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Physics Courses (PHYS) College of Arts and Sciences


Subject Area Course # Course Title Semester Credit Hours Expand
PHYS 1100 Structure of the Universe I Fall 3
Course Description

An introductory course directed at non-science majors. Physical principles are developed and applied to our space and astrophysical environment. Topics include structure and evolution of the solar system, physics of the sun and planets, space discoveries, creation and structure of stars and galaxies, relativity and cosmology, extraterrestrial life, and astronomical concepts.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 1101 Structure of the Universe II Spring 3
Course Description

An introductory course directed at non-science majors. Physical principles are developed and applied to our space and astrophysical environment. Topics include structure and evolution of the solar system, physics of the sun and planets, space discoveries, creation and structure of stars and galaxies, relativity and cosmology, extraterrestrial life, and astronomical concepts.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 1115 Structure of the Universe I Fall 3
Course Description

An introductory course directed at non-science majors. Physical principles are developed and applied to our space and astrophysical environment. Topics include structure and evolution of the solar system, physics of the sun and planets, space discoveries, creation and structure of stars and galaxies, relativity and cosmology, extraterrestrial life, and astronomical concepts.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 1400 The Art of Physics Summer 3
Course Description

This four week summer course is a contemporary prologue to classical physics themes for students seeking to gain an appreciation of the scope, methods, and tools of physics, and to reflect on its place among liberal arts. The course will present major physics ideas in a broader cultural context, providing historical perspectives and taking advantage of science museums in Florence, Pisa, and other places, where early modern science has its roots. Simultaneously, it will aim to develop specific, highly practical physics skills, such as order-of-magnitude estimates, dimensional analysis, and some problem solving techniques based on physics laws.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 1500 Foundations of Physics I Fall 3
Course Description

First semester of a two-semester algebra-based introductory physics course sequence, primarily for non-science majors, that covers the basic principles of physics. Emphasis is placed on problem-solving to demonstrate the implications of these principles, and to develop analytical skills. This course is similar to PHYS2100 in pace and content but with less emphasis on mathematical technique. First semester covers classical mechanics, including Newton's laws, energy, rotational motion, fluids, thermal physics, oscillations, waves, and gravitation.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Recommended laboratory (optional): PHYS2050-2051.

PHYS 1501 Foundations of Physics II Spring 3
Course Description

Second semester of the two-semester algebra-based introductory physics course sequence primarily for non-science majors. This course is similar to PHYS2101 in pace and content but with less emphasis on mathematical technique. Topics to be covered are fundamentals of electrostatics, simple electrical circuits, magnetism, electromagnetism, electromagnetic oscillations and waves, physical optics, and, if time allows, basic concepts and applications of special relativity and quantum physics.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Recommended laboratory (optional): PHYS2050-2051.

PHYS 1600 Special Projects Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Individual programs of study and research under the direction of physics faculty members.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Credits and requirements by arrangement with the approval of the Chairperson.

PHYS 2050 Introductory Physics Laboratory I Fall 1
Course Description

A laboratory course that provides an opportunity to perform experiments on topics in mechanics and acoustics. This lab is intended for students in PHYS2100-2101 or PHYS2200-2201.


Instructor(s): Andrzej Herczynski

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Lab fee required

PHYS 2051 Introductory Physics Laboratory II Spring 1
Course Description

A laboratory course that provides an opportunity to perform experiments on topics in electricity and magnetism and physical optics. This lab is intended for students in PHYS2200-2201 or PHYS2100-2101.


Instructor(s): Andrzej Herczynski

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Lab fee required.

No lab on 07/04/2017. Make up lab will be on 07/05/2017.

PHYS 2100 Introduction to Physics I (Calculus) Fall 4
Course Description

First semester of a two-semester calculus-based introduction to physics primarily for biology majors and premedical students. The development and application of classical physical principles are covered, and students are introduced to more advanced mathematical techniques to extend these applications. Emphasis is placed on problem-solving to better understand the implications of these principles, as well as to develop analytical skills. Topics include classical mechanics, including Newton's laws, energy, rotational motion, hydrostatics and fluid dynamics, oscillations, waves, and gravitation.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: MATH1100 (May be taken concurrently)

Cross listed with:

Comments: PHYS2050 is the laboratory course to supplement the lecture course material.

PHYS 2101 Introduction to Physics II (Calculus) Spring 4
Course Description

Second semester of a calculus-based introduction to physics primarily for biology majors and premedical students. The development and application of classical physical principles are covered, and students are introduced to more advanced mathematical techniques to extend these applications. Emphasis is placed on problem-solving to better understand the implications of these principles, as well as to develop analytical skills. Topics are electrostatics, electrical circuits, magnetism, electromagnetism and electromagnetic waves, topics in physical optics, and basic concepts of special relativity and quantum physics.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: MATH1101 (May be taken concurrently)

Cross listed with:

Comments: PHYS2051 is the laboratory course to supplement the lecture course material. No class on 07/04/2017, make-up class is scheduled on 07/05/2017.

PHYS 2110 Introduction to Physics Recitation I Fall 0
Course Description

Problem solving and discussion of topics in a small-class setting.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 2111 Introduction to Physics Recitation II Spring 0
Course Description

Problem solving and discussion of topics in a small-class setting.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 2200 Introductory Physics I (Calculus) Fall 4
Course Description

First semester of a two-semester calculus-based introduction to physics for those majoring in the physical sciences. Students utilize analytical reasoning combined with mathematical formalism to fully explore the development, consequences and limitations of the classical principles of physics; similar to PHYS2100 in pace and content but at a greater depth appropriate for physical science majors. Class size is limited to promote classroom discussion. Topics cover classical mechanics, including Newton's laws, energy, rotational motion, oscillations, waves, and gravitation.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: MATH1102 (May be taken concurrently)

Cross listed with:

Comments: PHYS2050 is the laboratory course to supplement the lecture course material.

PHYS 2201 Introductory Physics II (Calculus) Spring 4
Course Description

Second semester of a calculus-based introduction to physics for those majoring in the physical sciences. Students utilize analytical reasoning combined with mathematical formalism to fully explore the development, consequences and limitations of the classical principles of physics; similar to PHYS2212 in pace and content but at a greater depth appropriate for physical science majors. Class size is limited to promote classroom discussion. Topics include fundamentals of electrostatics, simple electrical circuits, magnetism, electromagnetism and electromagnetic oscillations and waves, and selected topics in physical optics.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: MATH1103 (May be taken concurrently)

Cross listed with:

Comments: PHYS2204 is the laboratory course to supplement the lecture course material.

PHYS 3100 Vibrations and Waves Fall 4
Course Description

This course is an introduction to the phenomena of vibrations and waves that span most of the areas in physics. The basic subject matter includes the following: mechanical vibrations and waves, free and forced vibrations and resonances, coupled oscillations and normal modes, vibration of continuous systems, propagation of mechanical and electromagnetic waves, phase and group velocity, interference and diffraction. The course also covers the basic concepts in first and second order differential equations, matrices, eigenvalues and eigenvectors and Fourier series.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

PHYS 3300 Introduction to Modern Physics Spring 4
Course Description

This course is a transition between introductory and advanced physics courses for science majors. The basic subject matter includes the two principal physical theories of the twentieth century‚ÄĒrelativity and quantum mechanics. Included are the following: the Lorentz transformation, kinematic consequences of relativity, origin of the quantum theory, one-dimensional quantum mechanics, quantum mechanics of a particle in three dimensions, applications to the hydrogen atom and to more complex atoms, molecules, crystals, metals, and semiconductors.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

PHYS 3500 Advanced Independent Research Fall/Spring 6
Course Description

This course is reserved for Physics majors selected as Scholars of the College. Content, requirements, and credits by arrangement with the Chairperson.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 3510 Contemporary Electronics Laboratory Fall 2
Course Description

A laboratory course, with lecture component, providing hands-on experience, including a brief review of fundamentals of electronics followed by a study of analog devices, including diodes, transistors, operational amplifiers, resonant circuits, and digital devices, including Boolean algebra, digital Gates, Timers, Counters, and practical combinations of Gates and other digital elements.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Lab fee required

PHYS 4100 Classical Mechanics Fall 4
Course Description

This course studies classical mechanics at the intermediate level and develops analytical skills for later physics courses. It includes: single particle dynamics and oscillations; conservative forces and conservation laws; gravitation and central force motion; Lagrangian and Hamiltonian dynamics; system of particles and rigid body dynamics.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

PHYS 4200 Electricity and Magnetism Spring 3
Course Description

To provide students with the background in electricity and magnetism necessary to deal with experimental problems in electromagnetism. Part 1 will present the mathematical foundations for the entire treatment of electromagnetism. Part 2 deals with Coulomb's law and the electrostatics based on this law. Part 3 addresses stationary currents and magnetostatics. Part 4 deals with induction and quasi-stationary phenomena, self- and mutual-induction. Part 5 presents a treatment of Maxwell equations and the consequences of these equations, e.g., energy and momentum conservation, Plane waves, reflection and refraction. Time permitting, we will discuss radiation from moving charges.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 4300 Numerical Methods and Scientific Computing Spring 4
Course Description

This course introduces students to a variety of numerical methods and then applies these methods to solve a broad range of scientific problems. These problems include examples from physics as well as several other disciplines, including chemistry, mathematics, economics, and finance. Numerical techniques for solving problems expressed in terms of matrix, differential and integral equations will be developed. Other topics will include statistical sampling and Fourier and Laplace transforms.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: MATH2202 and permission of instructor

Cross listed with: ECON2215

Comments: This course is intended for students who plan to minor in Scientific Computation. It is also an elective for Physics majors.

PHYS 4350 Experiments in Physics I Fall 3
Course Description

The course includes experiments in optics, solid state physics, nuclear physics, spectroscopy, x-ray, and electron diffraction. Students will carry out independent projects aimed at acquiring a sound understanding of both the physical principles involved in each subject area and of the principles and problems of modern experimental physics.


Instructor(s): Zhifeng Ren

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Lab fee required.

PHYS 4400 Quantum Physics I Fall 3
Course Description

First of a two-semester sequence providing a comprehensive treatment of the principles and applications of non-relativistic quantum mechanics. This semester focuses on basic principles. Topics covered include: historical development of quantum mechanics; the uncertainty principle; the Schrodinger equation and its solution for simple one-dimensional potentials, including constant potentials and the harmonic oscillator; formal presentation of the postulates of quantum mechanics using Dirac notation; commutation relations; basic scattering theory; formulation of Schrodinger equation in three-dimensions, central potentials, orbital angular momentum, and the hydrogen atom; spin angular momentum and the addition of angular momenta.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

PHYS 4401 Quantum Physics II Spring 3
Course Description

Second semester of the PHYS4407-4408 sequence, focusing on applications. Topics covered include: treatment of the many-particle systems, including effects of spin and symmetry of the wave function; many-electron atoms and the periodic table; basic elements of quantum statistics; approximation techniques, including non-degenerate and degenerate perturbation theory and the variational principle; time-dependent perturbation theory and the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

PHYS 4505 Nuclei and Particles Fall 3
Course Description

This is a course at the intermediate level that includes the following: structure of the nucleus; the neutron; the deuteron; alpha decay; beta decay; nuclear models; nuclear reactions; collision theory; nuclear forces; high energy physics; systematics and properties of elementary particles and symmetries.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 4515 The Physics of Conventional and Alternative Energy Fall 3
Course Description

PHYS4416 is a three-credit, elective course designed for junior and senior Physics majors. The course consists of an overview of the entire field of energy, presented with attention to the mathematical, physical and economic principles needed to assess the feasibility and desirability of each source. It will also go into the most detail with respect to renewable sources, but there are also sections on nuclear power and fossil fuels. The course assumes an understanding of basic physics, and it strives to address energy problems on a mathematical level at the level of first year calculus.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 4525 Foundations of Plasmonics Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 4535 Nanoscale Integrated Science Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 4545 Condensed Matter Physics Spring 3
Course Description

Condensed matter physics concerns all aspects of the physics of "condensed" materials, that is, solids, liquids, gels and plasma. It is the science behind many technologically-relevant applied and integrated science and engineering fields. This course primarily covers the solid state, starting with crystal lattices and their vibrations (phonons), and descriptions of crystalline metals, semiconductors, insulators and superconductors. It covers in some detail the electrical, magnetic, optical and thermal properties of materials, and introduces the student to noncrystalline solids and so-called "soft condensed matter."


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 4555 Optics Fall 3
Course Description

The purpose of this course is to present to advanced undergraduate students a treatment of the basic principles of optics. The course will deal at length with physical optics, namely, propagation and nature of light, coherence, interference, and diffraction. A treatment of geometrical optics, including lenses and optical instruments, will follow. Finally, the course will deal with the theory of optical amplification and lasers.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course is addressed to advanced undergraduate physics students.

PHYS 4565 Cosmology and Astrophysics Fall 3
Course Description

An overview of the contemporary view of the Universe. The overall structure of the Universe: galaxies, clusters, and stars. Outlines of general relativity. Principles of stellar evolution. Hydrostatic equilibrium, radiative transfer, nuclear processes. Late phases of stellar evolution: White dwarfs and neutron stars. Black holes Pulsars. The expanding Universe. Big Bang. The inflationary Universe. Elementary particles, and cosmology.


Instructor(s): Gabor Kalman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 4570 Topics in High Energy Astrophysics Fall 3
Course Description


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

PHYS 4575 Physics of Nanomaterials Spring 3
Course Description

The course covers materials preparation, characterization, physics, and applications of nanomaterials. The materials involved will be in the format of nanoparticles (0 dimensional), nanotubes/wires (1 dimensional), thin/thick films (2 dimensional), and bulk (3 dimensional) of insulators, semiconductors, conductors, and superconductors.


Instructor(s): Zhifeng Ren

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This is a one-semester elective primarily for junior and senior physics major.

PHYS 4585 Nanoscale Integrated Science Spring 1
Course Description

This course will offer an introduction to state-of-the-art integrated science research at Boston College. It will include topics such as biosensor development, drug delivery and materials for energy harvesting, all stemming from fundamental studies in materials properties, molecular structures and chemical reactions. Through a series of seminars, the course will cover basic concepts of nanomaterial preparation and characterization and provide a brief survey of nano- and microfabrication technologies, molecular engineering, biophotonics, biomimetics, nanobiosensors, nano-optics and photovoltaics. The course is directed towards graduate and senior undergraduate students in physics, biology and chemistry.


Instructor(s): Prof. Dong Cai

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: CHEM5501 BIOL5320

Comments:

PHYS 4600 Statistical Mechanics and Thermodynamics Fall 4
Course Description

The results of classical thermodynamics are deduced from a statistical basis, including the concepts of temperature and entropy, and the three laws of thermodynamics. Applications to ideal and real gases. Basic elements of statistical mechanics, including the canonical ensemble, partition function, equipartition theorem and Maxwell velocity distribution. Simple application of Maxwell-Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein, and Fermi-Dirac Statistic.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 4951 Senior Thesis Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

A semester-long project in the course of which a student carries out an investigation and research of an original nature or formulates a mature synthesis of a topic in physics. The results are presented as a written thesis, which the student will defend in an oral examination. This course is highly recommended for majors considering graduate study in physics.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 4961 Senior Honors Thesis Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 5000 Readings and Research in Physics Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Individual programs of study and research for advanced physics majors under the direction of a physics faculty member. Requirements are with the approval of the Chairperson.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Credits by arrangement

PHYS 7000 Physics Colloquium Fall/Spring 0
Course Description

This is a weekly discussion of current topics in physics. No academic credit. No fee.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 7707 Physics Graduate Seminar I Fall 1
Course Description

A discussion of topics in physics from the current literature.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 7708 Physics Graduate Seminar II Spring 1
Course Description

A discussion of topics in physics from the current literature.


Instructor(s): Hong Ding

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 7711 Classical Mechanics Fall 3
Course Description

Kinematics and dynamics, variational principles, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations, canonical transformations, Hamilton-Jacobi theory, small oscillations, rigid body motion, relativistic mechanics.


Instructor(s): Pradip Bakshi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 7721 Statistical Physics I Spring 3
Course Description

Fundamental principles of classical and quantum statistics; kinetic theory; statistical basis of thermodynamics; ideal classical, Bose and Fermi systems; selected applications.


Instructor(s): Gabor Kalman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 7722 Statistical Physics II Fall 3
Course Description

Fluctuation-dissipation theorem, Kubo formalism, electron gas, of phase transitions and critical phenomena, Landau theory of phase transitions, critical exponents, scaling and an introduction to renormalization group methods.


Instructor(s): Gabor Kalman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 7732 Electromagnetic Theory I Spring 3
Course Description

Topics include Maxwell equations in vacuum and media, potentials and gauges, energy and momentum conservation, wave propogation, waveguides, radiating systems, scattering, diffraction, metamedia and photonic crystals.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 7741 Quantum Mechanics I Fall 3
Course Description

Introduction includes elements of the linear algebra in Dirac notation. Topics include postulates of quantum theory, simple problems in one dimension, classical limit, harmonic oscillator, Heisenberg uncertainty relations, systems with N-degree of freedom, symmetries, rotational invariance and angular momentum, hydrogen atom and an introduction to spin. Also included is the path integration formulation of quantum theory.


Instructor(s): Vidya Madhavan

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

PHYS 7742 Quantum Mechanics II Spring 3
Course Description

Equations of motion for operators, perturbation theory, interaction of radiation with matter, identical particles, scattering theory, second quantization, relativistic equations.


Instructor(s): Pradip Bakshi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 7835 Mathematical Physics I Fall 3
Course Description

Matrix algebra, linear vector spaces, orthogonal functions and expansions, boundary value problems, introduction to Green's functions, complex variable theory and applications.


Instructor(s): David Broido

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 8725 Quantum Field Theory Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

PHYS 8735 Techniques of Experimental Physics I Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course will give a general introduction to a subset of experimental techniques widely used and frequently encountered in modern condensed matter physics research. Many of these techniques are based on the use of synchrotron radiation (x-rays), electrons, laser or microwave as the incident excitations, each capable of providing unique information about specific aspects of the usually complex experimental subjects from a complementary perspective. Both theoretical and experimental contents of these and other techniques will be accessed through lectures in class, hands-on demonstrations and collaborative experimental projects in lab.


Instructor(s): The Department and Ruihua He

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 8736 Techniques of Experimental Physics II Spring 3
Course Description

This is a laboratory course that introduces several important modern experimental techniques in physics, which may include x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, angle-resolved photoemission, optical reflectivity, neutron scattering and other techniques. Lectures on these topics will be given first, followed by experimental projects performed by students in real research laboratories.


Instructor(s): Hong Ding

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 8750 Particle Physics Fall 3
Course Description

This graduate-level elective course is a survey of the basic principles of particle physics. The course will cover the `Standard Model, experimental tests of this model, and recent developments in extending the model to work towards a unified theory. A basic understanding of mechanics, quantum mechanics, electromagnetism, and special relativity is required.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 8761 Solid State Physics I Spring 3
Course Description

Introduction to the basic concepts of the quantum theory of solids. Drude and Sommerfeld theory, crystal structure and bonding, theory of crystal diffraction, and the reciprocal lattice, Bloch theorem and electronic band structure, nearly free electron approximation and tight binding method, metals, semiconductors and insulators, dynamics of crystal lattice, phonons in metals, semiclassical theory of electrical and thermal transport, introduction to magnetism and superconductivity.


Instructor(s): Willie Padilla

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 8762 Solid State Physics II Fall 3
Course Description

Advanced studies of the physics of solids. Elementary excitations, symmetry and symmetry-breaking, electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions, Hartree-Fock and random phase approximations, scattering theory, dielectric functions, screening, sum rules, optical properties, Landau Fermi liquid theory, disorder and localization, quantum Hall effect, quantum magnetism, superconductivity and superfluidity.


Instructor(s): Hong Ding

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 8770 Special and General Relativity Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 8775 Foundations of Plasmonics Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 8799 Readings and Research in Physics Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

By arrangement.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Credits by arrangement.

PHYS 8801 Physics Thesis Research Fall 3
Course Description

A research problem of an original and investigative nature.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 8845 Nanophotonics and Semiconductor Physics Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

PHYS 8888 Interim Study Fall 0
Course Description

Required for master's candidates who have completed all course requirements but have not taken comprehensive examinations. Also for master's students (only) who have taken up to six credits of Thesis Seminar but have not yet finished writing their thesis.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 8910 Seminar: Topics in Physics Fall 3
Course Description

A seminar course on topics in theoretical or experimental physics given in accordance with current research interests or needs of the students and faculty of the department.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 8935 Frontiers of Condensed Matter Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

PHYS 8950 Group Theory Spring 3
Course Description

The purpose of this course is to provide graduate students in physics with the theoretical background in group theory necessary to handle problems in atomic, molecular and solid state physics. The course will give both the theory and the tools necessary to handle such problems; it will first elaborate the theory and then deal with applications mainly in the theory of solids. No previous knowledge of group theory or solid state physics is required. This course can be taken by first year graduate students.


Instructor(s): Baldassare Di Bartolo

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 9901 Doctoral Comprehensive Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

For students who have not yet passed the Doctoral Comprehensive but prefer not to assume the status of a non-matriculating student for the one or two semesters used for preparation for the comprehensive.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 9910 Topics in Physics Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

PHYS 9911 Doctoral Continuation Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

All students who have been admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree are required to register and pay the fee for doctoral continuation during each semester of their candidacy. Doctoral Continuation requires a commitment of at least 20 hours per week working on the dissertation


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: