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Romance Languages&Literatures Courses (RLRL) College of Arts and Sciences


Subject Area Course # Course Title Semester Credit Hours Expand
RLRL 1020 The Immigrant in Film and Literature Summer 3
Course Description

The experiences of the displaced, the exile and the immigrant have inspired great literature and cinema in the Spanish speaking world. This course will delve into a variety of narratives about the perilous journeys of Central Americans and Mexicans making their way to the North, the terrifying voyages of the brave and desperate people crossing to Spain from North Africa, and the struggle to adapt to new social, cultural and linguistic realities. Students will read, in English translation, short stories, short novellas, and first-hand accounts of immigrant experiences and watch several Spanish-language movies with English subtitles.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Christopher Wood

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: All class discussions and assignments will be in English.

RLRL 1023 Elementary Portuguese I Fall 3
Course Description

This beginning course is designed for students with little or no knowledge of the Portuguese language. It is an introduction to the language and cultures of the Portuguese-speaking world: Portugal, Brazil, Mozambique, Angola, Guinea-Bissau, Cape Verde, Sao Tome and Principe and East Timor. Students will be engaged in basic activities and conversation, read simple texts, and study basic grammar structures and vocabulary (personal and family information, daily routines, food, housing, hobbies).


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Portuguese

RLRL 1024 Elementary Portuguese II Spring 3
Course Description

This course is aimed at those who want to further their knowledge of Portuguese. It is expected that students can understand texts and frequently used expressions related to areas of most immediate relevance (personal and family information, shopping, local geography, health, past memories, and leisure); communicate in routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information; and describe aspects of his/her background, immediate environment, and matters in areas of immediate need.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course is a continuation of RLRL1023
Conducted in Portuguese

RLRL 1163 Boston's French Connection Summer 3
Course Description

Students will explore the following topics: early French explorers and the Acadian experience, Boston’s Puritans and French Huguenots, the American and French Revolutions, French influences on Boston’s Catholics and Unitarian Transcendentalists, French influences on Boston’s musicians, painters, sculptors, architects politicians and writers, and contributions of the different Francophone peoples in Boston. Students will develop skill in analyzing historical and literary texts and will examine closely passages in Alexis de Tocqueville’s "Democracy in America" and Simone de Beauvoir’s "America Day by Day".


Instructor(s): Jeff Flagg

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

RLRL 2292 Modern Middle Eastern and Arabic Literature (in translation) Spring 3
Course Description

The complex, multicultural nature of the Middle East by surveying the twentieth- century literature of Arabic-speaking lands, Israel, and Turkey. Identity, culture, religion, nationalism, conflict, and minority narratives. Arabic works: the writings of Adonis, Darwish, and Qabbani. Hebrew works: the writings of Amichai and Bialik. Works written in French, English, Kurdish, Syriac, Turkish, and various Middle Eastern dialects: the writings of Andree Chedid, Mario Levi, Charles Corm, Louis Awad, Said Akl, and Orhan Pamuk.


Instructor(s): Franck Salameh

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: NELC2161 ENGL2348

Comments: All works are read in English translation.

RLRL 3302 Racism: French and American Perspectives Spring 3
Course Description

French visitors have been observing and commenting on race relations in the United States since before the Civil War. During the twentieth century Paris became a magnet attracting disillusioned African-American artists, musicians and writers in search of a home and an opportunity to express their talents. And today the French confront a history of colonialism and struggle to combat racism as they interact with immigrants from former colonies. What is racism? What are the influences that shape attitudes towards race relations? We will explore these issues in the writings of Tocqueville, Beauvoir, Wright, Baldwin, and Fanon, among others.


Instructor(s): Jeff Flagg

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: AADS3302

Comments:

RLRL 3310 Hacking the Humanities: Programming and Analysis for Literary and Historical Studies Fall 3
Course Description

This course will introduce humanities students to a variety of digital research methods. Students will learn the basics of Python programming for literary and historical studies, encounter a number of tools widely used by digital humanists (such as MALLET, Gephi, and GIS programs), and engage with theoretical works that underpin the field. While we will encounter open questions and the epistemological justification for digital research, this class is primarily a methods one. After completing this course, students will be able build or apply digital tools in their own research. Designed for graduate students/upper-level undergraduates. No programming or command-line experience required.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL4899 LING4328 HIST4899

Comments:

RLRL 3331 Writing Tutorial I Fall 0
Course Description

Offered in conjunction with RL courses beyond the 3000-level and by arrangement only. Includes individual work with a writing tutor for students whose written French is in need of improvement.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

RLRL 3332 Writing Tutorial II Spring 0
Course Description

Offered in conjunction with RL courses beyond the 3000-level and by arrangement only. Includes individual work with a writing tutor for students whose written French is in need of improvement.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

RLRL 3399 Readings and Research Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: By arrangement

RLRL 4495 Second Language Acquisition Spring 3
Course Description

An introduction to what it means to learn, and know, a second or foreign language. The course focuses on research carried out since the development of the "interlanguage hypothesis", addressing in particular the role of the learner's native language; debate about the role of input and interaction; research on the social and psychological factors that bear on second language learning. Emphasis is on the acquisition of second-language morphology, grammar, and vocabulary by adults, with some treatment of child language acquisition.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Claire Foley and Margaret Thomas

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: LING3378

Comments:

RLRL 4499 College Teaching of Foreign Language Fall 1
Course Description

This one-credit seminar is dedicated to establishing a strong foundation for graduate studies.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Laurie Shepard

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in English

RLRL 5572 Comparative Development of the Romance Languages Fall 3
Course Description

How many Romance languages are there? You may be surprised! What constitutes a Romance language? And why are they called "Romance" languages? In addition to answering these and many other questions, we will examine in considerable detail the linguistic development and structure of Spanish, French and Italian, and acquire more limited familiarity with other Romance languages. The focus of the course will be on their historical development from Latin. This course may be taken for either graduate or undergraduate credit.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Laurie Shepard

Prerequisites: Advanced knowledge of at least one Romance language or Latin, or a strong background in Linguistics.

Cross listed with: LING4372

Comments: Conducted in English

RLRL 5597 Foreign Language Pedagogy Fall 3
Course Description

For anyone considering the possibility of teaching a foreign language. Introduces students to techniques of second language teaching at any level. Students learn how to evaluate language proficiency, organize a communication course, review language-teaching materials, and incorporate audiovisual and electronic media in the classroom.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: EDUC6303 LING4330

Comments: Fulfills Massachusetts licensure requirement methods in foreign language education

RLRL 6620 Capstone:Beyond Study Abroad Fall 3
Course Description

Through the eyes of 20th century literary writers such as John Dos Passos, Ernest Hemingway, Carlos Fuentes and Julia Alvarez, students will explore literature and how external events interact with personal choices to affect relationships and life-commitments, often with serious moral consequences. More specifically, the course will examine how the experience of cultural displacement itself impacts the challenge and process of vocational discernment. While focusing on Spain and Latin America, the course will appeal to any student who has studied abroad. All readings and movies will be in English.


Instructor(s): Elizabeth Goizueta

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: UNCP5563

Comments: You can take a Capstone class only as a senior or second-semester junior. You can take only one Capstone class before graduation. You cannot take any Capstone class Pass/Fail.

RLRL 6697 Advanced Independent Research Fall 6
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

RLRL 6698 Honors Research Seminar Fall 3
Course Description

This semester is devoted to defining and researching the thesis. Students will work closely with their thesis director and meet regularly as a group with the program coordinator to discuss their work in progress. At the end of the semester students will present a clear statement of their thesis, accompanied by an outline, a bibliography of works consulted, and one chapter.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

RLRL 6699 Honors Thesis Seminar Spring 3
Course Description

This semester is devoted to the writing and completion of the thesis. Students will continue to work closely with their thesis director and meet as a group with the program coordinator. Upon submitting the final copy of their thesis, students will make a short oral presentation to the faculty and to other students during the annual reception honoring their achievements.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

RLRL 7780 Readings in Theory Spring 3
Course Description

This course is organized as an introduction to the reading of literary theory for graduate students in various disciplines. Its aim is to develop an awareness of and sensitivity to the specific means and consequences of interpreting literary and extra-literary language today. The course allows students to acquire a basic familiarity with some of the most formative linguistic, philosophical, and anthropological antecedents underpinning any attempt to understand and account for the special status reserved for rhetorical language in literature or beyond it.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

RLRL 7799 Readings and Research Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: By arrangement

RLRL 8802 Methods in Advanced Research Spring 3
Course Description

An introduction to new, interdisciplinary approaches to advanced literary analysis and scholarly research, conducted by the Italian faculty in three, separate, four-week sections. The semester's work will culminate in the preparation of a major research project incorporating the newly acquired methodologies.


Instructor(s): Franco Mormando, Rena Lamparska and Laurie Shepard

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian

RLRL 8880 Dissertation Seminar Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

This bimonthly seminar provides Ph.D. students with a forum in which to discuss their works in progress and further develop the variety of skills necessary for conducting effective academic research and bringing the writing of their dissertation to successful completion.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: For Ph.D. students only.

RLRL 8888 Interim Study Fall/Spring 0
Course Description

Required for master's candidates who have completed all course requirements but have not taken comprehensive examinations. Also for master's students (only) who have taken up to six credits of Thesis Seminar but have not yet finished writing their thesis.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

RLRL 8899 The Art and Craft of Literary Translation: A Seminar Spring 3
Course Description

Literary translation as an art. Discussion of the history and theory of literary translation in the West and in Russia, but mainly practice in translating poetry or artistic prose from Germanic, Romance, Slavic, or Classical Languages, into English.
Conducted entirely in English as a workshop.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Maxim D. Shrayer

Prerequisites: Knowledge of a Classical, Germanic, Romance or Slavic language beyond the intermediate level

Cross listed with: LING4327 ENGL6675 SLAV4061

Comments: Permission of instructor required for undergraduates and for languages beyond those in the course description.

RLRL 9990 Graduate & Professional Seminar Fall 1
Course Description

The seminar presents a systematic introduction to the issues and topics of graduate student life and preparation for a successful career. Discussions will include professional ethics, strategies for conference participation, publication, the evolving role of theory, the roles of literature and language in the classroom, long-term career planning, and specific information on departmental requirements.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

RLRL 9998 Doctoral Comprehensive Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

For students who have not yet passed the Doctoral comprehensive but prefer not to assume the status of a non-matriculating student for the one or two semesters used for preparation for the comprehensive.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

RLRL 9999 Doctoral Continuation Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

All students who have been admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree are required to register and pay for the doctoral continuation during each semester of their candidacy. Doctoral Continuation requires a commitment of at least 20 hours per week working on the dissertation.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: