Skip to main content

Theology Courses (THEO) College of Arts and Sciences


Subject Area Course # Course Title Semester Credit Hours Expand
THEO 1001 Biblical Heritage I Fall 3
Course Description

The Bible has been an influential and often fundamental source for many modern, Western views of God, nature, human beings, a just society, and the origin and destiny of humanity and the world. An intelligent, serious reading of the Bible raises most of the perennial questions that have traditionally stood at the center of philosophical and theological debate. Thus, a thorough analysis of Biblical texts in terms of the central concerns of the Core curriculum will be the primary goal of the Biblical Heritage.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: You must take both sections of Biblical Heritage (THEO1001 and THEO1002) to receive Core credit. There are no exceptions.

THEO 1002 Biblical Heritage II Spring 3
Course Description

The Bible has been an influential and often fundamental source for many modern, Western views of God, nature, human beings, a just society, and the origin and destiny of humanity and the world. An intelligent, serious reading of the Bible raises most of the perennial questions that have traditionally stood at the center of philosophical and theological debate. Thus, a thorough analysis of Biblical texts in terms of the central concerns of the Core curriculum will be the primary goal of the Biblical Heritage course.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: THEO1001

Cross listed with:

Comments: You must take both sections of Biblical Heritage (THEO1001 and THEO1002) to receive Core credit. There are no exceptions.

THEO 1016 Introduction to Christian Theology I Fall 3
Course Description

This is a two-semester course that fulfills the Theology core requirement. This sequence of courses considers significant questions in conversation with some of the most important writings in the tradition of Western Christian thought. Its purpose is to encourage students by drawing systematically on primary sources of historical significance to uncover the roots of the Christian faith and life and to delineate the values for which this tradition of faith stands. Students considering a minor course of study in the Faith, Peace, and Justice Program will find this course of special interest.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This is a year long course where you must take both sections of Introduction to Christian Theology (THEO1016 and THEO1017) first Part I, then Part II to receive Core credit. There are no exceptions.

THEO 1017 Introduction to Christian Theology II Spring 3
Course Description

This is a two-semester course that fulfills the Theology core requirement. This sequence of courses considers significant questions in conversation with some of the most important writings in the tradition of Western Christian thought. Its purpose is to encourage students by drawing systematically on primary sources of historical significance to uncover the roots of the Christian faith and life and to delineate the values for which this tradition of faith stands. Students considering a minor course of study in the Faith, Peace, and Justice Program will find this course of special interest.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Must take THEO1016 Introduction to Christian Theology I

Cross listed with:

Comments: This is Part II of a year long course where you must take both sections of Introduction to Christian Theology (THEO1016 and THEO1017) first Part I, then Part II to receive Core credit. There are no exceptions.

THEO 1023 Exploring Catholicism: Tradition and Transformation Fall 3
Course Description

This course is a two-semester exploration of the vision, beliefs, practices, and challenge of Catholicism. The first semester explores human existence as lived in the light of the Mystery of God and the gift of Jesus Christ. The second semester considers the Church as the people of God, gathered and sent forth in the Spirit; the sacraments as catalysts of ongoing transformation in Christ; and the challenge of the spiritual life today. Close analysis of passages from the Bible will be supplemented by readings from contemporary theologians, literary figures, and social commentators.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This is a year long course where you must take both sections of Exploring Catholicism (THEO1023-1024) first Part I, then Part II to receive Core credit. There are no exceptions.

THEO 1024 Exploring Catholicism: Tradition and Transformation II Spring 3
Course Description

A two-semester exploration of the vision, beliefs, practices, and challenge of Catholicism. The first semester explores human existence lived in the light of the Mystery of God and the gift of Jesus Christ. The second semester considers the Church as the people of God, gathered and sent forth in the Spirit, the sacraments as catalysts of ongoing transformation in Christ, and the challenge of the spiritual life today. Close analysis of passages from the Bible will be supplemented by readings from contemporary theologians, literary figures, and social commentators.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Must take THEO1023 Exploring Catholicism: Tradition and Transformation I

Cross listed with:

Comments: This is Part II of a year long course where you must take both sections of Exploring Catholicism: Tradition and Transformation I & II (THEO1023-THEO1024) first Part I, then Part II to receive Core credit. There are no exceptions.

THEO 1037 Introduction to Modern Hebrew I Fall 3
Course Description

A course for beginners in Hebrew with attention to modern Israeli. The course is intended to develop the ability to read a variety of Hebrew texts and other Hebrew prose and poetry and to set a foundation for both conversational and compositional skills. As part of the learning, students will be exposed to modern Israeli culture. No previous knowledge of Hebrew is assumed.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Gil Chalamish

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: NELC1211

Comments: The course continues in second semester as NELC1212 (SL038).

THEO 1038 Introduction to Modern Hebrew II Spring 3
Course Description

The second semester of a course for beginners in Hebrew, with attention to modern Israeli. The course is intended to develop the ability to read Hebrew texts and other Hebrew prose and poetry and to set a foundation for both conversational and compositional skills. As part of their learning, students will be exposed to modern Israeli culture.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Gil Chalamish

Prerequisites: NELC2211 (SL037/TH037) Continuing Modern Hebrew I or equivalent

Cross listed with: NELC1212

Comments:

THEO 1081 Continuing Modern Hebrew I Fall 3
Course Description

Continued work in the study of modern Israeli Hebrew and the reading and comprehension of texts of moderate difficulty. The course continues in second semester as NELC2212 (SL082).


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Gil Chalamish

Prerequisites: NELC1212/THEO1038 Introduction to Modern Hebrew II

Cross listed with: NELC2211

Comments:

THEO 1082 Continuing Modern Hebrew II Spring 3
Course Description

Continued work in the study of modern Israeli Hebrew and the reading and comprehension of texts of moderate difficulty.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Gil Chalamish

Prerequisites: NELC2211/THEO1081 (SL081/TH081) Contining Modern Hebrew I or equivalent

Cross listed with: NELC2212

Comments: Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency requirement.

THEO 1088 Person and Social Responsibility I Fall 3
Course Description

The course requirements include ten to twelve hours per week of community service. In light of classic philosophical and theological texts, students in this course address the relationship of self and society, the nature of community, the mystery of suffering and the practical difficulties of developing a just society. PULSE students are challenged to investigate the insights offered by their readings in relationship to their service work. Places in the course are very limited.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL1088

Comments: Enrollment limited to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors

THEO 1089 Person and Social Responsibility II Spring 3
Course Description

See description under PHIL1088.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL1089

Comments: Enrollment limited to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors

THEO 1090 Perspectives on Western Culture I/Perspectives I Fall 3
Course Description

The course introduces students to the Judeo-Christian Biblical texts and to the writings of such foundational thinkers as Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Luther, Bacon, Descartes, Hobbes, Locke, Kant, Hegel, and Kierkegaard. The first semester considers the birth of the self-critical Greek philosophic spirit, the story of the people of Israel, the emergence of Christianity and Islam, and concludes with a consideration of medieval explorations of the relationship between faith and reason. Attention will also be paid to non-Western philosophical and theological sources.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL1090

Comments: Freshmen only

THEO 1091 Perspectives on Western Culture II/Perspectives II Spring 3
Course Description

See description under PHIL1090.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL1091

Comments: Freshmen only

THEO 1107 Religion in Africa Fall 3
Course Description

The course is designed to introduce the variety of African religious experiences within the context of world religions. The significance and contents of Africism as the African autochthonal religion will be outlined. Heterochthonal religions to Africa will be discussed. These include the following: Middle East originating religions, like Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, and those originating in India, like Hinduism, Jainism, Sikhism, and Parseeism. While emphasis will be laid on the impact religion has had on African communities within the context of peace and justice in the world, the course will also consider the role of Africism in a changing Africa.


Instructor(s): Aloysius M. Lugira

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: AADS1120

Comments:

THEO 1108 Christianity in Africa Spring 3
Course Description

This course is intended to give a historically interdisciplinary bird's-eye-view of Christianity in Africa. While Christianity in general will be touched upon, emphasis will be laid on the development and extension of the Christian tradition in Africa. The three stages within which Christianity has so far been established in Africa will be discussed. Finally, the response Christianity has received in Africa will be considered for the purpose of visualizing the future role of Christianity in a changing Africa.


Instructor(s): Aloysius M. Lugira

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: AADS1121

Comments:

THEO 1161 The Religious Quest: Comparative Perspectives I Fall 3
Course Description

The Religious Quest explores the individual and communal search for wisdom about human nature, the world, ultimate realities and God, secrets of love and death, enduring values to live by, and paths to spiritual maturity. Although each section is different, likely themes include symbols, myths, doctrines, rituals, holy texts, saints, comparisons and contrasts among traditions, relevance of classical religious traditions to issues in today's world, interreligious dialogue today, and religious diversity in the Boston area. Each section brings the Biblical and Christian tradition into conversation with at least one other religious tradition.


Instructor(s): Cornille-Hinduism , DeLongBas-Islam, Makransky-Buddhism, Morris-Islam & Judaism, Mozina - Daoist, Buddhist, Confucian, VanZandt-Collins-Islam, Langer-Judaism and Slater-Judaism

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Religious Quest courses present Christianity and at least one other world religious tradition. Students are strongly encouraged to take both semesters of the same Religious Quest class. If circumstances require switching sections, students need permission of the instructor of the spring term course and may be asked to do additional background reading and writing for the religious tradition(s) not covered in their first semester of the course. You must take both sections of the Religious Quest I and II (THEO1161-1162) first Part I, then Part II to receive Theology Core credit. There are no exceptions.

THEO 1162 The Religious Quest: Comparative Perspectives II Spring 3
Course Description

The Religious Quest explores the individual and communal search for wisdom about human nature, the world, ultimate realities and God, and secrets of love and death, as well as enduring values to live by and paths to spiritual maturity. Although each section is different, likely themes include symbols, myths, doctrines, rituals, holy texts, saints, comparisons and contrasts between traditions, relevance of classical religious traditions to issues in today's world, interreligious dialogue today, and religious diversity in the Boston area. Each section brings the Biblical and Christian tradition into conversation with at least one other religious tradition.


Instructor(s): DeLongBas-Islam, Langer-Judaism, Makransky-Buddhism, Morris-Judaism & Islam, Mozina-Daoism, Cornille-Hinduism, VanZandt-Collins-Islam and Slater-Judaism

Prerequisites: You must take THEO1001 Religious Quest: Comparative Perspectives I for Theology core credit.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Religious Quest courses present Christianity and at least one other world religious tradition. Students are strongly encouraged to take both semesters of the same Religious Quest class. If circumstances require switching sections, students need permission of the instructor of the spring term course and may be asked to do additional background reading and writing for the religious tradition(s) not covered in their first semester of the course. You must take both sections of the Religious Quest I and II (THEO1161-THEO1162) first Part I, then Part II to receive Theology Core credit. There are no exceptions. Please see specific instructor's section for additional information.

THEO 1174 Islamic Civilization Fall 3
Course Description

This course introduces the varieties of Islamic civilization from the seventh century to the modern world. It explores not only the tenets of faith and practice, and political, social, theological, and economic history, but also considers Muslim cultural and intellectual contributions, including by women, from Indonesia to Morocco and in the Western world. Students will read primary sources, listen to recordings, and view films. The course will emphasize the variety of experiences of Muslims and their contributions to the world.


Instructor(s): David DiPasquale

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HIST2101 ICSP1199

Comments:

THEO 1198 The Language of Liturgy Fall 3
Course Description

The application of structural techniques to an analysis of liturgical form both in the poetic-religious context of the language of worship and in the more broadly based systems of non-verbal symbolism (music, gesture, vestments, and appointments). Principal focus on Roman, Anglican, and Eastern Orthodox liturgies.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): M.J. Connolly

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: LING2321 HONR4935

Comments:

THEO 1206 Relationships: A Way to Know God Spring 3
Course Description

The search for intimacy is a major developmental task of young adulthood. Intimacy is multi-faceted and includes not only sexual attraction and expression but the whole range of interpersonal relationships that serve to fulfill this deep longing of the human spirit. Intimacy with God is mediated through other people. How do we experience the unseen God through those who we see and know? A variety of relationships in life will be examined in order to explore our own religious and psycho-sexual development. Of special concern will be seeing our search for intimacy as deeply connected to our seeking of God.


Instructor(s): Joseph Marchese

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 1223 Saints and Sinners Summer 3
Course Description

TBD


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Boyd Taylor Coolman

Prerequisites: $fields.get("kuali.reqComponent.field.type.value.freeform.text")

Cross listed with:

Comments: The course is of special interest to students participating in the programs of International Studies; Faith, Peace, and Justice Studies; and Latin American Studies.

THEO 1224 Turkey at the Crossroads Summer 3
Course Description

This month-long summer course will examine a wide array of issues at the intersection of religion and public life in Turkey today. We begin with historical background crucial to understanding contemporary debates about Turkish culture, identity and politics. The core of the course is a focused study of the recent transition from strict secularism to what many describe as “moderate Islamism” as the dominant cultural and legal norm; we will investigate this transition in law, education, religion and politics. We close the course with case studies that illustrate the challenges Turkey faces in managing this transition while dealing with transitions in the European Union, the MENA region, and its relationship with the United States and Israel.


Instructor(s): Erik Owens

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ICSP1224 INTL1224

Comments:

THEO 1226 Religion, Racial Justice, and Reconciliation in South Africa Summer 3
Course Description

We will begin the course in Cape Town and then move to Pretoria for the remainder of the course. We will cover the following topics: key points in the history of South Africa; religious perspectives on apartheid; intellectual and armed conflict; fifty years of American foreign policy toward South Africa; Desmond Tutu and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission; reparations, forgiveness, trauma and healing; economic empowerment, gender. justice and religion; refugees, migrants, and xenophobia; HIV/AIDS; Christians-Jews-Muslims in South Africa; community organizing and economic justice


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: INTL1226 AADS1226

Comments: The course requirements and evaluations are based on the following: daily journal and reflection pieces; class participation; and a final paper. For the duration of the program, the class will meet from 9:00 am to approximately 1:00 pm in the arranged classroom followed by lunch and an afternoon excursion.

THEO 1285 Voices, Visions and Values Spring 3
Course Description

A primary source for Americans to derive meaning and purpose in their lives is work. Career and professional advancements alone do not seem to be sufficient in creating a life that captures the human spirit and makes a difference in the world. Leadership is the practical activity of those who would compose an adulthood that is responsible to a world larger than themselves, and at the same time personally fulfilling. This course will use fictional and non-fictional voices as well as psycho/social analysis, cultural critique, and theological/spiritual concepts to help envision a balanced life.


Instructor(s): Joseph Marchese

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 1310 Mentoring and Leadership Seminar Fall 3
Course Description

By arrangement with professor.


Instructor(s): Joseph Marchese

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 1341 Peaceful Conflict Resolution Methods Fall 3
Course Description

This course considers conflict resolution methods in several different types of contexts: personal and family, organizational and work, international peace-making. Among the methods analyzed and practiced in role playing exercises are: methods for resisting win-lose behaviors, methods for developing win-win solutions to conflicts, dialogic methods for developing creative solutions to conflicts, and third party facilitation, mediation, and arbitration methods. Personal skill development as well as careers in conflict resolution are explored. In addition, different types of personal philosophical and spiritual approaches to conflict resolution are considered.


Instructor(s): Richard Nielsen

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: UNAS1162

Comments:

THEO 1342 Peaceful Ethics: Social Action Leadership Methods Spring 3
Course Description

The course focuses on methods we can use individually and together in addressing ethics issues and in helping to build and maintain ethical communities and organizations within different types of political-economic environments and realities. Methods considered include: ethics reasoning, dialogue, and persuasion methods; win-win negotiating and incentive methods; win-lose, nonviolent forcing and compliance methods; internal due process and governance methods; and alternative institution building and social movement methods.


Instructor(s): Richard Nielsen

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: UNAS1163

Comments:

THEO 1361 Praying Our Stories Fall 3
Course Description

Significant experiences of God's presence are often thought of as extraordinary. They are moments we might expect while on retreat, during community worship, or while sitting under the stars. We might assume that to find God we must transcend our mundane life and get to another place. This course will explore how God is in fact more likely, and thankfully, discovered in the ordinary. Ignatian spirituality does not distinguish between secular and sacred, work and prayer, or God and "real life." Instead, it is about finding God in our lived experience and cooperating with God to transform that experience.


Instructor(s): Daniel Ponsetto

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 1383 The Christian East: Orientale lumen Spring 3
Course Description

The spirituality and traditions of Eastern Christianity across places and times. The worlds of Eastern Orthodoxy, Oriental Orthodoxy, and the Catholic Eastern Churches in their doctrine and practice. Liturgy and ritual; iconography and architecture; music, chant and hymnography; languages, social order, and ethnicity; history and the present. With emphasis on Byzantine Greek, Syrian, and Slavonic usages and the Armenian church, but not neglecting the Nestorian churches and Coptic and Ethiopian Christianity.


Instructor(s): M.J. Connolly

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: CLAS2268 LING2383 NELC2065

Comments:

THEO 1700 Theological Inquiry Fall 3
Course Description

This course introduces students to the study of theology in an academic setting. With a focus on theology as a process of open-ended inquiry, the course explores such topics as God, faith, symbol, doctrine, reason, transcendence, love, suffering, death, and the cultivation of spiritual and ethical practices in view of human flourishing. While working primarily within the Judeo-Christian tradition, the course draws upon insights from other religious traditions as well as other academic disciplines. One part of a two-course sequence: students taking this course will enroll in a Core Renewal Theology course in the other semester of the academic year.


Instructor(s): Brian Robinette

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: One part of a two-course sequence: students taking this course will enroll in a Core Renewal Theology course during the other semester of the academic year.
For Freshmen Only

THEO 1701 Spiritual Exercises:Engagement, Empathy,Ethics Spring 3
Course Description

This course introduces students to a variety of “spiritual exercises” that have helped shape the Christian theological traditions of the East and West. Focusing on figures and texts from antiquity to the current era, such a study presupposes that theology is not merely a theoretical enterprise but a way of life. Drawing upon insights from other disciplines (e.g., philosophy, psychology, the arts) as well other religious traditions, the course highlights the perceptual, emotional, and cognitive transformation of the human person—or what Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Jesuits, called “care for the whole human person” (cura personalis).


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Brian Robinette

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed THEO1700

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal Course:Enduring Questions
For Freshmen Only

THEO 2160 The Challenge of Justice Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course introduces the student to the principal understandings of justice that have developed in the Western philosophical and theological traditions. Care is taken to relate the theories to concrete, practical and political problems, and to develop good reasons for choosing one way of justice rather than another. The relationship of justice to the complementary notion of peace will also be examined. Special attention is paid to the contribution of Catholic theology in the contemporary public conversation about justice and peace. Problems discussed may include human rights, hunger and poverty, and ecological justice.


Instructor(s): Matthew Mullane and Meghan Sweeney

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL1160

Comments: This course satisfies the introductory requirement for students taking the minor in Faith, Peace, and Justice Studies. Other students interested in examining the problems of building a just society are welcome.

THEO 2210 Introduction to Asian Religious Traditions Spring 3
Course Description

This course introduces students to selected classics in Confucian, Daoist, and Buddhist traditions of thought and practice. No prerequisites or experience in Asian studies, theology, philosophy, or history is necessary.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): David Mozina

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 2231 The Bible and Ecology Spring 3
Course Description

In this course we will: (1) identify and analyze a variety of Biblical understandings of how humans relate to nature, from the Genesis creation accounts to St. Paul's notion of a liberated creation; (2) evaluate the influences of these Biblical ideas on current trends in theology, ethics, and ecology; and (3) explore ways in which religious world views hinder and/or enhance efforts to protect and preserve the environment.


Instructor(s): John Darr

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 2241 Roman Religion Fall 3
Course Description

The Romans lived in a world full of gods; religion affected every part of Roman life, from politics to warfare to entertainment. Christianity took shape within this world, and Roman religion, especially the mystery cults, has often been regarded as a model for the early church. Yet the Roman concept of ‘religion’ has very little in common with modern, Judeo-Christian-influenced notions. In this class we will explore the theory and practice of religion in the ancient Roman world, as reflected in ancient literary texts, as well as in epigraphic and archaeological evidence. Themes include the nature of Roman worship, from state cult to magic and mysteries, the interplay between religion and politics, and the development of Christianity in its pagan context.


Instructor(s): Kendra Eshleman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HIST4211 CLAS2242

Comments:

THEO 2290 The Problem of Belief in Modernity Fall 3
Course Description

The various critiques of religion that have emerged since the Enlightenment have raised issues which call into question the possibility of Christian faith. This course will explore several of those issues (especially regarding the doctrines of God, creation, incarnation, and grace) in order to appreciate the truth and relevance of the critiques. It will then consider how responsible persons today can express the Christian faith in such a way as to take account of the critiques.


Instructor(s): Michael Himes

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 2291 Philosophy and Theology of Community I Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar explores the nature of community, with particular focus on community in the American context. Some of the central historical, cultural, political and religious forces that have shaped both American community and the American understanding of community are examined. These questions are initially approached from an historical perspective with an assessment of philosophical ideas which were dominant in the political thinking of the American founders. The seminar then considers the historical development of those ideas in light of the way they are concretized in political practice, arriving at an assessment of contemporary American thinking on community.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Meghan T. Sweeney

Prerequisites: Limited to Members of the PULSE Council

Cross listed with: PHIL2291

Comments:

THEO 2292 Philosophy and Theology of Community II Spring 3
Course Description

This course is a continuation of the themes of Philosophy of Community I which further explores the themes of that course: the nature of community, particularly in the American context; the historical, cultural, political and religious forces that have shaped American community and the American understanding of community.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Meghan T. Sweeney

Prerequisites: Limited to Members of the PULSE Council

Cross listed with: PHIL2292

Comments:

THEO 2294 Cultural and Social Structures II Spring 3
Course Description

This course is a continuation of the themes developed in Culture and Social Structures I, with the focus on American culture in particular and on more specifically contemporary issues.


Instructor(s): Meghan T. Sweeney

Prerequisites: Membership on PULSE Council

Cross listed with: PHIL2294

Comments:

THEO 2309 Liberation Theology Fall 3
Course Description

This course will examine the Latin American liberation theology movement, its historical development and principal theological themes, and implications for North American Christianity. Topics to be addressed include, among others, the preferential option for the poor, the influence of Catholic social teaching on liberation theology, the role of the social sciences in theological method, spirituality of liberation, and critiques of liberation theology.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Roberto Goizueta

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 2327 Perspectives on War, Aggression, and Conflict Resolution I Fall 3
Course Description

This course develops an interdisciplinary approach to the study of war and conflict and investigates alternatives to their resolution in contemporary global society. The course is organized along multidisciplinary lines, with faculty members from various academic departments responsible for each topic of discussion. This interdisciplinary approach demonstrates the varied and complex perspectives on the causes of war and conflict and attempts to develop, out of the resources of these respective disciplines, intelligent insights into the resolution of conflicts, and the development of alternatives to war.


Instructor(s): Matthew Mullane

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL2259 SOCY2250

Comments: The Faith, Peace, and Justice Program at Boston College sponsors this course as an introduction to the field of Peace Studies.

THEO 2384 Church Latin Fall 3
Course Description

A rapid yet thorough coverage of the grammar of Ecclesiastical Latin, with associated readings in liturgical, scriptural, devotional, doctrinal and procedural texts of the Roman Catholic Church. A look at underlying linguistic structures of Latin, ironing out seeming irregularities and aiding in vocabulary building. 
 For students with little or no background in Latin. Non-novices may also enroll for grammar review and for extensive text reading practice, with the expectation that they will also meet higher demands and serve to tutor beginners.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): M. J. Connolly

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: LING2384 CLAS2384

Comments:

THEO 2397 Dwelling between East and West Summer 3
Course Description

Venice and Islam: a theological and philosophical meditation on the role that Byzantine and Islamic architecture play in helping to dwell contemplatively in the city.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Brian Braman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL2397

Comments:

THEO 2406 Literary & Religious Traditions of India Spring 3
Course Description

India is home to some of the oldest and most vibrant religious and spiritual traditions in the world, including Hinduism, Islam, Christianity, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, and Zoroastrianism. This religious plurality has generated a highly syncretic society, hosting a variety of discourses on the most basic questions of humanity articulated through ritual, mythology, art, and festivals. In this course we will read a variety of texts: mythology, folklore, modern fiction, as well as accounts by western travellers on the place of the sacred in India in order to understand how religious belief impacts social and political life in India today.


Instructor(s): Kalpana Seshadri

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL4406

Comments:

THEO 2410 Capstone: One Life, Many Lives Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course gives you the chance to review what you have made of your education and preview your long-term life commitments to work, relationships, community, and spirituality. We read fiction, psychology, sociology, and wisdom figures to find the deeper continuity underlying our many experiences. Students lead discussions, conduct interviews of working people, and cap off their Capstone by writing their own autobiography.


Instructor(s): James Weiss

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: UNCP5500

Comments: Capstone classes cannot be taken Pass/Fail. You may take only one Capstone class before graduation. This Capstone is designed for students who have engaged in service projects during college and want to reflect on that as they plan their future lives. The service projects may have been through BC (Pulse, 4Boston, Arrupe, service trips, etc.) or on their own in Boston, the USA, or abroad. Please contact Fr. Weiss to enroll: weissj@bc.edu or 617 552 3897.

THEO 2468 Introduction to Asian Philosophy Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines the three streams of thought that make up the core of East Asian philosophy: Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism. In the wisdom literature of these three "Ways," one finds the critical articulation of views about the nature of reality and about how one ought to live. An important theme common to all three teachings in this regard is the emphasis on learning as a process of self-transformation through self-effort in ordinary existence.


Instructor(s): David W. Johnson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL4468

Comments: This course has no prerequisites and does not assume any background in Asian philosophy, but a final research paper will be required.

THEO 2509 Black Theology Fall 3
Course Description

This course interrogates some of the ways in which biblical teaching and religious doctrine interact with race, simultaneously to impede and to facilitate cultural, social, and existential liberation. Emphasis may be placed on the cultural and social context in which black theologies emerge.


Instructor(s): M. Shawn Copeland

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 2523 Capstone: Telling Our Stories, Living Our Lives Fall 3
Course Description

Our lives take shape and meaning from the stories that we tell ourselves about what it means to be a man or a woman, what is worth doing in a life, and who or what is ultimately valuable and trustworthy. In this course, we shall investigate our own life narratives by looking at significant myths that derive from religion, culture, and our families. We shall read works in developmental psychology, cultural anthropology, and narrative theology. We shall also use selected fiction and film.


Instructor(s): H. John McDargh

Prerequisites: Enrollment restricted to seniors only.

Cross listed with: UNCP5523

Comments:

THEO 2533 Modern Catholic Social Teaching Spring 3
Course Description

This course will be an historical and analytical investigation of the church's official social teaching. The focus will be on the major texts from papal and episcopal sources. The aim of the course will be to understand the social and ecclesial contexts in which the documents were written and the development of the main themes comprising the Catholic social tradition.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kenneth Himes, O.F.M.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 2800 Race, Freedom, and the Bible in America Fall 3
Course Description

Discourse about American identity, purpose, and ethics has drawn on Scripture for its themes, terms, and claims to authority, from the nation's political genesis as a refuge for English Puritans to its current incarnation as "secular sanctuary" of ethnic and religious pluralism. This team-taught course surveys uses of the Bible and other "American Scriptures" in discourse on race and civil rights, focusing on its use by political opponents. Assigned readings, essays, and discussions will survey specific meanings that scriptures have acquired at critical historical moments, and what the multiplication of interpreters, methods, and meanings implies for prospects for unity.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Joel Kemp and Yonder Gillihan

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 2900 Discussion Group for THEO2800 Fall 0
Course Description

Discussion group for Race, Freedom and the Bible in America


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): JOEL KEMP and YONDER GILLIHAN

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 3001 Hinduism: Past & Present Spring 3
Course Description

One of the oldest, and one of the more complex religions, Hinduism continues to take on new and diverse expressions in the contemporary world. This course will focus on modern developments within Hinduism in light of its ancient history. It will deal with questions of the status of women, caste, mega-gurus, nationalism, and internationalization in relation to the traditional texts, teachings and practices of Hinduism.


Instructor(s): Catherine Cornille

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 3004 Aquinas: His Theology and His Influence Spring 3
Course Description

This course offers an introduction to the theology of Thomas Aquinas through an extensive reading of his Summa Theologiae. It investigates the development and content of Aquinas’ doctrines of God, the Trinity, creation, sin, grace, the virtues, Christology, redemption, and the Sacraments, with particular attention given to the biblical, patristic, and philosophical sources of his thought and the contemporary theological significance of his contributions.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 3116 Medieval Religions and Thought Spring 3
Course Description

The medieval world of philosophy and theology was a multicultural world: Arabian, Jewish, and Christian thinkers from the three great religious traditions adopted, adapted, and shared the philosophical riches of the classical world and the religious resources of the biblical heritage. This course introduces students to the great Arabian thinkers Alfarabi, Avicenna, Algazel and Averroes; the respected Jewish authors Saadiah Gaon, Moses Maimonides, and Gersonides; and the famous Christian writers Anselm, Bonaventure, and Thomas Aquinas and the intellectual challenges from the Greek intellectual world that they met and faced in the Middle Ages.


Instructor(s): Stephen F. Brown

Prerequisites: Core courses in Philosophy and Theology.

Cross listed with: PHIL1116

Comments: Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core requirement

THEO 3164 The Challenge of Peace Fall 3
Course Description

Religion is often regarded as the cause of conflict, aggression, and massive social evil. This course examines ways in which religion has contributed to resisting evil, preventing violence, and contributing to healing and reconciliation after large scale social violence.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Stephen Pope

Prerequisites: Must have completed Theology core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 3201 The Meaning and Way of Jesus Spring 3
Course Description

This course inquires into the meaning of the person and mission of Jesus of Nazareth, the Messiah or Christ of God. The course seeks (1) to probe and to clarify those key issues that emerge in the Church’s centuries-long response to the question, ‘who was/is Jesus Christ?’ and (2) to explore what concretely is at stake in ‘following Jesus’ or in being his disciple. The first aim of the course requires a consideration of proper theological matters—divine and human natures, the salvific meaning of the ministry, death, and resurrection of Jesus; the second explores the invitation of the gospel ‘to follow’ the way Jesus teaches—a way of compassionate solidarity and active commitment to the poor, abused, homeless, and excluded.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): M Shawn Copeland

Prerequisites: Required completion of the Theology CORE

Cross listed with:

Comments: As an elective course in the Pulse Program, students are required to engage weekly in four (4) hours of service at a non-profit community agency during the semester. The Pulse Program will work with the student in discerning an appropriate community service placement, setting up the Learning Work Agreement (LWA) with the supervisor, and handling details in relation to the community service agency. With its emphasis on discipleship or living the ‘way’ Jesus taught, the course seeks to deepen students’ understanding of the relation between action and reflection, social practice and religious faith.

THEO 3202 Immigration and Ethics Spring 3
Course Description

This course entails an interdisciplinary examination of contemporary immigration with a primary focus on the U.S. context. Texts from social scientific, legal, and policy perspectives frame the phenomenon of contemporary migration. Theological and philosophical texts, along with PULSE placement experiences, illuminate ethical assessments of immigration practices. Special attention will be given to Christian anthropology and ethics as resources for analysis as well as the role of gender in matters of migration and citizenship.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kristin Heyer

Prerequisites: Theology CORE

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 3222 Bioethics and Social Justice Spring 3
Course Description

Will primarily stress Catholic and Protestant theological approaches to death and dying, infertility therapies, abortion, genetics, health care reform, and AIDS in a social justice context. Feminist and intercultural perspectives will be included.


Instructor(s): Lisa Sowle Cahill

Prerequisites: Completion of theology core.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 3244 Classics of Christian Spiritualty Spring 3
Course Description

The history of Christian spirituality is a history of interactions between the life of the triune God and the lives of human beings. In this course, we will examine the conversion stories, ascetical practices, prayerful devotions, mystical encounters, and works of mercy and justice that have shaped Christian spirituality throughout the ages. The question will be how these interactions between divine and human life have enabled many Christian saints and witnesses to confront the sins, sufferings, and deaths of this fallen world in conformity with Christ.


Instructor(s): Andrew Prevot

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 3261 Spirituality and Sexuality Fall 3
Course Description

How does our experience of ourselves as sexual beings open us to the experience of the holy, and conversely, how might our desire for God be intimately related to our sexual desire and longings? These are the questions that will be the focus of our work. Not a course on sexual ethics, this course is an exploration of the complex interrelationship of sexual and spiritual desire as both are reflected upon in the Christian spiritual tradition.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): H. John McDargh

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. and Completed Theology core.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 3264 Gender (In)Equality in Classical&Christian Perspec Spring 3
Course Description

This theology seminar will examine traditional gender norms in classical, biblical, and Christian literature. Using the lens of feminist theology, this course will explore works in four categories: 1) classical works of Homer, Sophocles, and Virgil; 2) the Hebrew bible and New Testament; 3) major historical figures such as Aquinas, Luther, and Julian of Norwich; and 4) contemporary feminist theologians.


Instructor(s): Lisa Cahill

Prerequisites: HP, Theology majors or Women's Studies minors.

Cross listed with: HONR2264

Comments:

THEO 3330 Theology Majors' Seminar Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

The Majors' Seminar is designed to help majors extend their understanding of the meaning and methods of theology and religious studies. It provides students with an opportunity to synthesize aspects of their course work and identify key themes, questions, and areas in need of further study. This is done primarily through the research and writing of a seminar paper. This course is offered each fall and spring and may be taken senior or junior year. Sufficiently advanced students are urged to take the seminar in junior year.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Completion of Theology core.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Theology majors only.

THEO 3343 Genocide and Film Fall 3
Course Description

An historical overview of the twentieth century tragedy of genocide and ethnic cleansing as depicted in feature films as well as documentaries. Through analysis of a series of poignant films the plight of Native Americans, the controversial Armenian Genocide, the Holocaust and its legacy, the Killing Fields of Cambodia, the Hutu-sponsored massacres in Rwanda will help grasp the driving mechanism of genocide and ethnic cleansing.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): John Michalczyk and Ray Helmick, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: TMST7100 FILM3343

Comments:

THEO 3360 Living Truthfully: Way to Personal Peace and Social Change Fall 3
Course Description

The primary purpose of this course is to examine the proposition that it is better to tell the truth than tell the lie. Too often, we are tempted to live out an illusion. The personal and social costs of keeping an illusion pumped are steep. Personal peace and courage are born when we settle in on the truth of our identity and dare to live it. In short, this course proposes that the larger life is possible when we come home to the smaller life that defines us as individual women and men.


Instructor(s): Rev. Anthony Penna

Prerequisites: Completion of Theology core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 3505 Buddhist Philosophy and Spirituality Fall 3
Course Description

Focusing on early and Mahāyāna Buddhist philosophies of India with connections between concepts and spiritual practices. Buddhist versions of theological anthropology, ontology, epistemology, ethics, and soteriology are related to practices of meditation, ritual, phenomenological investigation, and philosophical analysis. Readings from classical and contemporary Buddhist writings.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): John J. Makransky

Prerequisites: Prerequisites: For undergrads, at least one prior course in philosophy or theology, and a B+ or higher average in prior humanities (non-science) courses.

Cross listed with: PHIL3503 TMST7124

Comments:

THEO 3506 Tibetan Buddhist Philosophy and Practice Spring 3
Course Description

Philosophical concepts and meditative and ritual practices of the Tantric Buddhism of Tibet (Vajrayana). Includes early Buddhist and Mahayana philosophical foundations of Tantric Buddhism, connections between philosophy and sacred story, nature of mind and the transformative potential of the human being, visionary practices, meditation theory, inner yogas, unities of wisdom and means, and the feminine divine in cultural context. We explore Tibetan philosophy and praxis through writings of modern Buddhist studies scholars and Tibetan lamas. Weekly writing, midterm, final papers.


Instructor(s): John J. Makransky

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: TMST8539 PHIL5509

Comments:

THEO 3507 Buddhist Philosophy and Psychology Fall 3
Course Description

We focus on early and Mahāyāna Indian Buddhism, then some areas of Tibetan and Japanese Buddhism, exploring philosophical, psychological and spiritual understandings. Buddhist approaches to theological anthropology, ontology, epistemology, ethics, and soteriology are related to practices of meditation, phenomenological investigation and to philosophical and psychological analyses. Reading in classical and modern Buddhism and in a few areas of modern psychology that draw on Buddhism. Weekly writing, active discussion, two short papers, one longer paper.


Instructor(s): John Makransky

Prerequisites: For undergrads, at least one prior course in philosophy or theology, and a B+ or higher average in prior humanities (non-science) courses.

Cross listed with: PHIL3507 TMCE7124

Comments:

THEO 3508 Just War, Pacifism, and Peacebuilding Fall 3
Course Description


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Lisa Cahill

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 3527 Meditation and Action: Interfaith Explorations Spring 3
Course Description

Tibetan Buddhist understandings of the nature of awareness with its capacities for wisdom and compassionate responsiveness are explored through contemporary writing and guided meditations adapted for students of all faiths and backgrounds. Buddhist thought and practice is then brought into conversation with Thomas Merton, Martin Luther King, Gandhi, Dorothy Day, Henri Nouwen and other faith-based activists—for learning across religious boundaries (comparative theology) and to shed light on the students’ own spiritualities as bases for social service and action. Weekly writing, active weekly discussion, two ten page papers.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): John Makransky

Prerequisites: At least one prior course in theology.

Cross listed with: TMCE7113

Comments:

THEO 3548 Buddhist Thought and Practice Spring 3
Course Description

We explore aspects of early, Southeast Asian, and East Asian traditions of Buddhism, focusing on ways that Buddhist philosophy informs and is informed by practices of meditation, phenomenological investigation, ritual and ethics. Students will be instructed in mindfulness exercises (cultivating fuller awareness of things) to inform our studies. Weekly writing, active discussion, two short papers, one longer paper.


Instructor(s): John Makransky

Prerequisites: For undergrads, at least one prior course in philosophy or theology is required, and a B+ or higher average in prior humanities (non-science) courses.

Cross listed with: TMCE7110 PHIL4448

Comments:

THEO 3556 Mystery of God Spring 3
Course Description

This course covers a variety of themes in contemporary philosophical and Trinitarian theology. The central goals will be (i) to think critically about what we can and cannot know about God in the light of natural reason and divine revelation and (ii) to consider how this theological knowing and unknowing has helped many Christian thinkers effectively address certain pressing epistemological, ethical, and political challenges in modernity and postmodernity. Students should have some background in philosophy and theology prior to taking the course.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Andrew Prevot

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 3557 Catholicism & Social Responsibility Fall 3
Course Description

This course explores the tradition of Catholic social thought and in its theoretical and lived forms. It probes the theological and moral foundations of social responsibility and the relationships between the church and civil society. It investigates the implications of the tradition’s core commitments (including human rights, solidarity, the option for the poor, liberation, the common good) for contemporary questions of justice. It attends to the ways structural inequalities and harmful ideologies impact the course’s applied ethics topics (e.g., racialized violence, migration, labor rights, and food justice). Finally it considers growing edges of the tradition in need of development.


Instructor(s): Kristin Heyer

Prerequisites: Must have completed Theology Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 3577 Conciliar Traditions of the Catholic Church Fall 3
Course Description

This course offers an introduction to the conciliar tradition of the Roman Catholic Church. The course will begin with an historical overview of the ecumenical and Catholic councils, from the councils of Nicaea and Constantinople in the early church era, to the Council of Trent and the First Vatican Council in early modernity. It will then turn to an extended exploration of the Second Vatican Council, its interpretation and reception. The course provides an introduction to the development of Catholic theology, in regard to both form and content, from the beginning to the present.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Boyd Coolman

Prerequisites: Theology Majors only.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 3598 Law, Medicine, and Ethics Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines legal and ethical issues in medicine. It is designed so that students take an ethical position on difficult or emerging issues in medicine, such as appropriate care of seriously ill newborns, new forms of reproduction, and proposals for health care reform. The student is expected to provide a principled rationale for the position. The goal is to have the students think, be prepared to recognize inadequacies or difficulties in their position, modify it if necessary, and ultimately arrive at a thought-through and principled position. A Socratic method is used to achieve that goal.


Instructor(s): John J. Paris, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL5598

Comments:

THEO 4409 500 Years of Michelangelo's Chapel in History and Imagination Fall 3
Course Description

From 1508 to 1512 Michelangelo painted the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel in Rome. From 1536 to 1541 he completed its altar wall, "The Last Judgment." Together these works constitute one of the most amazing individual achievements in the history of imagination and creativity. They coincided with the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, the rising power of the Ottoman empire, and the achievements of the Renaissance. This course will set Michelangelo's works within their artistic, religious, political, and intellectual contexts and explore their significance.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Benjamin Braude

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with: HIST4245

Comments:

THEO 4433 Faith, Service, and Solidarity Spring 3
Course Description

This course intends to provide advanced students an opportunity for in-depth study of the theology, spirituality, and ethics of Christian service. Significant prior service experience is necessary. Major themes include compassion, social concern, hospitality and companionship, advocacy, the virtue of humility, accompaniment and solidarity, justice and charity. Attention is given to Scripture, Thomas Aquinas, Ignatius of Loyola, and various contemporary authors.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Stephen Pope

Prerequisites: Completion of the Theology core.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 4446 David: The Hebrew Bible and History Spring 3
Course Description

The complex Biblical account of King David's royal accomplishments and private failings have increasingly aroused skepticism among biblical scholars. In what sense may the Biblical account be considered reliable? How do theological interests and narrative artistry affect historiography? The course will focus on David and Solomon (1 Samuel 1-1 Kings 11), contemporary non-biblical records, archaeological evidence, and the image of David provided in other biblical texts. Modern methods of biblical scholarship will guide the inquiry, but attention will also be given to the philosophy of history.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): David Vanderhooft

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 4456 The Holocaust: A Moral History Spring 3
Course Description

The tragic event that ruptured modern western morality will be examined from a variety of perspectives. We shall study the testimony of both its victims and its perpetrators. Special attention will be given to consideration of the intellectual and moral factors which motivated resistance or excused indifference. We shall conclude with interpretations of its meaning for contemporary morality and of its theological significance for Christians and Jews.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): James W. Bernauer, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL4456 HIST4846

Comments:

THEO 4464 Liberation Christology Spring 3
Course Description

This course will examine the person of Jesus Christ as the foundation of Latin American liberation theology. Beginning with an analysis of the roots, methodology, and key themes of liberation theology, course readings and discussions will explore how a "preferential option for the poor" influences the understanding of the life, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. Topics to be addressed, among others are the relationship between Christian faith and the social order, the implications of globalization for Christology, Jesus and violence, differences between "low" and "high" Christologies, and the meaning of salvation in the light of liberation Christologies.


Instructor(s): Roberto Goizueta

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 4472 Buddhist Ethics in Theory and Practice Fall 3
Course Description

We first study classical Buddhist ethical principles and practices in ancient India, Southeast Asia and Tibet. We then discuss some leading contemporary Buddhist writings on ethical analyses of issues in social justice, ecology, global economics, war and peace. Daily mindfulness practice, based on class instruction, is required. Requirements: Weekly writing of 3 pages, active class participation, and final paper.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): John Makransky

Prerequisites: For undergrads, at least two prior courses in philosophy or theology and a B+ or higher average in prior humanities (non-science) courses.

Cross listed with: PHIL4472 TMCE4472

Comments:

THEO 4496 The Moral Dimension of the Christian Life Spring 3
Course Description

This course provides a systematic overview of the basic components of Catholic moral theology. In manner of presentation the course is primarily oriented to lecture and readings. The content of the course is an exposition and analysis of topics traditionally treated under the heading of fundamental moral theology: moral character, moral freedom and its limits, the relationship of spirituality and morality, sin and conversion, conscience, the use of scripture in moral reasoning, natural law, the teaching authority of the church in moral matters, the development of moral norms, discernment, and moral decision-making.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kenneth Himes, OFM

Prerequisites: Completion of the Theology core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 4901 Readings and Research Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

In rare cases where regular courses do not meet the needs of students, independent research may be arranged by a student with a faculty member.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: The professor's written consent, on a form obtained from the department, must be secured prior to registration.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 4921 Advanced Independent Research Fall/Spring 6
Course Description

This course is reserved for theology majors selected as Scholars of the College. By arrangement with professor.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 4951 Senior Thesis Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

By arrangement with professor.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 4961 Senior Honors Thesis Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

By arrangement with professor.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 5348 New Testament Ethics Fall 3
Course Description

An introduction to ethical reflection in the New Testament which will treat the teaching of Jesus in the Sermon on the Mount (Matt 5-7 and parallels), select parables (Luke 10-19 and parallels) and moral formation in Pauline churches (Gal, 1 Cor). Individual modules will treat (a) social justice and concern for the poor; (b) love commands; and (c) sexuality, marriage and family. Students are introduced to ethical material from both Jewish and Stoic sources that deal with comparable topics.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Pheme Perkins

Prerequisites: Introductory course in either New Testament or Ethics.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 5349 Israel in Jewish Theologies Spring 3
Course Description

Israel, both the people and the land, are central to Jewish theology as concrete manifestations of God’s covenants. This course will explore the evolving meanings of these concepts from the Bible to today, looking at themes like peoplehood, life in the land, exile from it, and (messianic) return. The second part of the course will focus specifically on the theologies of a range of modern Jewish thinkers, with the goal of helping students to understand aspects of contemporary Israel and its meaning to world Jewry.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Ruth Langer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: TMST7136

Comments:

THEO 5350 Sacraments as Prophetic Actions Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the sacraments of the Church in continuity with the prophetic actions performed by Jesus. It begins with a study of the dramatic actions of the Hebrew prophets. It then links the actions with "signs and wonders" that characterized the ministry of Jesus Christ in his proclamation of the Kingdom of God. The sacraments are then presented as liturgical actions that insert us into the Paschal Mystery and that empower and challenge us to anticipate the "new heaven and new earth."


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Liam Bergin

Prerequisites: at least one core course in theology completed

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 5351 Faith Elements in Conflicts: The Role of Theological Positions in the Fomenting or Resolution of Conflict Spring 3
Course Description

Religious differences often appear to figure in the dehumanization of enemies and rationalization of violence. This course will look at the way key concepts, such as revelation; election; and universality in various religions, especially in sectarian guise, affect the origins and progress of violent conflicts and will ask to what extent employment of these concepts betrays the religions themselves. It will also examine how far the institutional interests of religious bodies make them vulnerable to manipulation by other parties engaged in any given conflict, and how the religious elements and loyalties relate to other interests that figure in such conflicts.


Instructor(s): Raymond Helmick, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: TMST3351

Comments:

THEO 5352 Israelis and Palestinians: Two Peoples, Three Faiths Fall 3
Course Description

In 1993 the parties in the Middle Eastern Conflict came to a watershed agreement, which had eluded them earlier, to recognize one another's legitimacy as peoples. The agreement has been difficult to maintain and to withdraw and has figured massively into the turbulent events in the region since that time. This course examines how, in the whole history of the conflict, the elements of ethnicity and faith have contributed to the hatreds and resentments of these peoples and the extent to which mutual acceptance and respect at these levels of faith and ethnicity can contribute to healing the conflict.


Instructor(s): Raymond Helmick, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: TMST3352

Comments:

THEO 5353 Christ's Knowledge Fall 3
Course Description

A discussion of Jesus's human knowledge in the context of Chalcedonian Christology transposed, first, into Aquinas's medieval context, and, second, into the context of historical consciousness and a post-modern phenomenology of knowledge.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Fred Lawrence

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 5354 Modern Catholic Social Teaching Spring 3
Course Description

This course will include historical and analytical treatments of the official social teaching of the Roman Catholic Church. The course will study the tradition of Catholic social thought as found in papal, conciliar and synodal documents of the modern era.


Instructor(s): Kristin Heyer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 5371 Turning Points in Jewish History Fall 3
Course Description

Jewish history stretches from creation to today. This course will focus on the major turning points which shape today's Jewish world, focusing on major intellectual and theological trends, figures, and events from the development of rabbinic Judaism to the twentieth century. Through this, students will come to have a basic understanding of the outlines of Jewish religious and intellectual history, of the nature of the Jewish experience as a minority culture in the Christian and Muslim worlds, and of the shapes of contemporary Judaism.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Ruth Langer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SLAV3061

Comments:

THEO 5372 Patristic Greek Fall 3
Course Description

This two-semester course is designed for the student with no previous knowledge of ancient Greek to develop reading and translating skills in Patristic Greek language by mastering the fundamental principles of Greek grammar and syntax and acquiring a basic reading vocabulary. The student becomes familiar with the meaning of Greek words, their forms and structure, and their customary arrangement in sentences. A secondary goal of this course is to serve as a foundation for further studies in Patristic Greek.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Margaret Schatkin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL5372

Comments: This course is continued in the spring as THEO5373 New Testament Greek II.

THEO 5373 New Testament Greek II Spring 3
Course Description

This two-semester course is designed for the student with no previous knowledge of ancient Greek to develop reading and translating skills in Patristic Greek language by mastering the fundamental principles of Greek grammar and syntax and acquiring a basic reading vocabulary. The student becomes familiar with the meaning of Greek words, their forms and structure, and their customary arrangement in sentences. A secondary goal of this course is to serve as a foundation for further studies in Patristic Greek.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Margaret Schatkin

Prerequisites: Must have completed THEO5372

Cross listed with: PHIL5373

Comments:

THEO 5378 Jesus in Story and History Spring 3
Course Description

An extensive literary-critical analysis of diverse portrayals of Jesus in the canonical Gospels, followed by an examination of modern historical-critical attempts to reconstruct the historical Jesus within and behind the various early Christian depictions of him.


Instructor(s): John Darr

Prerequisites: Biblical Heritage II or equivalent New Testament introductory course.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 5387 Mahayana Buddhism in East Asia Spring 3
Course Description

The bodhisattva--a wise and compassionate being dedicated to the salvation of all sentient beings--is arguably the model for and model of Buddhist practice in China, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, and, more recently, North America and Europe. This course will explore the cultic dimensions of Buddhism in East Asia--the modes of self-cultivation and worship that have revolved around the figure of the bodhisattva. Close readings of texts and images will challenge Western assumptions about what Mahayana Buddhism has been all about, and by extension, how we imagine the general categories "theology" and "religion."


Instructor(s): David Mozina

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL5387 TMST7097

Comments:

THEO 5425 Patristic Seminar: Intermediate Greek & English Fall 3
Course Description

Divine Providence and human suffering. Apostolic Letter of Pope John Paul II on the Christian’s significance of human suffering. Translation of the Greek text of St. John Chrysostom, Treatise on Providence.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Margaret Schatkin

Prerequisites: Introduction to Ancient Greek

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 5426 African Christian Fathers and Mothers of the Church Spring 3
Course Description

Introduction to the Fathers of the Church, with special emphasis on the period after the apostles to the Council of Nicea (A.D. 325). The lives, writings, and teachings of the Church Fathers will be studied through readings in English translation.


Instructor(s): Margaret A. Schatkin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course counts as an elective towards the interdisciplinary Minor in Ancient Civilization.

THEO 5429 Theology and Ecology Fall 3
Course Description

This course studies the emergence of ecological theology as a form of liberation theology. It investigates the roots of environmental degradation in the Judeo-Christian tradition and the attempts of contemporary theologians to re-envision our understanding of God, human being and nature in order to shape a sustainable, planetary theology. Authors studied include Thomas Berry, Teilhard de Chardin, Leonardo Boff, Dennis Edwards, Ivone Gebara, Elizabeth Johnson, Sallie McFague, Rosemary Radford Ruether, and statements of the World Council of Churches, the Orthodox Patriarchs, and the Catholic hierarchy.


Instructor(s): Mary Ann Hinsdale, IHM

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 5438 Career and Calling Spring 3
Course Description

How can people combine their sense of calling with their pursuit of work and career? Both corporations and spiritual writers have converged on the topic of "workplace spirituality." The Academy of Management, a leading forum for business schools, now includes a section on management and spirituality. Catholic and Protestant thinkers—including Jesuit experts on spiritual discernment—also seek to integrate career development and Christian spiritual practices. This multi-disciplinary seminar will read psychologists, theologians, sociologists, and developmental theorists to guide case studies of individuals' careers. Course includes personal discernment exercises. Suitable for ministry students and undergraduates.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): James Weiss

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: TMPS7105

Comments:

THEO 5441 Ibn Arabi & Islamic Humanities: Islamic Philosophy &Theology Spring 3
Course Description

The spread of Islam as a world religion after the 13th century involved an explosion of spiritual, social, and cultural creativity in vernacular languages and cultures across all regions of Asia and SE Europe. Everywhere this transformation reflected the manifold influences of Ibn ‘Arabi (d. 1240/638) and the “Akbari” tradition of his philosophic, theological, artistic and poetic interpreters. This course moves from an introductory overview of his key writings to representative interpreters in Iran, Central Asia, India, China, and the Ottoman world, with an overview of his global contemporary influences in psychology, literature, philosophy, and religious thought.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): James Morris

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: NELC4064

Comments:

THEO 5448 Patristics: Latin & English Spring 3
Course Description

Selections from St. Jerome read in the original Latin to illustrate his role as a biblical scholar, a translator, and a mediator between Eastern and Western theology.


Instructor(s): Margaret Schatkin

Prerequisites: Introduction to Latin

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 5449 Jewish Liturgy: History and Theology Fall 3
Course Description

Embedded in rabbinic prayer is a concise statement of Jewish theology. After an examination of the precursors of rabbinic prayer and of the development of the synagogue as an institution, this course will examine the structures and ideas of the prayers themselves as they have been received from the medieval world. This will create a context for a deeper discussion of some key Jewish theological concepts as well as a comparison of Jewish and Christian liturgical traditions.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Ruth Langer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: TMST8532

Comments:

THEO 5452 Marriage & Family in the Catholic Tradition Fall 3
Course Description

The Catholic Christian tradition has always given a prominent role to marriage and family yet both institutions have undergone significant changes and have been understood in quite different ways within that tradition. This course will explore the changing role and developing doctrinal/theological understandings of marriage and family with special attention to several controversial issues.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Richard Gaillardetz

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 5456 Genesis Spring 3
Course Description

This course will serve as an introduction to the text, context and reception of the book of Genesis. Examining the book of Genesis in detail, we will explore not only the book itself, but parallel creation and national origin stories in the ancient Near East, methods of interpretation and their history, as well as the book's profound legacy in Jewish, Christian and Muslim tradition.


Instructor(s): Jeffrey Cooley

Prerequisites: THEO1001, A&S Honors, Grad students, or instructor's permission.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 5469 What Can We Know About God? Exploring the Answers of Christian Antiquity Fall 3
Course Description

The knowledge of God blossomed in Christian antiquity and opened up the possibility of natural and revealed knowledge of God. In this course we shall explore the writings of the Greek Fathers of the fourth century A.D. (Basil the Great, Gregory of Nazianzus, John Chrysostom) in their historical and geographical context, including the Silk Road.


Instructor(s): Margaret Schatkin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL4469

Comments: Team-taught with Rev. George Dion D. Dragas of Greek Orthodox School of Theology.

THEO 5471 Bread Broken for a New World Spring 3
Course Description

The Eucharist is primarily about the future. God has laid hold of human history and has begun to transform it from within. The Eucharist has the power to shape the community that celebrates it to be a source of life in a broken and fragile world. This course examines the biblical roots of the Eucharist in the meal traditions of the Jewish people, in the table fellowship of Jesus and in his death on the Cross.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Liam Bergin

Prerequisites: Must have completed Theology CORE

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 5474 Jews and Christians: Understanding The Other Spring 3
Course Description

Interreligious dialogue requires interreligious understanding. This course will build a foundation for genuine dialogue between Jews and Christians by posing fundamental theological questions in a comparative context. Students will gain an understanding of the other tradition while also deepening their understanding of their own, discussing such matters as the human experience of God, the purpose of human existence, the nature of religious community, and the ways that the communities respond to challenges, both contemporary and ancient.


Instructor(s): Ruth Langer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: TMST7111

Comments: This course is an exercise in interreligious learning sponsored by the Boston College's Center for Jewish-Christian Learning.

THEO 5481 Women and the Church Spring 3
Course Description

The religious and social experience of women from a variety of cultures, including the experience of class participants, form the basis of this seminar. We will 1) study the historical roots of Christian feminist theology; 2) explore the critiques and alternative reconstructions of traditional understandings of the Bible, God, human beings and their relationship to the world that have been offered by Christian feminist theologians writing from a variety of ideological perspectives; and 3) investigate the ways in which women have defined themselves in relationship to the church, particularly in terms of spirituality and ministry.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Mary Ann Hinsdale. IHM

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 5498 HIV/AIDS and Ethics Fall 3
Course Description

This course looks at how we can understand a bit better the ethics of public health through the lens of HIV/AIDS. There besides studying the virus itself, we examine the varied related ethical issues regarding stigma, prevention, research, gender inequity, economic disparities, local culture, religion, funding, and access.


Instructor(s): James Keenan, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 5500 Women and Gender in Islam Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores women and gender roles in Islamic history, civilization, and societies, beginning with the pre-Islamic period and continuing through the present. The goal is to present women and womens issues as central to the main narrative of Islamic history, rather than as a side story. This course explores questions related to both historical and contemporary religious interpretation and practice, Sunni, Shia and Sufi, as well as the impact of religion and gender constructs on womens access to the public sphere, positions of leadership, and legal status.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Natana DeLong-Bas

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ICSP3310

Comments:

THEO 5501 Politics, Religion & Power in Antiquity Fall 3
Course Description

Taking "civic ideology" as its organizing concept, PRPA examines relationships between religious and political discourses and social power in Judaism and Christianity in the Greek and Roman imperial era. The course begins with theories on the dialectical nature of ideology and its role in the legitimation of power. Our main task will then be reconstructing and comparatively analyzing specific ideologies on the basis of evidence from Jewish, Christian, and pagan sources.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Gillihan

Prerequisites: Biblical Heritage 1-2

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 5502 Word and Sacrament Spring 3
Course Description

This course provides a broad thematic overview of the development of sacramental theology in the Western Church, focusing on the relation between ‘word’ and ‘sacrament’. Are sacraments primarily signs? Why are there no silent sacraments? How does the necessary linguistic aspect of sacramental action relate to the symbolic?”


Instructor(s): Cathal Doherty

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 5504 The Gospel of John and the Parting of the Ways between Judaism and Christianity Spring 3
Course Description

How, when and why Christianity moved out of the “big tent” of first century Judaism to become a major religious, political, and social movement of its own is one of the most important – and most elusive -- issues in the study of ancient Judaism and Christianity. A text that central to this issue is the Gospel of John. In this course we will examine this gospel in its social and historical context, as well as in the history of interpretation, in order to understand its contribution to our understanding of the development of early Christianity out of its Jewish matrix.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Adele Reinhartz

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Some New Testament preferable but not essential.

THEO 5505 Sacraments and Art Spring 3
Course Description

Much of our artistic heritage was commissioned to embellish places of worship and to deepen understanding of the ceremonies celebrated there. These works of art offer often-ignored insights into Christian sacraments that complements more traditional theological approaches. This course seeks to deepen our appreciation of Christian sacraments by acknowledging painting, sculpture and architecture as a locus theologicus. Both historical and thematic in approach, it explores sacramentality, incarnation, iconoclasm, typology as well as selected themes from sacramental theology. The course will include off-site visits.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): William Bergin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 5515 Anthropology of Karol Wojtyla/John Paul II Spring 3
Course Description

Before he became Pope John Paul II, Karol Wojtyla had always been preoccupied with understanding the nature of the human person. This course is devoted to a critical analysis of Wojtyla's philosophical writings, especially "Love and Responsibility" and "The Acting Person," in order to understand the full depth and richness of his relational anthropology. The course will also consider how this anthropology of the acting person is decisive for comprehending John Paul II's conception of freedom with his theory of action. That theory serves as the foundation for his moral theology articulated in encyclicals Veritatis Splendor and Evangelium Vitae.


Instructor(s): Richard Spinello

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL5513

Comments:

THEO 5516 Contemporary Philosophy of Religion Fall 3
Course Description

Reflection on the themes of faith, divinity, and being in the world, as contested in the field opened by Heideggerian phenomenology. In addition to some key texts by Heidegger, we will read and discuss works by K. Rahner, B. Welte, J.-L. Marion, and J.-Y. Lacoste. At several points, it will also be useful to draw on the positions of Augustine and Aquinas.


Instructor(s): Jeffrey Bloechl

Prerequisites: Core philosophy courses

Cross listed with: PHIL5510

Comments:

THEO 5519 The Crisis of Confidence in the Catholic Church Spring 3
Course Description

The Catholic Church in the United States and Europe has seen declining numbers both in regular attendance and in clergy and religious life. Scandals have torn at people's allegiance, and feelings of disappointment, disillusion, and anger have become widespread. Church authorities have seemed reluctant to acknowledge or address these problems and have responded with vexation to those who raise them from the Right or Left. This course will examine the roots of this crisis of confidence in light of the nature of the Church community, its institutional structure, and the historical experiences that have brought it to this pass.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Raymond Helmick, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: TMST7114

Comments:

THEO 5539 Human Rights, Humanitarian Crises, and Refugees: Ethical, Political, and Religious Responses Fall 3
Course Description

This course will explore the protection of human rights in the face of contemporary humanitarian crises, focusing on the relation between such crises and warfare, political oppression and economic injustice It will investigate the ethical perspectives that should guide responses by political, religious and civil communities. The issue of the forced migration that results from such crises will receive particular attention.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): David Hollenbach, S.J.

Prerequisites: Preference for theology and international studies majors.

Cross listed with: INTL5539

Comments: Registration is limited.

THEO 5544 Prophetic Tradition and Inspiration: Exploring the Hadith Fall 3
Course Description

Using English translations, this seminar surveys the ways the corpus of Prophetic hadith has inspired every area of Islamic life, including spiritual devotions and practices; theology, cosmology, and eschatology; family, social, and economic life; models of proper behavior; the interpretation of the Qur'an and sacred history; and later disciplines of Arabic learning. Seminar focuses on acquiring familiarity with the structure, contents, and uses of major Sunni hadith collections (but including representative Shiite sources) as well as later influential short collections (Nawawi, Ibn Arabi).


Instructor(s): James Morris

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: TMST5554

Comments: Supplemental Arabic reading session available.

THEO 5545 New Testament Sacraments and Rituals Spring 3
Course Description

This course studies the New Testament evidence for sacraments and rituals in early Christianity. Students are introduced to ritual theory and the rituals of religious associations in the ancient world which provided the templates for early Christian rites: baptism, eucharist, and anointing. The major New Testament texts on baptism and eucharist will be studied in detail. The final section of the course introduces other important witnesses to early Christian rituals: Didache, Justin Martyr, 1st Apology, and the alternative sacramental theology constructed by second century Valentinian gnostics (Gospel of Philip).


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Pheme Perkins

Prerequisites: Completion of Theology core.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 5552 God, Ethics and Neuroscience Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines some important questions regarding relationships between belief in God and scientific approaches to humanity and the natural world. We explore both the arguments for the incompatibility between science and theism, as well as constructive ways of understanding their potential relationships. We will examine major historical contributors to the discussion including Aquinas, Galileo, and Darwin. Central methodological questions focus on forms of naturalism, reductionism, and evolution. Other course topics include the ethical significance of neuroscience and evolutionary psychology, particularly concerning the relation between brain and mind, the meaning of responsibility, and the natural basis of moral decision-making.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Patrick Byrne and Stephen Pope

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL5552

Comments:

THEO 5554 Encountering the Qur'an: Contexts and Approaches Fall 3
Course Description

Using only English-language sources, this seminar will focus on developing the skills and background needed to understand and reliably interpret the Qur'an in translation. The course will also introduce the traditional contextual materials, such as Prophetic history (Sira, hadith), recitation, "tales of the prophets," textual development, and tafsir. But seminar sessions will focus on close reading and interpretation of selected early (Meccan) Suras.


Instructor(s): James Morris

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 5556 Mystery of God Spring 3
Course Description

This course covers a variety of themes in contemporary philosophical and Trinitarian theology. The central goals will be (i) to think critically about what we can and cannot know about God in the light of natural reason and divine revelation and (ii) to consider how this theological knowing and unknowing has helped many Christian thinkers effectively address certain pressing epistemological, ethical, and political challenges in modernity and postmodernity. Students should have some background in philosophy and theology prior to taking the course.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): andrew prevot

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 5557 Catholicism & Social Responsibility Fall 3
Course Description

This course explores the tradition of Catholic social thought and in its theoretical and lived forms. It probes the theological and moral foundations of social responsibility in the Catholic tradition and the relationship between the church and wider society. It then investigates the implications of the tradition’s core commitments (including solidarity, the option for the poor, human rights and responsibilities, the common good, peacemaking, ecological justice, and the dignity of work) for contemporary questions of justice.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kristin Heyer

Prerequisites: Must have competed Theology CORE

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 5559 Dante's "Divine Comedy" in Translation Fall 3
Course Description

An introduction to and critical reading of the "Divine Comedy" (in English translation), one of the world's greatest epic poems, produced by "the chief imagination of Christendom" (Yeats). Dante's journey through Hell, Purgatory, and Paradise will be analyzed at its multiple levels of interpretation: literal and allegorical, theological, philosophical, political, and literary. Compendium of an entire epoch of European civilization, the "Comedy" will also be interrogated for its responses to the fundamental questions of human existence: God, the Cosmos, the Self, Good and Evil, Right and Wrong, Suffering, and Happiness.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Laurie Shepard

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ITAL5526 PHIL5508 ENGL4696

Comments: Conducted in English. Elective for Italian major or minor.

THEO 5563 Ethics, Religion, and International Politics Fall/Spring 4
Course Description

An examination of the role of religion in international politics and of ethical approaches to international affairs. Special emphasis will be given to religion as a source of conflict, religious communities as transnational agents for justice, protection of human rights, and peace; the historical development and contemporary formulations of ethical norms for the use of force; and ethical and religious contributions to reconciliation and solidarity.


Instructor(s): Dept

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL5563 INTL5563

Comments: Major Restricted for IS. See International Studies, Philosophy or the Theology Department for registration approval. Preference to Theology and International Studies majors and minors.

THEO 5564 Studies in Luke--Acts Fall 3
Course Description

A short introduction to Luke as historian and theologian will be followed by detailed studies of characterization, plot, thematic structure, point of view, closure, and rhetorical patterns in this most literary of all New Testament narratives.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): John Darr

Prerequisites: Biblical Heritage II or similar Introductory New Testament course

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 5565 Root, Rite and Reason: Understanding the sacraments of the Church Fall 3
Course Description

Following an introductory section on the Catholic principle of sacramentality, this course considers, in turn, each of the seven sacraments in an attempt to appreciate the role that these Spirit-filled actions play in the Church's saving mission to witness to Jesus Christ and to proclaim the Kingdom of his God and Father until he comes again. Participants in the course will be introduced to the texts of significant authors on sacramental theology, particularly from the period following the Second Vatican Council. Course evaluation will be linked to a number of short reflection papers presented during the semester.


Instructor(s): Liam Bergin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: TMST7035

Comments:

THEO 5566 Mystical Poetry in the Islamic Humanities Spring 3
Course Description

Spiritual poetry and music have long been the primary cultural vehicle for the popular communication of Qur'anic teaching throughout the Islamic world. Beginning with essential background from the Qur'an and Hadith, this seminar will focus on three classics of the Islamic humanities: Attar's Language of the Birds; Rumi's Masnavi; and Hafez's lyrical poetry. Each participant will also study another major work from the Islamic humanities (in translation) from a different Muslim culture or cognate artistic forms (film, music, literature) from contemporary spiritual settings.


Instructor(s): James Morris

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: TMST8535 NELC4466

Comments: Supplemental Persian reading session available.

THEO 5567 Ethics, Religion, and International Politics I Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

An examination of the role of religion in international politics and of ethical approaches to international affairs. Special emphasis will be given to religion as a source of conflict, religious communities as transnational agents for justice, protection of human rights, and peace; the historical development and contemporary formulations of ethical norms for the use of force; and ethical and religious contributions to reconciliation and solidarity.


Instructor(s): Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL5567 INTL5561

Comments: Major Restricted. See International Studies, Philosophy, or the Theology Department for registration approval. Preference to Theology and International Studies majors and minors.

THEO 5571 Augustine's Confessions Spring 3
Course Description

This course will offer an in-depth reading of St. Augustine's classic work The Confessions. Attention will be paid not only to the theological, philosophical, and biographical issues raised in the text, but also to questions of genre, style, voice, and structure. Among the topics to be considered will be the nature of evil, language, scriptural interpretation, and the construction of individual and communal religious identity.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Doug Finn

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 5572 Intermediate Biblical Hebrew I Fall 3
Course Description

The course begins with a refresher of the basic grammar learned in Introduction to Biblical Hebrew I and II. Students will deepen their familiarity with Hebrew grammar and syntax. Strong emphasis is placed on reading and translating narrative selections directly from the Hebrew Bible. Texts for study will include passages from Genesis, Samuel, Jonah, and Ruth, among others.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): David Vanderhooft

Prerequisites: Introductory Biblical Hebrew I and II

Cross listed with: NELC2251

Comments:

THEO 5573 Intermediate Biblical Hebrew II Spring 3
Course Description

The course builds on the grammar and syntax learned in Intermediate Biblical Hebrew I. Students will develop more sophisticated knowledge of Hebrew grammar and syntax and refine their ability to read Hebrew prose narratives in the first part of the course. In the second part, students will be introduced to Hebrew poetry. Selections from the Psalms and Prophets will dominate course readings.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jeffrey Cooley

Prerequisites: THEO5572 or instructor's permission

Cross listed with: NELC2252

Comments:

THEO 5582 Introduction to Biblical Hebrew I Fall 3
Course Description

This course is a thorough introduction to Biblical Hebrew and its principal grammatical structures in preparation for translation of prose and poetic texts. Readings in the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament begin the fall semester and increase in variety throughout the year.


Instructor(s): Jeffrey Cooley

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: NELC1251

Comments: No previous knowledge of Hebrew is assumed.

THEO 5585 Introduction to the Dead Sea Scrolls Spring 3
Course Description

The discovery of nearly 800 manuscripts stashed in 11 caves near the Dead Sea and a ruined settlement and large cemetery nearby is one of the greatest archaeological finds of the twentieth century. This course will explore the relation between the texts, settlement, and cemetery, and introduce students to the basic problems in interpreting these artifacts. Our primary focus, however, will be on the texts, many of which are contemporaneous with those of early Christian literature and shed light upon ideas in the New Testament about the Messiah, law, and God's actions in history on behalf of the righteous.


Instructor(s): Yonder Gillihan

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 5592 Conflict Resolution Film Fall 3
Course Description

The two professors have over the years brought together their experiences, Michalczyk in making documentary films, Helmick in mediation in several major conflicts, cooperating to produce a series of films on the making of peace, in Northern Ireland, in the Balkan countries, in South Africa, in the Middle East, in Mafia-ridden Sicily, in post-Soviet Russia. These have since been used in those and other conflict areas as tools of peace-making and of understanding the processes of reconciliation.


Instructor(s): Raymond Helmick

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: FILM3386

Comments: The films will be screened during the course, and discussed as documentary cinema and as illustration of peace-making methods and as instruments of peace.

THEO 5596 Cross-Cultural Christian Ethics Fall 3
Course Description

This course considers models of fundamental Christian ethics in various parts of the world in order to illustrate convergences and divergences in terms of concerns, methods employed, conclusions reached, as well as prospects for cross-cultural collaboration. Two historical novels set in Africa (Achebe) and Asia (Endo) are read, along with works on cultural anthropology (Douglas), fundamental moral theology (Bretzke), global theological hermeneutics (Schreiter), a methodological reflection on the American moral tradition (Betsworth) and the 1986 movie Mission will be viewed and discussed in the context of Latin America liberation theology. A small group final project is required of all.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): James Bretzke, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: TMCE7011

Comments:

THEO 5598 Christology of Bernard Lonergan Spring 3
Course Description

A careful reading and critical discussion of Bernard Lonergan's treatise, The Incarnate Word (De Verbo Incarnato) and related materials, on his own terms and in relation to other currents in Christology. Seminar discussion with some lecture.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jeremy Wilkins

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 5599 A Theology of Food: Eating, Drinking and the Eucharist Fall 3
Course Description

Eating and drinking are primordial human experiences that nourish individuals, sustain communities and are at the heart of rituals in many religions. In the Judeo-Christian tradition meals play an important part in the unfolding dialog between God and humanity. Christians believe in a privileged encounter with the Lord Jesus in the Eucharistic meal of bread and wine. Eternal life is portrayed as a great banquet in God’s presence. This course articulates a theology of the Eucharist that takes meal as its point of departure. It examines how this central Christian action both shapes the divine-human relationship and informs our response to contemporary issues such as creation and ecology, hunger and suffering, solidarity and exclusion, hope and eternity.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Liam Bergin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 5652 Akkadian: Old Babylonian Spring 3
Course Description

Students will obtain a thorough introduction to Old Babylonian Akkadian, its graphic system, phonology, morphology and syntax. Text selections for primary consideration will include Hammurapi’s Laws and Enuma Elish (the Babylonian Epic of Creation).


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): David Vanderhooft

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: LING3251 NELC4751

Comments:

THEO 5748 Grace and Freedom Spring 3
Course Description

Thomas Aquinas’ theology of grace via B. Lonergan’s Grace & Freedom, followed by a transposition of this theology in the context of the Trinitarian Missions of the Word/Son & Holy Spirit.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Fred Lawrence

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 5794 Philosophy and the Church Fathers Spring 3
Course Description

Introduction to the major Church Fathers and Christian schools of antiquity and their varying engagement with philosophy. Elements of opposition and areas of harmony between Greek and Christian ideals.


Instructor(s): Margaret Schatkin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL7794

Comments:

THEO 6578 Daoism Fall 3
Course Description

Daoism (sometimes spelled Taoism) has been imagined in the West as an Eastern philosophy of blithe individuality and environmental consciousness. But what have Daoist thought and practice meant to Chinese practitioners? The answer might surprise. This course will examine major moments of thought and practice from the early, medieval, and modern periods of China’s most successful indigenous religious tradition. Close readings of texts and images will challenge Western assumptions about what this religious tradition has been all about, and by extension, how we imagine the general categories “theology” and “religion.”


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): David Mozina

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL6578

Comments: Formerly offered as TH578 Visions & Visualizations: Daoist Religious Traditions

THEO 6600 German-Jewish Thinkers Fall 3
Course Description

The brilliance and tragedy of German (and Austrian) Jewish culture is decisive for interpreting twentieth-century experience. This graduate seminar will examine the writings of some of its major thinkers, including Arendt, Buber, Freud, Kafka, Rosenzweig, and Strauss.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): James W. Bernauer, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL6603

Comments:

THEO 6602 Soundings in the Summa Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar will study a dozen topics in the Summa Theologiae of Thomas Aquinas, with the aim of understanding both the lineaments of the "forest" and the content of some of its most significant "trees": sacred science, knowing and naming God, Trinity, Creation, the last end of humankind, law and grace, virtues, faith, charity, the Incarnation, redemption, sacraments.


Instructor(s): Charles Hefling

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Knowledge of Latin, while obviously helpful, is not required.

THEO 6614 Levinas and Biblical Wisdom Spring 3
Course Description

The writings of Levinas will be studied through three different and interrelated lenses: philosophy, religion, and literature. The focus will be on how Levinas' theories offer new perspectives for reading and interpreting the Wisdom Books of the Hebrew Bible: Job, Ecclesiastes, and Proverbs.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Theodore Perry

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL6617

Comments: Advanced undergraduates may enroll with permission of professor.

THEO 6616 Origen of Alexandria: Life and Thought Spring 3
Course Description

A course examining the life and times of the great third century Christian intellectual, Origen of Alexandria. While reading his major works, special emphasis will be placed on the particular historical factors that contributed to the beginnings of Christian systematic thought. Since Origen's writings have been controversial for so many centuries and have been frequently misinterpreted, the seminar will focus on developing skills to understand his peculiar style of theological inquiry and the various literary genres it adopts. Topics addressed include Christian asceticism, scriptural exegesis, martyrdom, philosophy, as well as pertinent doctrinal issues including Origen's Trinitarian and Christological thought.


Instructor(s): Paul Kolbet

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 6626 Hermeneutics of God Spring 3
Course Description

This seminar explores recent debates in continental philosophy of religion about the "God who comes after metaphysics." Beginning with the phenomenological approach of Husserl, Heidegger, and Levinas, the course will proceed to a discussion of more recent retrievals of the God question in hermeneutics and deconstruction—Ricoeur, Derrida, and Caputo. Key issues explored include the critique of omnipotence, God as possible/impossible, theism/atheism/posttheism, and the question of interreligious dialogue and pluralism. The seminar invites class presentations from students.


Instructor(s): Richard M. Kearney

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL6626

Comments:

THEO 6636 Seven Theological Classics Fall 3
Course Description

This course, conducted as a seminar, will devote two sessions to each of seven important texts from the Christian tradition of "systematic," "philosophical," and "speculative" theology. These may include works of Anselm, Thomas Aquinas, Athanasius, Barth, Calvin, Irenaeus, John of Damascus, Newman, Schleiermacher, or other authors as determined by the instructor. Discussion will emphasize "methodological" issues—what each author is doing by saying what he says. Students will be responsible for preparing brief seminar papers and distributing them in advance.


Instructor(s): Charles Hefling

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 6655 The Book of Psalms in Jewish&Christian Traditions Spring 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Theodore Perry

Prerequisites: For graduate students and qualified undergrads. Hebrew and/or Latin recommended but not required.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 6662 Grace, from Lombard to Luther Fall 3
Course Description

This course studies the primary texts (in English) of authors who stood in the background of Luther's treatment of grace. His sources begin with Lombard, who, for Luther, identified grace with the presence of the Holy Spirit in the soul. Luther criticizes later scholastic authors who consider sanctifying grace as a created quality existing in the soul. This criticism begins with Thomas Aquinas and moves to John Duns Scotus, Peter Aureoli, and Gregory of Rimini, who all deal with sanctifying grace but within different views of God's acceptance of man's graced acts as meritorious of the blessed life of heaven.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Stephen F. Brown

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 6688 From Precept to Preacher to Pew: The Theological Development of the Medieval Popular Sermon Spring 3
Course Description

After a brief discussion of the Penitentials (8th-11th centuries), this course examines the impulses toward, sources for, techniques used, and effects achieved by the later medieval popular sermon. Focus topics: the Third and Fourth Lateran Councils, the Manuals of Instruction, the Artes praedicandi, the theological content of the sermons themselves; additional commentary on the response of the laity to the preacher's message.


Instructor(s): Margaret Jennings

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 6708 Hermeneutics of the Stranger Spring 3
Course Description

This seminar engages with the problem of how we interpret the stranger. It begins with a genealogy of some of the major responses of western thought to the inaugural scene of host and stranger--mythic, Platonic, Abrahamic. It then examines a number of thinkers in contemporary continental philosophy who have explored the enigma of the stranger in terms of hospitality, translation, justice and the uncanny. Such thinkers include Kristeva, Strangers to Ourselves, Derrida, Of Hospitality, Ricoeur, On Translation, Levinas, Totality and Infinity. Additional readings will be provided in class. The seminar also involves presentations, discussions, and a final paper.


Instructor(s): Richard M. Kearney

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL7708

Comments:

THEO 6901 Writing About Religion Spring 3
Course Description

A course in the history and practice of journalism and other popular nonfiction about religion. We read articles and books that translate religious ideas for a nonspecialized, often secular audience, and consider how they succeed or fail. Sources include The New Yorker, The Atlantic, documentary films, and books about topics including Scientology, Orthodox Judaism, Roman Catholicism, etc. The course aims to give students a perspective on how the popular press has created the secular encounter with religion; to prepare students to think critically about their own faiths' presentations in the written media; and to prepare them to write well for an irreligious audience — that is, to explain religion to people who may be curious but ignorant, or who may be skeptics.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7001 1-2 Maccabees Fall 3
Course Description

Exegesis of the Greek text of 1-2 Maccabees by philological and historical-critical methods. Meetings are devoted to reading, analyzing, and translating the Greek text, and to critically assessing scholarly opinions on its interpretation.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Gillihan

Prerequisites: Intermediate Greek

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7002 Theology & Phenomenology Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar will examine the conjunction between theology and phenomenology from both directions in order to understand the mutual influence of the one upon the other. We will study a variety of theological and phenomenological works that present differing accounts of each enterprise and of their proper relation. The central question will be this: What does a radical description of the nature of experience have to do with the contemplation of God?


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Andrew Prevot

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7003 Ancient Hebrew & Related Inscriptions Spring 3
Course Description

This course introduces students to the corpus of ancient Hebrew Inscriptions of the Iron Age and to several inscriptions from closely related languages, including Moabite. Students will study paleography, the historical grammar of Hebrew, the relationship of Hebrew to other closely related languages, and new photographic technologies for reading inscriptions. These inscriptions will also offer a perspective on the religious experience and ideas of ancient communities.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): David Vanderhooft

Prerequisites: Intermediate Hebrew I or equivalent.

Cross listed with: LING4203 NELC4251

Comments:

THEO 7004 Thomas Aquinas: A Christological Theology Fall 3
Course Description

Christ’s place in the Summa theologiae (ST) of Thomas Aquinas can best be understood by an ordering principle according to which all being comes and receives its plentitude from God (exitus), and every being tends toward its plentitude by a return (reditus) to its source in God through Christ. This course will explore this return “through Christ” in light of that principle: One must come to knows God’s existence, the mystery of the Trinity, source of all of creation, and the mystery of created and fallen humanity (ST I), before one can then show that our return to God and the attainment of our ultimate end, eternal beatitude, is possible only through the person and mission of Christ Jesus (ST III).


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Gregorio Montejo

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7005 Christian Ethics and Migration Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines the phenomenon of global migration from a Christian theological perspective. Texts from social scientific, legal, and policy perspectives will frame the phenomenon of contemporary migration. The seminar will then undertake ethical analyses of migration paradigms, policies and practices in light of resources from the Christian tradition, considering questions related to globalization, citizenship, economic justice, gender, family ethics and integration.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): kristin heyer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7006 The Book of Isaiah Spring 3
Course Description

In this course we will study the Hebrew text of the book of Isaiah, including the history of its interpretation and its modern study. Knowledge of biblical Hebrew is expected.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jeffrey Cooley

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7007 Theology, Ethics, and Politics Spring 3
Course Description


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Lisa Cahill

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7008 Early Christianity in its Jewish Context Spring 3
Course Description

The course surveys the Jewish context of early Christian literature and history through close analysis of primary texts. We begin with the origins of Jewish sectarianism in the second century BCE and study the development of various Jewish and Christian sects, concluding with Jewish and Christian groups in the second century CE. We will explore how closely related, and in many cases inseparable, Christian and Jewish identity were well into the second century CE.


Instructor(s): Yonder Gillihan

Prerequisites: Intermediate Greek: Hebrew preferred

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7009 Psalms and the Cult Spring 3
Course Description

The Book of Psalms, sometimes called Israel’s “Songbook,” engages the world of religious practice, or cult, in a variety of ways. This is true, also, of other biblical poetic compositions outside of the Psalms. The present course investigates the problem of Psalms and the Cult from a number of perspectives by posing a variety of questions. To what extent does Israel’s poetry reflect or take for granted specific cultic practices? Are such practices individual or communal? Were they connected with expert oversight? How might Psalms have been used during cultic practice? Were they liturgical or performative texts? How might the relationship between psalms and prophecy inform the discussion? Students will formulate answers to these and other questions by close reading of a selection of Psalms in Hebrew, and by engagement with secondary literature and material culture evidence.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): David Vanderhooft

Prerequisites: Three semesters of Biblical Hebrew

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7010 Islam and History in the Middle East Fall 3
Course Description

An in-depth study of the role of Islam in Middle Eastern history from the pre-Islamic era through the 18th century with emphasis on engagement with primary documents. We will introduce methods of historiography and the growth of the Arabic language historical tradition and will examine the role of Islamic thought and practice, Sunni, Shii, and Sufi alike, in the development of society and civilization across time and space.


Instructor(s): Natana De-Long Bas

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ICSP7010

Comments:

THEO 7011 Augustine's De Trinitate (On the Trinity) Fall 3
Course Description

This course will offer an in-depth study of Augustine’s De Trinitate (On the Trinity). The focus will be on the structure, intention, and content of the text, which extends well beyond an exclusively ontological discussion of the Trinity. We will also consider Christology, theological epistemology and language, the structure of the human mind, and ecclesiology. Students will be expected to engage a range of scholarly literature.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Doug Finn

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7012 The Eucharist in Christian Tradition Fall 3
Course Description

“Every day since the middle of the first century, Christians have gathered together around bread and wine, thanked God and received it as the body and blood of Christ” (Jaroslav Pelikan). Through the close reading of representative primary texts from a variety of authors and contexts, this course will explore Eucharistic theologies from early to post-modern Christianity, including Augustine, Hugh of St. Victor, Thomas Aquinas, Catherine of Siena, Calvin, Zwingli, the Council of Trent, and Emmanuel Falque. (NB: Latin not required, but strongly recommended).


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Boyd Taylor Coolman

Prerequisites: Latin (recommended)

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7013 Redemption & Soteriology Fall 3
Course Description

This course explores theological approaches to soteriology, that is, the meaning of redemption and the work of the Redeemer. Special attention is given to the way theories of redemption and claims about the Redeemer relate to accounts of human nature, diagnoses of the human condition and the problem of sin, and the scope of Christ's redemptive causality. We consider patristic, medieval, and contemporary approaches, including recent questions and critiques of traditional accounts.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jeremy Wilkins

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7014 Doctrine of God Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar surveys major figures, texts, and trends in contemporary Trinitarian theology.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Brian Robinette

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7015 Martin Luther and His Interpreters Fall 3
Course Description

The aim of this course is to query the construction of Luther as modern Protestant by returning to the sources, his most important theological works. In this course we will read Luther himself and analyze his writings in order to figure out in what respects he was indeed a Catholic theologian and reformer of the Church. We will analyze the structure of his thought, his rhetoric and polemic, and his theological ideas and commitments. During this process we will gain some familiarity with Luther’s medieval theological sources in addition to the twentieth-century Protestant theologians who took him for granted as their own.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Christine Helmer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7060 Education in Faith: Foundations and Practice Fall 3
Course Description

This course proposes theological, spiritual and pedagogical foundations for a participatory and empowering approach to faith-based education, pastoral ministry and service. Reflecting religious education as a mode of practical theology and concern for the spiritual foundations of Catholic education, the course invites participants to develop their own praxis of educating from and for faith. This is the purpose of the Church’s educational work in the world. However, it is also a responsibility of every Christian person and of every function of ministry and faith based service.


Instructor(s): Thomas Groome

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: TMPS7060

Comments:

THEO 7414 Contemporary Approaches to Religious Education Fall 3
Course Description

The task of forming a people of faith is the challenge each generation must embrace. This course examines various approaches to faith formation for their applicability to contemporary settings. Attention is given to both the theoretical framework and the pastoral expression of the work of religious education.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jane Regan

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: TMRE7000

Comments: This online course will begin on September 12 and will end on November 18, 2016

THEO 7415 Scribes, Scribalism and Scripture Spring 3
Course Description

This course will introduce students to scribes and their craft in ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean antiquity, from the 3rd millennium BCE to the Jewish Second Temple Period. Our goals will be to understand the current state of scholarship on scribalism, and to grasp how scribes thought, worked, and produced the documents that are at the core of the Judeo-Christian traditions. Proficiency in biblical Hebrew and, ideally, some other ancient languages (e.g., Akkadian, Aramaic, Greek, etc.) is expected


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jeff Cooley

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7416 Law and Religion Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines the various ways in which law and religion interact. Part I looks at the “Law of Religion,” focusing on key First Amendment Cases. Part II looks at “Religion in Law,” examining how religious ideas affected secular notions of marriage. Part III looks at the complicated ways in which law and religion influence each other. A key example will be how the Civil War altered biblical interpretation on the morality of slavery.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7443 Comparative Religion: History and Methods Fall 3
Course Description

The comparative study of religions has evolved through different stages of methodological reflection since its establishment as an autonomous discipline over a century ago. Questions concerning the nature and goal of comparison and the possibilities and limits of understanding individuals belonging to other religions remain at the heart of any engagement with religious pluralism. We will explore these questions through a study of the theories of early phenomenologists of religion such as Gerardus Van der Leeuw, through the work of Mircea Eliade and his critics, and up to the contemporary approaches of figures such as Jonathan Z. Smith.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Catherine Cornille

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: TMST7106

Comments:

THEO 7461 Human Rights Interdisciplinary Seminar Spring 3
Course Description

Students wishing to apply for the seminar should submit a brief statement explaining their interest (no longer than 250 words) to humanrights@bc.edu with the subject-line "Human Rights Interdisciplinary Seminar." Please include your Eagle ID and academic discipline in the application. The application deadline is Thursday, November 5, 2016. In the spring of 2017, the seminar's focus will be on the ethical, politico-legal, and psychosocial issues confronting those whose human rights are affected by torture, drones, sexual violence, forced movement, deportation and migration. The differential effects of rights violations due to power based on "gender," "race," ethnicity and economic resources will be critically examined. We will also explore refugee movement and migration and the contours of asylum and other forms of protection, especially in the context of humanitarian crisis, war, and grave forms of economic injustice.


Instructor(s): Brinton Lykes and Daniel Kanstroom

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: APSY7461 EDUC7461 LAWS7461

Comments:

THEO 7486 For God & Country: Thinking about Religion & Citizenship Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores the religious and ethical dimensions of citizenship, with particular attention to the points at which religious and political allegiances conflict or appear to conflict. With an eye toward the contemporary American context, we will draw upon diverse political philosophies, faith traditions, historical periods and geographic regions for insight. We will consider the nature of this conflict between God and country, attempts to resolve it in theory and practice, and contemporary issues that exemplify it. Among the many questions we will ask: Are patriotism and faith compatible? What is the difference between a good person and a good citizen? (Can we be one but not the other?) What are the limits of religious tolerance in a diverse society? How can we educate the next generation to sustain the values and institutions we hold dear?


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Erik Owens

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: EDUC4402

Comments:

THEO 7487 Citizenship in American Political Theology and Political Philosophy Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores the religious and ethical dimensions of citizenship, with particular attention to the points at which religious and political allegiances conflict or appear to conflict. With a focus on the contemporary American context, we will draw upon diverse political philosophies, faith traditions, historical periods and geographic regions for insight. We will consider the nature of this conflict between God and country, attempts to resolve it in theory and practice, and contemporary issues that exemplify it. Among the topics we consider are pluralism, religious freedom, patriotism, civic education, prophetic voices, civil disobedience.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): erik owens

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7507 Theology of Religions/Comparative Theology Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar will focus on the various theological positions which have been developed with regard to the reality of religious pluralism as well as on the relationship between theology of religions and comparative theology. While we will focus mainly on the works of Christian theologians, we will also pay attention to analogous developments in other religious traditions.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Catherine Cornille

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: TMST7115

Comments:

THEO 7518 Aquinas' Ethics Spring 3
Course Description

A study of Thomas Aquinas's Pars Secunda of the Summa Theologiae, including his writings on Faith, Hope, Charity, Justice, Prudence, Fortitude and Temperance.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): James Keenan, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7534 Feminist Theology and Ethics Spring 3
Course Description

Will treat major voices connecting feminist theology and ethics/politics (e.g., Mary Daly, Elizabeth Johnson, Elisabeth Schussler Fiorenza, Margaret Farley, Ivone Gebara, representatives from Asia and Africa, and applied ethics (e.g., economics, racism, sex, abortion).


Instructor(s): Lisa Cahill

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7535 Ethics of War and Peacemaking Fall 3
Course Description

This course will study the many ethical questions that arise in a Christian assessment of war and peacemaking in the modern age. The course will include historical development and moral analysis of various theories of just war and non-violence. Among the applied ethical questions to be examined are humanitarian intervention, targeted killing, economic sanctions, pre-emptive and preventive wars.


Instructor(s): Kenneth Himes

Prerequisites: Theology core.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7536 Christ's Knowledge Fall 3
Course Description

A discussion of Jesus's human knowledge in the context of Chalcedonian Christology transposed, first, into Aquinas's medieval context, and, second, into the context of historical consciousness and a post-modern phenomenology of knowledge.


Instructor(s): fred lawrence

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7567 Theology and Bioethics Spring 3
Course Description

The course will stress Protestant and Catholic approaches to death and dying, infertility therapies, abortion, genetics, health care reform, and AIDS. Social justice will be a key concern. Feminist and intercultural perspectives will be included.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Lisa Sowle Cahill

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7568 Ethics and Christology Fall 3
Course Description

The interdependence of theological ethics and interpretations of Jesus Christ will be explored, using recent and current figures, such as Reinhold Niebuhr, Jurgen Moltmann, Jon Sobrino, Elizabeth Johnson, as well as essays on new approaches, including African, African-American, Asian-American, and postcolonial theologies.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Lisa Cahill

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Doctoral Student only.

THEO 7571 Augustine's Confessions Spring 3
Course Description

This course will offer an in-depth reading of St. Augustine's classic work The Confessions. Attention will be paid not only to the theological, philosophical, and biographical issues raised in the text, but also to questions of genre, style, voice, and structure. Among the topics to be considered will be the nature of evil, language, scriptural interpretation, and the construction of individual and communal religious identity.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Douglas Finn

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7598 Lonergan's Christology Spring 3
Course Description

A careful reading and critical discussion of Bernard Lonergan's treatise, The Incarnate Word (De Verbo Incarnato) and related materials, on his own terms and in relation to other currents in Christology. Seminar discussion with some lecture.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jeremy Wilkins

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7603 Classic Texts of American Theology Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

A seminar focused on the classic texts, and secondary works, produced in and about religion in the United States: William James' Varieties of Religious Experience, H. Richard Niebuhr's Christ and Culture; and George Marsden's Fundamentalism and American Culture.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Mark Massa, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: TMHC7040

Comments: School of Theology and Ministry course

THEO 7606 Peace, Justice and Reconciliation Fall 3
Course Description

This course will consider theological and philosophical questions posed by the ethics of reconciliation in the social and political realms: In what respects are the reconciliation of peoples related to the themes of justice, liberation, reparation, and forgiveness? What are the appropriate forms of moral discourse invoked in assessing genocide, "ethnic cleansing," institutional racism, or the systematic rape of victims? In what respects are distinctively theological interpretations possible or necessary? This course explores the ethical dimensions of reconciliation, examining the interrelated aspects of justice, reconciliation, reparation, historical memory, and forgiveness. It gives special attention to recent attempts at public reconciliation.


Instructor(s): Stephen Pope

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7611 Hebrew Exegesis of the Dead Sea Scrolls Fall 3
Course Description

This course begins with exegesis of the Hebrew text of the three "Rules" found in the Qumran caves and in the Cairo geniza: the Community Rule (1QS), the Rule for the Congregation (1QSa), and the Damascus Rule (CD). We will also survey passages from other sectarian texts devoted to interpretation of scripture and history, esp. the pesharim. Students with ability to read Aramaic will read selections from the Aramaic DSS that complement the Hebrew texts, and all will read the entire corpus of non-biblical mss. in English translation.


Instructor(s): Yonder Gillihan

Prerequisites: Intermediate Hebrew or the equivalent.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7613 13TH Century Franciscan Theology: Alexander & Bonaventure Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores the thirteenth-century Franciscan theological tradition through a substantial engagement with the theology of Alexander of Hales and of St. Bonaventure, focusing on the central theological topics of the theological method, Trinity, and Christology.


Instructor(s): Boyd Taylor Coolman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7621 The Pentateuch Spring 3
Course Description

In this course we will study the Hebrew text of the Pentateuch, focusing on the history of its modern academic study. Knowledge of biblical Hebrew is expected.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jeffrey Cooley

Prerequisites: Knowledge of biblical Hebrew.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7624 Vatican II: History, Interpretation, and Reception Fall 3
Course Description

The Second Vatican Council was arguably the most significant ecclesial event for Roman Catholicism in the last four centuries. Although "Vatican II" has become a staple of contemporary church lingo, few who invoke it (including many bishops and theologians!) seem to have really grasped what happened at that council and what its consequences are for the life of the church today. This course will study the Second Vatican Council as 1) a seminal ecclesial event, 2) a source for authoritative Catholic teaching and 3) a source for a revitalized vision of the church for the third millennium.


Instructor(s): Richard Gaillardetz

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7627 Late Medieval Mystical Traditions Spring 3
Course Description

This course will explore the influence of the Pseudo-Dionysian corpus on late medieval descriptions of the human-divine relationship. In particular, it will analyze in detail (in both the original Latin and in English translation) the use and interpretation of Dionysian mystical theology in the writings of Hugh of St. Victor, Thomas Gallus, Bonaventure, Hugh of Balma, and the author of the Cloud of Unknowing."


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Boyd Taylor Coolman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7630 Authority in Church Spring 3
Course Description

This seminar will consider the nature, scope, limits and structures of the exercise of power and authority in the church. We will consider the topic from theological, historical and cultural perspectives. Particular topics to be considered include: the relationship between the magisterium and moral theology, the magisterium and theologians, the role of the papacy, structures of collegiality and synodality and the distinctive authority of the sensus fidelium. While attentive to ecumenical contexts and contributions, the seminar will focus on the exercise of authority in the Roman Catholic tradition. This will be conducted as a doctoral seminar. Masters level students who have already taken a graduate course in ecclesiology may request permission to enroll from the professor.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Richard Gaillardetz

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7639 Happiness & Virtue Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines major approaches to the relation of contemporary Christian ethics to virtue and human flourishing. It begins with recent scientific studies of human well-being and then examines how they might be understood in relation to important recent writings in contemporary Christian ethics. Topics include the relation between virtue and well-being, sin and grace, temporal and eternal happiness, science and theological ethics. Key terms: Pleasure, happiness, contentment, fulfillment, well-being, flourishing, beatitude, delight, joy. Authors studied include S. Hauerwas, T. Jackson, P. Waddell, J. Porter, J. Keenan.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Stephen Pope

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7640 Twentieth Century Systematic Theologians Spring 3
Course Description

This graduate seminar will consider major systematic theologians, both Catholic and Protestant, of the twentieth century. It follows on, but may be taken independently of, TH 694 Early Modern Theology. The seminar will entail close reading of major texts.


Instructor(s): Michael Himes

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7644 Foundational Theology II: Using Philosophy in Systematic Theology Spring 3
Course Description

The course will take soundings in contemporary philosophical theology's attempts to understand the Trinity, Christology, Soteriology, and Grace, especially in the work of Rahner, Balthasar, and Lonergan.


Instructor(s): Frederick Lawrence

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7652 Augustine: Life and Thought Spring 3
Course Description

This course will survey the major works of the late antique North African bishop Augustine of Hippo. Keeping in mind the social, philosophical, and religious background to his thought, we will explore the development of his theology over the course of his career, with a special focus on its ecclesial context and often polemical character. Towards that end, attention will be paid to his theological disputes with the Manicheans, Donatists, and Pelagians.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Doug Finn

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7654 Theology in a Secular Age Spring 3
Course Description

What is "secularity," and what is the role of theology in "a secular age"? Such questions have gained renewed urgency and complexity as numerous narratives and counter-narratives have been proposed to frame and address them. Engaging several recent voices shaping the conversation and debate in historical, philosophical, and theological terms, this seminar inquires into ways the contemporary theologian may contribute. Beginning with a thorough reading of Charles Taylor's A Secular Age, which lays out the landscape in broad and nuanced terms, the seminar will examine contributions from several figures, including: Asad, Milbank, Zizek, Habermas, Ratzinger, Girard, and Vattimo.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Brian Robinette

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7660 Hans Urs von Balthasar Fall 3
Course Description

Hans Urs von Balthasar is one of the greatest and most controversial figures of Catholic theology in the twentieth century. This seminar will explore his ecumenical mediation of the debate between Erich Przywara and Karl Barth; his development of a theological aesthetics in critical dialogue with Martin Heidegger; his elaboration of a theological dramatics in critical dialogue with G. W. F. Hegel; his method of retrieving various spiritual, cultural, and doctrinal sources; his Christology, Trinitarian theology, and anthropology; and several positive and critical receptions of his work.


Instructor(s): Andrew Prevot

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7666 Catholics and American Culture Spring/Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the interaction between Catholic theology, liturgical practice, and intellectual traditions with American mainstream culture Using demographic, sociological, and theological resources, it will examines a series of specific issues: passing on the faith to younger generations, Catholic "market share" in the ecology of American denominations, the tradition of neo-Thomism, etc.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Mark Massa, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: TMHC7063

Comments:

THEO 7667 Theology and the Mystical Turn Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar explores the wide-ranging apophatic mood in contemporary thought and the diverse ways mystical theology has come to occupy a central role in recent reflection upon God. In addition to examining the emphasis upon "difference," "absence," and "otherness" among key philosophical and theological voices, the seminar inquires into the relationship between negative theology and the incarnation, as this relationship uniquely characterizes Christian apophasis.


Instructor(s): Brian Robinette

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7671 Theology of Edward Schillebeeckx Spring 3
Course Description

This doctoral seminar will be devoted to the reading of primary texts from three periods in the work of Edward Schillebeeckx (1914-2009): 1) the early existential-phenomenological retrieval of Thomas Aquinas's theology of sacraments; 2) the shift to historical consciousness and hermeneutics during and after Vatican II, particularly exemplified in his Christology; 3) the shift to critical theory and its critique of modernity, leading to an historical praxis of mysticism and politics in the light of a suffering world.


Instructor(s): Mary Ann Hinsdale, IHM

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7674 Theology & Science Spring 3
Course Description

This seminar explores issues of divine creativity and salvation in light of evolutionary theory. Focusing primarily on theological works that articulate the meaning of freedom, sin, grace, and salvation in conversation with evolutionary sciences, the seminar highlights some of the challenges and prospects of soteriological reflection in a post-Darwinian context.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Brian Robinette

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7676 Theological Aesthetics Spring 3
Course Description

This course will explore the dramatic, aesthetic dimension of faith. In the light of Hans Urs von Balthasar's thought, students will examine the performative character of Christian faith as a locus theologicus that integrates contemplation and action, beauty and justice. Among the issues to be addressed are: theology and spirituality; the Christological foundation of theological aesthetics; popular Catholicism as liberating aesthetic practices; the relationship between liberation theology and theological aesthetics; theology and the arts.


Instructor(s): Roberto Goizueta

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7687 Catholic Theological Ethics: 12th-18th Century Spring 3
Course Description

A survey of the following major figures in theological ethics: Duns Scotus, William of Ockham, Jean Gerson, Antoninus of Florence, Desiderius Erasmus, John Mair, Bartolomé de las Casas, Juan Gines de Sepulveda, Francisco de Vitoria, Dominic Soto, Bartolomé Medina, the Council of Trent (1545-1563), Francesco de Toldeo, Thomas Sanchez, Francisco Suarez, Antonio Escobar, Blaise Pascal, Alphonsus Liguori, Johann Michael Sailer, Johann Baptist von Hirscher, and Thomas Slater.


Instructor(s): James F. Keenan, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7694 Early Modern Theology Spring 3
Course Description

This graduate seminar will treat several significant Christian theologians from the end of the 17th to the early 20th centuries by examining significant primary texts. It will discuss the ways these theologians understood their field of study, its method, organization, and relation to other fields, especially history and science.


Instructor(s): Michael Himes

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7705 Curating Revelation: Ancient reception, transmission, and transformation of Scripture Spring 3
Course Description

Examines the development of Jewish and Christian hermeneutics in ancient context through close reading of primary sources. Focus on creation of new meanings via key modes of interpretation (e.g., allegory, pesher, rewriting, commentary, pseudepigraphy), hermeneutical ethics, and implications of ancient precedents for later theology.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): yonder gillihan

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7711 Duffy Lectures: Ecological Theology in Global and Ecumenical Perspective Spring 3
Course Description

This graduate seminar will incorporate the five Duffy Lectures on “Ecological Theology” given by Professor Denis Edwards of the Australian Catholic University in Adelaide during the 2018 Spring semester. Beginning with the loss of biodiversity as a theological problem, we move on to explore the ecological and cosmic promise of Christian theology by rethinking and reframing some traditional Christian doctrines (e.g., God/Trinity, creation, humanity as Imago Dei, Incarnation, the Holy Spirit, etc.) using ecological lenses drawn from a variety of cultural perspectives.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): MaryAnn Hinsdale

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7712 John & Virtue Ethics Spring 3
Course Description

An examination of selected passages from the Johannine writings—John's Gospel, 1-3 John, and Revelation—with a focus on their possible contributions to virtue ethics and issues in moral theology today.


Instructor(s): Thomas Stegman, S.J. and James Keenan, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: TMNT8039

Comments:

THEO 7720 Ethics and Global Christianity Spring 3
Course Description

The course will incorporate the five Duffy Lectures given by Agnes Brazal from the Philippines. The lecture series title is "Liberation-Postcolonial Theological Ethics in the Philippine Context." The course content will follow the lecture topics: postcolonial theology, gender, HIV/AIDS, migration, and new social media. There will also be a component on peacebuilding. The course will reference but not be limited to a postcolonial approach and the Asian context.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Lisa Cahill

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7734 Spiritual Sources of Catholic Education and Catechesis Fall 3
Course Description

Catholic education and catechesis are rooted in particular appropriations of the Christian faith articulated as schools of spirituality. From these appropriations emerge commitments to specific charisms and pedagogical practices. It is imperative that Catholic educational efforts continue to affirm the spiritual legacies that have sustained schools, missions, and parochial programs throughout history. In this course we read some foundational texts of major schools of spirituality and explore how they have inspired life-giving philosophies of Catholic education. The guiding principle throughout the course is that a good philosophy of Catholic education and catechesis is always sustained by a deep spirituality.


Instructor(s): Hosffman Ospino

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: EDUC7734 TMRE7053

Comments: The course is open to Catholic school teachers and administrators, religious educators, and anyone interested in learning more about the spiritual roots of Catholic education.

THEO 7735 Faith, Morality&Law Fall 3
Course Description

Looks at the relationship between faith, morality, and law at key points in the Christian tradition and in relationship to contemporary issues. Section One examines the relationship between moral law and Christian life by looking at key passages from the New Testament in their historical context and classic Protestant and Catholic views of the subject. Section Two considers the relationship of law and morality in a pluralistic society. Section Three looks at responsibilities of Christians who find themselves in an unjust legal system. We will consider the possibilities and limits of civil disobedience and the call to martyrdom.


Instructor(s): Cathleen Kaveny

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: LAWS9735

Comments:

THEO 7738 Hermeneutics of the Gift Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar explores debates on the meaing of gift in contemporary continental thought.


Instructor(s): Richard M. Kearney

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL7739

Comments:

THEO 7762 Christian Ethics: Major Figures Fall 3
Course Description

Will consider fundamental questions in Christian theological ethics. Major issues are Scripture and ethics, nature and grace, Christian ethics and philosophy or "reason," and faith and social action or politics. Two areas of applied ethics will be emphasized: (1) just war and pacifism; and (2) gender, sex, marriage. The approach will be both historical or descriptive, and critical or normative. Authors include Augustine, Aquinas, Luther, Calvin, Menno Simons. This course is for doctoral students only.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Lisa Sowle Cahill

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7779 Christian Philosophy: Advanced Seminar Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar will ask whether or under what conditions "Christian philosophy" is not the "square circle" alleged by Martin Heidegger. We will sharpen this question through a preliminary study of the early 20th century debate over it and then move into a close reading of J.Y. Lacoste, Experience and the Absolute. The inquiry will also require frequent attention to works by Heidegger, Bonhoeffer, Hegel, and John of the Cross.


Instructor(s): Jeffrey Bloechl

Prerequisites: For advanced MA students and Ph.D. students; familiarity with the philosophy of Heidegger, and some basic Christian theology.

Cross listed with: PHIL7779

Comments:

THEO 7803 Graeca Spring 3
Course Description

Rapid reading in Jewish Greek texts (LXX, Philo, Josephus), with an introduction to research in the authors treated, for students who have completed Intermediate Greek.


Instructor(s): Pheme Perkins

Prerequisites: Intermediate Greek

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7813 Theological Bioethics: From the Basics to the Future Spring 3
Course Description

The Course addresses, first, the basics issues in bioethics focusing on the beginning of human life (reproductive technologies, prenatal diagnosis, abortion), biomedical research (transplantation, AIDS, genetic research, stem cell research), sustainability, and the end of human life (palliative care, vegetative state, euthanasia). Second, it discusses the bioethical concerns raised by developing biotechnologies (e.g., neurosciences, oncofertility, nanotechnology, cyborg technologies). By studying the current theological debate and the Catholic Magisterium, principles and theories will be highlighted aiming at supporting personal decision-making and pastoral service.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Andrea Vicini, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: TMCE7052

Comments:

THEO 7817 Global Health and Theological Ethics Spring 3
Course Description

The course engages theological ethics in promoting global health as an urgent good and right that is integral to a vision of just society. Global health challenges (from HIV/AIDS to poverty and underdevelopment) are studied by highlighting international examples (from Asia, Africa, and the Americas) that help to identify the theological agenda and to implement it. Public health concerns and universal health coverage are part of this agenda worldwide. The course's theological analyses and proposals rely on Catholic and Protestant insights (from social doctrine to philosophical and theological bioethical discourse).


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Andrea Vicini, S.J.

Prerequisites: ​One undergraduate or graduate course either in bioethics or moral theology.

Cross listed with: TMCE8518

Comments: Level 3 course

Undergraduate students can request permission to enroll in the course by contacting the professor.

THEO 7822 Human Genetics and Biotechnologies:Challenges for Theological Ethics Spring 3
Course Description

The course examines, first, the ethical issues raised by human genetics. It focuses on: genetic information, testing, screening, therapy, pharmacogenomics, and enhancement. Second, it studies new biotechnologies that rely on genetics (synthetic biology and regenerative medicine). Third, it discusses current biotechnological developments in neurosciences, oncofertility, nanotechnology, cyborg technologies, and artificial intelligence. In dialogue with philosophers and theologians, the proposed theological approach addresses the ethical issues that surface in research, in clinical practice, and in pastoral settings.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Andrea Vicini, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: TMCE8056

Comments:

THEO 7827 Introduction to the New Testament Fall 3
Course Description

Introduction to academic study of the New Testament for graduate students entering theology and ministry programs. Surveys each book of the New Testament including its historical setting, its sources, authorship, and literary structure, and its major theological themes. Concludes with a treatment of the "historical Jesus" debate.


Instructor(s): Pheme Perkins

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: TMNT7023

Comments:

THEO 7880 Psychotherapy and Spirituality Fall 3
Course Description

Participants explore the theoretical and practical integration of theological and psychological perspectives in the practice of clinical psychotherapy as well as in the practice of pastoral counseling and spiritual direction.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): John McDargh

Prerequisites: Undergraduates require permission of instructor.

Cross listed with: TMPS7120

Comments:

THEO 7893 Contemporary Theories of Justice Spring 3
Course Description

A study of some major recent interpretations of the meaning of justice (e.g., Rawls, Sandel, Walzer, Sen and Nussbaum, Taylor), their historical antecedents (e.g., Aquinas, Locke, Kant), and the critique and appropriation of these interpretations in recent Christian ethics.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): David Hollenbach, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7956 Theology as Hermeneutical Fall 3
Course Description

To understand (1) the Christian drama of salvation as presented in the Old and New Testaments; (2) the development of the creeds; (3) the difference between a Christian world view and Christian theology.


Instructor(s): Frederick Lawrence

Prerequisites: M.A. level Philosophy or Theology

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7957 Theology as Political Spring 3
Course Description

After comparing and contrasting the approaches of Latin American Liberation Theologies of Gutierrez, Sobrino, et al. with the Continental approach of Johann Baptist Metz, we will turn to more recent approaches and end with raising foundational issues vis-a-vis the current loss of legitimacy within American democracy and the absorption of civil society into the market.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Shawn Copeland

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7968 Theological Anthropology Fall 3
Course Description

This graduate seminar explores modern and postmodern theological approaches to the Christian doctrines of creation, sin, and grace. The study of each doctrine begins with a brief survey of biblical and classical understandings/controversies, followed by consideration of the critiques and correctives offered by post-liberal, political, and contextual/liberation theologians. The impact of recent developments in cosmology, social constructivist understandings of gender, sexuality and selfhood, and perspectives from critical race theory, class, and disability may also be explored, according to student interest.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Mary Ann Hinsdale

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7969 Suffering, Solidarity, and the Cross Spring 3
Course Description

Suffering and, often, tragedy and lament are basic features of human life. This course raises questions about the relevance of the cross of Christ and human solidarity to these afflictions.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): M. Shawn Copeland

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7977 Twentieth Century Catholic Moral Theologians Fall 3
Course Description

The course looks at the most important works that shaped Catholic Theological Ethics in the twentieth century. It analyses the innovative works of Lottin, Tillmann, and Gilleman whose works challenged the classical paradigm of manualists like Davis, Jone, Ford and Kelly. The course then looks at Häring, and at the roots of proportionalism that result from that same Council. The legacy of Fuchs as well as twentieth century papal encyclicals are also studied. The course concludes with the emerging work of Latin American liberationists, American feminist and black moral theologians, African inculturationists, and Asian theological ethicists


Instructor(s): James F. Keenan, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 7994 Education for Justice and Peace Spring 3
Course Description

The course begins with an investigation of the tools of social analysis as a means of getting beneath the surface of issues of injustice, followed by a review of Catholic social teachings as a means of offering a theological foundation for educating for justice. Finally, it looks at educational methods from the early 20th century to the present that reflect on education itself as a work of justice. The course concludes with student groups presenting lessons in which they have used tools of investigation and analysis on an issue, incorporated theological reflection, and developed a methodology for effective education.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Theresa O'Keefe

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: TMRE7083

Comments: This course if valuable for anyone who expects to be doing justice and peace work, regardless of teaching setting. The variety of potential settings is considered in the course.

THEO 8002 American Catholicism and Social Reform Fall 3
Course Description

This course will examine select individuals, groups and issues that have shaped the history of American Catholic involvement in social action, e.g. John Ryan and Charles Coughlin, the Central Verein and the Catholic Worker, immigration and slavery. The aim of the course is to see how American Catholicism interacted with the wider civil society and what contributions the Catholic community made to the reform of American social life.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kenneth Himes

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 8101 Interim Study Fall/Spring 0
Course Description

Required for master's candidates who have completed all course requirements but have not taken comprehensive examinations. Also for master's students (only) who have taken up to six credits of Thesis Seminar but have not yet finished writing their thesis. Interim Study requires a commitment of at least 20 hours per week working on the thesis.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 8501 Complicity Fall 2
Course Description

This seminar draws upon philosophical, legal, and theological materials to consider to what degree agents are responsible when they contribute to?or benefit from?the wrongdoing of other agents. Key topics to be considered are: 11) the nature of complicity as a distinct moral problem ; 2) conspiracy and accessory liability in the criminal law; 3) theological concepts of cooperation with evil and appropriation of evil; and 4) market complicity


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: LAWS9970

Comments:

THEO 8502 Mercy & Justice Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores the meaning of mercy, particularly in its relationship to justice. It examines four major topics: (1) mercy in its relationship to retributive justice, focusing on mercy or clemency in the case of criminal sentencing, as well as broader questions of retribution for wrongdoing, such as whether there can or should be criteria for the exercise of mercy, whether mercy can be exercised unjustly, and the relationship of forgiveness to mercy; (2) mercy in its relationship to distributive justice, focusing on the corporal works of mercy and issues such as the relationship of justice and private charity; (3) mercy in its relationship to social justice, or the social face of mercy; and (4) divine justice and mercy, focusing on the way theologians have attempted to reconcile God’s mercy and God’s justice. Readings for the course will be interdisciplinary, including philosophical, theological, and legal materials.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Cathleen Kaveny

Prerequisites: Ph.D. students; MA students by instructor's permission.

Cross listed with: LAWS8502

Comments:

THEO 8503 Authority of Scripture Fall 3
Course Description

A seminar investigating the emergence and development of the Christian Bible from the 1st to the 4th centuries C.E. This seminar will discuss the development of a New Testament canon as well as different views of Biblical writings as revelation that developed along with competing claims to a secret or higher truth in "esoteric," non-canonical works of the same period. Students will explore the understanding of Scripture in four early Christian exegetes: Irenaeus, Origen, Eusebius and Jerome. This seminar will incorporate a survey of scribes, book circulation and the role of reading circles in antiquity.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: MA level work in Bible, Early Church or Systematics

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 8504 Bonaventure's Breviloquium Spring 3
Course Description

This course focuses on St. Bonaventure’s Breviloquium, a short treatise on all the themes of systematic theology, wherein he presents the truths Christians must believe and how they must be understood.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): boyd taylor coolman and steve brown

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 8505 Natural Law Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines Thomas Aquinas's natural law doctrine in some detail, considering both the "treatise on law" and its larger doctrinal context within the Summa Theologiae. It then discusses modern philosophical and theological criticisms of natural law, the revival of natural law in the twentieth century, and current attempts to adapt natural law theory to questions raised in philosophy, theology (particularly divine command theory), and evolutionary theory.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Steve Pope

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 8506 Aquinas Pneumatology Spring 3
Course Description

A study of the doctrine of the Holy Spirit in the works of Thomas Aquinas, not only in the Summa Theologiciae but in various other works, including the Commentary on the Sentences, the Summa Contra Gentiles and the Disputed Questions, as well as the Biblical Commentaries particularly the Gospel of John. Among the topics considered will be: The inner-Trinitarian procession of the Spirit, the mission of the Spirit in the world, Spirit Christology, the gifts of the Holy Spirit, Ecclesiology, scriptural hermeneutics, and salvation.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Gregorio Montejo

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 8507 Contemporary Currents in Ecclesiology Spring 3
Course Description

This seminar will focus on six contemporary ecclesiological currents that have emerged in the last five decades directly or indirectly as critiques of so called “communion ecclesiology.”


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): richard Gaillardetz

Prerequisites: Graduate course in Ecclesiology

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 8508 Aquinas and Neoplatonism Spring 3
Course Description

An examination of Aquinas’ dynamically evolving engagement with such key thinkers in the Platonic tradition as Boethius, Proclus, and Dionysius the Areopagite, and Thomas’ increasingly complex retrieval of Platonic thought in his elaboration of several important theological topics, such as the problem of evil and the nature of the good, the task and scope of theology as a science, the relationship between divine transcendence and the created order, and the epistemology of religious experience.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Gregorio Montejo

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 8566 Mystical Poetry in the Islamic Humanities Spring 3
Course Description

Spiritual poetry and music have long been the primary cultural vehicle for the popular communication of Qur'anic teaching throughout the Islamic world. Beginning with essential background from the Qur'an and Hadith, this seminar will focus on three classics of the Islamic humanities: Attar's Language of the Birds; Rumi's Masnavi; and Hafez's lyrical poetry. Each participant will also study another major work from the Islamic humanities (in translation) from a different Muslim culture or cognate artistic forms (film, music, literature) from contemporary spiritual settings


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: In addition (as indicated on the syllabus), doctoral students will be doing an additional 15-20 p. (minimum) research paper on a topic relating to thier dissertation subject, and pursuing three hours weekly of additional advanced Arabic readings with the Professor from Ibn 'Arabi's Fusus al-Hikam and Futuhat (on spiritual psychology, epistemology and sainthood).

THEO 8567 Christian Ethics: Major Figures Fall 3
Course Description

This course will explore the theological ethics of Augustine, Aquinas, Luther Calvin, Menno Simons (Radical Reformation), and possibly Jonathan Edwards. It will highlight the interrelation of concepts of nature, sin, grace, justification, and sanctification; the use of the bible; and the ethics of marriage and of war and peace. This is a doctoral seminar; the last few weeks of the course will be dedicated to discussion of students' potentially publishable research projects


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Lisa Cahill

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 8618 Development of Theology as a Scientific Study Fall 3
Course Description

This course traces the development of theology from a study of the text of Sacred Scripture to the more technical examination of the difficult doctrinal questions raised in reading Scripture. The basic text for organizing these discussions was Peter Lombard’s Sentences. This course will study the methodical issues discussed in the prologues to many of the Commentaries on the Sentences of the 13th and 14th centuries to show the technical development of the formal discussions of these difficult doctrinal questions.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Stephen Brown

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 8630 Authority in the Church Spring 3
Course Description

This advanced graduate seminar is for doctoral students and masters level students who have already taken a graduate course in ecclesiology or its equivalent. The seminar will explore the nature, scope, limits and structures of authority in the church with an emphasis on specific issues and topics that have emerged within the Roman Catholic tradition.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Richard R. Gaillardetz

Prerequisites: Masters level students must receive permission from the instructor to enroll and must have already taken a graduate course in ecclesiology

Cross listed with:

Comments: Masters level students must receive permission from the instructor to enroll and must have already taken a graduate course in ecclesiology

THEO 8801 Masters Thesis Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

By arrangement.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 8816 Inaugural Sermons & Questions Fall 3
Course Description

A graduate introduction to Inaugural Sermons and Questions in the Arts and Theology faculties of the medieval universities. This course will require the edition of unedited Latin texts or English translations of previously edited Latin texts. The Sermon content illustrates the various senses of Scripture; the Question content deals with the difficult doctrinal questions arising from the study of the literal sense of Scripture. In the Theology faculty these debates are often disputations of those moving up to the level of Master with their fellow classmates.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Stephen Brown

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL8813

Comments:

THEO 8817 Christ in the New Testament Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar studies the diverse Christological patterns in the New Testament: Jesus as embodiment of Wisdom in sayings and hymns (John); as fulfillment of messianic hopes (Matthew); as crucified and resurrected redeemer (Paul), and as exalted in heaven (Rev). Both Jewish elements in these patterns and their reformulation in second and third century Christianity (Justin Martyr, Irenaeus, Valentinians and Origen) will be discussed. The final section of the seminar will discuss the use of these studies in Catholic systematics (Schillebeeckx, Gutierrez, Schussler-Fiorenza, Johnson and Benedict XVI).


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Pheme Perkins

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 8818 Theology of Historical Praxis Fall 3
Course Description

A consideration of Religion in relation to Civil Society (as intersubjective, technological, economic), State (polity), and Culture, with readings from A. de Tocqueville, Christopher Dawson, Robert Bellah, Pierre Manent, Nicholas Boyle, Eric Voegelin, Tony Judt, Wolfgang Böckenförde, Jürgen Habermas, Bernard Lonergan, Robert Doran, et al.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Frederick Lawrence

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 8819 Jerusalem and Athens: Foundational Methodology Fall 3
Course Description

Tertullian (c. 155 – c. 240 AD) asked, “What has Athens to do with Jerusalem?” (De praescriptione haereticorum, vii)—a question about the relation between philosophy and revelation that has been asked repeatedly down to our own day. We trace the stages of the problematic, focusing on Augustine (354-430), Averroes (1126-1198), Maimonides (1135-1204), Thomas Aquinas (1225 1274), Spinoza (1632-1677), Kant (1724-1804), Hegel (1770-1831), Heidegger (1889-1976), L. Strauss (1899-1973), Voegelin (1901-1985), Lonergan (1904-1984), with readings from Fortin, Mahdi, Brague, Sala, and Fackenheim.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 8820 Aquinas: Biblical Commentaries Spring 3
Course Description

This course will focus on Aquinas’ Biblical commentaries of select Old and New Testament texts in order to explore such issues as Thomistic scriptural hermeneutics, Christology, ecclesiology, Trinitarian theology, soteriology, and sacramental theology. We will look at select portions of Thomas’ exegesis of the Psalms, Job, Isaiah, Lamentations, the Gospels of Matthew and John, as well as the Pauline Epistles


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 8826 Introduction to the Hebrew Bible Fall 3
Course Description

A survey of the Hebrew Bible in its ancient Near Eastern context, focusing on historical and religious ideas and on the literary expression of those ideas. Participants are introduced to methods and results of modern critical biblical scholarship, but attention is also paid to the traditions of biblical interpretation in Judaism and Christianity.


Instructor(s): Rabbi Rifat Sonsino

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 9670 Methods in Theology Spring 3
Course Description

In the late 1960s, Karl Rahner asserted that theology's new partners in dialogue were the human and social sciences. Increasingly in answering new and perennial questions, contemporary theology has partnered with archaeology, sociology, cultural studies, psychology, world religions, and forms of critical theory. This course considers various methods in doing theology as well as some of theology's significant dialogue partners.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Shawn Copeland

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 9901 Doctoral Comprehensive Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

For students who have not yet passed the Doctoral Comprehensive but prefer not to assume the status of a non-matriculating student for the one or two semesters used for preparation for the comprehensive.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 9911 Doctoral Continuation Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

All students who have been admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree are required to register and pay the fee for doctoral continuation during each semester of their candidacy. Doctoral Continuation requires a commitment of at least 20 hours per week working on the dissertation.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 9941 Schleiermacher Spring 3
Course Description

An intensive seminar devoted to close reading of important theological, methodological, and philosophical writings of Friedrich Schleiermacher, including most or all of the following: the Speeches on Religion, the Brief Outline of the Study of Theology, the Christmas Eve dialogue, and the Glaubenslehre (The Christian Faith). Proficiency in German sufficient for regular, intelligent engagement with the original texts will be expected of those who enroll, although the standard English translations will be used.


Instructor(s): Charles C. Hefling

Prerequisites: Knowledge of German is essential.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 9980 Seminar: Biblical Studies I Fall 3
Course Description

By arrangement with Department.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Required of Ph.D candidates in Biblical Studies.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 9981 Seminar: Biblical Studies II Fall 3
Course Description

Required of Ph.D candidates in Biblical Studies.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Required of Ph.D candidates in Biblical Studies.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 9982 Ethics Doctoral Seminar Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

By arrangement.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 9984 Systematics Doctoral Seminar Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

By arrangement.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

THEO 9985 Comparative Doctoral Seminar Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

By arrangement.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: