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Italian Courses (ITAL) College of Arts and Sciences


Subject Area Course # Course Title Semester Credit Hours Expand
ITAL 1003 Elementary Italian I Fall 3
Course Description

The purpose of this course is to introduce the students to Italian language and culture. In the first semester students will learn the Italian sound system and the rudiments of vocabulary and grammar necessary for basic communication. While memorization and mechanical practice are required, the greater part of class time will be dedicated to practicing acquired knowledge in a conversational and contextualized atmosphere.


Instructor(s): Brian O'Connor (Coordinator) and The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian
This course is for those who have not studied Italian previously.
Students with prior Italian experience admitted only by placement test.

ITAL 1004 Elementary Italian II Spring 3
Course Description

This course is a continuation of ITAL1003 and further develops the goals of the first semester. Special attention is given this to the production of more complex speech, the expression of personal opinion, and a deeper knowledge of contemporary Italian culture. More formal writing exercises and reading of authentic texts aid students in reinforcing language skills. A group final project at the end of the course attempts to bring together the themes and experiences from previous study.


Instructor(s): Brian O'Connor (Coordinator) and The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian
Admitted by placement test, consent of instructor, or completion of ITAL1003

ITAL 1021 Elementary Italian Practicum I Fall 1
Course Description

This intensive, 50 minute supplementary course gives "real beginners" the extra conversation, listening, and reading practice they need to maintain the pace of Elementary Italian. All concepts presented in this course review those covered in ITAL1003.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ITAL 1022 Elementary Italian Practicum II Spring 1
Course Description

This intensive, 50 minute supplementary course gives gives students extra conversation, listening, and reading practice they need to maintain the pace of Elementary Italian. All concepts presented in this course review those covered in ITAL1022.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ITAL 1043 Intensive Elementary Italian Spring 6
Course Description

The aim of this total immersion, six-credit course is to provide students with an opportunity to study Italian language and culture in an intensive oral environment. While reading and writing are important elements of the learning process, the main focus will be on oral expression in everyday situations. Successful completion of this course will qualify students for ITAL1113 Intermediate Italian I the following fall or participation in the Parma summer language program or the fall semester at Parma.


Instructor(s): Brian O'Connor and The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian
This course is for beginners
Students with prior Italian experience admitted only by placement test
Meets five times per week

ITAL 1111 Intermediate Italian Practicum I Fall 1
Course Description

This intensive, 50 minute supplementary course gives gives students extra conversation, listening, and reading practice they need to maintain the pace of Intermediate Italian. All concepts presented in this course review those covered in ITAL1113.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ITAL 1112 Intermediate Italian Practicum II Spring 1
Course Description

This intensive, 50 minute supplementary course gives gives students extra conversation, listening, and reading practice they need to maintain the pace of Intermediate Italian. All concepts presented in this course review those covered in ITAL1114.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ITAL 1113 Intermediate Italian I Fall 3
Course Description

The prime objective of the course is to improve reading and writing skills, to continue building oral proficiency, and to provide a lively and current cultural background of contemporary Italy. A review of the elements of language will be supplemented by the reading of selected texts, oral practice, and individual research, all presented within the context of contemporary Italian society and classic Italian culture. Students will develop their ability to satisfy basic survival needs and to engage in conversation on a fairly complex level.


Instructor(s): Brian O'Connor (Coordinator) and The Department

Prerequisites: Admitted by placement test, consent of instructor, or completion of ITAL1004

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian

ITAL 1114 Intermediate Italian II Spring 3
Course Description

The prime objective of the course is to improve reading and writing skills, to continue building oral proficiency, and to provide a lively and current cultural background of contemporary Italy. A review of the elements of language will be supplemented by the reading of selected texts, oral practice, and individual research, all presented within the context of contemporary Italian society and classic Italian culture. Students will develop their ability to satisfy basic survival needs and to engage in conversation on a fairly complex level.


Instructor(s): Brian O'Connor (Coordinator) and The Department

Prerequisites: Admitted by placement test, consent of instructor, or completion of ITAL1113

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian
Elective for the Italian minor when taken as first course in language sequence. Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency core requirement.

ITAL 1125 Italy: Intensive Intermediate Italian Fall 6
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ITAL 1151 Italianissimo: Intermediate Italian II, Track 2 Spring 3
Course Description

This course is designed for motivated students interested in continuing the study of Italian language, culture, and literature beyond the intermediate level, and especially for those students who intend to major or minor in Italian or study at Parma. The development of oral proficiency is emphasized, but there is a new focus on reading and writing in accurate Italian. Readings include current newspaper and magazine articles and literary texts, including short stories, poems, and two short novels. Particular attention will be given to the development of consistency in grammatical accuracy, and to creating more complex and expressive speech.


Instructor(s): Brian O'Connor

Prerequisites: Admission by placement test, consent of instructor, or completion of ITAL1113.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian
Elective for Italian minor when taken as first course in language sequence
Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency core requirement.

ITAL 2213 Italian Conversation, Composition, and Reading I Fall 3
Course Description

The course topic, "Italian through Fiction and Films", allows development of oral and written language skills. Centered on the analysis of short stories and films related to contemporary Italian society, attention will be paid to analytical and lexical enrichment. Other sources (articles from the Italian Press, audio-visual programs, and the Internet) will provide additional avenues of interpretation.


Instructor(s): Mattia Acetoso

Prerequisites: Admitted by placement exam, consent of instructor, or completion of ITAL1114 or ITAL1151.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian
Elective for major and minor in Italian. Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency core requirement.

ITAL 2214 Italian Conversation, Composition, and Reading II Spring 3
Course Description

In this course students will continue to strengthen and expand their language skills through oral and written practice. The analysis of a contemporary novel and its cinematographic adaptation will be the basis for class discussion, written assignments, and oral presentations. Both ITAL2213 and ITAL2214 are strongly recommended for students who intend to use Italian to enrich their study experiences at home and abroad.


Instructor(s): Mattia Acetoso

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor or completion of ITAL2214.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted In Italian
Elective for Italian major or minor. Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency core requirement.

ITAL 3314 Literature and Business Fall 3
Course Description

The course looks at businessmen as they are portrayed in short stories, plays, a novel, and films from the Middle Ages to the present. It takes as a premise the revolutionary nature of the businessman, and literature will serve as the microcosm to explore society's evolving ideas about business. Questions include the role of businessmen in urban development, the arts and philanthropy, business and meritocracy, reputation and the need for privacy/secrecy, price vs. value, the ambivalent symbolism of currency, the commodification of the human body ature, the anxiety of poverty and of wealth, and inherited vs. earned money.


Instructor(s): Laurie Shepard

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL2206

Comments: Conducted in English
Elective for Italian major and minor.

ITAL 3323 Navigare l'Italia Spring 3
Course Description

A comprehensive course which will put you in touch with contemporary Italy through reading different texts (short stories, poems, articles), viewing films and listening to music from various regions. Emphasis will be on oral skills, especially during class work, but writing will be part of the evaluation. Students will be expected to actively participate in the process of learning by contributing to seminar-style class discussions.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor or completion of ITAL1114

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian.
Elective for Italian major or minor. Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency core requirement.

ITAL 3370 History, Literature, and Art of Early Modern Rome Fall 3
Course Description

This course focuses on early modern Rome from the interdisciplinary perspectives of history, art, architecture, and literature. Jointly taught by professors from the history, fine arts, and Romance Languages departments, the course will consider the connections between society and culture in the Renaissance and the Baroque. Rome will be discussed as an urban environment, as the artistic capital of Europe, and as a center of Italian culture. The city will also be explored as the world center of Roman Catholicism, with attention to the importance of historical, literary, and artistic developments for the shaping of culture and piety.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Franco Mormando, Sarah Ross and Stephanie Leone

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in English
Not open to students who have already taken HS 232
Elective for Italian major and minor

ITAL 3373 Love, Sexuality, and Gender Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores the modern conception of "romantic love" by examining its birth and development in prominent literary works (by men and women) of the Middle Ages and Renaissance. We will also investigate allied notions of sexuality, gender, and marriage, in both a heterosexual and same-sex ("homosexual") context. For contrast and comparison, the course begins with a study of the Bible and ancient Greek and Roman texts and ends with a look at the depiction of our themes in contemporary cinema as well as a discussion of the current debate in American society over the nature and purpose of marriage.


Instructor(s): Franco Mormando

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted entirely in English. Elective for Italian major and minor.

ITAL 3386 Critical Reading and Writing Fall 3
Course Description

Through in-depth readings of short narrative texts by modern and contemporary Italian writers, this course aims to examine some of the constitutive elements that define literary works, such as events, characters, plot, time and space. Practice includes textual analysis, discussion of selected critical sources and guided short essay writing.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Cecilia Mattii

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted In Italian

ITAL 3389 Italian for Business and Travel Fall 3
Course Description

Italy is one of the leading economic powers of Europe and most popular tourist destinations. This course is designed to help those contemplating a visit to Italy or a career involving the Italian business world to develop the necessary skills (reading, writing, and oral communication) and cultural background. The course will also be useful to those who simply seek to improve their command of Italian and acquaint themselves better with the culture of contemporary Italy, especially the practicalities of daily life: traveling by train or air, using banks, making hotel reservations, reading newspapers, etc.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Franco Mormando

Prerequisites: ITAL2214 or equivalent, or by permission of instructor.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian
Elective for Italian major or minor. Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency core requirement.

ITAL 3390 From Reader to Author Spring 3
Course Description

In this course, designed as a bridge between ITAL2213, ITAL2214 and the 5000-level courses, we will read a small number of stories by Italian contemporary authors. Our purpose is twofold: to examine and analyze the theme, structure, and syntax and style of the text, and to subsequently have the students write, through guided activities, original short stories modeled on the stories they have studied. In brief, the course aims at strengthening Italian writing and communication skills.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: ITAL2213 AND ITAL2214 or by permission of the instructor.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian.
Strongly recommended for Italian majors and minors.
May be taken concurrently with 5000-level courses.
Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency core requirement.

ITAL 5501 Dante:Inferno Fall 3
Course Description

A close encounter with Inferno, the class will focus on Dante's moral universe, as well as the way in which Dante uses poetry to paint that universe and to persuade the reader that the voyage through Inferno is actually taking place. The class will also examine Inferno as a staging ground for the other two books of the Divina Commedia. This undergraduate seminar will be conducted in Italian.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Laurie Shepard

Prerequisites: Open to students who have completed CCR or equivalent

Cross listed with:

Comments: Elective for Italian major or minor

ITAL 5507 Impossible Love in Italian Literature Fall 3
Course Description

Through the analysis of "impossible love" in selected works by Foscolo, Leopardi, Verga, D'Annunzio, Tozzi, and Gozzano, the cultural and intellectual forces underlying the protagonists' drama will be examined. We will also examine literary genres and the modes of expression chosen by the authors in order to understand better their originality and the literary trends within which they worked. The shifting dynamic of adverse forces in love relationships as presented in the texts analyzed in class will also be discussed in comparison to selected video-stories situated in diverse cultural periods.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Rena A. Lamparska

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian
Required for Major. Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency core requirement.

ITAL 5511 Manzoni's I Promessi Sposi Spring 3
Course Description

A critical reading of Alessandro Manzoni's nineteenth-century novel, I Promessi Sposi, the fascinating story of simple but star-crossed peasant lovers seen against the turbulent historical backdrop of the Spanish domination of seventeenth-century Lombardy. Universally acclaimed as the greatest and most important novel of Italian literature as well as one of the foundational texts of post-unification Italian national identity, the novel will be analyzed from a multiplicity of interdisciplinary perspectives (literary, political, theological, psychological, etc.). Accompanying our reading of the text will be a study of the two film versions of the novel produced in the 1940's and 1960's.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Franco Mormando

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian. Elective for Italian major or minor. Admitted by consent of instructor or completion of ITAL2214 (CCR II)

ITAL 5521 Michelangelo and His World Spring 3
Course Description

An interdisciplinary exploration of the life and works of Michelangelo Buonarroti, sculptor, painter, architect and poet, one of the greatest artistic geniuses of Western civilization. Against the historical backdrop of the High Renaissance in Italy, we will study his works, both artistic and literary, examining their roots in the political, philosophical, religious, artistic, and cultural debates of his age as well as in his personal biography.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Benjamin Braude and Franco Mormando

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with: HIST4232

Comments:

ITAL 5522 The Most Beautiful Pages of Italian Literature Spring 3
Course Description

In our itinerary through selected texts of Italian literature (from Marino to Calvino) we will be exploring the most compelling and profound thoughts, ideas and feelings. The analysis and the discussion of their significance, of their modes of expression and impact on the reader will be the focus of class meetings.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Rena A. Lamparska

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian.
The course is for undergraduates only.
Fulfills the requirements for Italian major and minor. Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency core requirement.

ITAL 5524 The Mystery of the Mafia in Fiction and Film Spring 3
Course Description

The class, a demystification of the Mafia, examines its Sicilian roots, history, and the contest between the Italian state and the Cosa Nostra in the end of the twentieth century. The social context and costs of omertà are explored in several novels and films.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Laurie Shepard

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian
Elective for Italian major or minor

ITAL 5525 Calvino's Worlds Fall 3
Course Description

An international literary celebrity at the time of his death, Italo Calvino (1923-1985) was one of the most imaginative writers of the twentieth century. A prolific author of best-selling and widely translated novels, short stories, and essays, he delighted audiences world-wide with his entertaining tales of fable and fantasy and whimsical perspective on modern life. In doing so, he redefined the idea of writing and storytelling, both in Italy and internationally. This course surveys the varieties of Calvino's fiction, exploring his narrative style and masterful use of the Italian language.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Mattia Acetoso

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian

ITAL 5526 Dante's "Divine Comedy" in Translation Fall 3
Course Description

An introduction to and critical reading of the "Divine Comedy" (in English translation), one of the world's greatest epic poems, produced by "the chief imagination of Christendom" (Yeats). Dante's journey through Hell, Purgatory, and Paradise will be analyzed at its multiple levels of interpretation: literal and allegorical, theological, philosophical, political, and literary. Compendium of an entire epoch of European civilization, the "Comedy" will also be interrogated for its responses to the fundamental questions of human existence: God, the Cosmos, the Self, Good and Evil, Right and Wrong, Suffering, and Happiness.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Laurie Shepard

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: THEO5559 PHIL5508 ENGL4696

Comments: Conducted in English. Elective for Italian major or minor.

ITAL 5541 The Genius of Machiavelli Spring 3
Course Description

We will read and discuss two of the greatest works by Nicolo Machiavelli, Il Principe and La Mandragola, as well as several other works (La Vita di Castruccio Castracani; Libro VIII of the Istorie Fiorentine), as time permits. Our objective is to define the originality of Machiavelli as a reader, thinker and writer, and to understand the challenge that his ideas posed to traditional political philosophy.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Laurie Shepard

Prerequisites: Open to students who have completed CCR or equivalent

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian
Elective for Italian major or minor

ITAL 5543 Theater Practicum Spring 3
Course Description

Theater has always been a quintessentially Italian genre, from Renaissance comedies to the experimentations of the 1900s. Students will carefully read Carlo Goldoni's La locandiera, one of the most revolutionary and influential plays of 18th century theater. The course is divided in two parts: in the first one students will closely analyze the text in light of its historical, social and literary context. In the second part the whole class will stage the play, and prepare every detail involved in such process: choose costumes, props and setting, direct, and ultimately act.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Mattia Acetoso

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian
Elective for Italian major or minor

ITAL 5550 In Search of the Meaning of Life Fall 3
Course Description

The course focuses on choices of identity and the meaning of life in existential, social, and religious situations. We will start with a discussion on the origin and essence of values as presented in selected writings. The nature of human passions and behavior will be explored in texts by modern Italian novelists and poets. Questions include a protagonist's alienation in modern society, the search for ones place in family and society, sacrifice as the ultimate confirmation and defense of one's values, apathy as a response to life's problems, and determination in the pursuit of a goal.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Rena A. Lamparska

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian

ITAL 5560 The Image of Women in Italian Drama Spring 3
Course Description

We will examine various images of women as represented in modern and contemporary Italian plays by male and female authors, and we will discuss these representations in relation to the place and role of woman in the social landscape and intellectual life of the times. Special attention will be brought to the questions of freedom, love, and women's positions in the family and in the society. Topics include the question of dramatic form and means of dramatizing individual identity through stylistic strategies. In some cases discussion will be complemented with video.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Rena A. Lamparska

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian

ITAL 5566 Twilight Zones: Italian Fantastic Short-Stories Fall 3
Course Description

Literature of the Fantastic has always challenged our perception of reality. Many Italian writers focused on fantastic themes and wrote unique stories about the uncanny, the unfamiliar and the astonishing in everyday life or described marvelous worlds and alternate universes. This course explores the short stories of major Italian writersfrom Romanticism to the New Millenniumwho engaged in this genre and mode of narration. Their short stories will show an unedited side of Italian literature, and allow students to more fully understand Italys history, society and culture.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Mattia Acetoso

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian

ITAL 5568 New Directors, New Directions: 21st Century Italian Cinema Spring 3
Course Description

Italian cinema of the twentieth century-from the innovations of postwar Neorealism, to the visionary experimentation of Fellini and Antonioni-influenced generations of filmmakers worldwide. Now in the new millennium, Italian cinema has blossomed once again, with revolutionary new directors participating in a cinemagraphic renaissance. This course explores the accomplishments of the most significant directors of the last twenty years, analyzing their films not only as works of literary and visual art but as also portraits of contemporary Italian society and culture.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Mattia Acetoso

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ITAL 5569 Twentieth-Century Italy in Fiction and Film Spring 3
Course Description

The class presents a panorama of twentieth-century Italy. Focusing on four distinct historical periods, we will explore the ways in which some of Italy's greatest authors and film directors interpret specific historical events and, more generally, the spirit of the times. The first objective of the class is to introduce the history of the Italian people in the twentieth century. The second is to explore the interpretive functions of literature and film. The final objective is to improve the Italian-language competency of all students.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Laurie Shepard

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian
Elective for the Italian major or minor

ITAL 5570 Immigrant Voices in Contemporary Italy Fall 3
Course Description

The class will examine the new reality of Italy as a nation with a significant population of immigrants. Focusing on the evolving meaning cultural identity in Italy today, we will read short works by four immigrant Italian writers of Italian: Amara Lakhous, originally from Algeria; Laila Wadia, from India; Gabriella Ghermandi, from Ethiopia; and Igiaba Scego, from Madagascar. The class is also designed to improve the oral and written linguistic competency of all students.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Laurie Shepard

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian
This course serves as an elective for the Italian major or minor. Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency core requirement.

ITAL 5571 Masters of Italian Cinema Spring 3
Course Description

Italian cinema left an everlasting footprint on Hollywood and cinema worldwide. Generations of filmmakers have recognized their debt towards Italian directors such as Roberto Rossellini, Federico Fellini, Michelangelo Antonioni, and many more. This course follows the footsteps of these masters of Italian cinema. From postwar cinema to today's experimentations, Italian directors have recorded and influenced the cultural evolution of a country that emerged from postwar poverty and became a global symbol of elegance, history and art.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Mattia Acetoso

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian

ITAL 5583 Murder, They Wrote: Italian Detective Fiction Spring 3
Course Description

Detective novels have always nourished our imagination with compelling tales of crime and mystery. This course explores the most relevant examples of Italian contemporary detective fiction. Students will be discussing novels, short stories, as well films and graphic novels. This course will offer a unique opportunity to investigate and understand crucial aspects of Italy’s history, society and culture.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Mattia Acetoso

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian

ITAL 8805 La Novella Premoderna: Boccaccio, Sercambi, Sermini, Masuccio e Bandello Fall 3
Course Description

The seminar focuses on Boccaccio's Decameron, a fourteenth-century masterpiece. With this collection of tales Boccaccio sought to renew and elevate the bourgeoisie, then emerging as the dominant class in Florence, and in the final analysis the Decameron teaches us the difficult lessons of personal virtue in troubled times. The invention of the novella genre, the author's art of narration, and the author's device of a frame to structure the interpretation of his tales will be among the topics discussed.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Laurie Shepard

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian.

ITAL 8806 Il Romanzo e la Saggistica di Italo Calvino Spring 3
Course Description

A study of Calvino's major works from the perspective that "there are things that only literature can give us, by means specific to it." Issues as "certain values, qualities, or peculiarities of literature," "Written and Unwritten World," la metaletteratura nel racconto, l'arte combinatoria, la logica della potenzialit will be discussed in-depth.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Rena A. Lamparska

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian
Undergraduates may enroll with permission of the instructor

ITAL 8807 Tasso and His World Spring 3
Course Description

The course explores Tasso's Gerusalemme liberata in the context of late sixteenth-century Italian society, a period when the Church sought to extend its moral authority. Turks threatened invasion, Protestantism was severing nations from the Church's body, and the known world was expanding rapidly. Tasso portrays Christian soldiers gradually becoming aware of their egocentric lust for sex and glory, then repenting to find their way back to a society governed by obedience and Truth. Readings will include Tasso's writings on aesthetics, excerpts from his Gerusalemme conquistata, and works on politics, religion, and exploration.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Laurie Shepard

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian
Undergraduates may enroll with permission of the instructor

ITAL 8808 Challenging Authority: Ariosto, Machiavelli and Aretino Spring 3
Course Description

The course examines the emergence of literature that directly confronts political, religious and textual authority in the early decades of the sixteenth century in Italy, when political and religious leadership was in crisis, and the imperative of humanism to question literary and philosophical authority was well established. Works of different genres by Ariosto, Machiavelli and Aretino will be explored with two questions in mind: What are the limits to the freedom of these authors to challenge authority? Do challenges to authority produce innovative ideas, or are they merely satirical attacks that did not promote new thinking?


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Laurie Shepard

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian
Open to undergraduates with permission of instructor

ITAL 8810 Lyric Poetry from Giacomo da Lentini to Petrarca Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar will survey Italian lyric poetry, the most dynamic and prestigious genre of the medieval period in which the literary language was being formulated. The course will cover the development of lyric poetry from the thirteenth-century Scuola Siciliana to the sixteenth-century petrarchisti, but the principal focus of the course is the Canzoniere of Francesco Petrarca. Discussions will include orality and manuscript/print transmission of poetry, the complex relation of the individual poet to the tradition, the theory of imitation, and literary Neoplatonism.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Laurie Shepard

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian

ITAL 8812 Boccaccio and Petrarca Fall 3
Course Description

Tradition has designated Petrarch's Rerum vulgarium fragmenta or Canzoniere and Boccaccio's Decameron as opposite poles of fourteenth-century Italian literary innovation. Nevertheless, the friendship between the two men was profound and productive, and has been called the most important in the history of Italian literature. The class will explore the friendship, preserved in letters, and the complex and moral concerns shared by the two authors as they are expressed in the two great masterpieces.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Laurie A. Shepard

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian
Elective for Italian major or minor
Open to undergraduates with permission of instructor.

ITAL 8813 Dante's "Divina Commedia" Fall 3
Course Description

A reading of the Divina Commedia in its entirety, examined at its multiple levels of meaning, literal and allegorical, theological, political, psychological, and artistic. The course will also introduce the student to the most current schools of interpretation and analytical methodologies, as well as interrogate the poem for its responses to the fundamental questions of human existence: God, the Cosmos, the Self, Good and Evil, Right and Wrong, Love and Hate, Suffering and Happiness.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Franco Mormando

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian.

ITAL 8820 Literary Society in Trieste at the Time of Svevo and Joyce Fall 3
Course Description

The mutual relationships (of selection/exclusion or of acceptance/respect) among national cultures, their specificities and identities, and, on the other hand, the "worldwide" character of literature assume today a particular value within the discussions on the identity and unity of European culture. The state of culture and literary society in the Trieste of Svevo and Joyce, a multi-ethnic and multi-cultural city, offers an eloquent example of this thematic. In this seminar, it will be discussed on the basis of Svevo's works with particular attention to his relationship with Joyce.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Rena Lamparska

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian.

ITAL 8821 I Ritratti Femminili Nella Letteratura Italiana Fall 3
Course Description

We will examine portrayals of women in modern and contemporary Italian literature from Verga to Morazzoni, and discuss these representations in relation to the place and role of woman in the changing social landscape and intellectual life of the times. Attention will be brought to the question of freedom, love, and women's positions in the family and society. We will also focus on the literary convention authors write within and against; the stylistic strategies of dramatizing the protagonists individual identities, and whether we can we distinguish between points of view in depiction of women protagonists by male and female authors.


Instructor(s): Rena A. Lamparska

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian.

ITAL 8822 Boccaccio and the Comedy of Renaissance Italy Fall 3
Course Description

Students will learn cutting edge technology and contribute to an interactive website (Commedia! Italian Renaissance Comedy). The first part of the course focuses on the Decameron by Giovanni Boccaccio, the model for Italian prose and source of the witty dialogue of Renaissance comedies. Students will then study comedies written and produced in Siena and Florence in the first half of the sixteenth century. After reading the comedies, a common list of theatergrams, or comic stock pieces, will be developed. Students will be invited to transcribe a comedy and encode the theatergrams for their final project. Training will be provided.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Laurie Shepard

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ITAL 8825 Italian Novel of the Novecento Spring 3
Course Description

The novel is arguably the primary literary form of the Twentieth Century. Italy offered a unique path of experimentation and exploration in this genre, with the psychoanalytical works of Italo Svevo, the magic realism of Dino Buzzati, and the historical works of Elsa Morante, up to the revolution of experimental form led by Italo Calvino. This course analyzes the evolution of the Italian novel, from the late 1900s to the end of the last century, offering a new understanding of this genre through a comparative, interdisciplinary and trans-historical perspective.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Mattia Acetoso

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian
Open to undergraduates with permission of instructor

ITAL 8826 Fifteenth-Century Florence: The Humanists Spring 3
Course Description

The seminar will examine the arc of fifteenth-century Florentine Humanism, from its expansive opening with Salutati and Bruni, to its introverted close with the lessons of Savonarola. Readings will also include texts by Bracciolini, Alberti, Landino, Ficino, Lorenzo, Valla, della Mirandola, and Poliziano. Humanism transformed the way in which texts are read and our relationship with the past, and it became the impetus for renewal in almost every field of human endeavor. We will explore Humanism's impact, and ask how such intellectual creativity was nurtured in a century of civil strife, periodic famine and plague, warfare and ecclesiastical turmoil.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Laurie Shepard

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian

ITAL 8828 20th Century Italian Poetry Fall 3
Course Description

In the first half of the last century Italy produced extraordinary poets of worldwide reputation who confronted the fundamental intellectual and psychological challenges of their age. They experimented with a variety of styles and themes, exploring crucial literary, philosophical, and theological issues. This course investigates and analyzes in depth the works of these poets: Eugenio Montale, Giuseppe Ungaretti, Umberto Saba, and Salvatore Quasimodo. Their poems and critical writings will be read in light of both twentieth-century theoretical debates and contemporary Italian life.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Mattia Acetoso

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian

ITAL 8830 Bernini and the Baroque Fall 3
Course Description

An interdisciplinary study of the art, literature and culture of the Baroque age (ca. 1600-1680), focusing on its epicenter, the city of Rome, and on the one artist who more than any other defined and disseminated that style, Gian Lorenzo Bernni. Against the backdrop of the political and institutional crises and social-religious metamorphoses of the period, we will explore the fertile and intimate inter-relationship between the arts (sculpture, architecture, theater, music) and the other forms of cultural expression.


Instructor(s): Franco Mormando

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Open to both graduate and undergraduate students

ITAL 8832 Heroism, Tragedy and Romance in Romantic Italy Spring 3
Course Description

In his letter On Romanticism, the Italian novelist Alessandro Manzoni described Italian Romanticism as moderate, nurtured by the Enlightenment and Neo-Classical order. This course probes Manzoni's claim, exploring key themes and aesthetic ideas of Italian Romanticism such as heroism, tragedy and romance, in the passage from the 18th to the 19th century. This course will discuss the work of several authors, such as Vittorio Alfieri, Ugo Foscolo, Alessandro Manzoni and others, and include different art forms, such as poetry and novels, as well as dramas and operas.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Mattia Acetoso

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian

ITAL 8842 Giacomo Leopardi Spring 3
Course Description

Leopardi and the literary trends of his epoch. His poetics, his Canti, Operette morali, Pensieri, and Zibaldone.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Rena A. Lamparska

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian

ITAL 8843 Courting Power: Castiglione and Machiavelli Spring 3
Course Description

Centuries before Covey's 1989 classic, The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People, Castiglione's Il libro del Cortegiano became an international and perennial best seller. Castiglione offers a prolonged and often poignant conversation about taste, manners, masculinity and femininity, influence, and power in a court. It inspired a raft of guides to good conduct for people of all classes, both male and female. The meaning and success of such texts, past and present, will be explored as a reflection of the psyche of the early-modern period and today.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Laurie Shepard

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian.

ITAL 8846 To the Moon: A Portrait of Italian Romanticism Fall 3
Course Description

The Romantic revolution in the first half of the nineteenth century had a lasting influence on art, literature, thought and society. Italy developed an original, although controversial Romantic movement: it was a fertile season of advanced artistic, philosophical and literary achievement. The Italian Romantics helped to shape the idea of a national identity and developed original works of narrative and poetry. The roots of modern Italian society lie in the accomplishments of the "three crowns" of Italian Romanticism, Ugo Foscolo, Giacomo Leopardi and Alessandro Manzoni. Their works and European-wide legacy will be the focus of our seminar.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Mattii Acetoso

Prerequisites: Open to undergraduates with permission of instructor

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian

ITAL 8850 The Plague in Italy: From Boccaccio to Manzoni Spring 3
Course Description

An interdisciplinary exploration of Italian literature and culture from the fourteenth to nineteenth centuries from the perspective of the bubonic plague, the disastrous medical scourge that struck the peninsula during every generation from the late Middle Ages through the Renaissance and Baroque periods. Literary sources will be supplemented by contemporary scientific treatises, religious tracts, personal diaries, and historical chronicles, as well as by documentation offered by the visual arts.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Franco Mormando

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian.
Undergraduates may enroll with permission of the instructor.

ITAL 8860 The Theater of Pirandello and Ugo Betti Fall 3
Course Description

The course will focus on the theatrical and theoretical works of Luigi Pirandello. The following themes will be analyzed and discussed within the larger European context: the concept of dramatic art, the "uneasiness" (il "disagio") of dramatic writing, the relation between the written word and its theatrical representation, the role of the actor and the audience in drama, and the author-director-actor relation, as well as major "existential" themes and concerns of texts analyzed. Class will include film viewing of the plays discussed in class and the history of modern ideas on the theatre (Stanislawski, Craig, Meierchold, Kantor, et al.).


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Rena A. Lamparska

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in Italian