be to examine the genesis of the issue, the range of views expressed about it, and to explore possible resolutions. Examples of issues that would be examined include the debate over the reception of Vatican II and the relationship between episcopacy and papal primacy. NOTE: successful completion of TMST7020 The Church, or equivalent, is required for enrollment in this seminar


Instructor(s): Richard Lennan

Prerequisites: Completion of TMST7020 The Church, or equivalent.

Cross listed with:

Comments: School of Theology and Ministry course WJ Req: Systematics

TMST 8501 Theology of the Spiritual Exercises of Ignatius Loyola Spring 3
Course Description

The theology underlying the Exercises is both familiar and foreign to us today. This advanced seminar brings it into dialog with contemporary theological interpretations of key topics such as: the will of God, vocation, prayer and discernment, divine and human action, grace and human freedom. Intended for advanced students with a basic familiarity of the Spiritual Exercises. Authors include Michael Ivens, William Barry, Karl Rahner, John Macmurray, Roger Haight and William Lynch.


Instructor(s): Randy Sachs, S.J.

Prerequisites: Familiarity with Spiritual Exercises.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 8502 Seminar on the Theology of Jon Sobrino Fall 3
Course Description

Jon Sobrino is one of the leading Latin American liberation theologians and his theological project, undertaken from the perspective of the victims of history, represents a major trajectory in Catholic Theology since Vatican II. This seminar will focus on a close reading and critical evaluation of major texts authored by Sobrino with particular attention to the social context and intellectual influences that shaped his thought, the theological options he embraces or rejects, and the critical reception of his work. Areas of focus will include Sobrinos theological method, Christology, spirituality, and his most recent work on soteriology.


Instructor(s): Ernesto Valiente

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: School of Theology and Ministry course. WJ Req: Systematics

TMST 8503 Seminar: The Cross in Christian Salvation Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar will deal with the question of the salvific meaning of Christ’s suffering and death on the cross, as interpreted by major figures in the Christian tradition (including Irenaeus, Athanasius, Anselm, Aquinas, Palamas) and in modern theology (including von Balthasar, liberation theology, feminist theology, Eastern Orthodoxy, and René Girard).


Instructor(s): Khaled Anatolios

Prerequisites: Christology

Cross listed with:

Comments: School of Theology and Ministry course

TMST 8505 Seminar: Karl Rahner Spring 3
Course Description

This advanced seminar will explore the methodology and central themes of Rahner’s theology principally through detailed analysis and discussion of key essays in Theological Investigations. Intended for students with basic familiarity with Rahner’s work. Essays will be chosen on the basis of the particular interests of the participants at the first meeting of the seminar.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Richard Lennan

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Limited to 15 students

TMST 8506 Seminar: Thomas Aquinas on God Fall 3
Course Description

A close reading and systematic examination of Aquinas' doctrine of God in the prima pars of the Summa theologiae. Concurrent readings from other parts of the Summa theologiae and from other texts of St. Thomas will also be used. In addition, modern interpretations and criticisms will accompany each week’s reading from Aquinas. This seminar is an advanced course intended primarily for students in doctoral, STL, and ThM programs, as well as senior M.Div. and MTS students preparing for further research.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Dominic Doyle

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 8507 Seminar: Early Christian Ethics Spring 3
Course Description

An examination of major ethical themes and issues in early Christian life from the second through the sixth centuries (Apostolic Fathers through Gregory the Great). The goal of the seminar is to explore the range of approaches and sources for Christian ethics in this period through extensive reading and discussion of primary sources (homilies, letters, apologetic writings, ethical and theological treatises) and through seminar presentations. A final research paper allows for in-depth work on a particular figure or topic.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Francine Cardman

Prerequisites: Early church history and moral theology.

Cross listed with:

Comments: This seminar is primarily intended for STL, STD and PhD students.

TMST 8509 Seminar: Post-Modern Sacramental Theology Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar will deal with postmodern approaches to sacramental theology, especially the major work of Louis-Marie Chauvet and Sacrament, as well as the work of Jean-Luc Marion, David Power, and others.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): John Baldovin, S.J.

Prerequisites: Faculty permission required.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 8510 Seminar: Theologies of Modernity Spring 3
Course Description

This seminar will examine how some contemporary and recent Christian thinkers have made theological sense of some of the momentous transitions—intellectual, social, political, and economic—to modernity. Students will also explore the practical options for effective Christian witness and action within the modern context. The course involves close textual readings and discussion and a final research paper. Authors to be studied include Michael Buckley, Charles Taylor, Alisdair MacIntyre, Bernard Lonergan, Louis Dupr, Jeffrey Stout, Nicholas Boyle, David Tracy, George Lindbeck, and Lieven Boeve.


Instructor(s): Dominic Doyle

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

TMST 8522 Seminar: Irenaeus and Origen Spring 3
Course Description

This course will entail a close reading of some major texts by two of the most influential theologians of the early Church, Irenaeus of Lyons and Origen.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Khaled Anatolios

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 8526 PhD-STL Colloquium Fall/Spring 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): DEPT

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

TMST 8528 S.T.D. Specialized Research Fall/Spring 6
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): James Bretzke, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 8529 S.T.L. Thesis Fall/Spring 9
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Thomas Stegman, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 8530 S.T.L. Continuation Fall/Spring 0
Course Description

TBD


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 8532 Jewish Liturgy: History and Theology Fall 3
Course Description

Embedded in rabbinic prayer is a concise statement of Jewish theology. After an examination of the precursors of rabbinic prayer and of the development of the synagogue as an institution, this course will examine the structures and ideas of the prayers themselves as they have been received from the medieval world. This will create a context for a deeper discussion of some key Jewish theological concepts as well as a comparison of Jewish and Christian liturgical traditions.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Ruth Langer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: THEO5449

Comments:

TMST 8535 Mystical Poetry in the Islamic Humanities Spring 3
Course Description

Spiritual poetry and music have long been the primary cultural vehicle for the popular communication of Qur'anic teaching throughout the Islamic world. Beginning with essential background from the Qur'an and Hadith, this seminar will focus on three classics of the Islamic humanities: Attar's Language of the Birds; Rumi's Masnavi; and Hafez's lyrical poetry. Each participant will also study another major work from the Islamic humanities (in translation) from a different Muslim culture or cognate artistic forms (film, music, literature) from contemporary spiritual settings.


Instructor(s): James Morris

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: THEO5566 NELC4466

Comments: Supplemental Persian reading session available.

TMST 8539 Tibetan Buddhist Philosophy and Practice Spring 3
Course Description

Philosophical concepts and meditative and ritual practices of the Tantric Buddhism of Tibet (Vajrayana). Includes early Buddhist and Mahayana philosophical foundations of Tantric Buddhism, connections between philosophy and sacred story, nature of mind and the transformative potential of the human being, visionary practices, meditation theory, inner yogas, unities of wisdom and means, and the feminine divine in cultural context. We explore Tibetan philosophy and praxis through writings of modern Buddhist studies scholars and Tibetan lamas. Weekly writing, midterm, final papers.


Instructor(s): John J. Makransky

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: THEO3506 PHIL5509

Comments:

TMST 8540 American Pragmatism and Theology Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar will introduce students to key figures in U.S. American Pragmatism (C.S. Peirce, Josiah Royce, William James, John Dewey) who were part of its golden age dating from the 1860s to 1920s. We will examine several of the most important contributions of these philosophers. Foundational to pragmatism is the association of mind with action, which enables it to serve as a powerful theoretical resource for liberation theologies and practical theologies. A growing number of theologians in these fields are discovering its contributions. We will conclude the course reading some theological works that make use of pragmatism. This course is suited for doctoral students and upper division masters level students.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Nancy Pineda-Madrid

Prerequisites: One year of theology courses at a graduate level

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Comments:

TMST 8543 STD Pro-Seminar Fall 1
Course Description

The S.T.D. Pro-Seminar provides an introduction to the doctoral program and covers the required foundational doctoral research competencies of research readiness based on formulation, research and exposition of at least two acceptable pieces scholarly writing (including proper application of the University Chicago Manual of Style), and successfully passing the foreign language requirement of the S.T.D. program, based on reading comprehension of several articles selected that have a direct bearing on the student’s own research agenda.


Instructor(s): James Bretzke, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Pass/Fail course

TMST 8544 Seminar: Teresa of Avila Fall 3
Course Description


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Andre Brouillette, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Canonized in 1622, declared a Doctor of the Church in 1970, St. Teresa of Avila (1515-1582) is a woman whose importance for the Church is paramount. Her works reveal an ingenuous and forceful personality, as well as a most fascinating experience of God. In this seminar at the crossroads of theology, spirituality and history, we will read large parts of Teresa’s works (e.g., the Autobiography, and the Interior Castle). Alongside a linear reading of those texts, some themes would be explored which criss-cross this corpus. (Note: some knowledge of Spanish would be helpful, but not required).

TMST 8546 STD Colloquium Spring/Fall 0
Course Description


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): James Bretzke, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

TMST 8548 Tradition Spring 3
Course Description

This seminar examines a prominent theme in Catholic theology. The seminar will chart the shifts in theologies of tradition through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. There will also be a focus on contemporary theologies of tradition, as well as feminist and other critiques of tradition. The initial focus will be on interpretations of tradition from the period before Vatican II(Newman, Blondel, Congar, and Ratzinger). The seminar will also explore Vatican II’s contribution to the theology of tradition and the theologies that have followed the council. The place of “reception,” “creativity,” and the “development of doctrine,” will also be examined.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Richard Lennan

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

TMST 8552 Ambrose of Milan Fall 3
Course Description

This course presents the life and thought of Ambrose of Milan (c.340–397). By considering his cultural formation, theological project, and major struggles and achievements, we will come to know Ambrose as a singular, yet representative, figure in the early church: “The most Roman of the Fathers” (Dawson) who borrowed extensively from the Greeks; a major player in matters of church and state; a biblical exegete; a liturgist and poet; and an original and creative theologian.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Brian Dunkle, SJ

Prerequisites: Some introduction to early Christianity.

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Comments:

TMST 8555 Latin West and Greek East: From Nicaea to the Fall of Constantinople Fall 3
Course Description

The course involves informed discussion of source texts referring to the main events and topics in theological relations between Latins and Greeks from the fourth to the fifteen century: from the “golden” conciliar age to early debates/schisms, especially on the filioque and azymes; iconoclasm; the so-called “Schism of 1054”; Innocent III and the Fourth Crusade; medieval theologians and their attitudes towards Byzantine theology and culture; Byzantine humanists and latinophrones of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries; the Council of Florence (1439), its achievements and failures. We focus on ecclesial self-understanding of the emerging Churches, and their respective perception of a theological and cultural “other.” Special emphasis will be placed upon the developments in attitudes to sacraments, doctrine, and authority. The course will conclude with reflection on the implications for ecumenical dialogue and current ecclesiology.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Brian Dunkle, S.J.

Prerequisites: One graduate course in historical theology.

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Comments:

TMST 8557 Theology of the People in the Teaching of Pope Francis Spring 3
Course Description

This seminar explores the connection between Pope Francis’ theological-pastoral options and the "theology of the people," which is a type of Latin American liberation theology. We will demonstrate how Francis consistently enlists a theological method that understands pastoral ministry and academic theology as a unity that takes as its focus of reflection the culture of the poor. Using an integrated historical, theological, and pastoral approach, we will examine concepts such as "people", "option for the poor", “popular pastoral", and the "mystic of living together." We will also study how these concepts can be understood in other contexts beyond Latin American.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Rafael Luciani

Prerequisites: Fundamental Theology or Foundations of Theology

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TMST 9901 Ph.D. Comprehensive Examinations Fall/Spring 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

TMST 9911 Ph.D. Continuation Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Jane Regan

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

TMST 9998 STD Comprehensives Spring 6
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Margaret Eletta Guider, OSF

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: School of Theology and Ministry--EFBC course