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Psychology Courses (PSYC) College of Arts and Sciences


Subject Area Course # Course Title Semester Credit Hours Expand
PSYC 1011 Psychobiology of Mental Disorders Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Abnormal behaviors characteristic of mental disorders are discussed with respect to psychological and biological origins and treatments. Topics include theoretical approaches, such as cognitive science and neuroscience; brain mechanisms that regulate behaviors associated with mental disorders such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease; interactive effects of genetic predispositions and environmental stresses in the cause of mental disorders; treatment of mental disorders by the use of biological methods, such as drug therapy, and psychological techniques, such as behavior therapies; and the prevention of mental disorders by behavior modification, stress management, and lifestyle.


Instructor(s): Joseph Tecce

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Does not provide credit toward completion of the Psychology major.

PSYC 1021 Art, Creativity, and Genius Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course introduces students to psychology through the study of the visual arts. Art is a universal human activity that confronts us with many puzzling questions: How does our mind allow us to look at a flat drawing and see a three-dimensional world? How can blind people draw using linear perspective? How can a retarded autistic child draw horses like Leonardo da Vinci? What is the relationship between creativity and mental illness? What happens to drawing ability after brain damage? Why do so few art prodigies become great artists? We will examine how psychological research has investigated these questions.


Instructor(s): Ellen Winner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Does not provide credit toward completion of the Psychology major.

PSYC 1029 Mind and Brain Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course is an introduction to the field of biopsychology, an approach to psychology stressing brain function as the source of cognition and behavior. We begin the course by establishing a "common vocabulary" by reviewing basics of brain and neuronal function. The bulk of the course addresses how brain function controls perception of the physical world, is altered by drugs and physical damage, and controls basic behaviors—eating, sleeping, language, and sex—that make humans so unique. A major underlying theme will be how the brain and mind have evolved over time and develop within an individual.


Instructor(s): Jeffrey Lamoureux

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Does not provide credit toward completion of the Psychology major.

PSYC 1032 Emotion Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines the scientific study of emotion for undergraduate students with no background in psychology. Topics include such questions as: What are the functions of emotion, interpersonally and intrapersonally? What are some ways that emotions can be dysfunctional? Are emotions the same across cultures? How do we know what someone else is feeling? How does emotion interact with decision-making? In addressing these questions, we will incorporate discussions of how psychological experiments are constructed, performed, and interpreted.


Instructor(s): Andrea Heberlein

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Does not provide credit toward completion of the Psychology major.

PSYC 1072 Memory in Everyday Life Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Memory doesn't just help us to excel on exams or to reminisce with friends. The ability to learn from past experiences makes us who we are and allows us to function in society. This course uses the study of memory as a way to explore the psychological research process. We will examine how we remember and why we forget, how our memories are tied to our sense of self and to our relations to others in society, and how everyone from advertisers to professors can capitalize on the nature of memory to influence what we remember about an experience.


Instructor(s): Elizabeth Kensinger

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Does not provide credit toward completion of the Psychology major.

PSYC 1110 Introduction to Psychology as a Natural Science Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This is one of two introductory courses required for Psychology majors. The course focuses on basic brain function (how neurons work, brain plasticity, and drug effects) and genetic influences on psychological functions (including attitudes), and introduces students to fundamental features of learning, motivation, appetite, memory, and perception, along with their biological underpinnings. A major course theme is the physical bases of psychological phenomena.


Instructor(s): Gene Heyman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 1111 Introduction to Psychology as a Social Science Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course is one of two introductory courses required for Psychology majors, along with PS1110. This course introduces students to the basic questions, perspectives, and methods that characterize the fields of developmental, social, cultural, personality, and clinical psychology.


Instructor(s): Michael Moore

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: PSYC1110 and PSYC1111 can be taken in any order.

PSYC 1120 Introduction to Behavioral Statistics and Research I Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course is the first in a two-semester sequence surveying research methodologies and statistical procedures. In this first semester the emphasis is on statistics. Students will be introduced to the most common topics and procedures in descriptive and inferential statistics. PSYC1120 is a large lecture course with a smaller breakout section (corequisite PSYC1122).


Instructor(s): Sean MacEvoy and Ehri Ryu

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 1121 Introduction to Behavioral Statistics and Research II Spring 3
Course Description

As the second course in PSYC1120-1121 sequence, this course covers one-way and factorial ANOVA, correlation and regression, within subject ANOVA, analysis of contingency tables and nonparametric methods. If time permits, logistic regression will be covered.


Instructor(s): Hao Wu

Prerequisites: PSYC1120

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 1122 Statistics Discussion Fall/Spring 0
Course Description

Discussion section for PSYC1120 and PSYC1121.


Instructor(s): Ehri Ryu, Hao Wu and Sean MacEvoy

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 1123 Statistics Discussion Spring/Fall 0
Course Description

Discussion section for PSYC1120 and PSYC1121.


Instructor(s): Hao Wu, Ehri Ryu and Sean MacEvoy

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 1124 Statistics (Honors) Fall 3
Course Description

This course satisfies the same statistics requirement as does PSYC1120. Students will be introduced to the most common topics and procedures in descriptive and inferential statistics. PSYC1124 is seminar format and limited to a small number of students. While this section is listed as an honors section it is not limited to students in the honors program. This section is designed for students who desire a smaller format and who are looking for a more intensive/conceptual/hands-on statistics experience. Students who are planning on writing a thesis are particularly advised to sign up for this section.


Instructor(s): Ehri Ryu

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 1126 Introduction to Behavioral Statistics & Methods II Spring 3
Course Description

This course satisfies the same statistics and research methods requirement as does PSYC1121.


Instructor(s): Hao Wu

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed PSYC1120

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 1127 Statistics Discussion Fall/Spring 0
Course Description

Discussion section for PSYC1121.


Instructor(s): Ehri Ryu, Hao Wu and Sean MacEvoy

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 1128 Statistics Discussion Spring/Fall 0
Course Description


Instructor(s): Ehri Ryu, Hao Wu and Sean MacEvoy

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 2200 Introduction to Social Work Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Starting with a discussion of its history and the relevance of values and ethics to its practice, the course takes up the various social work methods of dealing with individuals, groups, and communities and their problems. In addition to a discussion of the theories of human behavior that apply to social work interventions, the course examines the current policies and programs, issues, and trends of the major settings in which social work is practiced.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SCWK6600 SOCY5565

Comments: Available to undergraduate students

PSYC 2205 Undergraduate Research Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

An opportunity to participate in research projects in the laboratory of a faculty member. Students are encouraged to obtain permission of the instructor before they register for their other courses, so that they may keep open the time slot for the laboratory meetings associated with the laboratory.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor required

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 2206 Independent Study Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course offers students the opportunity to study a topic of personal interest, working independently under the supervision of a faculty member within the Psychology Department. A student may obtain the consent of a faculty member to serve as his or her instructor by contacting the faculty member directly. The instructor, working with the student, decides on the nature of readings and related activities involved as well as the precise form of scholarly work required.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor required

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 2234 Abnormal Psychology Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course provides an introduction to the field of abnormal psychology. Major topics include theoretical and empirical approaches to the study of psychopathology; assessment and diagnosis of abnormality; and psychological, behavioral, biological, and sociocultural characteristics of the major syndromes of psychopathology. Legal and ethical issues and current approaches to the treatment and prevention of psychological disorders will also be discussed.


Instructor(s): Marilee Ogren

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed PSYC1110

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 2241 Social Psychology Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores the scientific study of social thought and behavior. How do we understand, interact with, and influence other minds—and our own? How might we apply psychology to social problems? Topics include mind perception, emotion, persuasion, stereotyping, and moral psychology.


Instructor(s): Andrea Heberlein

Prerequisites: PSYC1111

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 2242 Personality Theories Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Does personality make us who we are? Whether selecting a mate, voting for a president, or understanding ourselves, we want and need to know about personality. In this course we consider how personality can be measured, how well it predicts behavior, what shapes our personality, and whether personality can be changed.


Instructor(s): James Russell

Prerequisites: PSYC1111

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 2260 Developmental Psychology Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course is an introduction to developmental psychology. The course examines topics in personality, social, and cognitive development.


Instructor(s): Sara Cordes

Prerequisites: PSYC1111

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 2268 Psychological Development Through the Life Span Summer 3
Course Description

Introduces the issues underlying the developmental process: infant knowledge, the nature of human attachment, separation, male and female differences, the meaning of adulthood, the interaction of physiological and psychological processes and the predictability of human development.


Instructor(s): Michael Moore

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 2272 Cognitive Psychology: Mental Processes and their Neural Substrates Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course introduces the scientific study of mental function from an information processing perspective. The course examines how information is processed and transformed by the mind to control complex human behavior. Specific topics include the history of cognitive psychology, cognitive neuroscience, attention, perception, consciousness, short-term and long-term memory, mental imagery, language, decision-making, and problem solving. Course material will be drawn from work with clinical populations (e.g., people who have sustained brain injury) as well as from work with non-injured populations. Class sessions will be devoted to lecture, discussion, demonstrations, and (if practical) student presentations.


Instructor(s): Hiram Brownell

Prerequisites: PSYC1110

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 2274 Sensation and Perception Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

How do our senses tell us what is really in the world around us, and can our senses be trusted? These questions have been pondered by philosophers for centuries, and more recently by psychologists and neuroscientists. This course will explore the anatomical/biological basis of sensation (how the world that we perceive is translated into the raw language of the nervous system) and the cognitive processes underlying perception (how our brains reconstruct the physical world from these neural inputs). We will examine these questions for vision, hearing, touch, smell, and taste.


Instructor(s): Sean MacEvoy

Prerequisites: PSYC1110

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 2276 Biological Psychology Summer 3
Course Description

Why can two people look at the same dress yet perceive it to be two different colors? Why can the sight of dessert make us feel hungry even after a large meal? These types of questions pertaining to human behavior and cognition are investigated by psychology and neuroscience researchers. This course will introduce students to the neural and biological bases that support a variety of human behaviors and cognitive processes, including sensation, perception, learning, memory, emotion, hormones, drugs, and psychological disorders. All topics will be taught at an introductory-level and geared to psychology majors.


Instructor(s): Jessica Karanian

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 2277 Psychology of Learning Summer 3
Course Description

A college student, a dog, and a rat walk into a classroom... Despite all their differences, they all learn the same ways. Learning is a critical aspect of our day-to-day lives. It is necessary for adaption and survival by enabling our experiences to alter our behavior. This course will cover basic theories and methods in the field of learning, including the roles of conditioning, imitation, and memory.


Instructor(s): Allison Foilb

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 2278 Psychology of Thinking Summer 3
Course Description

Most people acknowledge that activities like solving a math problem or playing the piano require thinking, and that thinking is a process that is embedded into our daily lives. But what is thinking? In this class, we will examine how psychologists conceptualize broad habits of mind like persistence, imagination, teamwork, and creativity, determine some areas of daily life that teach these ways of thinking for school children, and speculate how we can measure each of these so-called "soft skills." This class requires engagement, reflection, and in-class participation rather than memorization of facts.


Instructor(s): Jillian Hogan

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 2281 Sport Psychology Summer 3
Course Description

A survey of the field of sport psychology with emphasis on the role of athletics throughout the life cycle. Examines the recent trend of increased participation by children in organized sports at earlier ages, the impact of parental dynamics, the growing interest in continuing athletic participation over the life cycle, the economic and social expectations and their implications for psychological development. Discusses issues addressed by sport psychologists including those relating to performance, stress and self esteem.


Instructor(s): Kristy Moore

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 2285 Behavioral Neuroscience Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course presents an introduction to the physiological basis of behavior. Basic neuroanatomy and neurophysiology are presented, and the following topics are then discussed: neuropharmacology, psychopharmacology, and the biological bases of mental illness; brain mechanisms of reward and reinforcement; hormones and behavior; an introduction to the development of the nervous system; brain mechanisms of learning and memory; and brain mechanisms of emotion.


Instructor(s): Marilee Ogren

Prerequisites: PSYC1110, or BIOL1100-1102, or BIOL2000-2010

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 2289 Comparative Psychology: Study of Animal Behavior Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course is a survey of animal behavior from the psychologist's perspective. The methods and aims of comparative psychology are presented as we consider how and why psychologists should study animal behavior. All species are faced with fundamental problems such as navigating in their environment, finding food and water, defending against predators, communicating with conspecifics, attracting a mate, and learning and remembering information. The course will examine the very different strategies that various species, including humans, have evolved for solving these problems, and discuss reasons why these different kinds of strategies have evolved.


Instructor(s): Jeffrey Lamoureux

Prerequisites: PSYC1110 is suggested but not required

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3301 Statistics in Everyday Life Spring/Fall 3
Course Description

This course provides an opportunity for students to apply statistical knowledge to understand real world problems. Statistical thinking helps us demystify puzzles. When does anxiety help athletes perform and when does it hurt? How can we figure out whether a disease clustering in a geographical area occurred by chance or due to a hidden cause? When you think of someone just before that person calls you, is that evidence of mind over matter, or is it coincidence? The course will involve hands-on work in class with statistical software and actual data. The goal of this course is to develop critical thinking skills and to enhance students' familiarity with statistics.


Instructor(s): Li Chen

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed PSYC1120 or Must have successfully completed PSYC1124

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3302 Intermediate Statistics Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This is an intermediate level statistics course covering statistics from where PSYC1120 leaves off. The class will focus on the statistical analyses used in current psychological research and that students will need in carrying out independent research, in joining the Honors Program, or in volunteering in a lab. Topics include multiple regression, general linear modeling, and repeated measures analysis of variance. By the end of the semester, students should come away with a solid foundation in proper experimental design, data collection, and analysis. Students should expect to become adept at analyzing complex datasets using sophisticated statistical testing and become familiar with new and emerging statistical software and computer coding.


Instructor(s): Kyle Gobrogge

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed PSYC1120

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3328 Aggression, Anxiety, and ADHD Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This seminar is devoted to the causes, manifestations, and treatment of these disorders in childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. The interplay of genetics, physiological processes, family interaction, peer relations, cognition, and personality is a core theme. A critical analysis of research is complemented by case studies from journals, biographies, autobiographies, novels, and films.


Instructor(s): Barry Schneider

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed PSYC2234

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3329 Psychophysiology of Stress Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores the psychological and physiological factors underlying stress, including basic principles of psychophysiology and fundamental concepts of stress. Topics include emotion, motivation, multitasking, attention, arousal, and distraction. Physiological mechanisms underlying stress will be examined relative to health and abnormal behaviors, such as addictions, mood disorders, and violence. Students will be instructed in methods of stress control, including cognitive behavioral techniques and meditation.


Instructor(s): Joseph Tecce

Prerequisites: PSYC1110 or permission of the instructor

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3330 Clinical Assessment Spring/Fall 3
Course Description

This course is designed to provide students with opportunities to learn and integrate the fundamental knowledge and skills of clinical assessment. The core of the course will be learning and using basic interviewing, information-gathering, and rapport-building skills. Students will learn the process and products of broad biopsychosocial assessment. The class will also introduce topics such as ethics, the law, and uses of assessment, psychological testing, and clinical decision-making. There are two major sections in the course: Psychological testing and assessment and evaluation. This is a practical, hands-on course. Students participate in class discussions, do role plays of initial assessments, and write up evaluations based on these role plays.


Instructor(s): Trudy Good

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3331 Developmental Psychopathology Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course will provide an introduction to the field of developmental psychopathology, an area of psychology that combines the topics of developmental and abnormal psychology in order to facilitate an understanding of maladaptive behavior within a developmental framework. Course material will emphasize how aspects of development bear upon the subsequent adaptation of an individual and will generate an appreciation of normal and pathological behavior in the context of the individual, his or her developmental history, and current conditions. Examples of specific topics include the developmental impact of parent-child attachment, child maltreatment, peer relationships, and resilience in development.


Instructor(s): Amy Tishelman

Prerequisites: PSYC2260

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3332 Topics in Developmental Psychopathology: ADHD and Disruptive Behavior Disorders across the Lifespan Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course features an evaluation of the contentions for and against classifying ADHD and disruptive behavior disorder as manifestations of mental illness. We will examine the scientific evidence useful in evaluating the widespread beliefs that these disorders are overdiagnosed and that people are being overmedicated. Students will become familiar with prevailing procedures for diagnosis and treatment and some new alternatives. Family and cultural issues in diagnosis and treatment will be emphasized.


Instructor(s): Barry Schneider

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3334 Interpersonal Violence Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course will review research, assessment, treatment, and current controversies in the area of family violence, focusing on child sexual abuse, child physical abuse, and spousal abuse. The course will consist of a combination of a lecture and class discussion of the issues, including those related to memories of abuse, identification of abuse, and the legal, psychological, and social ramifications of extracting women and children from abusive homes.


Instructor(s): Amy Tishelman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3335 Psychology of Friendships and Romantic Relationships Spring/Fall 3
Course Description

This course begins with a review of the concept of friendship as it has evolved in the writings of several disciplines, ranging from ancient Greek philosophy to contemporary behavioral science. Research pertaining to the stages of close relationships is critically reviewed, with emphasis on gender differences and age differences across the entire lifespan. Special attention is devoted to the close relationships of members of non-Western and minority cultures, individuals with mental disorders, and people of minority sexual orientation.


Instructor(s): Barry Schneider

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3336 Clinical Psychology Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Issues associated with the treatment of psychological disorders will be examined. The concepts of normality and pathology will be discussed in the context of various models of intervention. Several different schools of psychotherapy will be covered, with an emphasis on the theoretical assumptions and practical applications of each perspective. Studies on the effectiveness of psychotherapy will be reviewed. The clinical training and professional practices of psychologists will be discussed.


Instructor(s): Karen Rosen

Prerequisites: PSYC2234

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3337 Culture and Mental Health Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course begins with an extended introduction to the concept of culture, including critical examination of a wide range of prevailing definitions. The ways in which features of culture affect both psychological well-being and mental illness are considered next. Students are familiarized with the core features of some of the cultures that are represented predominantly within the cultural mosaic of the Boston area. The course concludes with an exploration of how these features of culture influence both openness to psychological intervention and the optimal way of providing psychological assistance.


Instructor(s): Barry Schneider

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed PSYC2234

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3338 Topics in Abnormal Psychology Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course considers several adult neuropsychiatric disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, stroke, schizophrenia, depression, bipolar disorder, and savant syndrome. We will consider basic research as well as case studies to analyze these disorders in terms of their neurological and psychological basis, etiology, symptomology, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis.


Instructor(s): Marilee Ogren

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed PSYC1110 and Must have successfully completed PSYC2234

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3339 Understanding Autism Spectrum Disorder Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the autism spectrum and related disorders from infancy through adulthood. We will investigate topics in etiology and genetics, deficits in social cognition and perception, diagnosis and assessment, and treatment and advocacy. Students will also become familiar with scientific writing and primary literature.


Instructor(s): John Knutsen

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed PSYC2234 or Permission of instructor required

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3341 Psychology of Morality Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

How do we decide between right and wrong? When do we behave well, when do we behave badly, and why? In this course, we will explore moral judgment and behavior - the evolution and development of human morality, its psychological and brain basis, and moral "pathology" in clinical populations. Topics will include: emotion, mind perception, self-concept, motivated cognition, group membership, and connections to religion, politics, and the law.


Instructor(s): Liane Young

Prerequisites: PSYC2241 or PSYC2272 or permission of the instructor

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3344 Psychology of Gender Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course involves a multi-faceted and critical look at how gender shapes identities, beliefs, and behavior. Rather than concentrating on questions of sex differences, we will explore how females and males do gender in their everyday lives. We will review competing theoretical models and scrutinize empirical findings that support and fail to support common sense ideas about gender. Topics include a number of controversial issues such as violence in intimate relationships, sexual orientation, media constructions of femininity and masculinity, ethnic/racial/cultural critiques of feminist psychology, and gender harassment.


Instructor(s): Judy Dempewolff

Prerequisites: PSYC2241

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3345 Social Motivation Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

How do other people affect our motivation to act? Psychology has given too much emphasis to extrinsic rewards and too little to the ways in which our relationships with others determine our choices, feelings, and thoughts. Many of our behaviors are motivated primarily by our relationships with others. In this course we will explore the influence of others on our behavior. Topics to be considered include kindness and cruelty, cooperation and competition, and conformity and rebellion.


Instructor(s): Donnah Canavan

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3353 Culture and Emotions Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

The course is devoted to major psychological perspectives on emotion (such as cognitive and social psychological) both historic and contemporary, with an emphasis on how culture enters into the theory. The second part of the course focuses on ethnographies and other evidence on the possible roles of culture in emotion. Specific topics to be covered include universal recognition of emotion from facial expression, role of language in emotion, feeling rules, emotion scripts, and the development of children's understanding of emotion.


Instructor(s): Mary Kayyal

Prerequisites: Any course at 2000 level or with permission.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3354 Culture,Identity and Asian-American Experience Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar explores self and identity as products of shared culture and history as well as individual life experience and development. It focuses specifically on the complexities of ethnic and racial identity among Asian Americans drawing on contributions from psychology, nineteenth and twentieth century Asian American history, and Asian American literary works. Students are also introduced to current social issues that are especially relevant to Asian-American communities.


Instructor(s): Ramsey Liem

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: UNAS3354

Comments: PS35401/UN35401 satisfy Cultural Diversity Core Requirement.
Required for the Asian-American Studies concentration.

PSYC 3362 Animal Cognition Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores intelligence and cognitive processes across a variety of animal species, including humans. It addresses such questions as, do chimpanzees lie? Can dolphins count? What makes us uniquely human? Topics include mental representation, memory, tool use, counting, problem-solving, self-awareness, social knowledge, and communication/language. For each area, we will examine the evidence from both wild and laboratory settings, continually returning to the questions of what such knowledge tells us about non-human animals, and how this knowledge informs our theories of human cognition.


Instructor(s): Kelly Jaakkola

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3363 Language Acquisition and Development Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Children have an instinct for language. Every typically-developing child learns language – something neither our most powerful machines or smartest non-human animals can do. Even adults do not learn language as quickly or successfully as children. If not exposed to a language, children will invent one. In this course, we try to understand how children learn language, why animals, machines, and adults have so much difficulty learning language, and what the answers to these questions say about what it means to be human. In addition to learning about language, students will engage in hands-on laboratory research, resulting in a scientific publication. No knowledge of statistics or computer programming is required; students will learn all required statistics and programming during the course of the semester.


Instructor(s): Joshua Hartshorne

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed PSYC2260 and (Must have successfully completed PSYC2272 or Must have successfully completed LING3361)

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3366 Social and Emotional Development Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

In this course, we will explore developmental changes in social and emotional functioning from birth through adolescence. We will study the beginning of emotion expression and the emergence of attachment relationships, the development of emotional regulation, and the socialization of children during infancy. We will then continue to examine emotional changes and social development through toddlerhood, early childhood, middle childhood, and adolescence. The influences of parents, siblings, peers, and caregivers will be examined, as will the issues of individual differences, stability and change, and coherence of development across contexts and over time.


Instructor(s): Karen Rosen

Prerequisites: PSYC2260

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3367 Psychology of Art Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course considers philosophical questions about art such as these: Can art be defined? Can art express emotion? Why do we enjoy sadness and fear in art but not life? Are aesthetic judgments just matters of subjective taste? What’s wrong with a perfect fake? We will focus on experiments from psychology that attempt to answer these questions with empirical evidence.


Instructor(s): Ellen Winner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3368 Infancy Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

How do babies perceive the world? What do they understand about people and objects? What draws them to other people? How do they achieve the beginnings of symbolic thought and language? What about these early skills are distinctively human? Looking at the first few years of life, this course reviews past and current research, providing an understanding of the interactive role of nature and nurture on this very important period in human development. Students will present course readings, participate in class discussions, and work with infant behavioral data.


Instructor(s): Sara Cordes

Prerequisites: PSYC2260 or permission by instructor

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3369 Understanding the Social World: Social Cognition in Humans and Other Animals Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course will address the puzzle of how we make sense of our social world by focusing on questions such as: how do we carve our world into meaningful social groups, understand what others are thinking and maintain productive cooperative relationships? These questions will be tackled using both developmental and comparative approaches, with the goal of understanding how social cognition takes shape over childhood and what aspects of human social cognition are shared with other animals.


Instructor(s): Katherine McAuliffe

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed PSYC2241

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3371 Cognitive Neuroscience: Exploring Mind and Brain Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

What happens in your brain when you are secretly paying attention to a conversation at the next table? How is that conversation recorded into memory? Cognitive neuroscience aims to address such questions by exploring the brain mechanisms that underlie human mental processing. This course will examine the neural basis of core cognitive processes, including perception, attention, memory, action, and language (identified using techniques such as functional MRI, event-related potentials, and lesion studies). Other mind-brain topics that will be considered include hemispheric specialization, neural plasticity, frontal lobe function, and consciousness.


Instructor(s): Scott Slotnick

Prerequisites: PSYC1110, PSYC1111, and PSYC2272

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3372 Affective Neuroscience Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Affect and cognition have traditionally been studied in isolation from one another, but these processes typically interact with each other. Affect can modulate our attention, guide our decision making, bias our perception, and influence our memories. Affective neuroscience utilizes the tools typically used to study cognitive neuroscience to better understand how affect interacts with other aspects of cognition. In addition to providing an overview of the methods typically used in affective neuroscience, this course will explore how we regulate our affect, how we perceive moral behavior, and how affect interacts with cognition differently in individuals in young and later adulthood.


Instructor(s): Brendan Murray

Prerequisites: PSYC2272 or PSYC2285

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3373 Learning and Motivation Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines fundamentals of learning theory. We will examine principles of classical and instrumental learning in animals and will discuss the human application of these principles in the home, classroom and clinical settings. We will focus heavily on classic and recent experiments designed to assess the processes and content of associative learning. Lastly, we will consider whether animals simply acquire stimulus-response tendencies, or if they have a more cognitive representation of their world, again focusing on how we can even ask this experimentally.


Instructor(s): Jeffrey Lamoureux

Prerequisites: PSYC1110 is suggested but not required

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3374 Cognitive Aging Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course will examine recent work being conducted in cognitive psychology and neuroscience to understand the effects of healthy aging on the cognitive and neural processes associated with functions such as perception, language, memory, and emotion. The course will introduce and examine research studies that rely on a variety of research methods, including behavioral testing, functional neuroimaging (e.g., fMRI), and structural imaging, and will focus on how the integration of these methods has allowed researchers to better understand the effects of aging. Although the course will focus on healthy aging, it will conclude with an examination of age-related diseases (e.g., Alzheimer’s disease), allowing for a discussion of the ways in which the effects of disease differ from those of healthy aging.


Instructor(s): Jaclyn Ford

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3375 Psychology and Neuroscience of Human Memory Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

The field of memory research studies how people organize, maintain, and access experiences they have had, and knowledge and information they have encountered. This course introduces the theories, methodologies, and findings in current memory research. Topics, among others, include memory structures, processes, the flow of information, implicit and explicit memory, working memory, short- and long-term memory as they are currently defined, metacognitive processes, memory and aging, and the neuroscience of memory.


Instructor(s): Elizabeth Kensinger

Prerequisites: PSYC1110

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3377 Psycholinguistics Fall 3
Course Description

An exploration, from a linguistic perspective, of some classic issues at the interface of language and mind. Topics include the production, perception, and processing of speech; the organization of language in the human brain; the psychological reality of grammatical models; animal communication; the acquisition of language by both children and by adults; and the innateness hypothesis.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Margaret Thomas

Prerequisites: Some background in linguistics or psychology recommended.

Cross listed with: LING3361

Comments:

PSYC 3378 Vision Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

How do we see the world? Why does it look that way? Vision is the sensory system we typically rely on most to make sense of our environment. But vision is far from a passive reflection of the scene before our eyes: by necessity much of what we see is a result of inferences we make about the environment based on incomplete or ambiguous information. This course covers both the neuroscience of vision and its cognitive aspects to understand how we perceive the richness of the world around us.


Instructor(s): Sean MacEvoy

Prerequisites: PSYC2272, PSYC2285, PSYC3373, or BIOL4590

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3379 Disorders of Language and Communication Fall/Spring 3
Course Description


Instructor(s): Hiram Brownell

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3380 Neuroscience of Psychopathology Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

The course provides an overview of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying developmental and adult psychopathologies, including autism, schizophrenia, depression, anxiety disorders, violence, and personality disorders. We will explore the involvement of neurotransmitters in psychopathology, including serotonin and dopamine, neuropeptides such as vasopressin and oxytocin, and stress hormones. We will discuss how genetic background and early environment can be important risk factors for the development of psychopathologies. We will review how all these factors may mediate abnormal regulation of emotion, cognition and/or social behavior. The course will discuss current findings from human studies and from animal models of psychopathology.


Instructor(s): Alexa Veenema

Prerequisites: PSYC2285, PSYC3373, PSYC3382, PSYC3385, or PSYC3386. It is assumed that all students have a basic knowledge of the nervous system.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3382 Neurobiology of Stress Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

The course provides an overview of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the stress response from the cellular to the systems level. It explains the effects of stress on neuronal plasticity, learning and memory, mental health, and the immune system. Emphasis is also on the long-term consequences of early life stress on cognitive, emotional and social behaviors. Current research findings in both animals and humans will be discussed.


Instructor(s): Alexa Veenema

Prerequisites: PSYC2285

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3383 Neurobiological Basis of Learning Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course will explore the neural mechanisms that underpin basic processes of learning and memory. We will investigate both systems-level neuroscience (e.g., What do the hippocampus, amygdala, VTA, etc. actually do?), as well a more molecular view of the role of specific intracellular processes in producing changes in synaptic connections. The molecular focus of the course will comprise a detailed investigation of long-term potentiation (LTP), and its relation to endogenous memory processes. Systems-level topics will focus on fundamental associative and non-associative learning phenomena in non-human animal models.


Instructor(s): Jeffrey Lamoureux

Prerequisites: PSYC2285 or an equivalent neuroscience course

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3384 Neurophysiology Spring/Fall 3
Course Description

The action potential is fundamental to information processing in the brain. Neurons fire action potentials in response to a variety of inputs and action potentials exist in many different shapes, sizes and frequencies. In this course we will begin with a study of ion channels, the membrane bound biochemical switches that give the action potential its shape. Then we will explore the numerous factors that influence the nature of an individual action potential: neuronal morphology, ion channel composition, and intracellular signaling cascades. We will conclude by considering how circuits of diverse neuronal phenotypes integrate synaptic signals, which give rise to sophisticated information processing, learning and memory, and psychiatric disease. Student projects will explore how ion channel abnormalities, so-called "channelopathies," influence cognition and behavior.


Instructor(s): John Christianson

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed PSYC2285

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3385 Neurobiology of Motivation and Emotion Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course will review the neurobiology underlying motivated and emotional behaviors. The current neuroscience findings from animal models will be the primary focus of the course; however, results from human studies will be incorporated in some discussions. The course structure will include lectures and discussions of the assigned readings.


Instructor(s): Gorica Petrovich

Prerequisites: PSYC2285 or PSYC2287

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3386 Psychopharmacology: Behavior, Performance, and Brain Function Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores psychopharmacology, the science of drugs and behavior. We will discuss synaptic neurochemistry as associated with a number of specific mechanisms of drug action and outline brain circuits which mediate drug actions such as reward. Major classes of psychotropic drugs will be introduced, including both drugs of abuse and psychotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of mood disorders and psychosis.


Instructor(s): Jeffrey Lamoureux

Prerequisites: PSYC2285 or an equivalent neuroscience course

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3387 Developmental Neuroscience and Behavior Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the interaction among genetic and environmental influences on the development of the nervous system and behavior. A multi-level analysis is emphasized, ranging from cellular control of gene expression during development to complex behavioral phenomena.


Instructor(s): Marilee Ogren

Prerequisites: PS285 (or BI481) and ONE of the following (BI304, BI414, BI440)

Cross listed with: BIOL4437

Comments:

PSYC 3388 Neurobiology of Eating and Eating Disorders Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course will review the neural mechanisms controlling food intake, and body weight regulation under normal circumstances and in eating disorders. Eating is not only controlled by metabolic signals (e.g., hormones, peptides), but also by extrinsic or environmental factors that are not directly related to energy balance (e.g., stress, emotion, social/cultural factors). Likewise the brain systems regulating hunger are associated with networks mediating stress, reward, emotion, and learning and memory. The course will explore the current neuroscience findings from animal models, and human studies relevant to appetite, regulation of eating, and eating disorders.


Instructor(s): Gorica Petrovich

Prerequisites: PSYC2285 or PSYC3384

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3389 Sex and Aggression Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Have you ever wondered why animals are attracted to the opposite/same sex, why they attack other animals, how they decide with whom to mate or whom to fight, and how drugs of abuse hijack natural rewards like mating, parenting, and aggression? In this course, we will study how genetic and neurochemical pathways direct males’ and females’ social motivation. We will cover topics such as sex-specific social behavior, same-sex sexual partnerships, monogamous rodents, neurochemistry of human pair-bonding and violence, and drug impairment of natural reward. In the last few weeks of the course we will discuss the way sex research is covered by the media and its social implications within the legal system such as the burgeoning field Neurocriminology.


Instructor(s): Kyle Gobrogge

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed PSYC2285 or Must have successfully completed PSYC2289

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3391 Ethical Controversies in Psychology & Neuroscience Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Can fMRI machines really "see" your thoughts? Should our brains or our free will be held responsible for our behavior? Should psychotropic drugs be used for neural enhancement, or only to treat illness? Psychology and neuroscience raise a host of ethical controversies--from claims to peer into the privacy of the mind, to applications in the courtroom, to treatment of experimental subjects. Rather than determining the "right" answers, this course explores the scientific, political, social, moral, and religious values these debates involve. Readings include works by scientists, philosophers, historians, theologians, and ethicists. Students enact the roles of stakeholders in in-class debates.


Instructor(s): Nadine Weidman

Prerequisites: A 2000-level Psychology elective or permission of the instructor

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 3399 Advanced Independent Research Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 4431 Positive Psychology Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This advanced undergraduate seminar reflects a new direction in psychology that focuses on topics that emphasize people's positive characteristics and processes. Characteristics that will be studied include happiness, kindness, generosity, love, and gratitude. Growth, healing, relatedness, and curiosity are among the processes that will be examined. The course will also address the antecedents and consequences of positive social situations such as peace, solidarity, and massive public responses to catastrophes like 9/11.


Instructor(s): Donnah Canavan

Prerequisites: PSYC1121 and either PSYC2241 or PSYC2242

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 4432 Seminar on Choice, Decision, and Behavioral Economics Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course will focus on research on individual choice and decision making. The topics include prisoner's dilemma, delay discounting, optimal choice, risky choice, gambling, risk aversion, and related issues. Readings are drawn from psychology, economics, and behavioral economics. Course requirements include 6 short reactions papers on course readings, occasional seminar presentations, active participation in class discussion, and a term project.


Instructor(s): Gene Heyman

Prerequisites: An introductory and second level course in psychology or economics or permission of instructor.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 4433 Addiction, Choice, and Motivation Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This is a writing intensive course. Students write weekly prompts on course readings. The readings are drawn from the research literature on addiction and choice. The drug research includes biographical accounts, epidemiological studies, and experiments on drug effects and drug choice. The choice research includes studies with animals and humans that test simple quantitative models of rational choice and impulsiveness.


Instructor(s): Gene Heyman

Prerequisites: PSYC1110 and at least two 2000-level or higher courses in Psychology, Economics, or a Natural Science, or permission of instructor

Cross listed with:

Comments: Open only to sophomores and juniors, or with instructor permission.

PSYC 4434 Psychology of the Immigration Experience Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This seminar focuses on the psychological dimensions of the immigration experience, including motivation to emigrate, stages of acculturation, and the roles of language, war trauma, family support, and cognitive flexibility in promoting adaptation to a new culture. Special consideration is given to the immigration experience of people with mental health problems. Complementing the theoretical writings and research findings are in-person interviews with Bostonians who have emigrated from other countries.


Instructor(s): Barry Schneider

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 4435 Images of Mental Illness in Film and Literature Spring/Fall 3
Course Description

This course is devoted to the representations of mental illness in film and literature, which are often more complex and more personal than the descriptions of psychological disorders in scientific writings. Students deepen their understanding of abnormal psychology as they criticize material from selected books and films containing depictions of disorders. These creative works will be examined in terms of the possible motivation of the authors and filmmakers and the potential for the creative works to decrease or increase stigma. The messages conveyed about the nature of abnormality are emphasized throughout the course. The course concludes with consideration of the ways in which psychologists and other mental-health professionals are depicted in these media.


Instructor(s): Barry Schneider

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed PSYC2234

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 4436 Clinical Fieldwork in Psychology Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course will provide students with an opportunity to integrate theoretical and empirical work in clinical psychology with the real-life experience of working in a clinical setting. Students will select, together with the professor, a field placement (e.g., hospital, community clinic, day treatment center, shelter, emergency hot line, preschool classroom, prison). Students' work in the field will involve at least eight hours per week with weekly, on-site supervision. Weekly class meetings will focus on the discussion of issues relevant to the direct application of mental health services to child, adolescent, and adult patients.


Instructor(s): Karen Rosen

Prerequisites: PSYC3336

Cross listed with:

Comments: Priority will be given to students who are in the Clinical Concentration.

PSYC 4437 Stress and Behavior Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course provides an in-depth examination of causes of stress and effects of stress on behavior. Topics include the expression of body language, detection of deception, and the formation of psychosomatic diseases. Behavioral control of stress is evaluated relative to real-life factors, such as self-destructive social relationships, family dysfunction, and unhealthy life styles. Students will be instructed in methods of stress control, including cognitive behavioral techniques and meditation.


Instructor(s): Joseph Tecce

Prerequisites: PSYC2234, PSYC3329, or permission of the instructor

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 4439 Research Practicum in Child and Adolescent Clinical Psychology Spring/Fall 3
Course Description

This practicum focuses on research inspired by the assumption that faulty interpersonal interactions are at the core of psychological disorders of children and adolescents. Research methods for studying both peer and family relationships are considered as well as standard tools for the identification of participants for clinical research. Students will participate in the analysis of data on interpersonal relationships and adjustment. They will learn to interpret the data and write a manuscript in APA style.


Instructor(s): Barry Schneider

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed PSYC1120

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 4441 Research Practicum in Sport & Exercise Psychology Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course introduces students to research in sport and exercise psychology. Course content will focus on the various methods used to study psychosocial aspects of sport, exercise, and physical activity. Students will become familiar with quantitative and qualitative methods by examining current research in the field and participating in hands-on, collaborative research assignments. Students will also choose a topic related to course content, conduct a literature review, design a study, collect and analyze data, write a scientific paper in APA style, and present their findings.


Instructor(s): Kristina Moore

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 4442 Research Practicum in Emotion Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course introduces students to psychological research methods used to study emotion recognition. Students will read about and evaluate a range of behavioral methods employed in prior research, and then use this knowledge to conduct their own study. Students will work on a group project that involves each step of the research process - a literature review on a specific topic, study design, data collection and analysis, and the write-up of an independent report in APA format.


Instructor(s): Mary Kayyal

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor, or PSYC1120 and either PSYC2241 or PSYC2260. PSYC3343 or PSYC3353 is preferred but not required.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 4443 Research Practicum in Social & Cognitive Methods Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores how questions are asked and answered in social and cognitive psychology, focusing on discussions of articles and the conduction of a series of research projects and demonstrations. We will cover topics including research ethics, constructing experimental variables, experiment design, a few specific types of methods and their uses/constraints, and how to write an APA-style research report.


Instructor(s): Andrea Heberlein

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed PSYC1120

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 4444 Research Practicum in Social Psychology Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course provides students with a hands-on approach to research in psychology with an emphasis on personality and social approaches. The course requires students to put into practice the knowledge of psychological science that they have accumulated from previous courses. By the end of the course, students will have experienced the research process from beginning to end; i.e., writing a literature review on some topic in social or personality psychology, hypothesis formation, experimental design, analysis of data, and writing up results in publishable manuscript form.


Instructor(s): Donnah Canavan

Prerequisites: PSYC2241

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 4445 Research Practicum in Social Cognition Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course will introduce you to social psychological research methods. We will read about and discuss a range of methods in social psychology and will conduct our own study or studies using a subset of these methods in the lab. Students will work on one or two large group projects, contributing to all stages of the project, and will write up independent reports. You will learn to perform a literature review, carry out a study from data collection through analysis and interpretation, and write up a research paper in APA style.


Instructor(s): Andrea Heberlein

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 4446 Social Neuroscience Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Human beings are fundamentally social creatures. In this seminar, we will examine topics explored in classic and contemporary social psychology using the tools of neuroscience, such as functional neuroimaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation. Sample topics: social connection and rejection; conforming to crowds and obeying authority; dehumanization and objectification; stereotypes and group membership; first impressions and social expectations; prosocial behavior; sacred values; self-control; the future self.


Instructor(s): Liane Young

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed PSYC2241 or Must have successfully completed PSYC3341

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 4447 Individual Differences and Social Behavior Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course will study a series of individual differences or personality variables such as narcissism, self-esteem, defensive styles, fear of success/self defeat, and the Big Five. Each of these personality variables will be studied in a framework that focuses on the context of development as well as the traits and behaviors which are consequences (and correlates) of these personality variables. While the social context (of development) will be emphasized, the biological and cultural contexts will also be presented. Issues surrounding measurement and change in these variables will also be discussed.


Instructor(s): Donnah Canavan

Prerequisites: PSYC1111, PSYC1120, PSYC1121, and either PSYC2241 or PSYC2242

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 4448 Achievement Motivation Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course presents a wide-ranging set of theories/ideas about achievement and what facilitates and hinders it. Topics include intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, success, productivity, competition, fear of success, fear of failure, greed, risk, and social energy. Some of the psychological processes that will be covered are the childhood, cultural, and educational origins of achievement motivation, the development of expertise, and success and psychological health.


Instructor(s): Donnah Canavan

Prerequisites: PSYC1111, PSYC1120, PSYC1121, and either PSYC2241 or PSYC2242

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 4464 Psychological Perspectives on Schooling Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

In many countries, including the United States, children’s attendance at school, or the documentation of a plan for learning outside of a school, is compulsory until late adolescence. As former or current students of schools, most people have opinions about what makes for good teaching and good learning and they use these opinions when making decisions about schooling for their children. Rather than encourage the acceptance of the educational status quo, or promote using one’s personal anecdotes as the best evidence for making decisions about schooling, this course aims to use evidence from psychology concerning development and learning to examine the practices in some philosophically-driven approaches to schooling. Students will use this information to design schools in which the pedagogical approach, social milieu, and understandings of children’s development are evidence-based and support articulated values and goals.


Instructor(s): Jill Hogan and Mahsa Ershadi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: EDUC4464 APSY4464

Comments:

PSYC 4466 Current Issues in Developmental Psychology Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

An intensive analysis of issues in developmental psychology, including infancy, motivation, and cognition. This seminar will focus on recent research findings as a source for understanding human development.


Instructor(s): Michael Moore

Prerequisites: PSYC2260

Cross listed with:

Comments: Recommended for juniors and seniors

PSYC 4468 Research Practicum in Language Acquisition & Development Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Children have an instinct for language. Every typically-developing child learns language – something neither our most powerful machines or smartest non-human animals can do. Even adults do not learn language as quickly or successfully as children. If not exposed to a language, children will invent one. In this course, we try to understand how children learn language, why animals, machines, and adults have so much difficulty learning language, and what the answers to these questions say about what it means to be human. In addition to learning about language, students will engage in hands-on laboratory research, resulting in a scientific publication. No knowledge of statistics or computer programming is required; students will learn all required statistics and programming during the course of the semester.


Instructor(s): Joshua Hartshorne

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed PSYC2260 and (Must have successfully completed PSYC2272 or Must have successfully completed LING3361)

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 4469 Research Practicum in Language Acquisition & Development Lab Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

This is the lab corequisite for PSYC4468 Research Practicum in Language Acquisition and Development.


Instructor(s): Joshua Hartshorne

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed PSYC2260 and (Must have successfully completed PSYC2272 or Must have successfully completed LING3361)

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 4470 Research Practicum in Cognitive Psychology Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course introduces students to the research process in cognitive psychology and cognitive neuroscience. The semester starts with a review of experimental design, common paradigms, statistical analysis, critical reading of journal articles, and ethics. Then, students work individually or in small groups to carry out a research project in an area of language or cognition that relates to cognitive neuroscience. Possible research topics are discussed in class. The research project entails reviewing the psychological and neuroscientific literature, identifying an appropriate research topic, designing and carrying out an empirical study, and evaluating and communicating the results.


Instructor(s): Hiram Brownell

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 4471 Research Practicum in Experimental Psychology Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Students will conduct experiments on cognition and decision making, evaluate social and psychological aspects of opiate use as measured by mortality and social-economic measures, and learn how write APA-style research reports. Class readings provide the conceptual background for our studies. Class discussion focuses on the readings and methods for analyzing and presenting our research results.


Instructor(s): Gene Heyman

Prerequisites: PSYC1110, PSYC1120

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 4472 Social Neuroscience Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Human beings are fundamentally social creatures. In this seminar, we will examine topics explored in classic and contemporary social psychology using the tools of neuroscience, such as functional neuroimaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation. Sample topics: social connection and rejection; conforming to crowds and obeying authority; dehumanization and objectification; stereotypes and group membership; first impressions and social expectations; prosocial behavior; sacred values; self-control; the future self.


Instructor(s): Liane Young

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 4473 Event-Related Potentials: Laboratory Methods Course Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

When it comes to figuring out what the awake, human brain is doing, one of the most valuable tools is the use of electroencephalography (EEG) to measure the neural activity tied to particular types of events (event-related potentials, or ERPs). This course will serve as a hands-on introduction to ERPs, with equal parts discussion and hands-on application. Discussion will focus on the neurophysics of ERPs, the analysis of ERPs, and the insights that ERPs have yielded in the attention, language, and memory literatures. Hands-on activities will allow students to implement the laboratory techniques and analysis approaches discussed in class.


Instructor(s): Elizabeth Kensinger

Prerequisites: PSYC3371 or PSYC3372 or permission of instructor

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 4474 Research Practicum in Sensation and Perception Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

The course will introduce students to experimental methods used to understand human perception. In a hands-on, laboratory-style course format, students will become familiar with the process of designing perceptual experiments and the collection and analysis of perceptual data. As a final project, with guidance from the instructor each student will complete a perceptual experiment and prepare a report of their work in the style of a scientific publication.


Instructor(s): Sean MacEvoy

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 4475 Science of Sleep Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

The average person will sleep more than 20 years in his or her lifetime. What is the brain doing during this altered state of consciousness? In this seminar, we will broadly explore the neuroscience of sleep, including anatomy and physiology, pharmacology, human disease, behavioral and cognitive neuroscience, sleep deprivation, and dreaming. The cognitive neuroscience of sleep, and particularly sleep and cognition, will be emphasized.


Instructor(s): Kelly Bennion

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 4476 Cognitive Neuroscience of Memory Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Memory enables you to have skills, to communicate with other people, to make intelligent decisions, to remember your loved ones, and to know who you are. Without memory, you would not be you. Although human memory has been studied for over two thousand years, the neuroscience of human memory has only been studied for the last two decades. In this course, following an introduction on memory processes and brain regions of interest, we will discuss the following key topics on the neuroscience of human memory: the tools of cognitive neuroscience, explicit (conscious) memory in space, explicit memory in time, explicit memory failure, working memory, implicit (nonconscious) memory, explicit memory and other cognitive processes, explicit memory in animals, and the future of memory research.


Instructor(s): Scott Slotnick

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed PSYC2272

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 4477 Research Practicum: Cognitive Psychology of Memory Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course introduces students to the research process in the cognitive psychology of memory. Research in memory examines how people encode and retrieve information (e.g., personal experiential information and world knowledge). Topics will include implicit memory, explicit memory, semantic memory, and working memory. Class readings will come from journal articles. Students will analyze these articles and lead class discussions. The ultimate goal is to have students propose a novel study and possibly carry out a research project. This will entail reviewing the relevant literature, identifying a novel research question, designing an experiment, interpreting results, and writing up the experiment in publication format.


Instructor(s): Preston Thakral

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 4478 Research Practicum: Distortions, Disorders, & Diseases of Memory Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

The ability to encode and remember information is critical to the human experience. However, human memory is fragile and imperfect. Distortions, disorders, and diseases of memory will be extensively explored in this course. Students will read and critically analyze cognitive psychology and neuroscience research articles, lead a class discussion on a research paper, and ultimately propose a novel study within the realm of human memory.


Instructor(s): Jessica Karanian

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 4479 Research Practicum in Sensory Processes and the Psychology of Food Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

How do our senses—what we see, hear, smell, and taste, and the sensory features of how food is presented to us—influence what, when, and how much we eat? How do moods, expectations, the situation we are in, and the people we are with influence our feelings of hunger and satiety, and even how we metabolize food? How does what we eat influence our emotions, and how do our personalities and moral convictions influence what we eat? These are some of the topics that will be addressed in this research practicum involving critical reading, class presentations, research projects, and active participation.


Instructor(s): Rachel Herz

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed PSYC1110 and Must have successfully completed PSYC1120 and (Must have successfully completed PSYC3388 or Must have successfully completed PSYC3371 or Must have successfully completed PSYC2274 or Must have successfully completed PSYC2285)

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 4481 Research Practicum in Behavioral Neuroscience Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course will introduce students to research methods used in behavioral neuroscience. We will read and discuss a variety of methods that researchers use to determine the underlying brain circuitry and mechanisms of observable behaviors. Students will learn how to pose and test behavioral neuroscience research questions, conduct and write a literature review, analyze data, and write a research paper in APA style.


Instructor(s): Lauren Anderson

Prerequisites: PSYC1120 and PSYC2285

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 4490 Senior Thesis I Fall 3
Course Description

Students may elect to write a thesis during the senior year. In most cases, the thesis involves original empirical research, although theoretical papers may be permitted in exceptional instances. Students must obtain the consent of a faculty member to serve as thesis advisor. Students who choose to write a thesis are encouraged to take an Independent Study with a prospective thesis advisor during the junior year to develop a thesis proposal.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Registration for this course requires additional paperwork. See the Psychology website.

PSYC 4491 Senior Thesis II Spring 3
Course Description

This is a continuation of PSYC4490. Students writing a thesis may take only a one-semester thesis course, or they may take a two-semester sequence, PSYC4490 and PSYC4491.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Registration for this course requires additional paperwork. See the Psychology website.

PSYC 4492 Research Practicum on Understanding Literature Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Through which medium (reading the text, hearing the story, or watching a movie) do students best understand a novel/a play/a poem? In this practicum, students will work in small groups to collect and analyze data to help answer this question. Each student will be responsible for writing an APA style research report. Students will also learn about various research methodologies and data analytic techniques used by psychologists.


Instructor(s): M.E. Panero

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 4495 Senior Honors Thesis I Fall 3
Course Description

For students in the Honors Program writing a thesis. All Honors Program students write a thesis during the senior year. In most cases, the thesis involves original empirical research, although theoretical papers may be permitted in exceptional instances. Honors students are encouraged to take an Independent Study with a prospective thesis advisor during the junior year, to develop a thesis proposal. The designation "Graduated with Departmental Honors" will be granted by the Honors Program Committee upon successful completion of the Honors Program requirements and the final evaluation of the thesis.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Registration for this course requires an invitation and additional paperwork. See the Psychology website.

PSYC 4496 Senior Honors Thesis II Spring 3
Course Description

Continuation of PSYC4495.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Registration for this course requires an invitation and additional paperwork. See the Psychology website.

PSYC 4497 Scholars Project Research Fall/Spring 6
Course Description

This course is limited to Psychology majors who are conducting their Scholar of the College research.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PSYC 5501 Experimental Design & Statistics Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course focuses on experimental design and related statistical methods. It covers between-subject, within-subject, and mixed designs with one and two factors. Statistical topics include the relevant statistical model and model assumptions, omnibus test, test of contrasts, multiple comparison, effect size, and power calculations. One and two sample t tests will also be revisited. If time permits, advanced topics such as designs with nested factors or random factors, mixed model approach, and nonparametric approach may also be covered.


Instructor(s): Hao Wu

Prerequisites: An undergraduate course in statistics

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PSYC 5502 Multiple Regression Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course provides an introduction to the theory and application of multiple regression analysis. The topics are multiple regression, treatment of categorical predictors, test of interaction effect, statistical assumptions, regression diagnostics, and regression analysis for categorical dependent variable.


Instructor(s): Ehri Ryu

Prerequisites: PSYC5501

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PSYC 5540 Advanced Topics in Social Psychology Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This seminar is designed to provide students with an overview of current themes and research in social psychology. Topics include social cognition, social influence, social interaction and group dynamics, close relationships, stereotype and prejudice, attitudes, prosocial behavior, the self, and free will.


Instructor(s): Andrea Heberlein

Prerequisites: PSYC2241 or permission of instructor

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PSYC 5541 Moral Emotions Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

What is the relationship between morality and emotion? Do uniquely moral emotions exist? In what contexts do moral emotions arise? This course explores the nature of emotion and the nature of morality and their relationship, from the perspectives of social, cognitive, developmental psychology and neuroscience. Topics include: emotion regulation, pro-social behavior, inter-group attitudes, perspective-taking.


Instructor(s): Liane Young and James Russell

Prerequisites: None

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PSYC 5542 Theories of Human Emotion Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This seminar covers the major psychological theories of human emotion, beginning with the classic writings of William James and continuing to contemporary controversies about the nature of emotion. Some of the questions to be considered are whether or not there are basic emotions, the relation of emotion to cognition and action, and whether emotions are innate or learned through our particular culture. The focus is on biological, social, and cultural subdisciplines of psychology, but contributions of anthropology, philosophy, and other disciplines will be discussed as well.


Instructor(s): James Russell

Prerequisites: A 3000-level Psychology course

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PSYC 5543 Current Topics in Moral Psychology Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

In this graduate seminar, students will engage with current themes and research on moral psychology. Sample topics: intentions and motivations; status, class, power; punishment and forgiveness; free will and the self.


Instructor(s): Liane Young

Prerequisites: None

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PSYC 5560 Advanced Topics in Developmental Psychology Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This seminar explores major theories and issues in cognitive developmental psychology. Students gain a historical understanding of the emergence of developmental psychology as a field, become familiar with Piagetian theory, and explore more recent theories and findings in the aftermath of Piaget. For graduate students and advanced undergraduates.


Instructor(s): Sara Cordes

Prerequisites: PSYC2260

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PSYC 5563 The Logical Problem of Language Acquisition Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

If not confronted with overwhelming evidence to the contrary, scientists would have long ago unanimously concluded that languages are unlearnable. In fact, some scientists have endorsed that claim. The scientific literature on language-learning is replete with mathematical paradoxes (Quine's Paradox, Baker's Paradox, Fodor's Paradox) that would appear to prove that this or that puzzle confronted by any would-be language learner is unsolvable even in principle, whether by human, animal, or machine. In this course, we try to make sense of language learning. Why do these paradoxes arise? How might children—who do indeed learn languages!—meet the challenges of language acquisition? How have computer scientists who build language-learning machines tried to address the same challenges?


Instructor(s): Joshua Hartshorne

Prerequisites: None

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PSYC 5564 Computational Models of Cognition Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Introduction to computational theories of human cognition. Focus on principles of inductive learning and inference, and the representation of knowledge. Computational frameworks covered include Bayesian and hierarchical Bayesian models; probabilistic graphical models; nonparametric statistical models and the Bayesian Occam's razor; sampling algorithms for approximate learning and inference; and probabilistic models defined over structured representations such as first-order logic, grammars, or relational schemas. Applications to understanding core aspects of cognition, such as concept learning and categorization, causal reasoning, theory formation, language acquisition, and social inference.


Instructor(s): Joshua Hartshorne

Prerequisites: Two courses in computer programming and undergraduate courses in developmental psychology and cognitive psychology. Students who do not have this background should consult with the instructor on how to prepare.

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PSYC 5571 Controversies in Cognitive Neuroscience Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Cognitive Neuroscience is the study of how human mental processing relates to activity in specific brain regions. Current controversies in Cognitive Neuroscience will be critically examined by evaluating key articles relating to the following questions. Are there category specific processing regions in the brain (e.g., a region specialized for processing faces)? Can visual images be pictorial? Does short-term memory related activity in prefrontal cortex mirror more posterior perception related activity patterns? Do recollection and familiarity--two types of long-term memory--depend on different sub-regions of the medial temporal lobe? Does attention modulate activity in primary visual cortex?


Instructor(s): Scott Slotnick

Prerequisites: None

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PSYC 5574 Neuroscience of Sensation and Perception Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Our ability to survive as we make our way through the world requires the quick and accurate transformation of a vast array of sensory inputs into a cohesive picture of the environment. Drawing upon classic work and recent advances, this seminar will explore the critical neural steps that underlie this process, addressing topics in vision, audition, and somatosensation, among others. We will place a particular emphasis upon drawing parallels among sensory modalities and upon integrating information from a wide range of techniques, from single-unit electrophysiology to fMRI.


Instructor(s): Sean MacEvoy

Prerequisites: None

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PSYC 5575 Advanced Affective Neuroscience Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Affective and cognitive processes have traditionally been studied in isolation. Yet in most circumstances, there are interactions among these different types of processes. Affective neuroscience applies the tools traditionally used to study cognition (neuroimaging, neuropsychology) to better understand the neural bases of affective processes and the ways that affective processes interact with cognitive ones. Students will critically evaluate the design, methods, and interpretation of studies and will learn how the methods of cognitive neuroscience are best applied to examine affective processing.


Instructor(s): Elizabeth Kensinger

Prerequisites: PSYC2241, PSYC2242, or PSYC2285

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PSYC 5576 Methods in Human Brain Mapping Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

For over a century, human brain mapping has been conducted by correlating lesion location with impaired behavior. In the last two decades, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)—a noninvasive neuroimaging technique with excellent spatial resolution—has given rise to an explosion of knowledge regarding the role of specific brain regions in particular types of cognitive processing (such as shifting attention or memory retrieval). This course provides an in-depth examination of fMRI by reviewing the physical basis of the fMRI signal and its relation to neural activity in addition to considering issues of experimental design and data analysis.


Instructor(s): Scott Slotnick

Prerequisites: None

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PSYC 5577 The Hippocampus Spring/Fall 3
Course Description

The hippocampus has long been understood to play a critical role in long-term memory. However, its function appears to extend beyond processes typically associated with memory, and recent evidence has highlighted the structural and functional heterogeneity of the hippocampus. This seminar will focus on the theme of a multi-faceted hippocampus—one that is heterogeneous in its subregions, contributions to cognition, and connections with the rest of the brain. The course will integrate research from the cognitive and behavioral neurosciences, incorporating both human and rodent studies of hippocampal function. Class meetings will typically include student-led discussions of journal articles related to each week’s topic.


Instructor(s): Maureen Ritchey

Prerequisites: None

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PSYC 5580 Neural Systems and Stress Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

The course will provide an overview of the neural systems involved in the stress response, from the cellular to the behavioral level. We will discuss the roles of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in the stress response and the effects of stress on neuronal plasticity, learning and memory, and mental health and disease. Emphasis will be on vulnerability versus resilience to stress. The long-term consequences of early life stress on cognitive, emotional, and social behaviors will also be discussed.


Instructor(s): Alexa Veenema

Prerequisites: None

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PSYC 5581 Neurobiology of Mental Illness Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

The course will discuss current views of the pathophysiology and etiology of mental illness. We will discuss recent findings from human studies and from animal models. Emphasis will be on alterations in brain circuits and neurotransmitter systems underlying major depression, PTSD, autism, and schizophrenia. We will explore the involvement of neurotransmitters in mental illness, including serotonin and dopamine, neuropeptides such as vasopressin and oxytocin, and stress hormones and how they mediate the regulation of emotion, cognition and behavior. Finally, we will discuss how genetic background and early environment can be important risk factors for the development of mental illness.


Instructor(s): Alexa Veenema

Prerequisites: PSYC2285, PSYC3382, PSYC3385, or PSYC3386. It is assumed that all students have a basic knowledge of the nervous system.

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PSYC 5583 Molecular Basis of Learning and Memory Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Persistent yet pliable behavioral adaptations are the result of learning and memory. The goal of this course is to provide an introduction to the fundamental cellular and molecular mechanisms that permit the storage and retrieval of information. After a primer on cellular and molecular neurobiology, students will read and discuss the seminal works on the following topics: intrinsic (cellular), synaptic & morphological plasticity, molecular mechanisms of consolidation, modulators of memory systems and diseases of memory. The course participants will select additional topics for discussion and writing assignments.


Instructor(s): John Christianson

Prerequisites: None

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PSYC 5585 Advanced Brain Systems: Motivation and Emotion Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course will review the organization of neural networks that control motivated and emotional behaviors in mammals. This is a functional neuroanatomy course that will discuss how the brain regions are interconnected to form functional systems.


Instructor(s): Gorica Petrovich

Prerequisites: None

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PSYC 5587 Cellular Perspectives on Motivated Behavior Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

The goal of the course is to describe how changes in activity – and the composition – of single cells contribute to motivated behavior. Behaviors to be covered include but are not limited to: fear and anxiety, reward learning, addiction, feeding, pair bonding, and aging. The bulk of the reading and lecture materials will come from the primary literature and an extensive neuroscience background is required. As such this course is targeted for graduate students and only the exceptional undergraduate.


Instructor(s): Michael McDannald

Prerequisites: None

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PSYC 5590 History of Psychology Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

A hundred years ago, psychology was a tiny academic specialty called mental philosophy. In a matter of decades, however, psychology burgeoned into an enormous field influencing both scholars and the popular imagination (think IQ test, think analyst's couch). What accounts for the rise of psychology to its all-powerful position? This course will examine the twentieth century trajectory of psychology, asking how it has shaped, and been shaped by, cultural, social, and political conditions, and exploring major thinkers such as William James, Sigmund Freud, B.F. Skinner, Stanley Milgram, Abraham Maslow, and others.


Instructor(s): Nadine Weidman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL5590 HIST4286

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PSYC 6601 Structural Equation Modeling Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course provides an introduction to the theory and application of structural equation modeling (SEM). The topics are basic concepts of structural equation models, path models with measured variables, measurement models, confirmatory factor analysis, structural equations with latent and measured variables, and extensions and advanced application. The course assumes that you have already completed a course in multivariate statistics. LISREL will be used to perform statistical analysis.


Instructor(s): Ehri Ryu

Prerequisites: None

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PSYC 6602 Analysis with Missing Data Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course is to provide an introduction to the theory and application of analytic strategies for analyzing data with missing values. The course will cover traditional and modern approaches to dealing with missing data. SAS and Mplus will be used as primary software packages. Students must have completed graduate level courses in multiple regression and structural equation modeling.


Instructor(s): Ehri Ryu

Prerequisites: None

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PSYC 6603 Research Workshop in Quantitative Psychology I Fall 3
Course Description

Graduate students and faculty in the field of Quantitative Psychology discuss ongoing research; undergraduates may audit with permission of the instructor.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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PSYC 6604 Research Workshop in Quantitative Psychology II Spring 3
Course Description

Graduate students and faculty in the field of Quantitative Psychology discuss ongoing research; undergraduates may audit with permission of the instructor.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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PSYC 6605 Introduction to Multivariate Statistical Methods Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Topics covered in this class include: Matrix algebra and basic concepts in multivariate statistics; Exploratory factor analysis of continuous, dichotomous and ordered categorical data with analytic rotation; Principle component analysis; Discriminant analysis; Correspondence analysis; Clustering; Multidimensional scaling. SPSS and R will be the main computational tool. Students should have taken a graduate level linear regression class before enrolling this class.


Instructor(s): Hao Wu

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed PSYC5502

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PSYC 6608 Multivariate Statistics Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Matrix algebra for multivariate procedures, component and factor analysis, canonical and discriminant analysis, MANOVA, logistic regression, and hierarchical linear model are discussed in this course.


Instructor(s): Ehri Ryu

Prerequisites: PSYC5501

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PSYC 6625 Graduate Independent Study Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

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PSYC 6640 Research Workshop in Social Psychology I Fall 3
Course Description

Graduate students and faculty in the field of Social Psychology discuss ongoing research; undergraduates may audit with permission of the instructor.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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PSYC 6641 Research Workshop in Social Psychology II Spring 3
Course Description

Graduate students and faculty in the field of Social Psychology discuss ongoing research; undergraduates may audit with permission of the instructor.


Instructor(s): James Russell

Prerequisites: None

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PSYC 6660 Research Workshop in Developmental Psychology I Fall 3
Course Description

Graduate students and faculty in the field of Developmental Psychology discuss ongoing research; undergraduates may audit with permission of the instructor.


Instructor(s): Ellen Winner

Prerequisites: None

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PSYC 6661 Research Workshop in Developmental Psychology II Spring 3
Course Description

Graduate students and faculty in the field of Developmental Psychology discuss ongoing research; undergraduates may audit with permission of the instructor.


Instructor(s): Ellen Winner

Prerequisites: None

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PSYC 6672 Research Workshop in Cognitive Neuroscience I Fall 3
Course Description

Graduate students and faculty in the field of Cognitive Neuroscience discuss ongoing research; undergraduates may audit with permission of the instructor.


Instructor(s): Elizabeth Kensinger

Prerequisites: None

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PSYC 6673 Research Workshop in Cognitive Neuroscience II Spring 3
Course Description

Graduate students and faculty in the field of Cognitive Neuroscience discuss ongoing research; undergraduates may audit with permission of the instructor.


Instructor(s): Elizabeth Kensinger

Prerequisites: None

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PSYC 6686 Research Workshop in Behavioral Neuroscience I Fall 3
Course Description

Graduate students and faculty in the field of Behavioral Neuroscience discuss ongoing research; undergraduates may audit with permission of the instructor.


Instructor(s): Gorica Petrovich

Prerequisites: None

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PSYC 6687 Research Workshop in Behavorial Neuroscience II Spring 3
Course Description

Graduate students and faculty in the field of Behavioral Neuroscience discuss ongoing research; undergraduates may audit with permission of the instructor.


Instructor(s): Gorica Petrovich

Prerequisites: None

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PSYC 6690 Scientific Writing Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Writing is an essential part of science and is a craft that can be learned. In this class, students work on their own empirical articles, posters, and literature reviews.


Instructor(s): James Russell

Prerequisites: None

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PSYC 6691 Professional Development Workshop I Fall 0
Course Description

Graduate students meet once a month to discuss issues related to professional development in academic and non-academic settings.


Instructor(s): Scott Slotnick

Prerequisites: None

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PSYC 6692 Professional Development Workshop II Spring 0
Course Description

Continuation of PSYC6691.


Instructor(s): Scott Slotnick

Prerequisites: None

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PSYC 6693 Neuroscience Proseminar I Fall 1
Course Description

This is the fall semester of a two-semester sequence. This proseminar will include faculty presentations on topics directly related to their area of expertise and student-led discussions of research related to those faculty presentations. Students may be asked to consider current debates within the field, to read historical perspectives on research topics, or to discuss methodological details.


Instructor(s): Neuroscience faculty

Prerequisites: None

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PSYC 6694 Neuroscience Proseminar II Spring 2
Course Description

This is the continuation of PSYC6693, completing the two-semester sequence. This course will serve to inform students about the topics investigated, and the methods used, by the Neuroscience faculty in the Psychology department, and will also provide students with an opportunity to work together to discuss, critique, and present empirical studies across a range of neuroscientific levels of analysis.


Instructor(s): Neuroscience faculty

Prerequisites: None

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PSYC 6695 Neuroscience Journal Club Fall 1
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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PSYC 7721 Human Behavior and the Social Environment Fall 3
Course Description

A foundation course emphasizing a systemic perspective in human development and social functioning. Concepts from biology and the behavioral sciences provide the basis for understanding the developmental tasks of individuals, their families, and groups in the context of complex, environmental forces which support or inhibit growth and effective functioning. Attention is given to the variations that occur relative to ethnicity, race, social class, gender, and other differences which mediate the interface of these human systems with their environment.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SCWK7721

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PSYC 8888 Interim Study Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


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Prerequisites: None

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PSYC 9999 Doctoral Continuation Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

All students who have been admitted into Doctoral Candidacy must register and pay the fee for Doctoral Continuation during each semester of their candidacy. Doctoral Continuation requires a commitment of at least 20 hours per week on the dissertation.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

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