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Music Academic Courses (MUSA) College of Arts and Sciences


Subject Area Course # Course Title Semester Credit Hours Expand
MUSA 1080 Keyboard Skills Fall/Spring 0
Course Description

Keyboard Skills is a corequisite for each of the following theory courses: MUSA 1100 Fundamentals of Music Theory, MUSA 2100 Harmony, and MUSA 3100 Chromatic Harmony. In weekly 30-minute lessons, students will learn and demonstrate the practical understanding of scales, chord progressions and the ability to play short compositions on the keyboard. Times to be determined once class begins. Students must be enrolled in MUSA 1100, MUSA 2100, or MUSA 3100 to participate.


Instructor(s): Leah Kosch and The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Theory corequisite

MUSA 1090 Ear Training/Sight-Singing Lab Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

In meetings twice a week students learn to sing melodies by sight through a solfege system of drilling scales and intervals (sight-singing) and learn to notate melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic patterns (ear-training). The course principally helps students pass the Ear Training/Sight Singing requirement for the major but can benefit individuals in singing groups or those who wish to improve their practical musical skills. Preference given to majors & minors. Usually taken concurrently with MUSA 2100 Harmony or MUSA 3100 Chromatic Harmony.


Instructor(s): Michael Burgo

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: For music majors.

MUSA 1100 Fundamentals of Music Theory Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

An introductory music theory course designed for students with a strong interest in music. As a Core course it includes speculations on how musical discourse informs our perception and understanding of the world around us. Students learn to acquire skills in music notation and transcription. The following theoretical concepts will be extensively covered: notation of pitch and rhythm, scales, intervals, chords, and harmonic progression. Students leave the course prepared for upper level study in music theory and will begin to question broader issues concerning the meaning and use of music.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Leah Kosch, Michael Burgo, Benjamin Park, Randy McGee and Barbara Gawlick

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

MUSA 1200 Introduction to Music Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course will attempt to develop essential and critical listening faculties by employing a chronological survey of the elements, forms, and various types of music that the serious listener is exposed to today. The principal emphasis of the course will be on traditional Western art music from medieval Gregorian Chant to twentieth-century electronic music, but certain excursions into the world of non-Western musics, jazz, and American popular song will be included to diversify and enrich the experience of listening critically to music.


Instructor(s): Alexander Ludwig and Daniel M. Callahan

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

MUSA 1300 History of Popular Music Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

From the blues to country, jazz to rock, our nation's political, social, and economic history has been mirrored and influenced by the styles of popular music developed in our cultural melting pot. This course will provide an overall history of popular music in America, with emphasis upon mainstream popular music since 1954. Its focus will be on the independence and interdependence of black and white musical cultures in America. Students will learn stylistic developments in popular music and acquire interpretive strategies, including methods of aural analysis that will view popular songs as historical texts and as autonomous works of art.


Instructor(s): Donald James

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

MUSA 1320 Introduction to Musics of the World Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course provides an introduction to selected musical traditions from around the world, in their cultural contexts. Our main goals are to study the connections between music and other cultural features and institutions, to become familiar with the features of major musical styles from the cultures studied, and with basic concepts in ethnomusicology and comparative musicology. Case studies include Native North and South American; Western, Central, and Southern African; Arabic; Persian; Hindusthani; Karnatak; Javanese; and Japanese musics. Musical training and background are not required and are not presumed.


Instructor(s): Ann Lucas and Douglass Dineen

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Cross-cultural course within the major/minor.

MUSA 1400 Music in the Holocaust and the Third Reich Spring 3
Course Description

This course surveys the inspiring legacy of music by composers persecuted by the Nazis. We will study jazz, classical music, and cabaret from 1900-1944 targeted by the Nazi regime. Special focus is placed on the art and music created in Nazi concentration camps. Students will have the opportunity to experience live performances and archival materials and will meet Holocaust survivors, who will share their incredible testimonies with the class. Themes explored: socio-political impact on the arts in climates of intolerance and persecution; music and art as resistance; connections to contemporary forms of music such as rock, rap, reggae, etc.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Mark Ludwig

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

MUSA 1406 Soundscapes/Early Modern Spain: Court, Cloister, and Chapel Summer 3
Course Description

Course introduces, through texts, visitors, and site visits, the extraordinary variety of early Spanish music as a key to understanding a thriving, dynamic, and diverse culture at the height of its imperial glory. Special consideration is given to a body of Hispanic music within the wider cultural, political, social, and institutional contexts which made it and make it intelligible in both past and in the present.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Michael Noone

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

MUSA 1701 Aesthetic Exercises: Engagement,Empathy, Ethics Spring 3
Course Description

In this course you will hone your perceptual and critical faculties on a range of artworks and performances traversing media and frames, from ancient sculpture to contemporary sports. You will explore how differences between media and art forms affect representation, meaning, and reception. You will define and redefine “art.” You will read aesthetic theorists from Plato to YouTube users. Most importantly, you will lavish attention on your own embodied experience to understand what constitutes aesthetic engagement, with whom or what you empathize in aesthetic experience, and how, if at all, aesthetic exercises better your life and the lives of others.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Daniel Callahan

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal Course:Enduring Questions
For Freshmen Only

MUSA 1901 Music Internship Fall 1
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Jeremiah McGrann

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

MUSA 2080 Keyboard Skills: Harmony Fall/Spring 0
Course Description

Keyboard Skills: Harmony is a corequisite for MUSA 2100 Harmony. In weekly 30-minute lessons, students will learn and demonstrate the practical understanding of scales, chord progressions and the ability to play short compositions on the keyboard. Students must be enrolled in MUSA 2100 to participate.


Instructor(s): Lindsay Albert

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

MUSA 2085 Keyboard Skills: Chromatic Harmony Fall/Spring 0
Course Description

Keyboard Skills: Chromatic Harmony is a corequisite for MUSA 3100 Chromatic Harmony. In weekly 30-minute lessons, students will learn and demonstrate the practical understanding of scales, chord progressions and the ability to play short compositions on the keyboard. Students must be enrolled in MUSA 3100 to participate.


Instructor(s): Leah Kosch

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

MUSA 2090 Advanced Ear Training/Sight-Singing Lab Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

A continuation of MUSA 1090. See description for MUSA 1090.


Instructor(s): Michael Burgo

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: For music majors.

MUSA 2100 Harmony Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Harmony will cover the principles of diatonic harmonic progression, four-part writing from a figured bass, and harmonization of chorale melodies. Students will increase their musical vocabulary to include modes and seventh chords, and continue to develop skills in analysis, keyboard harmony, and ear-training. It is recommended that music majors sign up for MUSA1090 Ear Training/Sight-Singing Lab.


Instructor(s): Sandra Hebert

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed MUSA1100 or Permission of Music required

Cross listed with:

Comments: Theory course. It is recommended that music majors take MUSA 1090 Ear Training/Sight-Singing Lab.

MUSA 2130 Education Through Music Spring 3
Course Description

This is a course in general education, especially appropriate for majors and minors in education and music. The objectives of this course are to equip prospective teachers with strategies and methods of teaching and integrating music within the PreK -12 curriculum and to develop basic music competencies and understanding to engage a student's artistic, emotional, cognitive, physical, and psychological faculties. These objectives will be addressed through a variety of experiences: assigned readings, writings and research projects on topics of music philosophy and aesthetics, theories of children's musical development/learning, teaching methodologies and materials, hands-on activities, and in-class teaching opportunities.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Barbara Gawlick

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

MUSA 2201 Medieval/Renaissance Spring 3
Course Description

A study of the development of Western Music from the first stages of musical notation in the Middle Ages through the polyphonic music of the sixteenth century. Both sacred and secular traditions will be considered, including Gregorian chant, the polyphonic Mass and motet, the chanson, and the madrigal of the 16th century. Although most of the literature of this period is vocal, a study of the instruments and instrumental literature will be included.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Michael Noone

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Historical Period

MUSA 2202 Music of the Renaissance Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines the composition and practice of music from circa 1420 to circa 1600 within the context of the unprecedented florescence in the arts, sciences, and letters throughout Western Europe known as the Renaissance. We examine the art of Netherlandish polyphony (sacred and secular); the sacred and secular genres of France, England, and Italy; and a broad range of instrumental music. The course explores musical analysis, performing practices, and notation, with an emphasis on the acquisition of some experience in performing Renaissance music. The works of the following composers are treated in detail: Josquin, Palestrina, Byrd, and Victoria.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Michael Noone

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

MUSA 2203 Music of the Baroque Fall 3
Course Description

This course includes music in the seventeenth and first half of the eighteenth centuries from Monteverdi and Schutz to Bach and Handel. We will study the rise of new forms and growth of instrumental and vocal music: opera, oratorio, cantata, trio sonata, solo sonata, concerto, concerto grosso, dance suite, and fugue.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): T. Frank Kennedy, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Historical period

MUSA 2205 Music of the Classic Period Fall 3
Course Description

This course will consider the musical trends of the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries (c. 1750-c. 1815) that are characterized by the movement towards simplicity in melody and a clarification of harmonic language. While music that served as a transitional style from the Baroque period will be the starting point for this course, in large measure, the focus of the course will be on the music of the two great composers who lived and worked in or around Vienna in the period 1780-1800: Haydn and Mozart.


Instructor(s): Jeremiah W. McGrann

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Historical Period

MUSA 2207 Music of the Romantic Era Spring 3
Course Description

A study of the new concepts, genres, and musical institutions that grew up in the nineteenth century as exemplified by such composers as Schubert, Schumann, Mendelssohn, Berlioz, Chopin, Liszt, Wagner, Brahms, and Mahler.


Instructor(s): Jeremiah W. McGrann

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Historical period.

MUSA 2209 Music of the Modern Era Fall 3
Course Description

This is a study of the music of the twentieth century, including concepts, ideas, techniques, compositional materials, and analytical principles of the music, as well as a historical, chronological survey of the composers and compositions of the modern era. The course will include a study of the twentieth-century masters, including: Debussy, Ravel, Stravinsky, and Schoenberg; nationalist composers like Bartok, Britten, and Copland; and the flowering of avant-garde music since 1945, including electronic music. A discussion of the development of Jazz and American Popular Song will be included.


Instructor(s): Daniel M. Callahan

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Historical period.

MUSA 2304 Musics of India Spring 3
Course Description

This course will introduce students to the rich and varied musical arts of India. Students will delve into the ubiquitous songs of Bollywood and Tamil film, karṇāṭak and hindustānī art musics, temple musics, as well as the music (and dance) of bharatanatyam, bhangra, and other regional genres. Lectures will focus on situating Indian musics in their cultural and historic contexts while exploring issues of identity formation, regional and transnational movements, and the changing meanings of music and the arts in India. Students will also study performance practices––including basic exercises for South Indian melody (rāga), rhythm (tāḷa), and dance––which will provide engaged (and embodied) learning supplements to the lectures. There are no academic or music-skills prerequisites for this course.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Douglass Dineen

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

MUSA 2305 Native North American Song Spring 3
Course Description

This course surveys the song and dance traditions of Native North Americans, including traditional repertories and inter-Tribal musics of the last two centuries. The cultural contexts of songs and dances is our focus. Case studies include native oral traditions, seventeenth century European descriptions, classic ethnographies, and consideration of contemporary powwows and Native American popular musics. No musical experience is assumed.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Cross-Cultural Course within the major/minor

MUSA 2306 Musics of Africa Spring 3
Course Description

This course is a survey of the musical diversity and cosmopolitanism of one of the world’s most populous continents. Drawing from ethnographic studies of African musics, we will explore some of the political, economic, and historical circumstances out of which certain genres and styles of music emerge and at the ways in which these genres and styles circulate in global music and performance markets.


Instructor(s): Kivenko, Sharon

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: AADS2306

Comments: Cross-cultural course within the major/minor. The ability to read western European music notation is not required.

MUSA 2307 Musics of Asia Fall 3
Course Description

This course offers an approach to Asian culture focusing on music and the performing arts. Case studies from India, Tibet, China, Japan, Korea, and Indonesia highlight the profound richness of musical experience seen throughout Asia while providing the foundation for a broader analysis of music-as-culture. Examining how music is deployed--in religious expression, political and social strategies, identity formation, and entertainment--reveals both continuities in musical uses/meanings and diversity in its cultural, social, and personal dimensions. This course locates contemporary Asian performing arts in their historical contexts, considers the transformations that take place as music flows across borders, and examines the interplay between global information networks and local forms and representations.


Instructor(s): Douglass Dineen

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Cross-cultural course within the major/minor. The ability to read Western music notation is not required.

MUSA 2308 Music in the Medieval Islamic World Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines the nature of music in the medieval Islamic world and its relationships with cultural factors that shaped the history of the Arabic, Persian, and Turkish speaking worlds after the rise of Islam. The course will cover a period of history from the rise of the Ummayad Caliphate (c. 660), through the Perso-Islamic empires of the thirteenth, fourteenth, and fifteenth centuries. Some aspects of music under the Safavid and Moghul Empires during the sixteenth century will also be addressed. Topics covered in this course include: the place of music in the context of Islamic philosophy, the function of music within the Islamic Caliphate, the use of music in Islamic mysticism and musical changes that occurred in response to the changing nature of Islamic Empire.


Instructor(s): Ann Lucas

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

MUSA 2309 Music and Culture in the Middle East Fall 3
Course Description

This course explores the relationship between different music traditions of the Middle East and their respective cultural contexts. It addresses issues of music's structure and content vis-à-vis its role in social, political and religious situations in the region; the ways that these forces influence musical aesthetics, while also addressing the role of music in the Middle East historically. The cultural areas covered in this class include the Arab World, Iran, Turkey, and Afghanistan.


Instructor(s): Ann Lucas

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ICSP2309

Comments: Cross-cultural course

MUSA 2330 History of Jazz Fall 3
Course Description

A history of America's music from its origins in African traditions through the contemporary scene. The course will explore its African roots; its consolidation in New Orleans and its spread into the cultural mainstrean in the Jazz Age; its transformation into bebop, cool, third stream, funk, and avant-garde trends; and the return to traditionalism. Key figures covered will be Armstrong, Ellington, Parker, and Marsalis, among others.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: AADS2330

Comments:

MUSA 2331 Rhythm and Blues in American Music Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the elements of rhythm and blues in the Afro-American sense, and traces the influence of these elements on American popular and classical music from the early 1900s to the present. Records, tapes, and audio-visual material that include music from the early New Orleans period to present-day jazz/rock and music videos will be used throughout the course.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: AADS2266

Comments: Cross-Cultural Course within the major/minor

MUSA 2332 Jazz in America Spring 3
Course Description

This course provides a thorough and detailed study and examination of the Black music that has come to be known as jazz. The socio-political nature of Black music in America, Black music in education, and the relations of Black music and the mass media are considered. Students will have the opportunity to experience live performances of jazz and will be asked to do a general analysis of at least one recording (LP) of a jazz performance.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: AADS2285

Comments: Cross-Cultural Course

MUSA 2334 Hip Hop in American Culture Spring 3
Course Description

This course is an historical and ethnomusicological review of hip hop. We will examine the roots of hip hop in African expressive culture, the emergence of the hip hop genre in the United States, and hip hop’s impact in other places around the globe. The course requires active listening, readings, and use of multimedia.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Timothy Mangin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: AADS2334

Comments:

MUSA 2340 Introduction to Irish Folk Music Fall 3
Course Description

An introduction to Irish music, including a historical examination of the music and its indigenous instruments and a close study of contemporary developments arising from the folk music revival of the 1960s, particularly in relation to ensemble performance. Both dance music and the vocal tradition will be surveyed, with an emphasis on the former. Live performance will be incorporated where possible in class, combined with extensive use of audio material as a basis for discussion and analysis.


Instructor(s): Donald James

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Cross-cultural course.

MUSA 2405 Music and the Jesuit Tradition Spring 3
Course Description

This course views the broad and ongoing tradition of the Jesuits and music by means of a team-taught approach and including historical/archival considerations, analysis, and performance. A rich tradition with music accompanies the Jesuit mission since the founding of the Society of Jesus in 1540. Most research has concentrated on the Baroque period, but recently the late Renaissance tradition has undergone scrutiny by such scholars as Michael Noone.The course will look at many of the prominent composers who worked for the Jesuits, including a modern revival of this tradition manifested in the compositions of several Boston College composers.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): T. Frank Kennedy, S.J., Michael Noone and Christopher Willcock

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: TMST7103

Comments:

MUSA 3100 Chromatic Harmony Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course covers the basic principles of chromatic progression. The proper use of secondary dominants, diminished seventh chords, and augmented triads precedes an in-depth study of the harmonization of Bach chorales, the concept of modulation using modal exchange, and the introduction of Neapolitan sixth and augmented sixth chords. We will study via harmonic and form analysis the works of great composers including Bach, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Schumann, Chopin, Brahms, Wolf, Mahler, and Wagner.


Instructor(s): Thomas Oboe Lee and Ralf Gawlick

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed MUSA2100

Cross listed with:

Comments: Theory course. It is recommended that music majors take MUSA 1090 Ear Training/Sight-Singing Lab or MUSA2090 Advanced Ear Training/Sight-Singing Lab.

MUSA 3106 Counterpoint I Fall 3
Course Description

In this course we will study the fundamentals of two- and three- part polyphonic styles. Using the principles of species counterpoint, we will acquire a dependable contrapuntal technique to write short compositions, first in two parts and eventually in three. Assignments will include short works in free imitation, strict canon, and invertible counterpoint. Our studies will include a brief survey of the historical origins of Western polyphony and analysis of contrapuntal compositions of the Baroque period.


Instructor(s): Ralf Gawlick

Prerequisites: MUSA2100

Cross listed with:

Comments: Theory course

MUSA 3110 Form and Analysis: Methodological Approaches to the Study of Music from Bach to Webern Spring 3
Course Description

The focus of this course is in two parts. In part one, we will look at large forms in the Romantic music repertory. We will study Robert Schumann's song cycle "Dichterliebe," and Frederic Chopin's "Preludes, opus 28." In part two, we will study the techniques and methods behind some of the music of the 20th century. For instance, the music of Arnold Schoenberg, Anton Webern, Milton Babbitt, Steve Reich and others


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Thomas Oboe Lee

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed MUSA3100

Cross listed with:

Comments: Theory Course

MUSA 3114 Jazz Harmony, Improvisation, and Arranging Fall 3
Course Description

This music theory course will focus on the study of chord structures, chord substitutions, chord scales, composition, and improvisation as they have been codified by contemporary jazz musicians. The technical innovations in the music of Sonny Rollins, Thelonius Monk, Charlie Parker, and Miles Davis will be analyzed and discussed. Special attention will be placed on learning how to improvise on the great standards of the jazz repertory. Additional studies will include the following: piano lead sheet arrangements; ii-V-I keyboard harmony, re-harmonization, and composing original tunes based on chord structures of standards by Berlin, Kern, Gershwin; rhythm changes; and the blues.


Instructor(s): Thomas Oboe Lee

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed MUSA3100

Cross listed with:

Comments: Theory course -- students should have basic keyboard skills, but it is not essential.

MUSA 3120 Seminar in Composition Spring 3
Course Description

The course will be conducted in two parts. One: class will meet once a month. Works in both tonal and twentieth century idioms will be discussed and used as models for student compositions. Two: each student will meet once a week with the instructor for a private studio composition lesson. The student will complete, by the end of the semester, three original compositions: theme and variations, a movement for string quartet, and a song cycle for voice and piano. The purchase of Finale music software, created by Coda Music Technology, Mac or PC version, is required for this course.


Instructor(s): Ralf Gawlick and Thomas Oboe Lee

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed MUSA3100

Cross listed with:

Comments: Theory course

MUSA 3126 Tonal Composition Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Students enrolled in this course will complete three composition projects: (1) a three-part fugue in the Baroque style of J.S Bach, (2) a Sonata-Allegro first movement in the Classical style of Haydn or Mozart, and (3) a Rondo or Scherzo movement in the Romantic style of Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Schubert, or Schumann. We will examine representative works of these composers in these genres to serve as models for the student compositions.


Instructor(s): Ralf Gawlick

Prerequisites: MUSA3100 and MUSA3106

Cross listed with:

Comments: Theory Course

MUSA 3130 Orchestration Spring 3
Course Description

The study of individual instruments of the orchestra and their groupings. Score readings and analytical studies of important orchestra works from the baroque, classical, and romantic to the modern period. Expert musicians from the Boston area will come to class to demonstrate and perform student works. Monthly field trips to Jordan Hall at the New England Conservatory for concerts of orchestral music by the New England Conservatory Philharmonic. The final project will be a work for chamber orchestra composed by the student.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Thomas Oboe Lee

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed MUSA3100 or Must have successfully completed MUSA3106 or Must have successfully completed MUSA3120 or Permission of instructor required

Cross listed with:

Comments: Theory Course

MUSA 3220 Opera Fall 3
Course Description

In this course we will look at how text and music combine to relate a drama, concentrating on five representative masters of the seventeenth through nineteenth centuries--Monteverdi, Handel, Mozart, Verdi, and Wagner. This course will take excursions into other works--the operas created for the court of Louis XIV, the vocal pyrotechnics of the Italian golden age of singing, the spectacle of French grand opera, and the operatic qualities of the modern Broadway musical.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jeremiah W. McGrann

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Genre Course

MUSA 3222 Symphony Fall 3
Course Description

This course investigates the forms and meanings of selected works of the symphonic repertoire following its rise from a court entertainment to a statement of philosophical ideals.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Jeremiah W. McGrann and Alexander Ludwig

Prerequisites: Some previous training in music is helpful but not necessary.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Genre Course

MUSA 3224 Dance to the Music: Choreomusicality from the Baroque Court to YouTube Spring 3
Course Description

This course will explore the changing relationships between music and dance on street, stage, and screen from the seventeenth century up to the present. We will consider a range of interrelated topics such as music and dance as text (score, orchesography, choreography) versus as performance and/or improvisation, the performance of power and of identity (race, gender, sexuality, class), spectacle and the gaze, audiovisual synchronicity, film, modernism and the avant-garde, and popular culture. Case studies will be drawn from Baroque dance, ballet, tap, modern dance, hip-hop, and the contemporary music video. Students will share weekly responses with their peers, write a paper on a live performance they attend together, and complete a final research paper and presentation.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Daniel M. Callahan

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

MUSA 3225 String Quartet Spring 3
Course Description

In this course, we will trace the evolution of the string quartet from its creation in the Classical period up to the Modern era. Special attention will be paid to the influence of history on musical style. Our examination will include five masters of the form: Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Bartk and Shostakovich.


Instructor(s): Alexander Ludwig

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

MUSA 3226 Masterworks of Choral Music Fall 3
Course Description

A chronological examination of acknowledged masterpieces and lesser known works of the Western choral repertory in such genres as the Mass, motet, madrigal, oratorio, chorale, cantata, choral symphony, part songs, villancico, modern a capella music, and spirituals, among others. In addition to studying examples of each genre, we will look at the historical, social, and cultural contexts of this music and its performance.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Michael Noone

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Genre course.

MUSA 3227 Keyboard Music Fall 3
Course Description

This course will show how composer/performers have explored and exploited the expressive possibilities inherent in three keyboard instruments (harpsichord, clavichord, and piano music for organ is not included). Students should come away with an understanding of the main differences in the construction and sonic possibilities of these three instruments, the change of musical styles and forms over a four hundred year period (from the Baroque through today), and specific knowledge of the masterpieces of keyboard music by some of the great keyboard composer/performers. Some previous acquaintance with the keyboard is recommended but not required.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Genre course.

MUSA 3264 High Renaissance Masters Fall 3
Course Description

The High Renaissance is dominated by the works of four composers. Spanish priest Toms Luis de Victoria (1548-1611) worked in Rome and Madrid composed a relatively small body of works, all of which are Latin liturgical pieces. The more prolific Italian Giovanni Luigi da Palestrina (1525-1594) composed in secular and sacred genres. Much more versatile were the Englishman William Byrd (1540-1623) and the Franco-Fleming Orlande de Lassus (1532?-1594). Our course examines Renaissance lingua franca common to these composers and individual stylistic fingerprints that distinguish them. We examine the cultural, social, liturgical, professional, and national contexts within which each composer worked.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Michael Noone

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

MUSA 3265 Claudio Monteverdi Fall 3
Course Description

Standing at the dawn of the Baroque, Claudio Monteverdi (1567-1643) composed in an astonishing variety of styles in all of the important genres of both the High Renaissance and the early Baroque. Famously dubbed the "creator of modern music" (Leo Schrade), Monteverdi was also a master of the language and forms that he inherited from the past. Monteverdi transformed musical language and he created enduring masterpieces operas, liturgical works, madrigals, etc. that are as alive and fresh to us today as they were when they first performed. The course concentrates on intensive study of a representative sampling of Monteverdi's compositions.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Michael Noone

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Composer Course.

MUSA 3270 Beethoven Spring 3
Course Description

An introduction to Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827), tracing his intellectual development within the culture and society of the Rhenish Enlightenment, his musical enrichment of the High Classicism of Mozart and Haydn (among others), and the heroic style of his best known works to his feelings and expressions of musical and social isolation in his last years, and his problematic identity with the burgeoning romantic movement in Germany. Emphasis will be on the music itself, concentrating on compositions from three genres: piano sonata, string quartet, and symphony. Also covered will be the concerto, his opera Fidelio, and the Missa Solemnis.


Instructor(s): Jeremiah W. McGrann

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Composer course

MUSA 3275 Johannes Brahms Fall 3
Course Description

A second Beethoven, the last Romantic, a hidden source of Modernism--all these labels have been attached to Johannes Brahms (1833-1897). This course will look at the music of Brahms in light of various issues that defined the latter half of the nineteenth-century and that continue to influence the way we listen to his music today. We will consider ideas such as historicism, nationalism, and "conservative" versus "progressive" approaches to musical traditions. We will sample works in almost all of the genres for which Brahms wrote: symphonies, concertos, piano and chamber music, solo and choral songs.


Instructor(s): Sandra Hebert and The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Composer course.

MUSA 3276 Chopin Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course will look in depth at the works of this early-mid 19th century Polish/French composer including chamber music, concertos, and songs in addition to well-known and lesser-known solo and duo piano pieces. In order to create a context, the course will begin by looking at important pianistic and non-pianistic influences on Chopin's music, including Bach, Mozart, Field, and Italian bel canto opera among others, as well as contemporary musicians such as Schumann and Liszt. At the end of the semester, some time will be spent briefly exploring the influence Chopin had on subsequent composers in the latter part of the 19th century and into the 20th century.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Sandra Hebert

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

MUSA 3280 Modernist Movements Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores various meetings of music and dance on the twentieth- and twenty-first-century concert stage. In exploring formal, historical, and critical aspects of these meetings, we will learn how to persuasively describe and discuss choreomusicality, or the interaction between dance and music. We will explore the work of Isadora Duncan, the Ballets Russes, Igor Stravinsky, Vaslav Nijinsky, Bronislava Nijinska, George Balanchine, Martha Graham, Aaron Copland, Merce Cunningham, John Cage, Alvin Ailey, Judson Dance Theater, William Forsythe, Mark Morris, and others. In addition to assigned reading, weekly written responses, and a final paper, we will view a considerable amount of video, attend a live performance, and possibly dance a bit ourselves.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Daniel M. Callahn

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

MUSA 3300 Musical Identities Fall 3
Course Description

What is your musical identity? In this course we will explore how musical styles signal identity to composer, performers and audiences. Case studies from diverse cultures, historical periods, and genres are grouped into topics, such as: music and place; music and gender; music and ethnicity. The concepts of subculture, nation, and race will be examined as they are expressed in music. Extensive consideration will be given to contemporary hybrid identities. Topics vary.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: No previous study of music is necessary.
Cross Cutural Course for Music majors.

MUSA 3330 Contemporary Jazz Scenes Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines style and sociality across a number of jazz scenes throughout the world. Though indelibly associated with the US and with African American culture, jazz has become a music practiced internationally, demonstrating profound local meanings for networks of musicians from Tokyo to Kolkata, from Sydney to Stockholm. This course particularizes the experience of jazz music and jazz musicians in scenes around the globe by studying local music-making from a stylistic and ethnographic perspective. It also considers theories and models for the examination of a music scene from sociological, geographic, and musical perspectives.


Instructor(s): Donald James

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

MUSA 3340 The Ballad Tradition Spring 3
Course Description

This course surveys the English-language ballad traditions of England, Wales, Scottland, Ireland, North America, and Australia. Beginning with the medieval Continental roots of the form, we will consider how the ballad became a popular medium for news, politics, protest, and memorialization. Case studies include Child Ballads, Jacobite songs, emigration and famine songs, Union songs, the Folk Revival, and Celtic Rock.


Instructor(s): Ann Morrison Spinney

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL2184

Comments: No musical experience is assumed.
Open to M.A. students for credit.
Fulfills the pre-1900 requirement for English majors
Fulfills study abroad prerequisite in Ireland

MUSA 3342 Music & Ecstasy Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the many different contexts where music is used to attain an altered state of consciousness. Throughout the world, music is actively used to drastically alter the emotions, perceptions and actions of listeners in order to transport them into another state of being. This class deals with music's relationship with specific practices of mysticism, shamanism, and magic; it also explores the specific musical structures associated with altered states of consciousness and analyzes general questions of music versus other factors in achieving an altered state of consciousness.


Instructor(s): Ann Lucas

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Cross-cultural course

MUSA 3350 The Beatles: From "Yesterday" to "Tomorrow Never Knows" Spring 3
Course Description

Everyone loves the Beatles. In this class, we explore why that is the case. We will chart the rapidly changing idiom of popular music in the 1960s and outline its interaction with various social, political and cultural movements, such as "Beatlemania" and psychedelia. The primary source material for this class is the established canon of Beatles songs, albums and films, which we will supplement with secondary articles, reviews and interviews. This course will challenge you to listen critically to, and think deeply about, one of the most influential bands in the twentieth century.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Alexander Ludwig

Prerequisites: Restricted to Music Majors and Minors only.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Restricted to Music Majors and Minors only.

MUSA 4600 Senior Recital Preparation Spring 3
Course Description

Restricted for music majors. A course preparing for a 40-minute concert with research paper required.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

MUSA 4900 Readings and Research Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Michael Noone, Jeremiah W. McGrann, Thomas Oboe Lee, Sandra Hebert and Ralf Gawlick

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

MUSA 4921 Advanced Independent Research Fall/Spring 6
Course Description


Instructor(s): Ann Lucas and Jeremiah McGrann

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

MUSA 4941 Senior Seminar Fall 4
Course Description

For music majors in their senior year (exception only by special permission). Through supervised reading, research, writing, discussion, and performance, this seminar will help majors develop a framework for synthesizing their various courses into a coherent whole, with special emphasis in the area of strongest interest (theory, composition, history, cross-cultural studies, or performance). It will also help prepare students for examinations in listening repertoire and ear-training (see major requirements).


Instructor(s): Michael Noone

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

MUSA 4961 Honors Thesis Preparation Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: