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Political Science Courses (POLI) College of Arts and Sciences


Subject Area Course # Course Title Semester Credit Hours Expand
POLI 1021 How to Rule the World: Intro to Political Theory Fall 3
Course Description

This course will explore the highest political theme: the requirements of great political rule. What must we do and know in order to govern well? Should we be guided by the concern for justice, for example, or by the sometimes nasty demands of "national security"? We'll read a small number of foundational texts that all deal, in very different ways, with the requirements of great political leadership. Along the way we'll encounter the founder of the Persian Empire, the greatest king in the Hebrew Bible, Shakespeare's wickedest king, America's greatest president, and THE teacher of princes, Machiavelli.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robert C. Bartlett

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: For majors and non-majors. This course may be used to fulfill the field requirement in Political Theory, or it may be used to fulfill one of the elective requirements in the major. It cannot satisfy more than one of these requirements.

POLI 1022 Discussion Group: How to Rule the World: Introduction to Political Theory Fall 0
Course Description

Discussion Group for POLI1021. Students must register for one discussion section.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 1031 Performing Politics Spring 6
Course Description

This course explores how marginalized and oppressed people have used public performances—in the theatre and on the streets—to make political claims about human rights and social justice. We will examine a range of political plays and protest movements, asking how and why do relatively powerless people use public performances to make political claims? Can theatre be both good politics and good art? Students will create their own political performances (e.g. short plays, puppet shows, videos, etc.), learning about various aspects of theatre while developing a better understanding of their own political views and interests.


Instructor(s): Jennie Purnell and Luke Jorgenson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: THTR1503

Comments: Core Renewal Course:Complex Problems

POLI 1041 Fundamental Concepts of Politics Fall/Spring/Summer 3
Course Description

This is an introduction to the study of politics through a consideration of some of the basic elements associated with governing: the political association, justice, constitutions, equality, liberty, conflict among citizens and between citizens and governments, conflict among governments. Each of the course instructors uses a different set of readings, drawing on a mix of political philosophy texts, works on international politics, novels, biographies. Emphasis is on interesting and important readings, discussion, and writing.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Dennis Hale, Alice Behnegar, Candace Hetzner, Paul T. Wilford, Timothy McCranor and Peter NeCastro

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: For majors only. Restricted to freshmen and sophomores only.

POLI 1042 Introduction to Modern Politics Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines the politics and government of modern states, identifying what is distinctively modern (e.g., representative government, political parties), including in the survey both democratic and non-democratic nations. We will consider the nation-state itself—the most typical modern political arrangement—as well as efforts to "transcend" the nation (e.g., the European Union, the United Nations). We will examine the kinds of public policies that modern states adapt, and consider their consequences. Although this is not a class in international politics, some attention will be paid to the relations among modern states, including war and its causes.


Instructor(s): Alice Behnegar, David DiPasquale, Dennis Hale, Kathleen Bailey, Kenji Hayao, Marc Landy and Jennie Purnell

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: For majors only. Restricted to freshmen and sophomores only.

POLI 1043 The History and Politics of Terrorism Spring 6
Course Description

Terrorism dominates the headlines today, but how much do we really know about this form of political violence? Is terrorism a new or an old phenomenon? What are its causes, is it effective, and how do states and societies respond to it? This course will provide students with the tools to engage these complex questions in a sophisticated manner by combining the approaches of history and political science. As citizens and future leaders, students will be challenged to consider the problem of justifying and legitimizing violence as well as the struggle of balancing liberty, security, and community.


Instructor(s): Julian Bourg and Peter Krause

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HIST1509

Comments: Core Renewal Course: Complex Problems

POLI 1045 Religion in a Secular World: Separating Church, Mosque, and State Spring 3
Course Description

The course investigates how the modern state in Europe and the Middle East has led to changes within Islam and Christianity. Over the past two centuries, Roman Catholicism and Sunni Muslim religious authorities gradually came to operate under the secular rule of law, changing their internal rules and external activities. The modern State has defined itself in opposition to religion, but it has also appropriated many traditional religious roles in defining education, justice and social norms. We will look closely at moments of major change to see how religious actors adapt to new circumstances. We will examine the State’s impact upon religious institutions, and ask how these institutions shape the aims and activities of Muslim and Roman Catholic faith communities. Together, we will explore how the two largest transnational religious communities in the world have sought to coexist in a world dominated by nation-states.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jonathan Laurence

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal Course: Enduring Questions For Freshmen Only

POLI 1046 Politics of Human Rights Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores the comparative politics and history of human rights with a focus on Latin America and sub-Saharan Africa. We'll address the following questions: Why are human rights violated when and where they are? Do certain political, economic, and/or cultural factors make human rights violations more or less likely? The course will focus on civil and political rights (e.g. physical integrity rights, the right to participate in the political process). Topics to be discussed include: torture and the national security state; gender and human rights; and the search for justice in the wake of egregious rights violations.


Instructor(s): Jennie Purnell

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal Course: Enduring Questions

POLI 1047 Creating the Modern State: Power, Politics, and Propaganda from the Renaissance to the 21st Century Spring 3
Course Description

How does the modern nation-state work? Through persuasion, coercion, and indoctrination. Our national identity is manufactured through propaganda and socialization: it depends on accepting myths of common culture and history shared among an "imagined community" of strangers. Does the state work? It depends: certainly, "Big Brother" is omnipresent in many states. On the other hand, territorialized political units are not good at dealing with trans-border problems like terrorism, climate change, or globalization. But there is a history behind the evolution of the modern nation-state, one worth learning: how did we get here; where do we go from now?


Instructor(s): Hiroshi Nakazato

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal Course: Enduring Questions

POLI 1061 Introduction to American Politics Summer 3
Course Description

An overview of contemporary American government and politics focusing on how the institutions envisioned by the Framers of the Constitution (Congress, the judiciary, the executive) function today. Particular emphasis will be placed on how developments since the 1960s have affected the interaction of national, state, and local governmental actors, political participation, the articulation of interests, and policy formulation and implementation. Topics covered will include the media, public interest and advocacy organizations, campaign technologies and consultants, and public policy research institutes (think tanks). Whenever possible, comparisons between the U.S. and other advanced industrial democracies will be explored.


Instructor(s): Peter NeCastro

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: For majors and non-majors.

POLI 1063 Discussion Group: American Politics I Spring 0
Course Description

Discussion Group for POLI1061. Students must register for one discussion section.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 1081 Introduction to International Politics Spring/Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the principle sources of the behavior of countries in international politics, including the nature of the international system and the decision-making process within states. It examines such issues as the sources of power, the causes and implications of the security dilemma, the dynamics of alliances, the causes of war, international political economy, and the dilemmas of world order. This course is strongly recommended for students who plan to take upper level international politics courses.


Instructor(s): Gary Winslett

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Not open to students who have taken POLI1501. Course restricted to political science majors only. This course may NOT be taken by any International Studies majors or minors. Class restricted to political science freshmen and sophomores.

POLI 1091 Introduction to Comparative Politics Fall 3
Course Description

This course provides an overview of the political science subfield of Comparative Politics. Comparative Politics is the study of domestic politics among the 200 plus countries around the world. The class introduces students to three features of Comparative Politics: (1) comparative research design and the comparative method; (2) major theoretical themes in comparative politics; and. (3) sampling of case studies comparing politics in selected countries of the world.


Instructor(s): Gerald Easter

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course is open to majors and non-majors.

POLI 1201 Politics of Educational Reform Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the political forces, institutions and policy issues that influence public education reform efforts in America. Topics include: local governance and machine politics, roots and impact of federal involvement, organized labor's role, reform groups and other outside actors (non-profits, for profits, foundations), current debates over standards-based reform, parent and student rights and responsibilities, civic capacity and community voice, school choice and competition, implementation challenges, and emerging trends in school governance and educational approaches.


Instructor(s): Gigi Georges

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 1202 Research Methods and National Movements Spring 1
Course Description

This course will focus on teaching students a variety of research methods for analyzing national movements in a hands-on environment.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Peter Krause

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor required

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course is a pass/fail course. This course doesn't not meet any degree requirements for the political science major.

POLI 1203 Introduction to Public Administration Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines public administration both as an area of academic study and a profession. It looks behind the curtain of elected officials and judges at the powerful and complex systems of public agencies and administrators that manage and implement policy. Topics include: intersections between bureaucracy and the political process, theories of public organizations, bureaucratic discretion and accountability, policy implementation, and current debates about the changing nature of public administration.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Elizabeth Georges

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 1206 The Politics of Self-Rule: Ireland, Northern Ireland, and Scotland Summer 3
Course Description

A century ago, Ireland, Northern Ireland, and Scotland were integral parts of Great Britain and the United Kingdom and were governed by the British Parliament. Now each has its own parliament, although only Ireland is fully independent of the UK. We will consider the development of self-rule in these three places, how self-rule operates today and the major challenges that each administrative unit faces. We will also examine the key political questions that each parliament is currently debating. Our understanding of these matters will be greatly enhanced by the visits we will pay to each of the three parliaments and to other sites that are particularly important for understanding the political development of the three places. Students will also benefit from interacting with a variety of political leaders, policy analysts, journalists, civil servants, and citizen activists in Ireland, Northern Ireland, and Scotland.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Marc Landy and Robert M. Mauro

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 1215 The Politics and Policy of Land and Water Summer 3
Course Description

This course examines the politics and policy of public lands, water supply and resource management. It takes place at the Grand Canyon National Park using the national park as a case study illustrating the political, policy, and management issues involving land, water and recreation. The course will have both an online and a field component. The field work will be conducted at Grand Canyon National Park and Lake Mead and will include a raft trip through the entire Grand Canyon. Site visits to the other important government agencies involved in various aspects of public land and resource management will include the Bureau of Land Management, The Bureau of Reclamation, the Fish and Wildlife Service, the Forest Service, the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Readings will come from a wide variety of disciplines including political science, public administration, resource management, resource economics, tourism economics, arid land ecology and the history of the American West.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Marc Landy

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 1217 Venice and New Orleans:A Comparative Study Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 1225 Capstone: Lives of Faith and Solidarity Spring 3
Course Description

What does it mean to live in solidarity with the poor and marginalized? How has your education prepared you for this? We will explore solidarity as a commitment of faith and politics through analysis of faith-based movements linking the US and Latin America: Sanctuary Movement, Witness for Peace, and School of the Americas Watch. We will examine the meaning of faith and solidarity in our lives through previous and future service, advocacy, relationships, work, and spirituality.


Instructor(s): Jennie Purnell

Prerequisites: Previous participation in a BC immersion trip to Latin America or a semester-long study abroad program in Latin America required.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Students admitted by permission of instructor
Please contact instructor by email, purnelje@bc.edu

POLI 1227 Politics and Society of Contemporary Sub-Saharan Africa Fall 3
Course Description

Focusing on the study of politics and government in Africa, this course surveys the different approaches used to examine the history of political development on the African continent as well as the institutional structure of the African states. We will explore some of the dimensions of social change and poltical reform in Post-Colonial Africa, with special reference to factors such as nationalism, ethnicity, state dysfunctionality, the problem of political order, democratization, and development, doing so against the backdrop of the debate between Afro-pessimism and Afro-optimism as we grapple with the fate of the continent -- the subject of various controversies.


Instructor(s): Masse Ndiaye

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: AADS2217

Comments:

POLI 1249 Do the Virtues have Gender? Fall 3
Course Description

The question of virtue lies at the heart of every civilization. So does the question of gender. Historically in the West, some virtues, such as bodily strength, courage in battle, self-control, rational intellect, and leadership, have been seen as masculine and superior to other virtues seen as feminine, such as modesty, industry, frugality, nurturing, and obedience. Is this view natural, rooted in biological sex; or is it conventional, part of a socially constructed system of gender roles? Further, how does the Western debate over these questions compare with the one currently raging in the Islamic world? These questions will be addressed through a wide range of readings, as well as films and other media, from both traditions.


Instructor(s): Martha Bayles

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HONR4940

Comments: Open to all BC undergraduates who have completed the core requirements in humanities and social sciences.

POLI 1274 The Problem of Law: Perspectives from Old Books, Modern Times, and Great Movies Spring 3
Course Description

Human beings have a complicated relationship with law, above all because while we want the law to do justice, justice is elusive at every level: for the individual, within any given political community, and among communities. It is a problem to establish law and a problem to maintain law; individual lawlessness, political revolution, and war are ever-present possibilities in human life. We will explore the problem of law in these three contexts with the help of works of fiction (literature, film) and works of philosophy and contemporary social science. Some authors will be old friends from the Honors Curriculum (Plato, Shakespeare, Camus) and some will take us into new territory (the modern Middle East), but in every case the concern will be to explore how these works illuminate the world the students are about to join.


Instructor(s): Alice Behnegar

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HONR4941

Comments:

POLI 1501 Introduction to International Politics Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines the principle sources of the behavior of countries in international politics, including the nature of the international system and the decision-making process within states. It examines such issues as the sources of power, the causes and implications of the security dilemma, the dynamics of alliances, the causes of war, international political economy, and the dilemmas of world order.


Instructor(s): Robert Ross

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Course open to freshmen and sophomores only. Not open to students who have taken INTL2500 and INTL2546.

POLI 2210 The Politics of Constitutional Change in Ireland, 1922-2013: Governance, Nationality, Religion and Morality Fall 3
Course Description

This course will explore constitutional change in Ireland in the light of constitutional theory and of modern Irish politics. Since the 1960s, a ferment of social and political change has made the 75-year-old Irish constitution a battleground for opposing forces and controversial referendums. The external challenges involved in joining the EU, and the new relationships between Ireland, Northern Ireland and Britain have driven changes. Internally, secularisation and the weakening of traditional religious observance have given a new salience to issues such as contraception, divorce, abortion and gay marriage. All these issues have involved constitutional amendment and major political debates.


Instructor(s): John Horgan

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2251 Food, Power,&Politics Summer 3
Course Description

This course will seek to provide an intellecttual and analytical-driven framework around the question of food as an integral part of any human experience, but particularly our experience with food through across cultures. We each have a unique opportunity to understand better the role of food in each of our lives as we move through this summer program by examining our own cultural and political assumptions and those of others from a new point of view. We can appreciate the lenses brought by other individuals, cultures and places to the acts of eating and producing food. Finally, we can express the human experience of food in ways that represent our understandings, experiences and vision for a healthy, just and pleasurable relationship to food in ways that can be shared and appreciated by others. In eating and producing food, we exist simultaneously in a deeply personal and communal place, a place of the present, past and future in which we are never more and less than human.


Instructor(s): Hiroshi Nakazato

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: INTL2251 HIST2851

Comments:

POLI 2253 International Law of Food Summer 3
Course Description

This course, one of the few if not the only in the world to address this critical subject matter, identifies and analyzes contemporary international legal and policy issues related to food including supply, safety, security, subsidies, and trade. Students will master legal and structural analytical tools for addressing these increasingly important challenges of concern to all global citizens, including in particular undergraduates potentially interested in attending law school seeking an introduction to legal method. Field trips include visits to the European Food Safety Authority and the UN Food and Agriculture Organization in Rome. The course stresses the development of skills to enable students effectively to grapple with new and emerging issues in this ever-changing and expanding field.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: LAWS5253 INTL2253

Comments:

POLI 2282 Individual Research in Political Science II Spring 3
Course Description

This is a one-semester research course directed by a Department member that culminates into a long paper or some equivalent.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Permission of instructor required.

POLI 2301 Policy and Politics in the U.S. Spring 3
Course Description

This course is designed to acquaint students with the major features of American policymaking at the national level by engaging in primary research and extensive memo-writing on selected policy issues. Each student will be expected to become familiar with at least three policy areas, understanding existing government policies and underlying tradeoffs and paradoxes; proposing intellectually defensible and politically feasible reforms; and suggesting political strategies for enacting these reforms. Possible topics include social security, environmental regulations, federal aid and mandates for education, affirmative action, welfare, and the use of public lands.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): R. Shep Melnick

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2302 Dilemmas of Unity and Diversity in American Politics and Society Fall 3
Course Description

Both politicians and professors speak of diversity as an unqualified good that Americans must continually strive to achieve. Yet what exactly do we mean by "diversity"? Along what dimensions - racial, social class, cultural, phenotypical, religious, ideological - do we define diversity? More to the point, are there any limits such that the merits of diversity (or presumed merits) diminish once certain levels of diversity are achieved.


Instructor(s): Peter Skerry and R. Shep Melnick

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This is a team-taught class by Professors Peter Skerry and R. Shep Melnick.

POLI 2305 American Federalism Fall 3
Course Description

This course will examine the constitutional foundation, the historical development, and the contemporary character of American Federalism. It will explore the tension between centralization and decentralization as an independent factor influencing the course of American politics and governance and contemporary policy debate. It will also explore federalism in a comparative light by looking at current debates about European federalism.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Marc Landy

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2306 Parties and Elections in America Fall 3
Course Description

A general survey of American political parties and elections. Investigation of such topics as how voters make choices, the conduct of campaigns, the role of media in political campaigns, the importance of money in politics, and changing political commitments and party alignments will entail consideration of the issues, personalities, and campaign tactics involved in recent elections. Emphasis will be placed on the role of parties in structuring political conflict and the role of elections in enhancing citizen control of political leaders. We will follow the progress of the 2016 elections as they unfold.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kay Schlozman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2309 The U.S. Congress Spring 3
Course Description

Americans are habitually fierce critics of Congress even as they like (and usually reelect) their own representatives. In this course, we try to explain this paradox by investigating the ways in which the structure and organization of Congress allows members to cultivate personal popularity despite rampant disapproval of the institution in which they serve. Among other topics, the course addresses the nomination and election of congressional candidates, the roles of congressional parties and leaders, and the influence over the legislative process of the committee system, rules and procedures, lobbyists and interest groups, and other branches of government.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): David A. Hopkins

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2311 Urban Politics in Twenty-First Century America Spring 3
Course Description

An examination of the politics and policies concerning America's urban areas at the beginning of the twenty-first century. Topics include: the distinctive nature of urban politics; the meaning and relevance of concepts such as "community" and "the politics of place" in today's political context; the transformation of urban political institutions over the last century; the demographic and social changes confronting cities today; the role of community organizations and citizen groups; the relationships among cities, states, and the national government in our federal system; comparative analysis of cities in the United States with those in other advanced industrial nations.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Peter Skerry

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2312 Women in Politics Spring 3
Course Description

In this course we probe the role of women in American politics and the efforts that have been made in the past -- and are being made today -- on behalf of the collective political interests of women. We consider gender differences among citizens in public opinion, political participation, and vote choices and gender differences in the experiences and comportment of political leaders. Finally, we analyze the politics of a number of public policies having a special impact on women among them, employment discrimination, equal opportunity in education, and sexual harassment.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kay L. Schlozman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2314 Gender and Politics Fall 3
Course Description

In this course we probe the role of women in American politics and the efforts that have been made on behalf of the collective political interests of women. We consider gender differences among citizens in public opinion, political participation, and vote choices and gender differences in the experiences and comportment of political leaders. Finally, we analyze the politics of a number of public policies having a special impact on women - among them, employment discrimination and other workplace issues, child care, equal opportunity in education, sexual harassment and sexual violence.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kay Schlozman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2315 The New Politics of Public Policy Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines how American politics and policy has changed since the mid-1960s. Topics include the causes and consequences of divided government; congressional, presidential, and judicial influence on policy development; and the long-term consequences of heightened demand for government benefits and services, huge budget deficits, and declining public confidence in government. We will focus on income maintenance programs (especially Social Security, Disability Insurance, food stamps, and AFDC), asking whether these programs are likely to expand or contract in coming years.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): R. Shep Melnick

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2317 The American Presidency Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the American presidency in the views and actions of major Presidents, electoral politics, and relations with political party, Congress, the courts, and the executive bureaucracy.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Marc Landy

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2322 Courts and Public Policy Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines American courts as political institutions, asking how judges shape public policy, how politics outside the courtroom affects judicial behavior, and how the role of the federal courts has changed over the past 60 years. Topics include desegregation, voting rights, environmental and administrative law, statutory interpretation, and torts.


Instructor(s): R. Shep Melnick

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2327 U.S. Constitutional Development Fall 3
Course Description

A survey of the development of American constitutionalism, considered historically as the product of legal, political and intellectual currents and crises. Coverage includes the Founding, the Marshall and Taney eras, the slavery crisis, the rise of corporate capitalism, the emergence of the modern state, the Great Depression/New Deal, and new forms of rights and liberties. Topics include the growth of Supreme Court power, the Court's relation to the states and the other federal branches, and the influence on constitutional understandings of economic developments, reform movements, wars, party competition, and legal and political thought.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Ken I. Kersch

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors only.

POLI 2328 Discussion Group:U.S. Constitutional Development Fall 0
Course Description

Discussion Group for POLI2327. Students must register for one discussion section.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Corequisite: POLI2327 U.S. Constitutional Development.

POLI 2333 Democracy in America Spring 3
Course Description

This course uses the greatest book on American politics, Tocqueville's Democracy in America, as a guide for studying perennial issues in American politics. We will read Democracy in America in conjunction with contemporary studies that address such key themes as individualism and "self interest rightly understood," law and mores, tyranny of the majority and "soft despotism," and local government and the art of association. Some of these recent works build upon Tocqueville's insights. Others claim that the contemporary U.S. bears little resemblance to Tocqueville's America. Each week the Monday class will be devoted to lecture, the Wednesday class to discussion.


Instructor(s): R.Shep Melnick

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Students who have taken POLI7726 may not take this course.

POLI 2334 Political Behavior and Participation Fall 3
Course Description

How do citizens form opinions about politics, and how do these attitudes influence their participation in political life? This course addresses these questions by surveying the most prominent sources of influence on the political orientations of individuals, including personality effects, socialization, interpersonal dynamics, cognitive biases, and the news media. We then apply these findings to the most common forms of political behavior, including party affiliation, electoral participation, activism, and protest, aiming to explain why different citizens support different political candidates and causes-as well as why some members of the public engage extensively in political activity while others remain uninvolved.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): David A. Hopkins

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2335 Conflict and Polarization in American Politics Spring 3
Course Description

It was once common for observers to note--and sometimes bemoan--the relative lack of partisan and ideological polarization in American politics, yet many now believe that Americans have become too politically divided. This course examines the nature of political differences in the public, explaining how distinctions of race, sex, social class, religion, ideology, and issue positions are associated with differing choices at the ballot box. We will consider whether the strong ideological conflict now evident in elite institutions reflects similar divisions among citizens, and investigate whether the United States has in fact split into "red" and "blue" partisan territory.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): David A. Hopkins

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2338 Environmental Politics and Policy Spring 3
Course Description

This course provides an overview of environmental politics in the U.S., with an emphasis on the ways in which environmental policy is developed and implemented. We begin by analyzing the historical development of environmental policy in the U.S. paying close attention to how the environment as an issue has evolved from the time of the country's founding through to the modern environmental movement. We then examine specific case studies related to contemporary policy challenges. Whether climate change, nonpoint source pollution, Not in My Back Yard (NIMBY) politics, or natural disasters, today citizens are confronting the consequences of rapid economic growth and development. Along the way we will consider the key actors that shape environmental outcomes including: Congress, the EPA, industry lobbyists, state and local environmental agencies, advocacy groups, the science community, and the private sector.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Michael T. Hartney

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2339 State and Local Government Spring 3
Course Description

Although national politics captures most media and public attention, state and local governments may well have a greater impact on citizens' daily lives. Consequently, this course examines the key institutions and processes that shape politics and policymaking at the state and local levels of government. Specific attention will be paid to how American sub-national governments raise revenues, allocate and manage their resources (zoning laws, regulatory takings), and provide important governmental services (public schools, fire and police protection, parks). Along the way, students will be introduced to and asked to evaluate key concepts and theories relating to the operation of sub-national governments (e.g., federalism, Tiebout sorting, the "homevoter hypothesis").


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Michael T. Hartney

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2341 American Political Thought I Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines American political thought from the colonial settlements through the end of the Civil War. Topics include: religion and politics; modern liberalism; republican and democratic ideas in the colonies and states; the Constitution; parties; race and slavery; equalitarian ideas in politics, religion, and private life; judicial review, federalism, the democratic executive, constitutionalism, and representative government.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Dennis Hale

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2342 American Political Thought II Spring 3
Course Description

This course surveys the history of American political thought since the Civil War, with an emphasis on both recurring themes (such as liberal individualism and religiosity) and resurgent conflicts (such as over the scope of government power, and the meaning of democracy and political equality). Topics include Populism, Progressivism, feminism, Social Darwinism, the Social Gospel, New Deal/Great Society liberalism, civil rights, the Beat Generation, Black Power, the student revolts of the 1960s, the sexual revolution of the 1970s, and the 1980s conservative ascendancy.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Ken I. Kersch

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2350 Tip O'Neill and the Evolution of American Politics Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines how American politics has changed over the past 75 years by focusing on the career of Speaker of the House Tip O'Neill. O'Neill entered politics in an era of strong local parties, became Speaker while the "Watergate babies" were reforming Congress, and left office at the beginning of an era of intense partisan polarization. The course examines these three periods of American politics, asking how they shaped—and were shaped by—Speaker O'Neill's long political career. Class lectures and discussions will be supplemented by talks by prominent congressional scholars.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): R. Shep Melnick

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2360 Seminar: Rights in Conflict Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines a series of political controversies in which at least one—and usually more than one—side makes a claim on the basis of rights. The political controversies we investigate involve demands made in the name of, among others, property rights, First Amendment rights, the rights of the accused, and the right to vote, as well as rights-based assertions on behalf of the disabled.


Instructor(s): Kay Schlozman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This seminar is primarily for sophomores. Juniors admitted with departmental permission, provided there is an open seat in the course.

POLI 2364 Persuasion in Politics Spring 3
Course Description

In this course, students will be introduced to the theory and techniques of political persuasion. The course draws on literature from psychology, political science, and communications to explain how people can be persuaded to change their attitudes and/or behavior. The course also covers how new media—from Facebook to smartphones—can help or hinder persuasion. Students will design their own theory-driven persuasive messages on a topic of their choosing.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Emily A. Thorson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course is restricted to juniors and seniors.

POLI 2367 Media and Politics Fall 3
Course Description

This course provides an overview of the media's role in American political life. In doing so, it will focus on several broad themes: the relationship between the media and government; the process of newsmaking and how it shapes the content of political news; the effects of the media on public opinion and voting behavior; and the critical changes to the media (new and old) taking place today.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Emily A. Thorson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2386 Civil Liberties Spring 3
Course Description

A political, historical, normative, and legal consideration of the development of individual liberties in the United States. Topics include the freedom of speech, religious liberty and non-Establishment, criminal process, property rights, privacy, and sexual and bodily autonomy.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Ken I. Kersch

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors only.

POLI 2400 Comparative Politics Fall 3
Course Description

This course is an introduction to the field of comparative politics. This course starts with an intensive study of a number of country case studies. It then proceeds to a comparative analysis of important topics in political science, such as state power, democratization, and government institutions. The course is intended for majors who have completed the introductory courses for political science and plan to take more specialized courses in comparative politics.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kenji Hayao

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2401 Politics of India: Democracy, Diversity, and Development Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the challenges and opportunities of democracy and development in modern (post-Independence) India. How does democracy persist in a society divided along multiple social and economic cleavages? What are the respective roles of the Indian state, civil society, and private sector in promoting economic growth and human development? How well do India's political institutions perform in promoting these goals? What can we learn from the Indian experience about democratic practice and prospects for development in other countries?


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Gabrielle Kruks-Wisner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors

POLI 2402 Comparative Revolutions Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the causes and implications for societies of major social revolutions. The course will cover major theories of revolution, and will include a series of case studies of revolutions from around the world that succeeded and that failed. Cases will include France, China, Russia, peasant rebellions, national liberation struggles, and others.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Paul Christensen

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2403 Rise and Rule of Islamic States Fall 3
Course Description

This course explores the nature of Islamic political systems from the Arab caliphates, Mongol Khanates, and Turkic conquests to the problems and prospects faced by Muslim states today. The modern states to be examined include Turkey, Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Azerbaijan, and Iran, as well as Muslim enclaves inside Russia such as Chechnya. Islamic philosophy, religion, and culture will also be treated.


Instructor(s): Kathleen Bailey

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies Cultural Diversity requirement

POLI 2405 Comparative Politics of the Middle East Spring 3
Course Description

The course explores origins of Muslim majority societies and political systems in the Middle East. It covers the formative era of Islamic civilization, and traces the diffusion of the Middle Eastern Islamic paradigm, culminating in the Ottoman system, and explores the social and political disruptions caused by the breakup of Muslim empires and establishment of European economic, political and cultural domination. It addresses how these forces led to the creation of national states and changes in class structure, and explores how the failure of Western forms of modernization and political organization led to demands for the formation of new political communities based on the revival of Islamic principles. Discussions will center Islam's compatibility with liberalism, secularization, modernity, democracy, and terrorism. Recent developments surrounding the "Arab Spring" and its aftermath will be explored. The course includes a crisis simulation exercise.


Instructor(s): Kathleen Bailey

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2410 Latin American Politics Fall 3
Course Description

This course explores efforts by Latin Americans to create more democratic, inclusionary, just, and rights-respecting political systems. Topics to be considered include: state terror and transitional justice; violence and organized crime; poverty and inequality; indigenous peoples and collective rights; LGBT rights; and sustainable development and environmental justice.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jennie Purnell

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Class restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

POLI 2411 Indigenous Politics in Latin America Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines the emergence and dynamics of indigenous identities, social movements, and political parties in Latin America.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jennie Purnell

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2414 Politics and Society in Central Eurasia Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores political systems and contemporary society in Central Eurasia and devotes special attention to ethnic relations among the various peoples of the region. Greater Central Asia constitutes the western part of Inner Asia, stretching from the Caspian Sea to Xinjiang Province in China and from Chechnya in the north to Afghanistan and Pakistan in the south. It belongs culturally to the Islamic world. The region has been impacted by the imperial policies of the Soviet Union and China, the rise of nationalism, and religious radicalism, terrorism, and war. Reform strategies and models will be discussed.


Instructor(s): Kathleen Bailey

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2415 Models of Politics Spring 3
Course Description

This course is an introduction to thinking analytically about human behavior by exposing students to various models of political phenomena. The emphasis is on improving students' skills in thinking about individual and collective behavior through the use of a few simple concepts and some imagination.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kenji Hayao

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2417 Introduction to Japanese Politics Spring 3
Course Description

This course offers an overview of contemporary Japanese politics, designed for students with a general interest in Japan as well as political science concentrators. It begins with a brief historical account, and proceeds to discussions of Japanese culture and society, electoral politics, decision-making structures and processes, and public policy issues in both domestic and foreign affairs.


Instructor(s): Kenji Hayao

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2418 U.S.-European Foreign Policy Cooperation Spring 3
Course Description

The transatlantic alliance is increasingly challenged by new geopolitical configurations and divergent assessments of what constitutes the most urgent threats to national security: a steady energy supply, democratization, or fighting terrorism? What are the inherent links, tensions and tradeoffs when pursuing one objective at the cost of another? Students will be challenged to identify the defining traits of the transatlantic partnership as nations redefine themselves and their foreign policy goals in the wake of massive population shifts and changing economic circumstances. What binds the U.S. and Europe: geography, institutions, regime types, shared values, or something else?


Instructor(s): Jonathan Laurence

Prerequisites: Previous coursework in European politics or international relations is required.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2420 Modern Iran Fall 3
Course Description

This course will analyze the trends and transformations in the political, social, and cultural history of Iran from the late nineteenth century to the present. Particular emphasis will be placed on the following topics: Iran's encounter with the West in the nineteenth century and its impact on the country's economy and society, social and religious movements in the nineteenth century; the causes and consequences of the Constitutional Revolution of 1905-1909, Iran's modernization and political development under the Pahlavis (1925-1979), the causes and consequences of the Iranian Revolution of 1979, and Iran's postrevolutionary experience as an Islamic Republic.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Ali Banuazizi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HIST4150

Comments:

POLI 2421 The Politics of Northern Ireland, 1921-Present Fall 3
Course Description

This course seeks to trace the political development of Northern Ireland from its creation in 1921 to the present, examining in particular the political parties, organizations, and movements that have shaped the political landscape of the six counties of historic Ulster that remain part of the United Kingdom. The focus of this course will be on the "Troubles," 1968-present, with special attention given to the 1998 Good Friday Agreement. There will also be a brief survey of the major political, economic, religious, cultural, and social developments in Ireland from the early 1600s to the late 1800s.


Instructor(s): Robert K. O'Neill

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2423 Comparative Empires: Britain in the World Spring 3
Course Description

How do empires form, dissolve and influence each other? And what does this mean for the United States in an age of failed post-imperial states and humanitarian intervention? This course studies the largest empire ever seen: the British Empire. Focusing on British interactions with other discontinuous European empires, and with older, continuous empires (Russia, China, Turkey), we will define the difference between imperialism and colonialism; the paradoxes of liberal imperialism; how local forces (religion and nationalism) interact with imperial strategies; and whether empires protect minority populations better than nation states


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Dominic Green

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2426 Modern Turkish Politics Fall 3
Course Description

The aim of this course is to introduce the major historical developments, main actors and institutional framework of modern Turkey. It will enable students to understand the complexities of and developments in political life, institutions and processes; as well as socio-economic factors that influence the political system in Turkey. After providing a historical overview, starting from the westernization efforts during the late Ottoman Empire to the founding of modern republic, contemporary issues that have considerable impact on Turkish political life in the last decades will be discussed.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Cigdem H. Benam

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2427 International Migration and Refugees in a Global World Spring 3
Course Description

Migration is a phenomenon as old as human history. Yet, the way it has been perceived has changed over time. International migration, today, is accepted as a complex, dynamic and multi-dimensional phenomenon, which is inextricably linked with fundamental concepts of modern politics. This course aims to introduce basic concepts and theories related to international migration as well as the major challenges the international society faces. The course is structured in two broad parts; the first will introduce conceptual, historical and theoretical background whereas the second will focus on a particular type of migration: the refugees. Upon successful completion of the course students will be able to develop an understanding of concepts and theories of migration, major challenges for international society, international refugee regime, and link between international security and migration. They will also be able to contextualize the developments in the post-'Arab Spring' era.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Cigdem Hajipouran Benam

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2431 Radical Political Economy: From Marx to Anti-Globalization Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the work of radical thinkers from Marx to contemporary critics of globalization. The course examines Marx's theory of history and his writings on capitalist economics and politics. It explores the evolution of radical thinking on issues such as the state; the role of class in contemporary societies, particularly in relation to issues of gender, ethnicity, and religion as bases for identity and power; and prospects for progressive social transformation. We conclude with a critical examination of theories imperialism and globalization, and what they imply for the future of societies at different stages of development.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Paul Christensen

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2432 Postcommunist Transitions Spring 3
Course Description

The course examines the multi-dimensional reforms underway in transitions in Eastern Europe, Russia, and the Former Soviet Union. The class will compare the strategies for establishing democracy, creating a market economy, and building nations.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Paul Christensen

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2434 Post-Soviet Politics Fall 3
Course Description

This course explores the political, economic, and social changes that have taken place in the post-Soviet countries. We will examine the evolution of political institutions, the effects ofeconomic transition, the development of civil society, and regional political relations. The course is designed to familiarize students with the political and socioeconomic realities of post-communist countries; to encourage students to think critically, using these countries as case-studies, about the meaning of democracy, democratization, economic change, and social empowerment and justice; and to evaluate competing arguments about the trajectory of the post-communist states and their place in the world.


Instructor(s): Paul Christensen

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2438 Human Rights Fall 3
Course Description

Do human rights exist? If so, which rights are human rights? Are human rights truly universal, or do our most fundamental rights vary in accordance with the cultures and political systems in which we live? Who is responsible for the enforcement and realization of human rights? What should be done about egregious violations of human rights—and who should do it? This course addresses these questions from the perspective of comparative politics, drawing primarily on cases from the the United States, Europe, and Latin America.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jennie Purnell

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Not open to students who have previously taken POLI1041 Fundamental Concepts of Politics with Professor Jennie Purnell.

POLI 2439 Cops, Colonels, and Spies Spring 3
Course Description

This course develops a comparative analytical framework to understand the role of organized state coercion in domestic politics, protest politics and regime change. Cases are drawn from across different regions and regime-types, with an emphasis on the communist and post-communist regimes of Eastern Europe. The analytical themes covered include: Origins of modern police forces; campaigns of Dirty War in authoritarian and democratic regimes; espionage during the Cold War; policing protest politics; and the role of coercion in cases of regime change.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Gerald Easter

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2440 A Continent on the Move: Immigration in Contemporary Europe Spring 3
Course Description

Why do people migrate? How do host states and societies react to an increasingly multicultural and diverse foreign population? What impacts the political, economic and socio-cultural incorporation of Europe's immigrants? This course explores the central debates in immigration studies through a survey of contemporary Western Europe, with cases comprising immigrant populations in both traditional immigrant receivers (e.g., Moroccans in France or Turks in Germany) and "new" immigration countries (e.g. Africans and Latin Americans in Spain or Poles and Nigerians in Ireland). Middle Eastern refugees in Europe will be discussed throughout the semester. Particular emphasis is placed on how the relationship between the immigrant and the receiving state transforms both.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Elitsa Molles

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2441 Comparative Politics of Development Fall 3
Course Description

Why are some countries rich and others poor? How do politics and power shape development outcomes? These questions have long puzzled academics and policy-makers. In this course, students will study the historical, institutional, and political explanations for economic development. In the first half of the semester, we will examine the effects of colonialism, geography, natural resources, and conflict on economic growth. The second half of the semester explores the domestic and international politics that influence development outcomes. This includes the impacts of foreign aid, international intervention, and globalization.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Lauren Honig

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2442 African Politics Spring 3
Course Description

This course provides an introduction to contemporary African politics. The course engages important debates related to the state, economic development, democracy, natural resources, political institutions, identity politics, and conflict. We will examine this dynamic and diverse region from a comparative perspective, focusing on both comparison of states within Africa and between Africa and the rest of the world.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Lauren Honig

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2445 Political Development of Western Europe Fall 3
Course Description

This course explores the development of modern politics in Britain, France, Germany and Italy. Readings and discussions during the first part of the semester will examine the ideas and social forces behind the English, French and Industrial revolutions. The second portion of the course will cover German and Italian national unification and democratization in France and Britain. Finally, we will consider the breakdown of democratic politics in Germany and Italy in the first half of the 20th century and institutional legacies for the postwar period.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jonathan Laurence

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2451 France and the Muslim World Spring 3
Course Description

Colonies, migrations, wars, world cups and terrorism... For over two centuries, the French Republic (and Empire) has had a complex and occasionally tormented relationship with Islam and the Muslim world. The exchange of ideas, politics—and populations—has transformed all parties involved. At times serving as a beacon of freedom and enlightenment, at other times France's relationship with its citizens of Muslim origin and its Mediterranean neighbors has been fraught with tensions. This course will examine these relationships through political science texts and with the aid of films and novels.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jonathan Laurence

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2460 Comparative Politics of Development Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines cross-national perspectives on the politics of development. What is the relationship between political, economic, and social development? Who sets the development agenda, and whose voice is heard? What role do various political and social institutions play in shaping development outcomes? In examining these questions, we will consider varying views from multiple regions, and will examine the relevance of these debates from the perspective of policymakers, citizens' organizations, and others engaged in development practice.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Gabrielle Kruks-Wisner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Class restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

POLI 2462 Grassroots Politics: Local Democratic Practice in Comparative Perspective Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines the complex relationships between citizens and the state at the most local-grassroots-level, exploring whether and how citizens makes claims on the state for essential services, and how the state, in turn, responds to local demands. With its focus on the grassroots, the course highlights a critical, but often overlooked, political arena. Drawing on cases from around the world, from both advanced industrial and developing countries, the course explores issues of participation, representation, and distribution, asking: who speaks up, who speaks for (or through) whom, and who gets what at the local level.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Gabrielle Kruks-Wisner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Do not take this course if previously taken POLI3462. Class restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

POLI 2469 The Politics of Japan and the Republic of Korea Fall 3
Course Description

This course provides an overview to the politics of contemporary Japan and the Republic of Korea (South Korea). While most of the focus will mostly be on domestic politics, it will include some discussion of their respective foreign policies. The course begins with a brief historical account, and it then proceeds to discussions of culture and society, electoral politics, decision-making structures and processes, and public policy issues.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kenji Hayao

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course is restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors only.

POLI 2475 Kuwait:Politics and Oil in the Gulf Summer 3
Course Description

This seminar addresses the comparative and international politics of the Gulf States, with emphasis on Kuwait and Saudi Arabia. It analyzes state formation, state-society relations, democratization, the rise of Islamism and regime stability, foreign policies, regional politics, and the politics of OPEC and international oil markets. It assesses the effects of oil on domestic and foreign policy. Finally, it highlights pressures for political liberalization and growth in civil society. Students visit sites of political, religious, and historical significance throughout Kuwait and the Gulf, attend presentations at the National Assembly and Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and meet with English-speaking Kuwaiti students.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: INTL2475 ICSP2475

Comments:

POLI 2502 U.S.-Iran Relations since World War II Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines the domestic, ideological, and strategic dimensions of the troubled relationship between the United States and Iran since the Second World War. After a brief overview of the relationship in the pre-war period, it will focus on the war-time occupation of Iran by the Allied powers and the subsequent onset of the Cold War; Iran's oil nationalization crisis and the 1953 CIA-sponsored coup; U.S.'s unstinting support for the Pahlavi monarch after the coup until his fall in 1979; and the state of mutual distrust, tension, and hostility between the two countries since the Islamic Revolution.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Ali Banuazizi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course is restricted to juniors and seniors.

POLI 2504 Cyber Security:The Intersection of Technology and Policy in the Digital Era Spring 3
Course Description

What are the rules for operating in cyberspace? Who is in charge of governing cyberspace? What is really going on with the bits and bytes and why do we need policy to address it? This course will attempt to answer these questions and more as it examines the complex and dynamic structure and evolution of cyberspace. It will tackle key issues, such as sovereignty and boundaries in cyberspace, 'hactivism,' cyber espionage, and examine major cyber attacks. The course will explore the evolution of conflict in cyberspace, as well as the tensions between freedom and security, free enterprise and malicious action.


Instructor(s): Alison S. L. Russell

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2506 UN and International Security Fall 3
Course Description

The course begins with the League of Nations and the origins of the UN and its key structures. Then we examine the UN's role in collective security, arms control and disarmament, and peacekeeping as these activities were practiced during the Cold War and as they have evolved in recent years. We then turn to UN activities that go beyond treating the symptoms of conflict and aim instead to fight its root causes, such as racism and human rights violations. Finally, we close with an exploration of the meaning of UN legitimacy and the future prospects of the Security Council.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Timothy Crawford

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2512 The Causes of War Fall 3
Course Description

In the first two-thirds of the course we will survey the major strands of theory concerning the causes of war and apply them to the First World War-a monumental human disaster for Europe and a pivotal event in world politics, therefore making it a very important case. The last one-third of the class will focus on contemporary problems of war and peace (e.g., civil wars, ethnic conflict, proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, and terrorism) using theoretical approaches introduced earlier as well as new ones.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Timothy Crawford

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2516 American Foreign Policy Spring 3
Course Description

The goal of this course is to explain and evaluate American foreign policies of the past and present. This course will apply the theoretical foundations of American foreign policy to key historical and contemporary events and examine the role of actors inside and outside of the US government in creating and influencing policy. The course will examine current issues including US relations with the Middle East, China, and international organizations, as well as policies on global issues such as human rights, terrorism, weapons of mass destruction, and cyber security.


Instructor(s): Alison S. L. Russell

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2518 Liberalism, Nation Building, and American Foreign Policy Fall 3
Course Description

What are the historical roots and contemporary implications of liberalism and nation-building in American foreign policy? In what ways have liberalism and nation-building shaped presidential foreign policy doctrines and priorities? How have U.S. foreign policy leaders attempted to spread core ideas and institutions to other countries? In particular, how have key American officials understood the relationship between markets and democracy? To what extent might U.S. policies and decisions be expected to spread liberalism to countries in the Middle East? Finally, what can be learned from the continuing cases of Afghanistan and Iraq?


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): David A. Deese

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2519 The European Union in World Affairs Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the external relations of the European Union, as it seeks to establish an economic, normative, and military power status in world affairs. It will employ theoretical approaches to understand in what capacity and to what effect the EU is involved with global governance and relations with states outside its borders. It will introduce the institutional arrangements of EU external relations and delve into EU activity in policy areas including human rights and democracy promotion, international peacekeeping, and trade and economic development.


Instructor(s): Jennifer L. Erickson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2522 International Institutions, Public and Private Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores the structures, processes, and impacts of international institutions within the larger context of world politics. The course will first review the contending theoretical perspectives regarding the effect(s) that international institutions have on both interstate relations and political—economic discourse within states. The course will then examine a number of international institutions that are active in a diverse group of issue areas (e.g., security, political-economic, humanitarian, and environment) on both the global and regional levels.


Instructor(s): David A. Deese

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2525 Politics and Institutions of International Economics Fall 3
Course Description

Examines the contending theoretical approaches to the politics of international economic relations through the issue of globalization. Emphasizing the period since World War II, it analyzes the primary political questions and international institutions associated with trade, money and finance, multinational corporations, and development. It concludes with the perennial challenge of leadership and change in international political economy.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): David A. Deese

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2527 Terrorism, Insurgency, and Political Violence Fall 3
Course Description

Terrorism and insurgency dominate the headlines today, but how much do we really know about these forms of political violence? Are they inventions from the modern era, or do they have a deeper past? What drives an individual to join an armed group? Why do some groups choose to employ violence, while others do not? Are terrorism and insurgency effective political tactics? Just how significant is the threat of terrorism? This course will address these and other questions, while introducing students to relevant analytical frameworks, theories, and cases concerning terrorism, insurgency, and related forms of political violence.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Peter Krause

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Not open to students who have taken PO527/POLI3527 Seminar: Terrorism and Political Violence.

POLI 2531 Politics of Energy in U.S., Comparative and Global Perspective Spring 3
Course Description

Why is energy policy fundamentally political, deeply entwined with human, national, and international security, and critical to global stability and well-being? Major course units assess the main actors and institutions in energy, including OPEC and international markets; contrast the primary challenges confronting energy policy in the exporting and importing states; and analyze how energy policy and politics shapes global security, climate change & sustainability. Class members will also simulate a severe international energy crisis and use the extensive resources and contacts developed from 2008 - 2011 BC summer course in Kuwait-Oil & Politics in The Gulf.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): David A. Deese

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: INTL2531

Comments:

POLI 2532 International Organizations Spring 3
Course Description

A multitude of international organizations exist today to address the growing number of increasingly complex issues that test the relationships between modern state—these comprise the United Nations, European Union, World Bank, International Monetary Fund, the International Criminal Court, as well as many others, including international non-governmental organizations (NGOs). The dynamics of these organizations, their relationship with states and each other, is critical to developing an understanding of modern international relations. This course will examine the landscape of international institutions, including their structure, function, and impact on the broader global landscape. The course will explore the relationship between states and intergovernmental organizations, as well as other international institutions such as international NGOs and multinational corporations.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Anna Schulz

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2536 Non-State Actors in World Politics Spring 3
Course Description

From human rights NGOs to multinational corporations to terrorist networks, non-state actors abound in our contemporary international system. Why have non-state actors become so prevalent and how do they influence international politics? This course addresses these questions. It introduces students to different theoretical and historical frameworks for assessing the role of non-state actors in an international system that has been reshaped in recent decades by globalization, privatization, and technological change. We will discuss different kinds of non-state actors, including transnational advocacy networks, philanthropic foundations, multinational corporations, terrorist groups, and private contractors. We will assess their influence on key issues, including global health, democratization, economic development, the environment, and human rights. Ultimately, we will evaluate the benefits and drawbacks of non-state actors and their growing role in the international system.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kate B. Geoghegan

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2541 Global Governance Fall 3
Course Description

How do states and other actors in the international community manage global challenges? What are the sources of order in international politics? In the absence of world government, questions about how international rules are made, monitored, and enforced are important and widespread. This course provides an overview of the concept and theories of global governance, with a focus on power, institutions, and norms in contemporary international relations. It then examines the processes, actors, and outcomes of global governance in the context of policy areas such as human rights, fragile states, the global economy, and the environment.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jennifer L. Erickson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2548 The World Wars: Causes, Conduct and Unintended Consequences Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the origins, military conduct, and societal consequences of World War I and World War II. We will look at each war from the perspective of state leaders designing their state's military strategy and the soldiers fighting for them. What caused the outbreak of each war? What was each state’s military strategy and how did it interact with the strategies of other states? Why were so many soldiers willing to risk their lives and kill others on an unprecedented scale of destructiveness? Topics covered include: the social and technological developments necessary to fight wars of this scale; domestic, accidental, and international explanations for WWI; the military strategies of the major combatants in both wars; the Versailles Treaty and Post-WWI order; individual, domestic, and international explanations for WWII; the European and Pacific theaters; German mass killings; and Japan’s surrender.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Lindsey A. O'Rourke

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2549 United States Foreign Policy 1945 to Present Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines the formulation, execution, and consequences of U.S. foreign policy since 1945. What were the underlying patterns and logics guiding U.S. leaders? How did changes in the structure of the international system influence U.S. foreign policy? What caused America’s foreign interventions and wars? Topics covered include: the origins of the Cold War; the development of the post-WWII economic order; the consequences of America’s position in the Western Hemisphere; the strategies of rollback and containment; the evolution of U.S. nuclear doctrine; U.S. interventions in Korea, Iran, Guatemala, Vietnam, the Persian Gulf, Iraq, and Afghanistan; the collapse of the Soviet Union and rise of American unipolarity; as well as the Bush and Obama Doctrines.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Lindsey A. O'Rourke

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2550 Nuclear Weapons and International Relations Spring 3
Course Description

This course will deal with nuclear weapons and international relations.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Lindsey O'Rourke

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2601 Principles of Political Rhetoric Fall 3
Course Description

This course will examine both the principles of politic rhetoric and its practice. We will therefore read theoretical accounts of rhetoric and many examples of political speeches drawn from literature and history.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Nasser Behnegar and Robert C. Bartlett

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This is a team-taught class.

POLI 2606 Introduction to Modern Political Philosophy Spring 3
Course Description

A study of seminal modern thinkers, attending especially to planners (Bacon and Descartes) of scientific-technological societies.


Instructor(s): Robert K. Faulkner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2608 Introduction to Political Philosophy Fall 3
Course Description

After some preliminary readings from the Federalist, Shakespear's Tempest, and other works, we study Xenophone's charming Memories of Socrates and other works.


Instructor(s): Robert K. Faulkner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2609 Markets, Justice, and the Public Interest Spring 3
Course Description

A consideration of the political and moral basis and limits of market society. Texts will include Aristotle, Locke, Smith, Marx, and a variety of contemporary readings.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Susan Shell

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2613 Christian Political Thought Fall 3
Course Description

From an outlawed faith to the official religion to one of many in the "marketplace of ideas," Christianity has experienced the whole spectrum of possible Church-State relations and there are many different opinions concerning what the State ought to do about the Church. But what does the Church say ought to be done about the State? In this course, we begin with the Gospels and with the words of Jesus as they have been reported to us. We turn then to Augustine, the founder of Christian political philosophy and his most accomplished student, Thomas Aquinas, before moving to the titans of the Reformation, Martin Luther and John Calvin, as well as John Locke, who sought, among other things, to reconcile Christianity to what we might today call market economics. We will take a look at the backlash against this supposed reconciliation, as well as at the Christian basis of the civil rights movement as articulated by Martin Luther King, Jr. We conclude with contemporary authors.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Matthew Berry

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2615 Islam and Liberal Democracy Fall 3
Course Description

We will take advantage of current geopolitical controversies in order to unearth the theoretical core of the debate between Islam and the West. Materials related to the Islamic heritage will be placed next to arguments made on behalf of the West in relation to certain key issues, such as rights versus duties; religion and freedom; and democracy and progress. Modern, pre-modern, sacred, and secular texts will be studied. How can the secular world defend itself against a critique that begins from a position of faith and emphasizes virtue, God, and justice?


Instructor(s): David M DiPasquale

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ICSP2615

Comments:

POLI 2616 Realism and Idealism in Political Thought Spring 3
Course Description

This course will examine Niccolo Machiavelli's revolution toward a realistic political science by comparing his work to the thought of two great proponents of idealism or utopianism, Immanuel Kant and Thomas More.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Nasser Behnegar

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2626 Shakespeare's Politics Spring 3
Course Description

This course attempts to uncover Shakespeare's reflections on politics by a close analysis of a number of his plays.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Nasser Behnegar

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2631 Ethics and Politics Spring 3
Course Description

A consideration of two or three classic texts on the problem of reconciling political rule with thoughtfulness, justice, and a good life. We begin with a few illustrative speeches by American presidents.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robert K. Faulkner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2634 Hobbes and Christianity Spring 3
Course Description

The seminar is an in-depth examination of the historical context for Thomas Hobbes's Leviathan, with a focus on analyzing his explicit intentions behind writing the text. Students will also read other works by Hobbes to see the development of his thinking on the problem of political authority, as well as contemporary and current scholarship and criticism of his ideas.


Instructor(s): Hiroshi Nakazato

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2635 Plato's Republic Fall 3
Course Description

This advanced seminar will undertake a careful study of the most famous political book ever written, Plato's Republic. In it, Socrates and two young friends become founders of the best political community. Along the way they explore difficult and even troubling questions about justice and the truly best way of life for a human being. Are you up to the challenge to join them in their founding?


Instructor(s): Robert C. Bartlett

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course is open to juniors and seniors only.

POLI 2638 Islamic Political Philosophy Spring 3
Course Description

What is the relationship between philosophy and Islam? Does the divine law (Shari'a) need to be supplemented with purely rational reflections on the nature and purpose of political life? What is the place of toleration and individual rights in the Islamic legal and philosophic tradition? We will explore these and similar questions by focusing on two particularly fertile periods of Islamic thought: the encounter of Islam with Greek philosophy in the classical period and its encounter with the modern secular west in late modernity.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): David M. DiPasquale

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ICSP2638

Comments: This course is restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors, only.

POLI 2639 Shakespeare's Politics II Spring 3
Course Description

This course attempts to uncover Shakespeare's reflections on politics by a close analysis of a number of his plays. The plays chosen will be different from those examined in Shakespeare's Politics I, but that course is not a prerequisite for this one.


Instructor(s): Nasser Behnegar

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2641 Enlightenment Political Thought Fall 3
Course Description

This course will focus on a variety of themes debated during the Enlightenment such as the relation between religion and politics, the significance of the differences between communities, and the role of intellectual life in society.


Instructor(s): Christopher J. Kelly

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2642 Political Philosophy and Autobiography Spring 3
Course Description

In this course we will read the autobiographies of several political thinkers including Rousseau and John Stuart Mill. We will consider the account each gives of the relation between his life and his thought.


Instructor(s): Christopher Kelly

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2645 Kant: Morality and Liberalism Fall 3
Course Description

A study of the political philosophy of Kant and its bearing on American political thought and practice. Part of the course will be devoted to various recent attempts to reconceive and/or revive American liberalism along Kantian lines.


Instructor(s): Susan Shell

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2647 Montesquieu's Spirit of the Laws Spring 3
Course Description

This course will examine the major work by the author most frequently and favorably cited by the framers of the American Constitution. It will focus on the relation between ancient and modern republicanism.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Christopher Kelly

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2649 Rousseau and Practice Fall 3
Course Description

This course will explore the abstract theoretical account of politics given in Rousseau's Social Contract and then examine his attempts to apply this theory to concrete political circumstances in a variety of countries.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Christopher Kelly

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2651 Liberty and Order Fall 3
Course Description

This course will examine the relationship between liberty and order in the political thought of John Stuart Mill. We will read On Liberty and Considerations on Representative Government as well as other works by Mills.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Christopher Kelly

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2652 Introduction to Ancient Greek Political Science and Language Spring 3
Course Description

This undergraduate seminar introduces fundamental concepts of political science with the ancient Greek language. There is no more important influence on our self-understanding than the ancient Greeks (consider our use of the words "democracy" and "politics"). The important modern and post-modern thinkers take their bearings by a critique of the classics. They agree that we cannot understand their texts without knowing their language. We will read and compare selections from Aristotle, Plato, and others in English translations, learn the Greek alphabet, and build a basic political science vocabulary. No previous knowledge of Greek is needed. Open to all disciplines.


Instructor(s): Amy Nendza

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2654 Rousseau's Emile, or On Education Fall 3
Course Description

This course will focus on Jean-Jacques Rousseau's Emile, or On Education. The major issue of the course will be the question of whether an education devoted to making individuals happy also makes them into good citizens.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Christopher Kelly

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2659 Liberal Democracy and Its Critics Fall 3
Course Description

The worldwide expansion of liberal democracy is perhaps the most important trend of recent history. Yet difficulties and attacks have arisen, in practice and theory. Leading democracies are weighed down by debt and divisions; the successes of an authoritarian brand of mass production earn increasing respect for China. Also, deep critiques have arisen from environmentalists, communitarians, multiculturalists, and post-modernists. The course examines the foundations of our liberal democratic way of life and leading challenges to it.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2665 The Question of Justice Fall 3
Course Description

Almost all human beings agree that to live well one must live with others. But how are we to live together? What end or purpose orders our relations? What are our obligations? What are our rights? By examining the writings of various seminal thinkers, this seminar seeks to shed light on these questions which are at the core of the great controversies between political orders and even between political parties.


Instructor(s): Christopher Kelly

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This seminar is primarily for sophomores. Juniors are admitted with departmental permission, provided there is an open seat in the course, after the sophomore registration period.

POLI 2669 Leadership Spring 3
Course Description

A study of a classic text on military and political leadership, Xenophon's account of how to form and lead an army out of the Middle East , and of a modern example, perhaps Ataturk's founding of modern Turkey out of an Islamic monarchy.


Instructor(s): Robert K. Faulkner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 2670 Introduction to Modern Moral and Political Thought Spring 3
Course Description

A study of four key texts of the enlightenment and of subsequent reforms and disillusionments. We read chiefly Bacon's Essays, Rousseau's First and Second Discourses, and Nietzsche's Beyond Good and Evil.


Instructor(s): Robert K. Faulkner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 3340 Sem: Democracy and Our Schools Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines K-12 education policy through the lens of American politics. On the one hand, schools influence American democracy by cultivating norms of civic and political engagement among youth. Yet public schools are also agencies of government, which means that education policy is established through democratic political processes. This interplay between democracy and education raises fundamental questions about the consequences of living in a nation that relies on elected officials to govern its schools. We begin by examining contestation over the very purposes of public education. We then assess the formal institutions, groups, and ideas that shape education policymaking. Along the way we will be guided by questions such as: Does democracy compromise educational equity? How much say should the public have in determining education policy? Should schools be organized primarily by politics or by markets?


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Michael Hartney

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This seminar is restricted to juniors and seniors only.

POLI 3351 Seminar: Religion and Politics Fall 3
Course Description

This course serves as an introduction to the relationship between religion and politics in the United States. We will examine such topics as the rise of conservative Christianity, the changing nature of American Catholicism, the relationship between faith and party identification, and legislative and judicial responses to the role of religion in the public sphere.


Instructor(s): Alan Wolfe

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 3355 Seminar: Religion and the Constitution Spring 3
Course Description

This seminar will explore the constitutional issues arising out of the relationships among religion, government, and public life in the United States. Our reading and discussions will focus on the principal decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court that provide the foundation for contemporary interpretations of the Constitution's guarantees of the non-establishment and free exercise of religion. We will consider what religious liberty might best be understood to mean and how U.S. constitutional law operates to protect religious liberty. The requirements for the seminar include careful preparation for each of the weekly seminar sessions, constructive contribution to the seminar discussions, a mid-term exam, and a final paper.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Gregory A. Kalscheur, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course is class restricted to juniors and seniors.

POLI 3357 Seminar:The Problem of Evil Fall 3
Course Description

Terrorism, genocide, ethnic cleansing--all raise the question of whether evil exists and whether there is anything we can do to respond to it. This course will examine how the problem of evil has been treated by classic texts in the Western tradition and will then seek to apply the lessons taught by those texts to acts of political evil in the twenty-first century.


Instructor(s): Alan Wolfe

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 3365 Seminar: Public Opinion Spring 3
Course Description

This seminar will tackle a series of big questions about the role of citizens in contemporary democracy: How do people make sense of the political world? What is public opinion? Is there really such a thing? Where can we look for it and where does it come from? We will consider the history of public opinion and how our understanding of it is shifting with the changing media ecology. The course will go beyond discussions of polling data to explore the role of media content, political talk, social identities, and even our beliefs about other people’s beliefs in shaping what we think about politics and public life.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Emily A.Thorson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course is major restricted.

POLI 3416 Race and Ethnicity in Latin America Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores the politics of race and ethnicity in Latin America. We'll consider efforts by indigenous peoples and people of African descent to overcome long histories of discrimination and subordination and to achieve recognition of and respect for their rights as individual citizens and as collective entities.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jennie Purnell

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course is restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Students who have previously taken POLI2411 should not take this course.

POLI 3430 Religion, Rebellion, and Revolution Spring 3
Course Description

The first political revolution was the English Revolution, otherwise known as the Puritan Revolution. The theoretical framework employed in this course understands religion as both a source of domination and as an instrument of social change. In the course, we will inquire into the origins of the relationship between religion and rebellion in both the Western and Eastern traditions: in the Messianism of ancient Judaism and early Christianity and in the Mandate of Heaven in China. The course shall engage in a comparative-historical examination of the role of religion in both religious and secular revolutions (e.g. the English, French, Russian, Chinese and Iranian Revolutions among others). It will pay particular attention to messianic movements, religious communists, heretical sects, and secular religions.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Warren S. Goldstein

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 3436 Children's Rights in Comparative Perspective Spring 3
Course Description

This course looks at the comparative politics of children's rights. Issues to be examined include international movements and law related to the rights of children; child labor and the trafficking of children; children and armed conflict; and autonomy rights of older children.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jennie Purnell

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: By instructor's permission only.

POLI 3444 Seminar: Intellectuals and Politics in the Middle East Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the role of intellectuals, both religious and secular, in several Middle Eastern countries in analyzing the key problems of their societies, articulating visions for change, supporting or challenging the political status quo, and at times acting directly as agents of social change. The main themes to be explored in the works of a number of prominent Middle Eastern intellectuals include: the conflict between tradition and modernity; the encounter with the West and the quest for authenticity; secularism, human rights, minority rights, and democracy; and reformist versus radical strategies for political, social, and cultural change.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Ali Banuazizi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Open to juniors and seniors only.

POLI 3452 Seminar: Presidents and Prime Ministers Spring 3
Course Description

This course will focus its attention on the top elected political leaders of democratic states--presidents or prime ministers (or, in the case of certain countries, both). As part of the course requirements, students will develop a particular country case study (e.g., Great Britain, India, South Africa), looking at how the politics shapes what they do and how they shape their countries' politics.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kenji Hayao

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 3461 Seminar: State, Society, and Citizen Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar examines the relationship between state and civil society institutions in shaping democratic practice and development. Drawing on cases from around the world, we will investigate the effects of social networks and social capital on outcomes ranging from political participation to government performance, social welfare, economic development, and ethnic conflict. What are the respective roles of the state, civil society organizations, and ordinary citizens in shaping these political, economic, and social outcomes?


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Gabrielle Kruks-Wisner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Restricted to juniors and seniors.

POLI 3462 Grassroots Politics: Local Democratic Practice in Comparative Perspective Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines the complex relationships between citizens and the state at the most local-grassroots-level, exploring whether and how citizens makes claims on the state for essential services, and how the state, in turn, responds to local demands. With its focus on the grassroots, the course highlights a critical, but often overlooked, political arena. Drawing on cases from around the world, from both advanced industrial and developing countries, the course explores issues of participation, representation, and distribution, asking: who speaks up, who speaks for (or through) whom, and who gets what at the local level.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Gabrielle Kruks-Wisner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Class restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

POLI 3508 New Cold War Spring 3
Course Description

The end of the Cold War promised a new era of cooperation in world politics between Russia and the West. This course examines the policies, personalities and events that instead led to a “New” Cold War. It follows Russia's search to redefine its role and identity in the post-Cold War world, revealing the inherent conflict between global accommodation and great power autonomy. Course themes include: Geopolitics of Empire and Empire Lost; From Western ally to antagonist; Russia at War with its neighbors and with the West; Russia as an Energy Superpower in a Global Economy; and, the Domestic Sources of Russian Foreign and Security Policies.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Gerald Easter

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course is restricted to juniors and seniors; no graduate students will be permitted to enroll in this class.

POLI 3510 Globalization Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the political, economic, social and cultural implications of the increasingly integrated world system. The course focuses on conflicting assessments of international institutions (IMF, World Bank, WTO) and political governance; the impact of economic integration; and the effects of globalization on state sovereignty, democracy, and social cohesion. Specific case studies will include: globalization and the environment; globalization, gender, and work; globalization and immigration/migration; globalization and the illicit economy, and anti-globalization social movements and activism.


Instructor(s): Paul Christensen

Prerequisites: Dept. Permission Required

Cross listed with: INTL3510

Comments:

POLI 3514 East Asian Security Fall 3
Course Description

This class offers an analytical perspective on the strategic conditions of post-Cold War East Asia. It examines the regional political structure, the strategic characteristics of the region's great power relationship – U.S.-China relations – and the implications for the conflicts on the Korean peninsula, in the Taiwan Strait, and in the South China Sea, and the role of alliance relationships in regional diplomacy. From these different perspectives, it attempts to understand the sources of state behavior and prospects for regional stability and instability.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robert Ross

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course is restricted to Political Science majors. This course is class-restricted to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

POLI 3520 Seminar:Globalization and National Security Fall 3
Course Description

How have accelerated forces of globalization in recent decades affected national security? This course examines how globalization can amplify, change, and create challenges to state security. Through discussion and written work, this seminar addresses three major questions: (1) How do we define the concept of national security?; (2) How do states understand the complex and changing relationship between globalization and national security?; and (3) How do states respond to old and new national security challenges brought on by increased economic globalization and interdependence? We will explore these three interrelated questions in the context of a number of issue areas, such as conflict, defense procurement, trade, terrorism, and the environment.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jennifer L. Erickson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 3521 International Law Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the role of international public law (the "law of nations") in the world today. It takes as its starting point the academic (and practical) debate about the utility of international law in world politics. From there, we consider the philosophical foundations of law, the sources of international law, and the application of international law in different arenas. In particular, the course will focus on how international law deals with a number of issues, including the connection between domestic and international law and the laws on territory, jurisdiction, human rights, and security, as well as other relevant topics.


Instructor(s): Hiroshi Nakazato

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: INTL3521

Comments:

POLI 3527 Seminar: Terrorism and Political Violence Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Terrorism and insurgency dominate the headlines today, but how much do we really know about these forms of political violence? Are they inventions from the modern era, or do they have a deeper past? What drives an individual to join an armed group? Why do some groups choose to employ violence, while others do not? Are terrorism and insurgency effective political tactics? Just how significant is the threat of terrorism? This course will address these and other questions, while introducing students to relevant analytical frameworks, theories, and cases concerning terrorism, insurgency, and related forms of political violence.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Peter Krause

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 3552 Seminar: Use of Force Spring 3
Course Description

This is an advanced undergraduate course in international politics. It presupposes knowledge of the basic concepts of the international political system and of state behavior. It offers an in-depth discussion of one aspect of international politics - how and why states use force to achieve their objectives. In so doing, it addresses the use of force in its multiple dimensions and its role in contemporary international politics.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robert Ross

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course is restricted to Political Science majors. This course is class-restricted to Juniors and Seniors.

POLI 3561 Seminar:Modern Classics of International Relations Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar will examine five major books, and related articles, published in the field of international relations over the last sixty years. Each deals theoretically and empirically with the nature of the international system and the sources of order, stability, and war within it. Through close readings, intensive discussions and critical writing, we will explore each book and, cumulatively, the connections among them. The ultimate objective is to build conceptual and theoretical foundations for thinking about the present state and future prospects of international order while achieving, along the way, a deeper understanding of international political systems of the past


Instructor(s): Timothy Crawford

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course is open only to juniors and seniors.

POLI 3570 Seminar: The Arab-Israeli Conflict:Can It Ever Be Solved? Spring 3
Course Description

The Arab-Israeli conflict has lasted nearly a century, defying most attempts at resolution. The historical evolution of the conflict and peace process will be surveyed, as a basis for understanding the central issues today, the course's primary focus. The course will focus on Israel-Palestine, but also Israel-Syria and Lebanon, and will present the issues in the national security and domestic contexts of the different players. As a contemporary policy oriented course, students will draft "policy papers" elucidating the issues and recommending solutions. The course is designed for those interested in the Middle East, national security, decision-making and future practitioners.


Instructor(s): Charles Freilich

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 3607 Historical Dimension of Modern Political Theory Fall 3
Course Description

Through a careful study of Edmund Burke's Reflections on the Revolution in France, G.W.F. Hegel’s Philosophy of World History, and Friedrich Nietzsche’s Genealogy of Morals, the class will investigate the meaning and significance of history for our social, political, moral, and religious lives. The course will be guided by three questions: (1) Is the turn to the historical a critique or an extension of Enlightenment ambitions? (2) Does an emphasis on the importance of history change how we understand the relation between philosophy and politics? (3) If history determines certain human possibilities, how should we understand the classical distinction between nature and custom?


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Paul T. Wilford

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course is restricted to juniors and seniors. Students must have previously taken PO021/POLI1021 How to Rule the World or PO041/POLI1041 Fundamental Concepts of Politics.

POLI 3617 Hegel and Marx Fall 3
Course Description

This course will examine the writings of two pivotal figures in the history of political philosophy. The course will begin with a brief treatment of Kant and focus on their different views of historical progress.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Paul T. Wilford

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course is restricted to sophomores, juniors and seniors. Students must have previously taken PO021/POLI1021 How to Rule the World or PO041/POLI1041 Fundamental Concepts of Politics.

POLI 3637 Democracy and the Pursuit of Happiness Fall 3
Course Description

Beginning with the Declaration of Independence with its proclamation of the right to pursue happiness, we will examine what in the world such a right might entail. We will examine books, ancient and modern, in an effort to find out.


Instructor(s): Robert C. Bartlett

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 4390 Immigration: Processes, Politics, and Policies Spring 3
Course Description

This course will examine immigration as a social as well as an economic process, with particular attention to its political and policy dimensions. Special attention will be paid to the interaction between immigrants and contemporary American institutions, and to how the contemporary context differs from earlier periods in our history. The various dimensions (social, cultural, economic, and political) of assimilation will be examined. Particular emphasis will be placed on undocumented immigration as well as the group competition and conflict engendered by immigration generally. The course will culminate in an examination of policy responses to the continuing controversy over immigration.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Peter Skerry

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Restricted to juniors, seniors, and graduate students only. Not open to students who have previously taken POLI2330.

POLI 4391 American National Institutions and Policymaking in Mature Welfare State Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar focuses on (1) how our peculiar political institutions have shaped the American welfare state, and (2) how the expansion and maturation of the welfare state has changed American politics. Topics include partisan polarization and the persistence of divided government; the centralization of power within Congress and its preoccupation with budget matters; the paradox of growing administrative power and vulnerability; the entrenchment of "adversarial legalism"; the incentives for presidents to go around rather than through Congress; mobilization and counter-mobilization by interest groups; and efforts by state governments to create national policies.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): R. Shep Melnick

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Open to all graduate students-see Shirley Gee for admission paperwork; restricted to juniors and seniors with the permission of the instructor.

POLI 4392 Seminar: Democracy in America Spring 3
Course Description

This seminar combines a careful reading of Alexis de Tocqueville's classic work Democracy in America with an investigation of contemporary American politics using Tocqueville as our guide. Topics will include political culture and American individualism; political participation, decentralization, and self-interest; tyranny of the majority and its cures; the special role of lawyers and courts in the US; the danger and causes of administrative centralization; the effects of mores on law and law on mores; and the omnipresent problem of race.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): R. Shep Melnick

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: By instructor permission only. Graduate students should contact Shirley Gee for permission.

POLI 4393 How Dysfunctional Is American Politics? Spring 3
Course Description

On constantly hears that contemporary American politics is “dysfunctional” and our government “gridlocked.” Many people argue that as a consequence we need fundamental constitutional change. This course examines a variety of critiques of American politics—left, right, and center—and the corresponding proposals for reform. It assesses the accuracy of these arguments and the merits of reform proposals.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): R. Shep Melnick

Prerequisites: Students must have previously enrolled in an upper-level American Politics course. and Permission of instructor required

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 4394 Muslims in American Society and Politics Fall 3
Course Description

An examination of the demographic, social, cultural, religious, and political forces that are shaping the emergent American Muslim community. Intergenerational family dynamics, Muslim schools, mosque governance, civil religion in America, advocacy group politics, and voting patterns will be examined. So will ethnic, linguistic, national-origin, and sectarian differences among immigrant-origin Muslims, particularly their political implications. African-American Muslims will also be considered, especially their relations with immigrant-origin Muslims. Attention will be paid both to the impact of Muslims on American society and to the impact of American institutions and policies, especially post-9/11 initiatives such as the Patriot Act, on Muslims.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Peter Skerry

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Do not take this course if you have previously taken POLI2363. This course is restricted to sophomores, juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

POLI 4424 Reform, Revolution, and the Communist Collapse Fall 3
Course Description

The class examines the collapse of communist regimes in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. The focus is on the reform strategies of political leaders and the opposition movements of nationalists, workers, and students. Cases include the Prague Spring, Poland's Solidarity, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Gorbachev's Perestroika, and the Rise of Boris Yeltsin and Independent Russia.


Instructor(s): Gerald Easter

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 4437 Cops, Colonels, and Spies Spring 3
Course Description

This course develops a comparative analytical framework to understand the role of organized state coercion in domestic politics, protest politics and regime change. Cases are drawn from across different regions and regime-types, with an emphasis on the communist and post-communist regimes of Eastern Europe. The analytical themes covered include: Origins of modern police forces; campaigns of Dirty War in authoritarian and democratic regimes; espionage during the Cold War; policing protest politics; and the role of coercion in cases of regime change.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Gerald Easter

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Restricted to juniors, seniors, and graduate students

POLI 4447 The Modern State Spring 3
Course Description

The class explores the rise of the modern state as the dominant form of political organization in world politics. It traces the development from premodern stateless societies to medieval states and finally the modern nation-state. The class also examines the contemporary processes of globalization and their effects on the survival of the modern state.


Instructor(s): Gerald Easter

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 4448 The Political Development of Western Europe Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores the development of modern politics in Britain, France, Germany and Italy. Readings and discussions during the first part of the semester will examine the ideas and social forces behind the English, French and Industrial revolutions. The second portion of the course will cover German and Italian national unification and democratization in France and Britain. Finally, we will consider the breakdown of democratic politics in Germany and Italy in the first half of the twentieth century and institutional legacies for the postwar period.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jonathan Laurence

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 4449 Domestic Politics of Post-1945 Europe Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines civil society and parliamentary democracy in Western Europe since World War II. What are the distinctive features of European political systems? How have the major political cleavages developed and changed in the last sixty years? Material will cover institutions and political participation in several countries, from prime ministers and presidents to political parties and social movements. We will consider the influence of Europeanization and regional movements on domestic politics. The course will also pay particular attention to the political impact of mass labor migration, including the emergence of right wing parties and contemporary politics of cultural diversity.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jonathan Laurence

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 4490 THE RISE, FALL AND TRIUMPH OF DEMOCRACY IN WESTERN EUROPE Spring 3
Course Description

This course is an advanced exploration of themes and topics in political development, democratic institutions, and the ideas and political and social forces that have influenced the evolution of modern European nation-states to the present day. We will consider the English Civil War and French and Industrial revolutions, the German and Italian national unification and democratization in France and Britain, and the breakdown of democratic politics in Germany and Italy in the first half of the 20th century – as well as democracy’s survival in France and Britain – and the institutional legacies of these regimes for the postwar period.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jonathan Laurence

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course is open to seniors and graduate students only.

POLI 4491 Russian Politics Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines contemporary Russian Politics from a comparative historical perspective. It seeks to explain the persistence of authoritarianism in Russia Politics. The topics examined include: the role of leadership with comparisons of Gorbachev, Yeltsin and Putin; the dilemmas of state and nation building after the Soviet collapse; and, Russia’s sometimes cooperative and sometimes contentious relations with its neighbors and the West.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Gerald Easter

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 4493 Sex and the State: Gender and Sexuality in Latin America Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar explores the politics of gender and sexuality in Latin America. Topics to be addressed include family law and reproductive rights; women and revolution; women and the struggle for democracy; same-sex marriage; and the politics of gender identity.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jennie Purnell

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course is by instructor's permission only. Please contact Professor Jennie Purnell at jennie.purnell@bc.edu, for information. This course is class restricted to seniors, juniors, and graduate students.

POLI 4494 Models in Political Science Spring 3
Course Description

This course will introduces students to several models that many scholars have used to represent political and social processes. We will give particular attention to game theory, collective action, rational choice, and some non-rational choice models. The emphasis is on improving skills in thinking about individual and collective behavior through the use of some simple concepts and some imagination.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kenji Hayao

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course is closed to students who have previously taken POLI2415 Models of Politics. This course is restricted to sophomores, juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

POLI 4590 East Asian Security Fall 3
Course Description

This class offers an analytical perspective on the strategic conditions of post-Cold War East Asia. It examines the regional political structure, the strategic characteristics of the region's great power relationship (U.S.-China relations), and the implications for the conflicts on the Korean peninsula, in the Taiwan Strait, and in the South China Sea and the role of alliance relationships in regional diplomacy. From these different perspectives, it attempts to understand the sources of state behavior and prospects for regional stability and instability.


Instructor(s): Robert Ross

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course is class restricted to juniors, seniors, and graduate students only. Not open to students who have previously taken PO514 East Asian Security.

POLI 4591 Seminar: Modern Classics of International Relations Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar will examine five major books, and related articles, published in the field of International Relations over the last sixty years. Each deals theoretically and empirically with the nature of the international system and the sources of order, stability, and war within it. Through close readings, intensive discussions and critical writing, we will explore each book and, cumulatively, the connections among them. The ultimate objective is to build conceptual and theoretical foundations for thinking about the present state and future prospects of international order while achieving, along the way, a deeper understanding of the international political systems of the past.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Timothy Crawford

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Not open to students who have previously taken PO561. Open to graduate students; restricted to juniors, and seniors only.

POLI 4592 Seminar: Foreign-Imposed Regime Change Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines competing theories of foreign-imposed regime change. The modern international system is built upon the idea of state sovereignty. However, states routinely violate one another’s sovereignty in order to replace the political leadership of their rivals. Why do states launch regime change operations? What are the different ways that states try to overthrow their adversaries? What are the likely consequences of these interventions? The course will introduce multiple theories regarding the causes and consequences of regime change and evaluate their merits in relation to several in-depth historical cases.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Lindsey A. O'Rourke

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Restricted to juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

POLI 4593 International Relations of the Middle East Fall 3
Course Description

Media coverage of the Middle East increases by the day, but in-depth knowledge of the region and its politics remain in short supply. Why has the Middle East seemingly experienced so much conflict? How do ethnic and religious identities, domestic politics, and the balance of power between nations help explain state behavior in the region? What explains variation in the political situation of Middle Eastern states since the beginning of the Arab Spring? This course will address the international relations of the Middle East from World War I to today. The course will focus on the most powerful states in the region-Egypt, Israel, Iran, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Syria, and Turkey-in addition to foreign powers that have historically played a significant role in the Middle East, such as the United States and Great Britain. They are the key actors in the past and present wars, negotiations, alliances, revolutions, movements, interventions, and peace treaties that are the focus of the course.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Peter Krause

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Please do not take this course if you have previously taken POLI2528. This course is class restricted to juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

POLI 4594 Power Transitions in Theory and Practice Fall 3
Course Description

This class offers an analytical perspective on how great powers respond to power transitions (the rise and decline of powers), and the implications for war and peace. It considers multiple theoretical perspectives on power transitions, with attention to the factors that determine the sources of power transitions and the factors that affect the course of great power conflict. It considers case studies of power transitions drawn from European and Asian history, examining the variation in origins and outcomes. It considers the implications of these theoretical and historical perspectives for understanding the contemporary U.S.-China power transition and the prospects for war and peace.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robert Ross

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course is major restricted; all others by permission of the instructor. This course is restricted to juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

POLI 4640 Plato and the Problem of Virtue Spring 3
Course Description

This course will examine in detail three dialogues of Plato that deal with the problem of excellence or virtue, the Protagoras, Meno, and Theaetetus.


Instructor(s): Robert C. Bartlett

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 4690 The Political Philosophy of Alfarabi Spring 3
Course Description

In the Muslim world today, more than ever there is an effort to locate the key figures of Islamic civilization and to situate them in a contemporary context. Alfarabi (d. 950) founded the main tradition of philosophy in the Islamic world. Regarded by his successors such as Avicenna (Ibn Sina), Averroes (Ibn Rushd) and Maimonides as the "Second Teacher" or greatest philosophical figure following the death of Aristotle, Alfarabi was understood to have been the leading authority in two fields of study, namely, logic and political science. This course will involve a close reading of The Philosophy of Plato and Aristotle. No prior acquaintance with the Arabic language or Islamic philosophy is necessary.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): David M. DiPasquale

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 4901 Reading and Research-Undergraduate Spring/Fall 3
Course Description

This is a one-semester readings and research course directed by a Political Science faculty member that culminates in a long paper or equivalent.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: By arrangement; by permission of the instructor.

POLI 4921 Advanced Independent Research Fall/Spring 6
Course Description

Independent study in the Political Science Department under the direction of a faculty member for undergraduate students qualifying for the University's Scholar of the College Program.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: By arrangement; by instructor permission only.

POLI 4931 Honors Seminar: Body Politics Fall 3
Course Description

What does politics have to do with the human body? States seek to regulate bodies and intimate matters involving bodies, in relation to race, sexual activity, sexual orientation, gender identity, reproduction, and medical care. States also inflict, or permit the infliction, of great harm to bodies, in the form of torture, disappearances, lynching, and other acts of violence. A wide range of social movements have emerged to challenge state policies and practices with respect to bodies, such as civil rights and anti-racism, feminist, LGBT, and human rights movements. This course explores the relationship between the public realm of politics and the personal realm of the body, considering a range of issues, time periods, and regions of the world.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jennie Purnell

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 4932 Honors Seminar: Crisis Politics Spring 3
Course Description

This course is designed to give students an understanding of how decisions are made under the conditions of national security crisis, such as the Cuban Missile Crisis, the war in Vietnam, the decision to invade Iraq, or circumstances that involve terrorism. After examining historical cases of crisis decision-making, students play roles of members of the National Security Council, discuss current foreign policy issues, conduct briefings, develop initiatives, and debate policy positions and proposals. The class will design and run a crisis simulation exercise.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kathleen Bailey

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 4933 Honors Seminar: The Politics of Plato Fall 3
Course Description

This course will consider one of the most famous books about politics ever written, Plato's Republic.


Instructor(s): Robert C. Bartlett

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 4934 Honors Seminar: American Politics from the Ground Up Spring 3
Course Description

The populist upsurge landing Donald Trump in the White House has evident economic causes. But it also reflects critical developments in society and culture that challenge conventional modes of political analysis. This course will take up this challenge by examining the social and cultural dimensions of politics, including the dynamics between prepolitical institutions (e.g. families and kin groups) and informal social relationships (street gangs, neighborhood associations, bowling leagues, social media) on the one hand; and formal civic, political, and governmental organizations on the other. Contemporary US politics will be the focus, but examples from other eras and contexts will be drawn on. Topics will include: the social/cultural dimensions of corruption; churches and mosques as community institutions; Alinsky community organizing; the impact of changing values and culture; identity politics; and the impact of expert, professional knowledge.


Instructor(s): Peter Skerry

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 4951 Senior Thesis I Fall 3
Course Description

Students interest in writing a senior thesis may do so over two semesters in their senior year. Students are encouraged to think about their senior thesis topic in the second semester of their junior year, and they are encourged to contact individual faculty members about their topic.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 4952 Senior Thesis II Spring 3
Course Description

Students interest in writing a senior thesis may do so over two semesters in their senior year.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: By arrangement; by instructor permission.

POLI 4961 Honors Thesis in Political Science I Fall 3
Course Description

Students in the Political Science Honors program are encouraged to write an Honors Thesis over two semesters in their senior year. Students are encourage to start thinking about their Honors Thesis topic during the second semester of their junior year, and they should start contacting individual faculty member to discuss their topic of interest.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: By arrangement; by permission of the instructor.

POLI 4962 Honors Thesis in Political Science II Spring 3
Course Description

Students in the Political Science Honors program are encouraged to write an Honors Thesis over two semesters in their senior year.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 7101 Graduate Readings and Research Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

A directed study in primary sources and authoritative secondary materials for a deeper knowledge of some problems previously studied or of some area in which the candidate is deficient.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: By arrangement; by instructor permission.

POLI 7231 Research Methods in Political Science Fall 3
Course Description

This course provides an introduction to the practice of empirical research in political science. It addresses a variety of prominent methodological approaches, including experimental and quasi-experimental designs, field studies, interviews, content analysis, survey research, and aggregate data analysis. We will also consider relative strengths, tradeoffs, and syntheses of qualitative and quantitative methods. The course aims to equip students both to conduct original research and to evaluate the work of others.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Emily Thorson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 7702 American Government Field Seminar Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar is intended to provide graduate students with a general intellectual survey of the field of American government and politics. In terms of the topics it covers it is not unlike an introductory American government course, but its intellectual agenda is obviously different, focusing on the prominent scholarly debates, lines of inquiry, and perspectives. Among the topics considered are: the Founding and the Constitution, public opinion and voting, parties and elections, organized interests, Congress, the presidency, the bureaucracy, the judiciary, and public policy.


Instructor(s): R. Shep Melnick and Kay Schlozman

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor required.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 7705 Civil Liberties Fall 3
Course Description

A consideration of the law, philosophy, and politics of civil liberties (especially the First Amendment), with an emphasis on political and constitutional development.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Ken I. Kersch

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 7706 The American Founding Spring 3
Course Description

This seminar will examine the political debates associated with the American Founding. We will read some of the more important pre-Founding texts; examine the debate between and among the Federalists and Anti-Federalists; and study some of the immediate post-Founding discussions over such contested matters as: the nature of the Union, the powers of states, the status of slavery, the role of political parties, and the appropriate way to understand the presidency, the Congress, and the federal courts.


Instructor(s): Dennis Hale

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Open to undergraduates with permission of the instructor.

POLI 7709 Agencies,Legislatures&Courts:Interdisciplinary App Spring 2
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: LAWS6626

Comments:

POLI 7710 Research Methods in Political Science Fall 3
Course Description

This course provides an introduction to the practice of empirical research in political science. We will address a variety of prominent methodological approaches, including experimental and quasi-experimental designs, field studies, interviews, content analysis, survey research, and aggregate data analysis. The course aims to equip students both to conduct original research and to evaluate the work of others.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): David A. Hopkins

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 7711 Quantitative Methods in Political Science Fall 3
Course Description

This course provides an introduction to quantitative data analysis techniques commonly used in the social sciences to make descriptive and causal inferences. We will cover both the theoretical bases and practical applications of these techniques with an emphasis on the general linear model.


Instructor(s): David A. Hopkins

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 7726 Democracy in America Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar will use Alexis de Tocqueville's Democracy in America to examine fundamental issues in the study of American politics. Readings from Democracy in America will be coupled with contemporary political science works. What are Tocqueville's central insights? Was his description of American politics accurate? How has the U.S. changed since he wrote? These are among the questions we will address in the course.


Instructor(s): R. Shep Melnick

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Do not take this course if you have already taken PO392/POLI4392.

POLI 7727 American Political Development I Spring 3
Course Description

This seminar looks at the course of American history from the Federalist period of the 1790's through the end of the nineteenth century for the purpose of understanding subsequent American politics. Its axiom is that contemporary politics cannot be adequately understood without understanding its philosophical and historical underpinnings nor without examining the critical political conflicts and institutional developments that have occurred. Readings consist of original documents and secondary works by historians and political scientists.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Marc Landy

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 7728 Political Economy of Federalism Fall 3
Course Description

This course explores the structure and operation of American federalism, both in its original constitutional sense and in its modern form. The first half of the course will examine the constitutional architecture and its transformation. The second half of the course will be devoted to in-depth, empirical studies of federalism's significance and implications in a variety of regulatory, economic, and legal contexts.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Michael Greve

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 7729 American Political Development II Spring 3
Course Description

This seminar is look at the course of American history from the Progressive Era through to the present day. Its axiom is that contemporary politics cannot be adequately understand without understanding its philosophical and historical underpinnings nor without examining the critical political conflicts and institutional developments that have occurred. Readings consist of original documents and secondary works by historians and political scientists.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Marc Landy

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 7731 American Constitutional Development Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar will explore questions of order and change in American constitutional doctrine and institutional relations and powers across time. Students will consider diverse theories of constitutional and institutional change. Emphasis will be on the relationship between paths of constitutional development and both conventions of legal and constitutional reasoning, and political, economic, social, and intellectual currents, settlements, and crises.


Instructor(s): Ken I. Kersch

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 7732 Constitutionalism and Constitutional Design Fall 3
Course Description

The seminar examines the basic purposes and principles of democratic constitutions and some of the principal institutional design choices (including presidentialism vs. parliamentarianism; federalism; judicial review; and electoral and party systems). Roughly one-third of the course is devoted to constitutional and institutional theory; another third, to the United States Constitution; the remainder, to comparative questions, including constitutional design for divided societies.


Instructor(s): Michael Greve

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 7800 Advanced Directed Study Spring 3
Course Description

Advanced Directed Study is a final paper project for eligible second year Master's students. It is a focused and substantial paper, written under the guidance and approval of a supervising faculty member. The project is intended to cultivate expertise in a subject in which the student has formed an interest and has already done some work in. Examples include: further development of a paper from a previous seminar with a case study, primary sources or original research; an extended critical literature review; or, a delegated project in cooperation with a supervising professor's own research.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: MA students who are interested in enrolling for the Advanced Directed Study are advised to contact Professor Gerald Easter early on in the fall semester of their second year of the MA program. Professor Easter will make the final decision as to which professor will supervise the Advanced Directed Study for each individual student.

POLI 7801 Master's Thesis Seminar Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

A research course under the guidance of a faculty member for those writing a Master's Thesis.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 7803 Comparative Politics Graduate Field Seminar Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar aims at training graduate students in asking and answering the broadest and deepest questions of comparative politics, which seeks to understand similarities and differences in political culture and political institutions, with differing individualist and sociological emphases in methodology.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Gerald Easter

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Open to undergraduates with permission of the instructor.

POLI 7804 Politics and Society in the Middle East Spring 3
Course Description

This graduate seminar provides a comparative survey of the Middle East and North Africa, with emphasis on the economic, social, and cultural dimensions of politics. After a broad historical introduction to the region, it explores the contemporary patterns of authority and governance, the persistence of authoritarianism and the quest for democracy, ethnicity and identity politics, economic inequality and class relations, the dominant role of religion in politics, minority rights, and gender relations. A special focus in the latter part of the seminar will be on the social bases, ideologies, dynamics, and consequences of the recent revolutionary and protest movements in the region.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Ali Banuazizi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This graduate course is open to undergraduate students with the permission of the instructor.

POLI 7806 Political Cultures of the Middle East Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar explores the influence of cultural norms, religious traditions, and values on political behavior and institutional patterns in the Middle East. It focuses on several spheres of political life, including conceptions of political leadership, legitimacy, and authority; different responses—from embrace, to adaptation, to outright rejection—to the West; the encounter with modernity and the problem of secularization; the uses of Islam as an ideology of resistance and the rise of fundamentalism; prospects for democratization; role of women in public life; and the impact of globalization and the new media on political participation and change.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Ali Banuazizi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course is open to advanced undergraduate students with the permission of the instructor.

POLI 7807 International Relations Field Seminar Spring 3
Course Description

This graduate-level seminar provides an overview of the field of international relations. It seeks to provide students with a substantive understanding of the dominant theoretical perspectives and debates within the field; to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of contrasting arguments within those debates; to ground empirical topics in the context of these broader theoretical issues; and to provide a theoretical foundation for academic research and teaching in international relations. It is recommended for graduate students who plan to major or minor in International Relations.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jennifer L. Erickson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 7808 Comparative Regime Change Fall 3
Course Description

The course investigates the wave of collapsed dictatorships in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. While some regime changes are relatively peaceful, many are violent as protest politics from below confronts official coercion from above. The class is especially interested in cases where coercion was tried and failed to keep an authoritarian regime in power. The course also examines subsequent efforts to build new democratic regimes, which in some places succeeded, but in other places led to new forms of authoritarianism. Case studies are drawn from around the world, with a particular focus on the Communist experience.


Instructor(s): Gerald Easter

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 7812 State-Church Relations in Comparative Perspective Fall 3
Course Description

Freedom of worship is a signature characteristic of democratic states, and yet governments have often had an uneasy relationship with organized religion. This seminar examines the evolution of policies and institutions that have accommodated and regulated religious exercise in Western Europe from the nineteenth century to the present, with some comparisons made to the United States. The central case studies include the Catholic Church, Jewish communities, and Islam in the West. Readings will reflect on processes of secularization, the separation of church and state, the emancipation of religious minorities, and the development of state-church relations with minority religious communities.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jonathan Laurence

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Open to advanced undergraduate students by permission of the instructor.

POLI 7813 Islam in Europe Spring 3
Course Description

Students will explore the policies that governments in Europe adopted in response to the presence of growing numbers of Muslims in their territories over the past half-century. How do democratic governments cope with the emergence of new religions? How are new citizens incorporated? How are challenging or threatening ideologies reconciled with the rule of law? What is the relationship between policies towards groups and incorporation outcomes? The course will examine how Muslims' presence affects the relationship between state and society, and explore how governments have come to treat Islam as a domestic religion and encourage Muslims to embrace national citizenship.


Instructor(s): Jonathan Laurence

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor required

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 7814 Religion in International Politics Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar examines the role of religious communities and religious institutions in foreign affairs, including the practice of state-church relations and the rights of religious minorities across borders. We will focus on the international implications of domestic religious politics with particular reference to contemporary Europe and the Middle East/North Africa regions.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jonathan Laurence

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course is open to advanced undergraduate students with the permission of the instructor.

POLI 7815 Use of Force Fall 3
Course Description

This course offers an in-depth discussion of a critical aspect of international politics - how and why states use force to achieve their objectives. In so doing, it addresses the use of force in its multiple dimensions and its role in contemporary international politics. Topics covered include the causes of war, deterrence, the use of coercive military and economic power, the role of nuclear weapons, armed intervention, and terrorism.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robert Ross

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 7816 Russian Revolution in Comparative Perspective Fall 3
Course Description

The seminar surveys the Comparative Politics theoretical literature on revolution. The case studies include an extended and in-depth focus on the Russian Revolution as well as other Great Revolutions in history.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Gerald Easter

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 7817 The Political Economy of Development Fall 3
Course Description

This is a graduate-level course on the political economy of development. This course examines the political roots of economic development with attention to the role of institutions, redistributive politics, and governance. In addition to studying the key debates within the political economy of development, this course examines comparative methodologies and how empirical evidence is used.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Lauren Honig

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 7818 Global Public Goods and Cooperation in International Politics Spring 3
Course Description

Some of our most urgent challenges, from global warming and international financial crises to nuclear proliferation, global epidemics or disruption of the internet, can be understood as "global public goods." These require international actors to bargain, coordinate and collaborate in reaching effective responses. This seminar investigates the nature of public goods and collective action in order to help understand these pressing challenges, possible responses to them, and how politics both limits and opens opportunities for policy formation. It begins with prevalent theories about the production of public goods, from the local to transnational and global, and analysis of their governance. It then studies in depth three case studies, providing international financial stability, slowing the spread of nuclear weapons worldwide, and mitigating global climate disruption. It concludes by examining the implications of rising socio-economic inequality in major countries worldwide.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): David Deese

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 7819 Seminar: Current Issues in the U.S. Foreign Policy Fall 3
Course Description

This graduate course will deal with current issues in U.S. Foreign Policy.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Lindsey O'Rourke

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 7863 Institutions in International Politics Spring 3
Course Description

This graduate seminar probes the nature and limits of cooperation in world politics. It begins by examining the fundamentals of power, conflict, and cooperation at international and global levels. It focuses on the sources, evolution, and prospects for cooperation, including competing theoretical understandings. Key questions include the importance of regions and regionalism, the effects of democracies and democratization, and the role of both balancing and leadership at the global level. Weekly papers, oral presentations, and a major research project are required.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): David A. Deese

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Open to undergraduates with permission of instructor.

POLI 7865 Realism in International Politics Spring 3
Course Description

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the body of international relations theory known as realism. There are many differences among realists about how international politics works. The course will focus on those differences, as well as the similarities among realist thinkers. Some of the key questions that inform the readings and lectures include: 1) what is power? 2) why do states pursue power? 3) how much power do states want? 4) what causes war? 5) what strategies do states pursue to gain power 6) what can realism tells about contemporary international politics?


Instructor(s): Robert Ross

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 7901 Contemporary Political Theory Spring 3
Course Description

An introduction to the major contemporary political theorists, including Weber, Schmitt, Arendt, and Oakeshott.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Paul Wilford

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 7902 Field Seminar in Political Philosophy Spring 3
Course Description

This course will read some of the classic texts in political theory and consider issues such as the nature of the regime, the modern state, constitutionalism, and religion and politics. Authors read will include Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Aquinas, Augustine, Montesquieu, Rousseau, and Nietzsche.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Christopher Kelly

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 7903 Plato's Political Philosophy Spring 3
Course Description

A graduate seminar devoted to the study of the four dialogues of Plato that detail Socrates' turn to moral and moral and political philosophy.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robert C. Bartlett

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 7904 Thucydides Spring 3
Course Description

This course will be devoted to a careful examination of Thucydides' The War of the Peloponnesians and Athenians. Through both narrative and directly quoted speeches, Thucydides brings to life the twenty-seven-year-long war between Athens and Sparta that elicited the noblest efforts of great statesmen as well as the basest acts of scoundrels and cowards. But in addition to riveting our attention by the manner of his storytelling, Thucydides also teaches us to think seriously about the serious questions that arise in and through war, above all the question of the fate of justice.


Instructor(s): Robert C. Bartlett

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

POLI 7905 Bacon's Enlightened Moral and Civil Science Spring 3
Course Description

A study of Essays, Wisdom of the Ancients, and Advancement of Learning (portions).


Instructor(s): Robert K. Faulkner

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

POLI 7906 Aristotle's Ethics Fall 3
Course Description

A close reading of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robert C. Bartlett

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

POLI 7907 Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit Spring 3
Course Description

The class will undertake a close reading of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit. The course will focus especially on the political and religious dimensions on the Phenomenology and how the relation between these two fundamental human interests shapes the desire of consciousness to be at home in the world. Ultimately, we will try to understand Hegel's audacious claim to have brought philosophy “nearer to the form of science, to where it can lay aside the title ‘love of knowing’ and be actual knowing.”


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Paul T. Wilford

Prerequisites: None

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POLI 7909 Rousseau and Novels Fall 3
Course Description

This course will involve reading novels whose authors take up questions raised by Roussseau. The authors will include, Mary Shelly, Tolstoy, Balzac, Conrad, and Celine.


Instructor(s): Christopher Kelly

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

POLI 7910 Machiavelli and Shakespeare Fall 3
Course Description

A reading of the Discourses on Livy, together with a Shakespearean play (or two) that addresses the Machiavellian alternative.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

POLI 7911 Aristotle's Politics Spring 3
Course Description

A close study of Aristotle's Politics.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robert C. Bartlett

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

POLI 7912 Political Philosophy of Aristotle Spring 3
Course Description

Topics in the political philosophy of Aristotle.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robert C. Bartlett

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

POLI 7913 The Political Philosophy of Al Farabi Spring 3
Course Description

Alfarabi (d. 950) founded the main tradition of philosophy in the Islamic world. Regarded by his successors such as Avicenna, Averroes and Maimonides as the "Second Teacher" or greatest philosophical figure following the death of Aristotle, Alfarabi was understood to have been the leading authority in two fields of study, namely, logic and political science. This course will involve a close reading of The Philosophy of Plato and Aristotle. No prior acquaintance with Arabic or Islamic philosophy is necessary. Qualified undergraduates may take the course with approval from the instructor.


Instructor(s): David DiPasquale

Prerequisites: None

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POLI 7916 Xenophon's Socratic Writings Spring 3
Course Description

A consideration chiefly of the Memorabilia and also, lightly, of the Symposium and Oeconomicus.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robert K. Faulkner

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

POLI 7918 Hobbes and the Common Law Fall 3
Course Description

What is the relation between reason and law? This course will pursue this question through a study of two seminal works of Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan and the less familiar Dialogue between a Philosopher and a Student of the Common Laws of England. Related topics include the development of common law in the modern (Blackstonian) sense as distinguished from its pre-Hobbesian counterpart. This course may also be of interest to students of legal theory and of American politics and its “unwritten law” more generally.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Susan Shell

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

POLI 7919 Kant's politics Fall 3
Course Description

In his famous essay Toward Perpetual Peace [1795/97] Kant writes: “True politics … cannot take a single step without already having paid homage to morality.” What does Kant mean “the true politics” and in what sense must it first “pay homage” to morality? We will address these questions through a reading of Kant’s principle political works, including through a study of Perpetual Peace, The Metaphysics of Morals (Part One), Theory and Practice, What is Enlightenment, Idea for a Universal History, and The Conflict of the Faculties, Part Two.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Susan Shell

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

POLI 7925 Protagoras Spring 3
Course Description

An examination of Plato's account of Socrates' encounter with the most famous sophist of antiquity, Protagoras.


Instructor(s): Robert C. Bartlett

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

POLI 7928 Montesquieu's Fiction Fall 3
Course Description

This course will involve a close reading of Montesquieu's Persian Letters and some of his shorter fiction in relation to the major themes of his political thought.


Instructor(s): Christopher Kelly

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Open to undergraduates with permission of the instructor.

POLI 7931 Bacon and Descartes: the Politics of Science Spring 3
Course Description

The political aims and implications of modern science, according to two seminal figures.


Instructor(s): Robert K. Faulkner

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

POLI 7937 Rousseau's Emile Spring 3
Course Description

A careful reading of Rousseau's Emile with special attention to such themes as the conflict between virtue and happiness, and the proper ordering of the relations between men and women.


Instructor(s): Christopher Kelly

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

POLI 7938 The Political Philosophy of Rousseau Fall 3
Course Description

This course will focus on Rousseau's last work, The Reveries of the Solitary Walker. It will consider the relation between the private pursuit of happiness and civic duty.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Christopher Kelly

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

POLI 7940 Nietzsche's Political Philosophy Fall 3
Course Description

This course will examine Nietzsche's understanding of and response to nihilism, or the unraveling of the spiritual foundations of the Western Civilization, by examining one or more of his major works.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Nasser Behnegar

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

POLI 7947 Hobbes Fall 3
Course Description

A careful reading of the one of Hobbes' works.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Susan Shell

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

POLI 7948 Rousseau and Kant Spring 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Susan Shell

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

POLI 7949 Political Philosophy of Xenophon Spring 3
Course Description

A close reading of Xenophon's Education of Cyrus and Oeconomicus.


Instructor(s): Robert C. Bartlett

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

POLI 7960 Political Philosophy of Machiavelli Fall 3
Course Description

This course will examine the origin of modern political philosophy through a close reading of Machiavelli's Prince and Discourses on Livy.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Nasser Behnegar

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

POLI 7962 Kant Fall 3
Course Description

A careful reading of one or more of Kant's seminal texts.


Instructor(s): Susan Shell

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

POLI 7963 Kant's Theory of Justice Spring 3
Course Description

A close reading of Kant's Doctrine of Right (Part One of the Metaphysics of Morals), his definitive work on the nature of justice and rights, domestic and international.


Instructor(s): Susan Shell

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

POLI 7971 Political Thought of Lucretius Fall 3
Course Description

This course will read Lucretius' On the Nature of Things. This work addresses such issues as the opposition between political life and individual happiness and the relation between philosophy and religion.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Christopher Kelly

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

POLI 7982 Seminar: The Political Philosophy of John Locke Fall 3
Course Description

Modern liberalism involves a critique of the older understandings of the basis and the ends of government, a critique that led to the transformation of the relationship between politics and religion. This course will focus on Locke's major political writings in order to understand this revolution in thought.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Nasser Behnegar

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

POLI 7988 Religion and Modern Political Philosophy Fall 3
Course Description

This course will examine few seminal works of early modern political philosophy that shed light on the new philosophy's assessment of the Biblical moral and political teaching.


Instructor(s): Nasser Behnegar

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

POLI 7996 Dissertation Seminar I Fall 1
Course Description

This course will involve discussions of all stages of the dissertation from proposal to defense. In addition it will address issues of professional development such as teaching, conference participation, and interviewing for jobs.


Instructor(s): Nasser Behnegar

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Only students who have passed their doctoral comprehensives should take this course.

POLI 7997 Dissertation Seminar II Spring 1
Course Description

This course will involve discussions of all stages of the dissertation, from proposal to defense. In addition, it will address issues of professional development such as teaching, conference participation, and interviewing for jobs.


Instructor(s): Nasser Behnegar

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course is a continuation of POLI7996: Dissertation Seminar I. Only students who have passed their doctoral comprehensives should take this course.

POLI 8101 Masters Interim Study Fall/Spring 0
Course Description

Required for Master's candidates who have completed all course requirements but have not taken comprehensive examinations. Also for Master's students (only) who have taken up to six credits of Thesis Seminar but have not yet finished writing their thesis. Interim Study requires a commitment of at least 20 hours per week working on the thesis.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

POLI 9901 Doctoral Comprehensive Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

For students who have not yet passed the Doctoral Comprehensive but prefer not to assume the status of a non-matriculating student for the one or two semesters used for preparation for the comprehensive.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

POLI 9911 Doctoral Continuation Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

All students who have been admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree are required to register and pay the fee for doctoral continuation during each semester of their candidacy. Doctoral Continuation requires a commitment of at least 20 hours per week working on the dissertation.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: