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History Courses (HIST) College of Arts and Sciences


Subject Area Course # Course Title Semester Credit Hours Expand
HIST 1001 Europe in the World I Fall 3
Course Description

The course focuses on Europe and the world from the Black Death through the Haitian Revolution. Topics covered in the course include the Black Death and Renaissance, European expansion across the Atlantic and Indian Oceans, Europe and the Ottoman Turks, religious reformation and warfare, early capitalism and transatlantic slavery, early modern science and the Enlightenment, and the French and Haitian Revolutions.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Followed in spring semester by HIST1002.

HIST 1002 Europe in the World II Spring 3
Course Description

Continuation of HIST1001.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies History Core Requirement

HIST 1003 Discussion Group for HS 001 Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1004 Discussion Group for HS 002 Spring 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1005 Asia in the World I Fall 3
Course Description

This Core course surveys the Asian origins of the modern world, from the rise of the Eurasian empire under the Mongols in the thirteenth century to the global colonial context of the Industrial Revolution in the eighteenth century. We will challenge common geographical (mis)conceptions (e.g., "East" versus "West") in historical narratives/uncover their origins and how they have changed. While emphasizing the global conjunctions in history, this approach highlights Asian experiences of the historical forces that integrated yet also divided the world in changing ways: trade routes, migrations, religions, empires, wars, ideologies, and the constraints of a shared ecological environment.


Instructor(s): Yajun Mo

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Followed in spring semester by HIST1006.

HIST 1006 Asia in the World II Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines Asia in the shaping of the modern world, from competing definitions of empires circa 1800 to the rise of the notion of the twenty-first century as a "Pacific Century." It investigates the definition(s) of Asia as a world region, explores transnational interactions, and emphasizes Asians as historical actors via written, visual, and aural sources. Events are placed in the context of key historical paradigms, including varying definitions of modernity, the rise of the nation-state, the birth of mass politics, new mechanisms of war, the language of self-determination, changing views of gender, shifting types of media/consumption, etc.


Instructor(s): Franziska Seraphim

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1007 Discussion Group for HS 005 Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1008 Discussion Group for HS 006 Spring 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1011 Atlantic Worlds I Fall 3
Course Description

This course surveys the history of the Atlantic world between the arrival of the Black Death in Europe in the mid-fourteenth century and the French Revolution at the end of the eighteenth century. We will pay particular attention to the ways in which the often violent encounters between people in this region of the world produced new social, cultural, and economic forms. Among these were ideas about gender, race, and the relationship between communities and individuals; notions of equality; and the emergence of a global system of trade.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Followed in spring semester by HIST1012.

HIST 1012 Atlantic Worlds II Spring 3
Course Description

This course will focus on the effects of rapid technological and economic development upon European and Atlantic society, politics and ecology. The readings and lectures will explore the dilemmas that industrial civilization created and the various responses to these problems. Our goal is to gain a better understanding of how these forces transformed "traditional" society into our "modern" world.


Instructor(s): Charles Gallagher

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1013 Discussion Group for HIST1011 Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1014 Discussion Group for HIST1012 Spring 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1015 Modern History I: Cultural History of Modern Europe Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the interactions of the persons, ideas, institutions, and movements that have shaped the European experience from the Renaissance through the Reconstruction of Europe after World War II. The special emphasis during the first semester will be on the Renaissance, and the Reformation, the discoveries of explorers and scientists, and the Enlightenment. The second semester will cover the period since the French Revolution.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Followed in spring semester by HIST1016

HIST 1016 Modern History II: Cultural History of Modern Europe Spring 3
Course Description

The continuation of HIST1015.


Instructor(s): Philipp Stelzel

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1017 Discussion Group for HS 015 Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1018 Discussion Group for HS 016 Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1021 Discussion Group for HS 019 Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1022 Discussion Group for HS 020 Spring 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1023 Eurasia in the World I Fall 3
Course Description

Around 1250 Mongol hordes threatened Christian Europe and the Muslim Middle East. In other respects both regions also shared remarkably interactive cultural and political development. In fact by many measures, Islamic societies as a whole were more advanced than Europe. However in the mid-eighteenth century, their paths started to diverge. This course explores the similarities and differences between these two regions. This is the first part of an integrated two-semester sequence covering 1250 to 2010. Each semester can be taken independently of the other, but the entire sequence is intended as one whole. This first half addresses 1250 to 1800.


Instructor(s): Benjamin Braude

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Followed in spring semester by HIST1024

HIST 1024 Eurasia in the World II Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores the political and economic restructuring of Western Europe, Russia, and the Third World under the pressure of the modern population explosion and Industrial Revolution. We will examine the outcome of these developments: the national security state; the age of revolutions (1776-1975); militarism; the new imperialism (1880-1914); Communism; Fascism; the World Wars; capitalism after WW II; the Cold War and subsequent local wars. We will look at the reform then collapse of the Soviet Union. And finally, the breakdown of the bi-polar world of the Cold War and the emergence of the globalized, multi-polar, inter-dependant world of today.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Roberta Manning

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1025 Discussion Group for HS 023 Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1026 Discussion Group for HS 024 Spring 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1031 Europe and the Modern World I Fall 3
Course Description

The purpose of this course is two-fold. First, as an essential part of a liberal education, the course will assist students to develop their skills of critical reading, thinking, speaking, and writing. Second, the course will introduce students to some of the broad outlines of European politics, society, and culture from the Renaissance and Reformation to the outbreak of the French Revolution.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Penelope Ismay

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Followed in spring semester by HIST1032

HIST 1032 Europe and the Modern World II Spring 3
Course Description

The continuation of HIST1031


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robert Savage

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1033 Discussion Group for HIST1031 Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1034 Discussion Group for HIST1032 Spring 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1035 Europe and the Modern World I Fall 3
Course Description

This course surveys European history from the Renaissance through the French Revolution, emphasizing economic, political, and social developments. The course pays particular attention to the development of the global economy and the European state system. We will examine these developments and their impact on the lives of men and women both in Europe and around the globe. As a result, understanding issues of class, gender, and race are crucial to this endeavor. Our goal is to learn about history not simply for the sake of knowledge, but in order to think critically of our past and present.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Sarah Ross

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies History Core requirement Followed in spring semester by HIST1036

HIST 1036 Europe and the Modern World II Spring 3
Course Description

This introductory course surveys the histories of European peoples from the late eighteenth century to the present. We will focus on the development of the modern era and some of its central themes: secularism, individualism, capitalism, nationalism, etc. We will survey the major landmarks in the social, political, and cultural histories of Europe: the Enlightenment, democratic revolutions, industrialization, socialism, the development of national states, imperialism, war, and the construction of post-national Europe.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robert Savage

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies History Core requirement

HIST 1037 Discussion Group for HS 035 Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1038 Discussion Group for HS 036 Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1041 Europe in the World I Fall 3
Course Description

The purpose of this course is two-fold. First, as an essential part of a liberal education, the course will assist students to develop their skills of critical reading, thinking, speaking, and writing. Second, the course will introduce students to some of the broad outlines of European politics, society, and culture from the Renaissance and Reformation to the outbreak of the French Revolution.


Instructor(s): Sarah Ross

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Followed in spring semester by HIST1042. No Discussion Sections for this Core course.

HIST 1042 Europe in the World II Spring 3
Course Description

This course seeks to acquaint students with the ways in which today's Europe (and today's wider world) developed out of the very different world of the late eighteenth century. It centers on what have been called "the plagues and pleasures" of a competitive market economy, tracing the rise of that economy in the nineteenth century as well as the challenges it has endured and the changes it has experienced since then. The course fulfills the second half of the university core requirement in history.


Instructor(s): Thomas Dodman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1043 Discussion Group for HS 041 Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1044 Discussion Group for HS 042 Spring 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1045 The Making of the Modern World Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Followed in spring semester by HIST1046

HIST 1046 Modern History II Spring 3
Course Description

The continuation of HIST1045


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Laura Baines-Walsh

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1047 Discussion Group for HS 045 Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1048 Discussion Group for HS 046 Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1051 Modern History I: The Rise of Europe in the World Fall 3
Course Description

This course provides an introduction to the history of Europe between the Renaissance and the French Revolution. Many of the momentous changes that transformed Europe during this time arose from how European monarchs, philosophers, scientists, artists, clergymen, merchants, farmers, and even peasants responded to their increasing contact with the peoples, products, cultures, and ideas from Asia, the Middle East, Africa, and the New World. Readings, lectures, and discussions will attempt to convey the history of how Europe rose as it engaged with the rest of the world.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Followed in spring semester with HIST1052

HIST 1052 Modern History II: The Rise of Europe in the World Spring 3
Course Description

The continuation of HS 051.


Instructor(s): Peter Weiler

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1053 Discussion Group for HS 051 Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1054 Discussion Group for HS 052 Spring 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1055 Globalization I Fall 3
Course Description

"Globalization" is a fairly new term for the world-wide connections that are diminishing the significance of traditional geographical, cultural, and political boundaries. Global connections have increased rapidly in the past half-century, but global convergence has been a powerful force during the eight centuries covered by this survey. The year-long course examines three kinds of globalization: commercial, cultural, and political. While recognizing the Western world's expansiveness as a key force for globalization, the course gives extensive attention to how people from other continents have also been major agents in initiating, promoting, and resisting globalizing forces.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Followed in the spring semester with HIST1056

HIST 1056 Globalization II Spring 3
Course Description

The continuation of HIST1055


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1057 Discussion Group for HIST1055 Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1058 Discussion Group for HIST1056 Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1059 Islam and Global Modernities I Fall 3
Course Description

This course surveys the making of the modern world from the perspective of Eurasia, from the long-distance links formed by medieval Islam to the global context of the Industrial Revolution of the eighteenth century. Along the way, we will challenge common geographical (mis)conceptions of East versus West in historical narratives and find out where they came from and how they have changed. While emphasizing global conjunctions in history, this course will highlight the interaction of Europe and Asia in the the period before 1880. Topics to be examined include trade, religion, ecological change, migration, and warfare.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Prasannan Parthasarathi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Followed in spring semester by HIST1060.

HIST 1060 Islam and Global Modernities II Spring 3
Course Description

The continuation of HIST1059.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1061 Discussion Group for HS 059 Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1062 Discussion Group for HS 060 Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1063 Latin America in the World I Fall 3
Course Description

This course runs from the 1490s to the 1790s and is a survey of the rise of capitalism and colonialism and their impact (economic, social, and cultural) upon Europeans and Latin Americans (Indigenous, Iberian, and African), including the rise of Portuguese, Spanish, Dutch, and English empires, the Atlantic slave trade, and the revolutions in England, France, and their American colonies.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Sylvia Sellers-Garcia

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Followed in spring semester by HIST1064

HIST 1064 Latin America in the World II Spring 3
Course Description

The course looks at the development of modern Latin America through the examination of revolutions that took place throughout the Americas from the late 18th through the early 21st centuries. The independence of United States from England failed as a model for political, economic, and social change in Latin America. Through an understanding of the Haitian Revolution, the Independence movements of the Spanish Americas, Brazil's break from Portuguese authority, the struggle for Cuban Independence in the late 19th century, the Mexican Revolution, and the socialist revolutions in 20th century Latin America, we will trace the development of modern Latin America.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Deborah Levenson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1065 Discussion Group for HIST1063 Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1066 Discussion Group for HIST1064 Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1067 America and the World I Fall 3
Course Description

This class studies the role of America in the world and America and the world. It examines the creation of modern America through collisions of and among people, ideas, institutions, and cultures from pre-contact to 1800 (first half); and from 1800 to the present (second half). Central themes of the course are race, religion, and power.


Instructor(s): Cynthia Lynn Lyerly

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Followed in the spring semester by HIST1068; Course Open to Freshmen Only

HIST 1068 America and the World II Spring 3
Course Description

The continuation of HIST1067


Instructor(s): Arissa Oh

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Course Open to Freshmen Only

HIST 1069 Discussion Group for HIST1067 Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1078 Globalization II Spring 3
Course Description

Continuation of HIST1077


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1079 Discussion Group/HIST1077 Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Followed in spring semester by HIST1080

HIST 1080 Modern History II: Africa's World II Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1083 Globalization I Fall 3
Course Description

"Globalization" is a fairly new term for the world-wide connections that are diminishing the significance of traditional geographical, cultural, and political boundaries. Global connections have increased rapidly in the past half-century, but global convergence has been a powerful force during the eight centuries covered by this survey. The year-long course examines three kinds of globalization: commercial, cultural, and political. While recognizing the Western world's expansiveness as a key force for globalization, the course gives extensive attention to how people from other continents have also been major agents in initiating, promoting, and resisting globalizing forces.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1084 Globalization II Spring 3
Course Description

The continuation of HIST1083.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1085 Discussion Group/HIST1083 Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1086 Discussion Group/Hs084 Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1089 Discussion Group for HIST1087 Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1090 Discussion Group for HS 056 Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1093 Modern History I Spring 3
Course Description

This course covers several centuries of time (prior to 1800)and traces the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that created the modern world. Depending on the expertise of the instructor, different parts of the world may serve as focal points for examining the complex historical processes behind modern-day transnational relationships, values, and ideas. As part of the Core Curriculum, this course seeks to broaden students' intellectual horizons by exposing them to new places, periods, and perspectives.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course is the first half of the History Core. Offered in the Spring semester of the academic year.

HIST 1094 Modern History II Fall 3
Course Description

This course covers several centuries of time (1800 and after) and traces the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that created the modern world. Depending on the expertise of the instructor, different parts of the world may serve as focal points for examining the complex historical processes behind modern-day transnational relationships, values, and ideas. As part of the Core Curriculum, this course seeks to broaden students' intellectual horizons by exposing them to new places, periods, and perspectives.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course is the second half of the History core. Offered in the Fall semester of the academic year.

HIST 1101 Modern History I Fall 3
Course Description

This course covers several centuries of time and traces the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that created the modern world. Depending on the expertise of the instructor, different parts of the world may serve as focal points for examining the complex historical processes behind modern-day transnational relationships, values, and ideas. As part of the Core Curriculum, this course seeks to broaden students' intellectual horizons by exposing them to new places, periods, and perspectives.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1102 Modern History II Spring 3
Course Description

This course covers several centuries of time and traces the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that created the modern world. Depending on the expertise of the instructor, different parts of the world may serve as focal points for examining the complex historical processes behind modern-day transnational relationships, values, and ideas. As part of the Core Curriculum, this course seeks to broaden students' intellectual horizons by exposing them to new places, periods, and perspectives.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1105 Modern History I Fall 3
Course Description

This course covers several centuries of time and traces the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that created the modern world. Depending on the expertise of the instructor, different parts of the world may serve as focal points for examining the complex historical processes behind modern-day transnational relationships, values, and ideas. As part of the Core Curriculum, this course seeks to broaden students' intellectual horizons by exposing them to new places, periods, and perspectives.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1106 Modern History II Spring 3
Course Description

This course covers several centuries of time and traces the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that created the modern world. Depending on the expertise of the instructor, different parts of the world may serve as focal points for examining the complex historical processes behind modern-day transnational relationships, values, and ideas. As part of the Core Curriculum, this course seeks to broaden students' intellectual horizons by exposing them to new places, periods, and perspectives.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1109 Modern History I Fall 3
Course Description


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1110 Modern History II Spring 3
Course Description

This course covers several centuries of time and traces the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that created the modern world. Depending on the expertise of the instructor, different parts of the world may serve as focal points for examining the complex historical processes behind modern-day transnational relationships, values, and ideas. As part of the Core Curriculum, this course seeks to broaden students' intellectual horizons by exposing them to new places, periods, and perspectives.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1113 The African Diaspora and the World I Fall 3
Course Description

This course is the first of a two-course sequence that explores the African diaspora and its relationship to the world. By African diaspora, we are referring to both the continent and the communities of people of African descent that have formed in the Americas, in Europe, and in Asia as the result of forced and voluntary migrations over the last five hundred years. The course seeks to foster a fuller understanding of the African diaspora’s role in the development of the modern world and the experiences of African-descended peoples from a global perspective.


Instructor(s): Priya Lal

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1114 The African Diaspora and the World II Spring 3
Course Description

The continuation of HIST1113


Instructor(s): Martin Summers

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 1503 Understanding Race, Gender and Violence Fall 6
Course Description

This course explores pressing problems of modern race and gender-based violence across the globe, including domestic violence, youth gangs, police violence, sexual assault, and genocide. Using both historical and sociological perspectives, we will examine the roots of such violence, the ways in which it has been expressed, the meanings attached to it, and its implications for society--particularly for racial/ethnic minorities, women, and LGBT people. The lab for the course will involve students in collaborative work with local anti-violence projects and organizations in the Boston area.


Instructor(s): Marilynn Johnson and Shawn McGuffey

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SOCY1503

Comments: Core Renewal Course:Complex Problems

HIST 1505 Planet in Peril:The History and Future of Human Impacts on the Planet Fall 6
Course Description

The 21st century opened with crises of climate, bio-diversity, and eco-system functioning. In this class we address ecological overshoot from the perspectives of sociology and history, emphasizing the role of inequality, the state, inequality and power. The course combines contemporary analyses with a long historical record of human impact, considering both the familiar and the novel in the realm of ecological challenges. We devote substantial attention not only to causes but to solutions. Topics to be covered include: the Columbian exchange, forests, agriculture, water, climate change, toxics, and population. Solutions include state policy, social movements, individual action and social innovation.


Instructor(s): Juliet Schor and Prasannan Parthasarathi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SOCY1509

Comments: Core Renewal Course:Complex Problems

HIST 1507 Social Problems on the Silver Screen Spring 6
Course Description

Film, as a socio-political witness to a specific historical era, documents the past but also speaks poignantly to the present. In this course we will use film to explore central social problems of the modern era--war, hate, and injustice--putting the movies both in historical and aesthetic contexts. Students will not only understand the artistic and historical import of the films in this class, but also will grapple with the difficult ethical questions these films will raise. This course will also promote visual literacy in an increasingly visual world.


Instructor(s): Cynthia Lyerly and John Michalczyk

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: FILM1501

Comments: Core Renewal Course:Complex Problems

HIST 1509 The History and Politics of Terrorism Spring 6
Course Description

Terrorism dominates the headlines today, but how much do we really know about this form of political violence? Is terrorism a new or an old phenomenon? What are its causes, is it effective, and how do states and societies respond to it? This course will provide students with the tools to engage these complex questions in a sophisticated manner by combining the approaches of history and political science. As citizens and future leaders, students will be challenged to consider the problem of justifying and legitimizing violence as well as the struggle of balancing liberty, security, and community.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Julian Bourg and Peter Krause

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: POLI1043

Comments: Core Renewal Course: Complex Problems

HIST 1511 Science and Technology in American Society Fall 6
Course Description

What roles do science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) play in advanced, knowledge-dependent societies? This course examines our institutional and cultural relationship to innovation: hopes and fears about STEM, views of science and religion, conceptions of democracy’s cultural requirements, the emergence of DIY and geek culture, and more. And it explores ethical questions around STEM, including debates over biotechnology, pharmaceuticals, climate change, and mass extinction. The course gives students the basic technical background to address these questions and an opportunity to imagine a technological application of their own for addressing the complex problems of the twenty-first century.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Andrew Jewett and Christopher Kenaley

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: BIOL1503

Comments: Core Renewal Course: Complex Problems. For freshmen only.

Students must also register for a lab section (HIST1512 or BIOL1502)

HIST 1703 Religious Diversity in a Muslim World Spring 3
Course Description

While Muslim in its self-definition, the Ottoman Empire was a multi-ethnic and multi-religious empire that included all denominations of Christians, and Jews. In this complex multi-religious landscape, the Sultan had to ascertain his Islamic legitimacy while simultaneously claiming papal authority. This course is about the challenging management of the plural religious composition of the Ottoman Empire. Through the life stories of individuals, the course attempts to understand religious identity as a process of complicated negotiations between the state, the clergy, and groups with different ideas of the Divine. Student will discover that “Islamic” pluralism as an enduring condition.


Instructor(s): Dana Sajdi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal Course: Enduring Questions

HIST 1704 The Worlds of Moby-Dick: What Historical Forces Shape a Book's "Greatness"? Spring 3
Course Description

As an Enduring Questions course (linked with ENGL1714), this course explores the historical contexts of Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick. First published in 1851 as the United States hurtled toward civil war, the novel reflects the cultural, political, and economic fault lines of nineteenth-century America. We will read a range of texts that illuminate the histories of New Bedford, Manhattan, antebellum America, and the globalizing economy of the era.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): David Quigley

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal Course: Enduring Questions

HIST 1705 Revolutionary Media: How Books Changed History Spring 3
Course Description

The printing press changed the course of history in Europe and the Americas. This course centers on the book as a vehicle for the production and spread of ideas during the first three centuries of printing (1450–1800). By paying close attention to the material book and its makers—authors, printers, readers, and owners—we will explore some of the era’s great political and cultural upheavals, especially the Reformation, scientific revolution, and revolutions in France, North America, Haiti. Such events appear as more intensely human and local when seen through the lens of printed books, their makers, and their readers.


Instructor(s): Virginia Reinburg

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal Course: Enduring Questions

HIST 1821 Core Topics: Odysseys in the Western and Islamic Traditions Fall 3
Course Description

Bridging the traditional divide between "East" and "West," "Christendom" and "Islamdom" and viewing cultural production as rooted in the human experience, this course focuses upon similar literary and intellectual trajectories across Europe and the Middle East from antiquity to the late eighteenth century. We will examine a series of parallel texts that span the genres of epic, poetry, biography, autobiography and travel narrative. Students will be asked to read these texts in two ways: as an individual perspective (male or female) and as an odyssey - a literary repository of socio-cultural transformation and exchange.


Instructor(s): Dana Sajdi and Sarah Ross

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Students taking this course may earn History Core I credit.

HIST 1831 Core Topics: Colonial Latin America Spring 3
Course Description

Anchored in close readings of primary sources, particularly the first-person accounts of contemporaries, this course considers the history of Latin America from the pre-contact period to roughly 1800. It follows the individual, communal, institutional, and national stories of transformation in order to understand how people in this region became “Latin American.”


Instructor(s): Sylvia Sellers-Garcia

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the requirement for the first half of the History Core, or History Core I.

HIST 2020 Japanese Cultural Icons through Modern Times Fall 3
Course Description

This course surveys Japanese history from 1600 to the present. Each week focuses on a cultural icon that dominated public culture at the time or came to be identified as such later. Examples include the samurai warrior, the courtesan, the "men of high purpose" in the Meiji Revolution, the war general, the modern girl, the emperor, the postwar salaryman, etc. Some are anti-heroes, but all have found a firm place in Japan's cultural history. Lectures place these figures in historical context, while readings examine their cultural meanings through literature, biography, scholarly texts, visual images, and film.


Instructor(s): Franziska Seraphim

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the Non-Western Requirement for the History Major.

HIST 2041 China From Antiquity to the Middle Ages Fall 3
Course Description

This survey offers a basic understanding of the historical transitions of Chinese society, politics, and culture. Among the topics covered are: the historical discourse of the emergence of early China; archaeological representations of early kingdoms and their path toward the formation of empire; territorial expansion versus the growth of a Chinese identity vis-à-vis non-Chinese ethnic groups; Confucianism as political and ethical philosophy; the Medieval Economic Revolution; and maritime China and its early encounters with the West.


Instructor(s): Ling Zhang

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

HIST 2042 All Under Heaven: Religion and Politics in Early China Fall 3
Course Description

The world of early China - from the 8th century BCE through the 3rd century CE - was a place teeming with political upheaval and religious innovation. Great thinkers like Confucius, Mencius, Xunzi, Han Feizi, Laozi, and Zhuangzi labored to prescribe political and ethical visions that could correctly situate human beings and society within a larger world filled with warfare, natural forces, and supernatural beings. In this team-taught course, we will read primary texts in historical context to tease out the debates that combined political, ethical, and cultic patterns that formed the foundations of imperial China.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Ling Zhang, Department of History, David Mozina and The Department of Theology

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the Non-Western Requirement for the History Major

HIST 2043 The First Emperor and the Rise of Imperial China Spring 3
Course Description

This course studies the history of early imperial China, by focusing on the short reign of the First Emperor of the Qin dynasty (221-210 BCE). Students will learn to use a variety of materials (literary, archaeological, artistic, and multimedia) and to think critically about issues including the formation of China’s early imperial dynasties; early China's social, intellectual, and cultural histories; the continuity of China’s bureaucratic system and authoritarian tradition; and China’s relations with the outside world. The course is reading and discussion intensive.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Ling Zhang

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2044 Chinese Environmental History Fall 3
Course Description

Environmental degradation in contemporary China has attracted widespread attention. To understand China's environmental dilemmas, this course investigates key topics in Chinese environmental history over the last two millennia. The course begins with a broad survey of environmental problems in contemporary China. It then explores Chinese ideas and thoughts about the relationship between nature and human beings. It finally journeys back to pre-modern China to look at the historical roots of many environmental problems. The course focuses on several regional cases, and examines how different parts of China developed different relations with their environments and different strategies in dealing with them.


Instructor(s): Ling Zhang

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

HIST 2045 A Material and Cultural History of Food in China Spring 3
Course Description

This course studies historical continuity and changes of dietary traditions and culinary practices in China. We will examine how certain foods gave possibilities to and conditioned China's cultural formation and, in return, how food and ways of eating are culturally, socially, and politically constructed. The course's themes include food and religion in early China, food and Chinese medicine in the early medieval, food exchanges with central Asia, food and urbanization during the "Medieval Economic Revolution," the New World food in late imperial China, regional culinary and cultural diversities, and eating in globalized, modern China.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Ling Zhang

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

HIST 2051 Modern China Fall 3
Course Description

This course will trace the history of China from roughly the year 1800 to the present, including the collapse of the imperial system, the rise of nationalism and new political ideologies, the forging of Chinese identity through war and revolution, and the gradual consolidation of the nation-state. The focus will be on the daily life of ordinary people, and their relationship to the family, the village/city, the environment, and the State; their connections with local, regional, and global economic and cultural networks; and their ethnic identity, religious practice, and gender relations.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

HIST 2101 Islamic Civilization Fall 3
Course Description

This course introduces the varieties of Islamic civilization from the seventh century to the modern world. It explores not only the tenets of faith and practice, and political, social, theological, and economic history, but also considers Muslim cultural and intellectual contributions, including by women, from Indonesia to Morocco and in the Western world. Students will read primary sources, listen to recordings, and view films. The course will emphasize the variety of experiences of Muslims and their contributions to the world.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): David DiPasquale

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ICSP1199 THEO1174

Comments:

HIST 2151 Arts of Islamic Spain Fall 3
Course Description

Seminar introduces students to the rich artistic heritage of the Iberian Peninsula and adjacent regions in northwest Africa when Muslims ruled much of the region. From the eighth century through the fifteenth, Iberian cities, Cordoba, Seville, Granada were centers of brilliant Arab Islamic civilization. Course examines extraordinary architecture and decorative arts including ivory, woodcarving, metalwork, textiles, manuscripts. As Muslims lost control of large areas of the Iberian peninsula, impact of Spanish Islamic art and culture remained strong among the Christians and Muslims elsewhere in Islamic lands. Students participate in class discussions, research a topic,prepare oral presentations,submit a written research paper.


Instructor(s): Jonathan Bloom

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ARTH3315

Comments:

HIST 2152 The Art of the Islamic Book Spring 3
Course Description

Muslims revere the Koran as God's word revealed to the Prophet Muhammad, 7th century CE, consequently writing, books became a major art form in Islamic culture. This seminar traces development of a distinctive tradition, from manuscripts of the Koran, copies of Persian classics some of the finest illustrations and illuminations ever produced to the modern trend for "artists books."


Instructor(s): Sheila Blair

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ARTH4409

Comments:

HIST 2155 Podcasting the Ottomans Spring 3
Course Description

The Ottoman Empire (1299-1922) connected West Asia, North Africa, and parts of Europe, and was of the largest and longest lasting empires in world history. This course deals with aspects of the social and cultural history of, and the latest trends in scholarship on, the Ottomans by using the Ottoman History Podcast as a launching point each week. Each podcast features an interview with a scholar accompanied by a suggested reading list. Students will listen to a selected podcast and do the assigned reading and will keep a “scholarly diary”, which will be submitted in lieu of exams.


Instructor(s): Dana Sajdi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

HIST 2180 Africa Since 1850 Spring 3
Course Description

This course provides an overview of the recent history of sub-Saharan Africa. It begins by examining colonization and the dynamics of colonialism, then traces the development of anti-colonialism and nationalism, and concludes by surveying the trajectories of post-colonial states and societies. Throughout the semester we will think about popular experiences in addition to institutional or elite narratives, ask questions about the changing position of Africa in the world, and contemplate the stakes of conceptualizing African history in the present. Materials will include a range of academic literature, fiction and non-fiction works by African intellectuals, and visual media.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Priya Lal

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the Non-Western Requirement for the History Major

HIST 2200 Life and Times of Martin Luther King, Jr. Fall 4
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2201 Greek History Fall 3
Course Description

A study of the history of Greece from the Bronze Age in the second millennium BCE to the preeminence of Alexander of Macedon in the 4th century. The course will focus on such broad topics as the development of Greek social and political institutions; notions of justice, freedom, and Greek identity; relations among Greek city-states and with foreign nations; imperialism; the golden age of Greek literature; and the rise of Macedonian monarchy. Emphasis will be on the study of the ancient sources: literary, historiographic, archaeological, and epigraphic.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kendra Eshelman

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through 094

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2202 Greeks and Barbarians Spring 3
Course Description

In "Greeks and Barbarians," we'll use a combination of written sources, archaeological evidence, and even visual art to investigate the fascinating history of relationships and conflicts between Greeks, Persians, Egyptians, Carthaginians, and more. We'll read a variety of literature in English, such as the histories of Herodotus and Xenophon, the tragedies of Aeschylus and Euripides, and more, to help us figure out what Greeks really thought about barbarians - and about themselves.


Instructor(s): Mark Thatcher

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: CLAS2207

Comments:

HIST 2205 Roman History Fall 3
Course Description

A study of the social, political and cultural history of ancient Rome from its foundation by Romulus to the rise of Constantine and late antiquity. The course will focus on the development of Roman social and political institutions, the Roman conquest of the Mediterranean, the evolution of Roman identity, and the rise and spread of Christianity. Emphasis will be on the study of the ancient sources: literary, historiographic, archaeological and epigraphic.


Instructor(s): Kendra Eshelman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: CLAS2206

Comments:

HIST 2206 Roman Law and Family Spring 3
Course Description

We will look at the makeup and dynamics of the Roman household through legal sources, which allow investigation of Roman legal arguments and approaches to issues such as marriage, dowry, divorce, disciplining children, adultery, procreation, adoption, and women's rights, and the role of the pater familias. We will also observe similarities and differences between Roman family law and modern American family law. By the end of the course you will have gained a better understanding not only of the Roman family but also of how societies -- including our own -- use law to order and regulate family relationships.


Instructor(s): Kendra Eshleman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: CLAS2236

Comments:

HIST 2207 Roman Spectacles Fall 3
Course Description

Rome overflowed with spectacle: theatrical shows and gladiatorial combats, chariot races and military parades, animal hunts and funeral processions, ritual sacrifices and Christian martyrdoms. In this course we will explore what public spectacles looked like in Rome and why they were ubiquitous sights in the ancient world, paying special attention to: who produced public spectacles and what benefits they derived from them, tangible or otherwise; how spectators responded to and participated in such events; and how spectacular displays reinforced and/or challenged social norms and traditional values, both individually and for society at large. Students will have hands-on opportunities to reconstruct and perform select spectacles in order to reflect on the ancient and modern experience of spectacular public display.


Instructor(s): Christopher Polt

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: CLAS2210

Comments:

HIST 2221 An Outsider's History of the High and Late Middle Ages Fall 3
Course Description

This course is an introduction to the High and Late Middle Ages that focuses on voices of marginal individuals and groups. Women, Jews, dissenters, beggars, (false) prophets, and the possessed—not necessarily mutually exclusive categories—will be subjects of our study. Our central concern will be the shaping of medieval societies through the tension between the peripheral and the traditional.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Zachary Matus

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2226 Tolkien and Medieval History Fall 3
Course Description

This class exams historical themes from the Middle Ages derived from Professor JRR Tolkien's academic and literary works. This is not a course specifically on Tolkien's novels, but rather an exploration of the medieval past that inspired him, and how he adapted that past to a modern audience. Themes will include medieval warfare and Tolkien's experience of WWI, medieval women and gendered history, and the medieval "other" and Tolkien's racism. Students are expected to have read The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings before classes begin.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Christopher Riedel

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2230 Science before the Scientific Revolution Spring 3
Course Description

The advent of modern science in the western world was never a necessary outcome of western intellectual activity. Yet histories of science frequently spin a tale of intellectual progress leading inexorably to scientific thinking (and hint at brighter futures to come). This course examines the technologies and philosophical tools that would give rise to science, but with an eye to their historical contexts and their many non-scientific aspects. We especially will focus on how pre-modern medicine, astronomy, and alchemy relate, or do not, to their modern counterparts.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Zachary Matus

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2240 Irish History: An Introduction Spring 3
Course Description

Covering the broad sweep of Irish history from ancient Celtic times until the present; no prior knowledge is presumed. Topics include: the coming of Christianity; the various invasions by the 'Danes', and the Normans; relations between the various groups in Ireland in the high Middle Ages; the Reformation; the movement from Lordship to Kingship; and the attempts to impose Protestantism on the country. We will examine the role of Cromwell and William III, the Penal Laws, rebellion, Ireland’s position in the United Kingdom, partition, sectarianism and the most recent Troubles ending with the Good Friday Agreement and the Celtic Tiger.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Oliver Rafferty

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2251 The Credit Nexus: The Secret History of the Economy in Britain, 1600s-1900s Spring 3
Course Description

In his "Wealth of Nations," Adam Smith pointed to the shift from barter to cash as the critical turning point from a feudal to a modern economy in Britain. Unlike barter, cash was capable of facilitating anonymous exchange between strangers, greatly increasing the scope for economic growth. Recently, however, scholars have discovered that the vast majority of economic exchanges in Britain in Smith's era were conducted on the basis of credit rather than cash. And this credit was largely personal, connecting thousands of individuals in networks of trust. This course will examine this new social history of the British economy.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Penelope Ismay

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2252 Europe, 1750-1914 Spring 3
Course Description

This course surveys the history of Europe from the mid-Eighteenth Century to the outbreak of The First World War. It considers how political, social, economic, and cultural forces affected European countries in relation to the wider world. Throughout we explore major themes that seemingly made this era "modern": from the Enlightenment and science, to liberalism, socialism, and imperialism among others. We seek to grasp how people lived through major upheavals brought about by war, revolution, industrialization, urbanization, nation-formation, and secularization. The course combines lectures and sessions dedicated to analyzing primary sources. No prior knowledge of European history is required.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Thomas Dodman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2253 The Melancholy of War Fall 3
Course Description

What was it like to go "over the top," to experience "shell shock,” to witness mass slaughter? This course explores the history of wartime emotions and, in particular, of soldiers' combat trauma. First, we will cover medical thinking about the psychological harm induced by combat from Antiquity to post-traumatic stress disorder. Second, we will use soldiers' narratives, literature, artwork, and film to ground this medical discourse within military and civilian wartime experiences. Throughout, our premise will be that war isn't merely a geopolitical or a strategic question, but a social fact and a cultural act.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Thomas Dodman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2254 A Social History of Money in the World Fall 3
Course Description

Money, they say, makes the world go round. But what is it? How does it acquire value? Who or what says how much it is worth? This question has been answered in very different ways throughout time and throughout the world. Even today the meaning of money varies greatly. This course will explore the meaning of money mostly in ancient, medieval, modern Europe and America but we will also explore the meaning of money in non-Western parts of the world, as well.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Penelope Ismay

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2255 History of Terrorism Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the genesis and shifting development of the phenomenon of terrorism in the modern era. We will investigate ideas and arguments behind the various forms of political terror that have emerged in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Emphasis will be placed on problematizing and historicizing the relationships between violence and democracy. Primary topics include the Terror of the French Revolution, theories of modern war, anarchism, totalitarian state terror, anti-colonial violence, 1960s radicalism, and religiously motivated violence.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Julian Bourg

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2256 The Melancholy of War Fall 3
Course Description

What was it like to go “over the top,” to experience “shell shock,” to witness mass slaughter? This course explores the history of wartime emotions and, in particular, of soldiers’ combat trauma. First, we will cover medical thinking about the psychological harm induced by combat from Antiquity to post-traumatic stress disorder. Second, we will use soldiers’ narratives, literature, artwork, and film to ground this medical discourse within military and civilian wartime experiences. Throughout, our premise will be that war isn’t merely a geopolitical or a strategic question, but a social fact and a cultural act.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Thomas Dodman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2269 World War II Fall 3
Course Description

This course analyzes the global history of the Second World War, from its origins in the 1930s to its aftermath in the late 1940s. The emphasis will be as much on the broad social and political war as much as on the strict military history.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Devin Pendas

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2270 Germany Divided and Reunited Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course provides a multi-dimensional look at post-war Germany, East and West. Politics, social and economic structure (East versus West), music, art, literature, philosophy (Critical Theory), the crisis and reform of the West German university system, the young generation, and Americanization will be discussed. Other topics include radicalism/extremism/protest movements (including terrorism), coping with the past (National Socialism), the Revolution of November 1989, and the legal ramifications and unsolved problems deriving from reunification.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Daniel Bowles

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: GERM2242

Comments: Conducted in English.
Required for the German Studies minor.
Counts toward German major and German minor.

HIST 2280 History of Modern Russia, 1700-2000 Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores the major themes and developments in Russian history through the prism of political, social, religious and economic change that accompanied the rise and modernization of this vast Eurasian country. The lectures and readings will explore the emergence of Russia as a major global empire during the Romanov monarchy, the decline of autocracy and the challenges of revolutions, the rise and fall of the Soviet Union and the contemporary resurgence of Russian Federation under Vladimir Putin. The course will also analyze how ideas, institutions, popular movements, wars, and memories of terror and genocide shaped Russian culture, politics and society.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Andrey Ivanov

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2284 Gender & War in Eastern Europe Spring 3
Course Description

A study of the intersection of gender, ethnicity, and ideology in the World Wars in Eastern Europe and the recent Yugoslav wars. In World War I, women confronted their duties to the nation against the backdrop of an ongoing struggle for equality. In World War II, women in communist Eastern Europe were liberated by their nations' ideology to fight, on all fronts, against tradition. More recently, in former Yugoslavia, women, particularly Bosnian Muslim women, flouted tradition in a different way--by organizing and fighting for peace.


Instructor(s): Cynthia Simmons

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SLAV2067

Comments: Undergraduate major elective

HIST 2301 Colonial Latin America Fall 3
Course Description

Empires are often thought of as authoritarian political units that spread monolithically through time and space. This class will revise that understanding of imperial rule by closely examining the complex economic, political, environmental, and cultural trends that shaped the colonial history of the region we now call Latin America from pre-Columbian times to the rise of independent American republics in the first decades of the nineteenth century. In order to offer a general but sophisticated view of the region, we will approach this history by reading, analyzing and discussing primary and secondary sources.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills Non-Western Requirement for History majors

HIST 2302 Modern Latin America Spring 3
Course Description

This class will study how different cultural, political, economic, and environmental trends have shaped Latin America since the mid-nineteenth century to today. Throughout the semester we will analyze how the region has changed over time, and we will learn the historical origins of debates, (involving issues such as migration, violence, social justice and economic development) that affect the region today. This history will be approached from different perspectives in order to offer a general but complex view of the region.


Instructor(s): Rodolfo Fernández

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: AADS1174

Comments: Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core requirement Fulfills the Non-Western Requirement for the History Major

HIST 2401 U.S. History I Fall 3
Course Description

A survey of the political, social, economic, and intellectual developments that have shaped and influenced the growth of the United States from a colonial appendage to a world power. The course seeks to provide a firm chronological foundation for the study of the American past but seeks to go beyond narrative and to provide analytical insights into the institutions, society, economy, and ideas upon which American civilization is founded. Consideration will be given to continuity, change, and conflict in American society.


Instructor(s): Heather Richardson

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments: Followed in spring semester by HIST2402

HIST 2402 U.S. History II Spring 3
Course Description

Continuation of HIST2401


Instructor(s): Patrick Maney

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2403 Disc Sec for HIST2401 Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2404 Disc Sec for HIST2402 Spring 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2405 Pirates in History and Myth Spring 3
Course Description


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Owen Stanwood

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2406 "This Land is Your Land": US Environmental History Spring 3
Course Description

How have different environments, places, and resources shaped American history? We will survey main themes and events in the environmental history of the United States. We move from colonial-era differences in land use through contemporary environmental debates. We ask how American communities have used, defined, and fought over places and natural resources, from bison herds to nuclear stockpiles. We investigate intriguing aspects of our local Massachusetts environment: the Emerald Necklace of parks, the brass hoof prints of Harvard Square, even our nearby reservoir. No background in history is necessary to thrive in this class. Students in the sciences are welcome.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Conevery Bolton Valencius

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2407 The American Revolution Spring 4
Course Description

This course assesses the American Revolution and how it altered the political, economic, social, and cultural landscape of North America, the British Empire, and the World. Addressing the period from 1763 to 1800, it places the major events of the Revolution in a broader context, situating these years in a continental, Atlantic, international, and imperial context and countering traditional narratives of American exceptionalism that have long held sway in the history of Revolutionary America.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jared Hardesty

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2410 The Civil War Fall 3
Course Description

In this course, we will study how the wrenching changes of the Civil War era created modern America. We will study political and military developments from 1861 to 1865 and will also focus on changes in government, economy, and society in the North, South, and West during and immediately after the war years.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Heather Richardson

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2411 U.S. Civil War and Reconstruction Spring 3
Course Description

A hundred and fifty years ago, one part of the United States declared its independence as a separate nation. It almost succeeded. Why did Southern whites seek to secede and how did other Americans resist? What were the legacies of war, emancipation, and Reconstruction? We will investigate how agriculture, racial slavery, economics, environments, foreign relations, naval war, field tactics, and free and enslaved Americans shaped this wrenching upheaval. Through historical accounts, images, music, and discussion, we will explore the causes of the Civil War of 1861-1865, its military and social course, and its consequences for a bloodied and re-made Union.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Conevery Bolton Valencius

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2420 American Political Rivalries Fall 3
Course Description

Beginning with the contest between Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson for control of national policy in the first years of the new republic, conflicting ambitions and beliefs among major political figures have both shaped and reflected major developments in the history of the United States. This course will examine several of these rivalries, including the Hamilton-Jefferson clash; Andrew Jackson versus John C. Calhoun, Henry Clay and Daniel Webster; Stephen Douglas and Abraham Lincoln; Theodore Roosevelt versus Woodrow Wilson; Franklin Roosevelt and Huey Long; and John Kennedy and Richard Nixon.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Mark Gelfand

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2421 American Presidency Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the single most important position of power in our political system, the men who shaped it, and the elections that placed them in that office. Although the course begins with the drafting of the Constitution, the focus is on the twentieth century.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Mark Gelfand

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2430 Business in American Life Spring 3
Course Description

An examination of the interplay between business ideas and practices and American society and politics. This is not an economic history course, but a study of how the entrepreneurial spirit has helped shape the contours of modern America. Among the topics to be covered are the continuing tension between the profit motive and the sense of commonwealth, the rise of corporate structure and corporate power, and the role of government.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Mark Gelfand

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2431 Leeches to Lasers: Medicine and Health in the United States Fall 3
Course Description

This course surveys key moments in the history of American medicine, from pre-contact indigenous medical systems through debates over Obamacare. We study the rise of institutional and professional structures in response to health needs and disease. We also examine cultural responses to epidemics, illness, and changing norms of well-being in American history. Our work and discussions will help participants read and evaluate diverse sources, construct solid arguments, and write effectively. Students intending to enter the health professions and science majors are welcome


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Conevery Valencius

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2440 American Icons: Nineteenth-Century Images of National Identity Fall 3
Course Description

The nineteenth century was a time of turmoil and change in America. From the taming or destruction of the wilderness, to the exploitation of natural resources, the fate of Indians, the expansion of slavery, and the spread of industry, painters, sculptors, photographers, and architects created iconic works that spawned public debates about the frontier, industrialization, and the environment that sometimes percolated and sometimes raged throughout society. By depicting European-American perceptions of Native Americans, African-Americans before and after the Civil War, and women in public and private life, artists escalated the debate over who is an American.


Instructor(s): Judith Bookbinder

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ARTH2263

Comments:

HIST 2450 Spies, Spying, and the Presidency Spring 3
Course Description

This survey course will examine the relationship between U.S. intelligence agencies and their impact on presidential decision-making. We will examine the history of intelligence and the presidency from the period of the American War for Independence through the present U.S. war actions in Iraq and Afghanistan. The course aims not only to provide a discussion of US political history, but also incorporates elements of the relationship between intelligence studies and literature, philosophy, and religion. Questions of civil liberties, legal history, the role of Congress, and moral and ethical questions surrounding the gathering and effectuation of intelligence will be under study.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Charles Gallagher, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2455 American Fascisms Fall 3
Course Description

Our goal is to understand the nature and role of the political right, right-wing extremism, and fascism in the U.S. from its European importation to the present. Beginning in the late 19th century, the course will address right-wing ideology in religion, politics, and culture both in Europe and the U.S. Topics will be connected to the theoretical underpinnings of European Fascism, its adaptation to the American landscape, and its persistence in modern discourse. The course will begin with a discussion of allegations of Trumpian fascism in the U.S. press in 2016.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Charles Gallagher

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2460 Celluloid Salvation: Redemption in American History and Film Fall 3
Course Description

Since the first American motion pictures, filmmakers have been concerned with issues of salvation and damnation, good and evil. This course uses American film as an historical artifact, a lens through which Americans have grappled with these essential questions. From the biblical epics of the 1950s, where a Judeo-Christian consensus was assumed, to films like Platoon and Do the Right Thing, which suggest how difficult redemption and good can be in the late twentieth century, American movies have answered these questions in historically specific ways. Lectures and readings will situate the films (viewed in class) in temporal and philosophical context.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Cynthia Lyerly

HIST 2461 Seeing Workers Across the Americas: Cinema and Working Class History Fall 3
Course Description

This course explores comparative labor history in the Americas through feature films, related readings, and discussion. The aim is to examine differences and similarities in the lives of the rural and urban poor and working classes in the U.S. and Latin America, areas which have been affected in different ways by international political economy. Films offer a unique lens into the social imagination of these radically changing post-World War II years. Viewing films from the United States, Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Brazil and Nicaragua, themes of formal and informal labor, working-class culture, immigration, religion, gender, race, and war will be examined.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Marilynn Johnson and Deborah Levenson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2467 "Ugly Americans" in the "American Century:" A Transnational History Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines how involvement in an increasingly global community has shaped the history of the United States since the late nineteenth century. As such, it is chiefly concerned with asking the following questions: How have "American" socio-political, economic, and cultural trends been shaped by interactions with others in the wider world? How have the experiences of Americans, at home and abroad, shaped the world around them? While this course examines some familiar topics such as labor and immigration, war and diplomacy, the struggle for civil rights, consumerism and popular culture, it is not a comprehensive survey of U.S. history.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Alexander Noonan

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2470 The American Pacific Spring 4
Course Description

This course explores the U.S.' role in constructing and perpetuating an American Pacific. How have Americans imagined, understood and interacted with the people and nations in and around the Pacific Ocean? How have relations with the nations of the Pacific Rim influenced Americans' view of themselves? How have economic, cultural and military activities contributed to America's rise as an imperialist power in this region? Rather than focusing on high politics and diplomacy, we will examine the American Pacific as a cultural, gendered, racial, military and political project, and explore themes such as empire, migration, race, sex and war.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Arissa Oh

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the Non-Western Requirement for the History Major

HIST 2471 Asian-American History Spring 3
Course Description

This class surveys the history of Asians in America from the late nineteenth century to the present. We will examine how relationships between the United States and various Asian countries have negotiated their claims to U.S. citizenship and social belonging. This negotiation is a dynamic and ongoing process, framed by changing constructions of race, class, gender, sexuality, and inter-generational conflict, as well as by intra- and inter- group conflict. We will consider these complex dynamics and the way they have operated within, and have been produced by, Asian American history.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Arissa Oh

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core requirement

HIST 2475 America's War in Vietnam Fall 3
Course Description

This course will examine America's thirty-year military involvement in Southeast Asia, one of the most controversial episodes in U.S. history. Students will read a wide variety of primary and secondary sources, from recently declassified state and Defense Department documents to poetry and short stories. Course readings are selected from various points on the left-right political spectrum, with both "hawks" and "doves" receiving their day in court. Lectures will include the origins of the Cold War; the Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon presidencies; antiwar activism and other Vietnam era movements; and American soldiers' experience during and after service in Vietnam.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Seth Jacobs

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2476 The Cold War in the Third World Spring 3
Course Description

The half-century conflict between the United States of America and the Soviet Union began in the mid- to late 1940s when the two superpowers established spheres of influence in Europe. Thereafter, unable to make much headway on the Continent, Washington and Moscow jockeyed for influence in the so-called "third world" of developing, decolonizing, and predominantly nonwhite areas in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. This course examines America's campaign to win the third world to its side, and the often tragic consequences of that effort, as U.S. policymakers frequently wound up simplifying local and regional developments, equating nationalism with communism, aligning America with unstable and unrepresentative regimes, and wedding American interests to the status quo in places experiencing massive social, political, and economic upheaval.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Seth Jacobs

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2481 African-American History I Fall 3
Course Description

This two-semester survey examines the history and culture of African-Americans from the pre-colonial period to the present. The first semester treats the period before the middle passage, the evolution of slave and free society, the development of Black institutions, and the emergence of protest movements through the Civil War's end. During the second semester, the emphases are placed on issues of freedom and equality from Reconstruction, urban migration, and civil rights struggles through current consideration of race, class, and gender conflicts.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Karen Miller

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: AADS1104

Comments:

HIST 2482 African American History II Spring 3
Course Description

The two-semester survey examines the history and culture of African-Americans from the pre-colonial period to the present. The first semester treats the period before the middle passage, the evolution of slave and free society, development of Black institutions, and emergence of the protest movements through the Civil War's end. During the second semester, the emphases are placed on issues of freedom and equality from Reconstruction, urban migration, civil rights struggles through current consideration of race, class, and gender conflicts.


Instructor(s): Karen Miller

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: AADS1105

Comments:

HIST 2483 Booker T. Washington Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines the life, times, and legacy of Booker T. Washington, 1856-1915. A complex and often polarizing historical figure, Washington alienated almost as many as he influenced domestically and internationally with his conflicting public statements and private acts regarding race, politics, violence, education, capitalism, and foreign relations, but he never failed to elicit impassioned responses from adversaries and supporters alike. Despite his death in 1915, Washingtons ideas and influence continue to spark debate even today.


Instructor(s): Karen Miller

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2484 Focus on Civil Rights: The Montgomery Bus Boycott Fall 3
Course Description

This course dissects the 382-day bus boycott by Montgomery, Alabama's black residents. Though not the first protest of its kind, it introduced two iconic figures to the national stage: Martin Luther King, Jr. and Rosa Parks. Four simple questions provide the foundation for the class, but the answers are unexpectedly complicated: What "law" did Parks violate? Why did Montgomery's black residents rally around Parks' 1955 arrest? How did Rev. King become the boycott's "voice" and "face," even though he was a relative newcomer to the city? How did this lengthy boycott change Montgomery's black community in the short term?


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Karen Miller

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: AADS2484

Comments:

HIST 2485 Foodways and Folkways in African American History Spring 3
Course Description

Food provides a lens through which to explore and compare the impact of this dispersal on a people as they moved, adapted long-held practices to new places, new times, and new concerns. This course focuses on several themes such as evolving food customs and traditions, how those traditions reflect the common bonds as well as the limitations of diaspora, the politics, economics, and health implications of food availability and scarcity, and the presence of food as a dynamic element in cultural production and representation in art, literature, film, and history. Students will examine and share their own familial food traditions and histories.


Instructor(s): Karen Miller

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: AADS2485

Comments:

HIST 2486 Black Education Movements Spring 3
Course Description

This course will cover the history of Black education movements, including freedman schools, citizenship education, court ordered school desegregation, war on poverty's education programs, community control of schools, revolutionary political education, liberation schools, affirmative action, and the twenty-first century issue of re-segregation.


Instructor(s): Lyda Peters

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: AADS2222

Comments: Fulfils Cultural Diversity Core Requirement

HIST 2487 Race and Identity in African American History Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines and engages readings that reflect a variety of approaches to questions of racial identity and “American-ness” over time. Textual materials have been selected to illustrate both historical and literary treatments of "race" and "identity" within the context of the United States. How do individuals become conscious of themselves as "racial" beings and as national citizens? How do racial identities comport with other identities? How does racial identity influence or color one's sense of self and relations with others within and outside of one's race? How, ultimately, does race impact the study and writing of history over time?


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Karen Miller

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2502 Introduction to Feminisms Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This introductory course offers both an overview and a foundation for understanding the various movements that make up what has come to be called the feminist movement in the U.S. Because systems of privilege and disadvantage shape women's and men's identities and social positions in multiple and unique ways, Introduction to Feminisms analyzes gender from an interdisciplinary approach and applies numerous academic disciplinary methods to the study of gender, including history, literature, psychology, and sociology, and explores women's and men's experiences within various cultural contexts, including socioeconomic class, race and ethnicity, religion and spirituality, nations of citizenship, origin, and generation.


Instructor(s): Andrew Owens

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL2125 SOCY2225 COMM2225

Comments: Fulfills Women Writer's requirement for ENGL/LSOE majors.

HIST 2503 People & Nature: History & Future of Human Impacts on the Planet Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

The twenty-first century opened with combined crises of climate, bio-diversity, and eco-system collapse. This course studies these crises from the dual perspectives of history and sociology. We look at how climate change developed, the shift from sustainable to unsustainable agriculture, the loss of forests around the planet, toxic chemicals, population trends, and other topics. For each section of the course we begin with historical trends before tackling present issues. Throughout, the class we focus not just on problems, but also solutions. This year we are planning to "flip" the class in order to maximize interaction and project based learning. The class will not be offered in 2016-17.


Instructor(s): Juliet Schor and Prasannan Parthasarathi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SOCY1025

Comments:

HIST 2504 History of East Asian Martial Arts Spring 0
Course Description

This course examines the transmission and periodic reinvention of martial arts in China and Japan. Exploration of the adaption of these East Asian practices in American and other global contexts. Consideration of how cultural and embodied knowledge is transmitted from person to person and through time.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): TJ Hinrichs

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2505 Feast or Famine? Food and the Environment Spring 3
Course Description

Through most of history the primary quest of humans has been to obtain sufficient food for survival. This course will explore the evolving relationships between that quest and the environment. Topics will include: climate change, the domestication of plants and animals, the development of settled agricultural societies, the Columbian exchange of biota, plantation and state sponsored agriculture, and the emergence of agro-business. We will explore the role of both individual crops/commodities such as sugar, chocolate, cod, corn and the potato, and the environmental systems of which they were part.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kevin O'Neill

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2507 Black Robe: Representations of the Jesuits in Film Spring 3
Course Description

The Jesuits, for better or worse, were involved in virtually every facet of modern culture, sciences, and politics around the globe. They were, for instance, theologians, polemicists, political theorists, astronomers, dramatists, pharmacists, architects, engineers of city fortifications, governors of Amerindian settlements, cartographers, musicians, and, above all, missionaries and schoolmasters. Almost from the moment the Jesuits were founded in 1540 they suffered from misunderstanding, some positive, much of it negative, which has been expressed in a variety of ways until today. This course examines contrasting representations of the Jesuits in contemporary film.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robert Maryks

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2650 Urban China:Then and Now Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2651 The Last Just War Spring 3
Course Description

TBD


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2652 History of Shanghai Spring 3
Course Description

Shanghai: "the Paris of the East," "the Pearl of the Orient. "the City of the Future!" Why is it that this city evokes such hyperbolic statements? How, despite dramatic social, political, and economic upheavals, is Shanghai's unique history guiding its present and future path? On course to be the world's largest city in the near future, Shanghai is a city with an identity crisis. This course will explore various facets of the city’s history, including urban culture, the representation of gender and sexuality, the complex adaptation of global influences, the role of class and ethnicity, and economic development.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Steven Pieragastini

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2660 Periclean Athens Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2661 Southern France and Northern Italy Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2671 Argentina: History and Culture Fall 6
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SPAN3322

Comments:

HIST 2681 The History and Literature of South Africa Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: AADS3363 ENGL2317

Comments:

HIST 2701 Eco-Challenges and Sustainable Solutions Summer 3
Course Description

Climate crisis and ecological overshoot have become humanity's most pressing challenges. Despite the contemporary nature of these problems, human disruption of the natural environment is not new. Environmental historians have identified major human alterations in ecosystems over the last 500 years. This course combines historical and contemporary perspectives to explore both the familiar and the novel as we study forests, climate, agriculture, water, and toxic pollution. We devote substantial attention to solutions and what will be necessary to achieve a sustainable future.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Juliet Schor and Prasannan Parthasarathi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SOCY1027

Comments:

HIST 2802 Digital Detectives: Sherlock Holmes Spring 3
Course Description

In this course we will read and analyze the Sherlock Holmes novels and short stories in their historical context using a variety of digital tools. These include, but are not limited to, tracking character movement using mapping software, visualizing changes in characters’ social networks, and comparing stylistic shifts in the works. We will also use a variety of contemporary historical materials such as digitized newspaper articles and case files. The course will culminate in an analytical or creative digital project that will employ skills learned during class: possibilities include projects that feature mapping, timelines, 3D modelling, or game building.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL2298

Comments:

HIST 2827 Puritans, Papists and Fanatics: American Immigration and Religion Spring 4
Course Description

This course will consider the role of religious identity, practice, and belief in the history of immigration to America. We will discuss how religion encouraged certain migrants to settle in the American colonies; how fear and suspicion of the religious identities of later immigrant groups (such as Catholicism, Judaism, or Islam) made their entry and adaptation to the United States more difficult, even while these immigrants used religious institutions, networks, and belief systems as vehicles for adapting to and prospering in their new society. Further, we will examine the role of religious ideas in constructing laws governing immigration and citizenship.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Grainne McEvoy

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2828 American Religious History since 1945 Fall 3
Course Description

This course explores the multiple dimensions – political, cultural, and social – of the role religion played in American life since 1945. We will investigate the role religious subjects played in the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, Feminism, Vietnam, and other significant trends. This course will stress the ways religious actors have ended up on both sides of these struggles. This course also investigates religion as a category and discrete set of experiences. It aims to investigate the content of beliefs held by Americans in recent history. It asks "what has been believed?" and "how have these beliefs changed over time?"


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Peter Cajka

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2829 American Political Thought from the Constitution to Trump Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores the shifting categories and frameworks through which Americans have understood their shared political world since the founding period. Topics include the influence on the Constitution of republicanism, Enlightenment thought, and Christianity; the nineteenth-century emergence of liberalism and socialism; the contours of pro-slavery and anti-slavery arguments; the effects of the Civil War and Reconstruction; the political battles of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era; the rise of New Deal liberalism; the influence of the Cold War; the upheavals of the 1960s; and the recent ascendance of conservatism.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Andrew Jewett

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2830 Boston Neighborhoods Summer 3
Course Description

An historical look at Boston explores parts of its “neighborhoods,” including the old West End, the South End, the North End, South Boston, East Boston, Charlestown, Dorchester, Roxbury, Jamaica Plain, Mattapan, Hyde Park, and West Roxbury. Walking and bus tours are planned during the regular class meetings.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2837 Multiculturalism in the Roman Empire Spring 3
Course Description

From its beginnings as a small city-state in central Italy, Rome built a vast multicultural empire stretching across the entire Mediterranean and much of Europe. We will travel through this empire, visiting such different peoples and provinces as the Germans and the Jews, Britain and Greece. How did those people remain loyal to their origins while also becoming Roman? How did the different cultures included within the empire transform who “the Romans” were and what it meant to be Roman? How did the emperors – those larger-than-life figures like Augustus and Nero – use the diversity of the empire to craft their public images as conquerors or as...Greek actors? We’ll use a combination of written sources, archaeological evidence, and even visual art to investigate these questions and to explore the ever-expanding melting pot of the Roman world.


Instructor(s): Mark Thatcher

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: CLAS2250

Comments:

HIST 2838 Humanists and Heretics: Identities of the Early Modern Italian Peninsula Spring 3
Course Description

Covering the period from approximately 1400-1800, this course will broadly address the concept of “identity” in the Italian peninsula from a variety of different perspectives. Specific topics, to name a few, will include political divisions of the peninsula, city-states, and civic identity; the social and cultural experience of elites versus non-elites; the Renaissance and different expressions of humanism; and the religious diversity of the peninsula in the context of both the Protestant and Catholic Reformations.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Andrea Wenz

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2839 Urban Underworlds: Crimes and Madness in Nineteenth Century Europe Fall 3
Course Description

Nineteenth century industrialization and the urbanization that accompanied it changed the nature of Europe’s cities permanently. These new metropolises saw a steady rise in crime, violence, and a preoccupation with the dangerous — or “mad”— elements in society. This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to analyze the seedy underbelly of cities such as London, Paris, and Berlin. Focusing on the darker side of city life from Jack the Ripper to Bedlam to the brothels of Montmartre, we will examine issues of class, crime, madness, deviant sexuality, and popular culture as we explore the impact of modernity on Europe’s urban societies.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Erica Foss

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2840 World War I Fall 3
Course Description

A century on from a war that ravaged populations across the globe, radically altered international politics, and changed the landscape of philosophy and culture, nations and historians are still trying to make sense of what happened. In this course we will explore some of the classic historical problems of the First World War, such as how it started and what its aftermath wrought, but we will also examine the war’s deeper impact – how did the memory of the war shape subsequent generations? How has its legacy complicated the development of the Middle East and Asia through the 20th century? Finally, we will investigate the efforts of the belligerent nations to commemorate the war’s 100th anniversary from 2014-2018 as an example of how World War I, then and even now, shapes national identities.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jesse Tumblin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2841 Nuclear Terror Fall 3
Course Description

This course will examine the history of nuclear weapons from the development of the atomic bomb under the Manhattan Project to the end of the Cold War. It will consider both the history of technological development and the geopolitical decisions that drove continued rearmament. We will cover diverse topics including the hydrogen bomb, the Space Race, and the paranoia of living in a nuclear world. This course will use cultural production (including films like Dr. Strangelove and novels like A Canticle for Leibowitz) to try to understand the everyday experience of those who lived under the specter of nuclear war.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): James Clifton

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2842 Catholicism Confronts Modernity Spring 3
Course Description

From the French Revolution until the middle of the 20th century, Catholicism was largely defined by its opposition to "modernity." Subjective individualism, secularism, and the notion of historical progress were all rejected as antithetical to the Catholic worldview. After WWII, the Church adopted a more accommodating stance, culminating in the reforms of Vatican II; yet it remains, in important ways, fundamentally "askew" to the modern world. In this course, we will explore the fraught relationship between Catholicism and modernity, engaging with the social, political, cultural, and intellectual aspects of the issue through a variety of primary and secondary sources.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kasper Volk

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2843 Total War Spring 3
Course Description

Much has been made of the turn to "total war" in the twentieth century, beginning with the mechanization and massive death rates of the First World War. But what defines total war, and is it really a twentieth century - or even a modern - phenomenon? This discussion-focused course examines the definition of total war, and will use cases including the U.S. Civil War and the wars of 1914-1945, as well as less well-known pre-modern examples, such as the Thirty Years' War, and Western colonial warfare in places such as South West Africa, Tasmania, and the Philippines.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Shannon Monaghan

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2851 Food, Power,&Politics Summer 3
Course Description

This course will seek to provide an intellecttual and analytical-driven framework around the question of food as an integral part of any human experience, but particularly our experience with food through across cultures. We each have a unique opportunity to understand better the role of food in each of our lives as we move through this summer program by examining our own cultural and political assumptions and those of others from a new point of view. We can appreciate the lenses brought by other individuals, cultures and places to the acts of eating and producing food. Finally, we can express the human experience of food in ways that represent our understandings, experiences and vision for a healthy, just and pleasurable relationship to food in ways that can be shared and appreciated by others. In eating and producing food, we exist simultaneously in a deeply personal and communal place, a place of the present, past and future in which we are never more and less than human.


Instructor(s): Hiroshi Nakazato

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: POLI2251 INTL2251

Comments:

HIST 2860 Religion, Arts and Politics Spring 3
Course Description

Nowadays, we accept the idea that religion, like so much else, is political. It makes sense, then, that visual culture, which can be used, situated, manipulated and exploited in the service of religion can serve to affirm and in some cases to subvert the political messages of religion. This class will explore examples of the collusions of religion, art and politics, as well as their collisions in the productions of majority and minority culture in Judaism, Christianity and Islam in the West, from antiquity to post-modernity.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Marc M. Epstein and The Department of Theology

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 2862 Introduction to the History of Chemistry Summer 3
Course Description

The science of chemistry represents one of the great intellectual and practical achievements of human civilization. This course will explore the development of chemistry beginning with its prehistory, followed by the long alchemical period, its seventeenth and eighteenth century transformation into a true science, and its evolution into modern form through the dramatic advances of the 19th and 20th centuries. Controversies, dead ends, and flawed hypotheses, the inevitable companions of progress, will also be analyzed, as will the essential interdependence of chemistry and technology.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kenneth Metz

Prerequisites: Permission of Chemistry required. and (Must have successfully completed CHEM1110. or Must have successfully completed CHEM1118.)

Cross listed with: CHEM3310

Comments:

HIST 2869 Empires, Islam, and Trade: Regional Connections with the Indian Ocean, 1700 to Present Fall 3
Course Description

The Indian Ocean served as an arena for some of the most cosmopolitan interactions in global history. Bordering the regions of East Africa, the Middle East, India, and Southeast Asia, the commercial, religious, and imperial networks that crisscrossed the ocean entangled these disparate areas in unexpected ways in the early modern and modern eras. This course will examine the period from 1700 to the present through the increased role of European capital and colonialism, regional responses to the rise of Europe, the changes brought about by World Wars and decolonization, and the region’s place in a post-Cold War global system.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jeffery Dyer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the Non-Western Requirement for the History Major

HIST 2870 Mobile Muslims in Indian Ocean Empires Fall 3
Course Description

Societies in the East African, Arabian, Indian, and Malay-Indonesian territories surrounding the Indian Ocean experienced dramatic changes in the centuries after 1800. This course examines how people like Zanzibari Sultans, Yemeni mercenaries in India, or Sikh policemen in Malaya inhabited the new Indian Ocean created in the nineteenth century by steamships, the Suez Canal, and expanding foreign empires. With a focus on itinerant populations, we will explore what motivated people to navigate new threats and opportunities within their changing environments and see how they transformed the region from the colonial period through world wars, decolonization, and post-colonial nationalisms.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jeffrey Dyer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 3030 Study and Writing of History: From Hiroshima to Fukushima Fall 3
Course Description

The atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945 and the meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Facility in March 2011 frame a range of Japanese (and global) historical experiences with environmental catastrophe. This course offers opportunities to investigate, through original research, the social, cultural, ecological, and political consequences of such disasters in Japan and what they have meant elsewhere. Students are encouraged to explore issues of environmental sustainability from a historical perspective. Students will use a range of primary materials from policy papers and public media sources to individual testimonies and the visual arts. Using the internet responsibly will be an important focus.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 3031 Study and Writing of History: Historical Memory in the Global 1990s Spring 3
Course Description

The 1990s witnessed a “memory boom” around the world. Fifty years after World War II, new claims of restitution for and commemoration of war atrocities assumed an unprecedented urgency in politics and public culture as survivors and veterans neared the end of their lives. More generally, how societies remember, and what they forget, became an explosive subject of public debate about reconciliation in the age of post-Cold War global reorientation. This course offers opportunities to investigate, through original research, one of the many “history wars” as they unfolded in East Asia, Europe, the American South, and elsewhere.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Franziska Seraphim

Prerequisites: History Major Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 3199 Study and Writing of History: Social Biography Fall 3
Course Description

This course is about the pursuit of the mundane, the personal, and the micro-level in order to reveal the political, the collective, and the macro-level. Students will use personal narratives (diaries, letters, interviews) to reconstruct individual lives of regular people and see these lives as windows onto larger phenomena in history. In other words, this is an exercise in social biography. A social biography is not about the lives and works of great men, but about how the life experience of a regular person is both symptomatic and constitutive of the society at large.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Dana Sajdi

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II; History Major Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 3201 Study and Writing of History: Material Culture Fall 3
Course Description

Students will learn to write history using things as well as texts. We will begin the course by reading secondary literature on how to read objects. Each student, in consultation with the professor, will then choose a kind of material evidence, a period and a topic, and the rest of the semester will be devoted to learning how to research and write an ambitious and original research paper. Topics in the past have included: Late-Roman women's fashion and social status in Roman floor mosaics; Grave-goods and the construction of early medieval childhood; Union and southern American Civil War amputation kits; British and American World War II ration cookbooks; and a comparative study of Soviet and American bomb shelters during the Cold War.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robin Fleming

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 3224 Study and Writing of History: Witchcraft and Magic, c.1400-1700 Spring 3
Course Description

The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the practice of history through intensive reading and writing about witchcraft, magic and heresy in sixteenth and seventeenth-century Europe. Over this two hundred year period thousands of trials were conducted in church and secular courts for practices labeled sorcery, superstition, and heresy. At the same time, hundreds of published works on demonology by theologians, lawyers, and rulers portrayed in detail the many offenses against God and humanity committed by Satan and his human collaborators, the witches. Reading for the course will be chosen from primary sources (trial records, pamphlet literature, demonology, theology) and historians' interpretations. After a few weeks of common reading, students will work on individual projects.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Virginia Reinburg

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II and History Major Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 3255 Study and Writing of History: Coffeehouses, Pubs and Clubs: Associational Life in Europe Spring 3
Course Description

This course will initiate you into the craft of doing history. It is an apprenticeship that begins by exposing aspiring historians to some of the great practicing master historians in the field. The theme we will use to introduce the craft is associational life, which underwent radical transformation from the 16th and 17th to the 18th and 19th centuries. Using a variety of books and articles on this topic, the class will help you to develop a clearly defined topic, a manageable research plan and will give you the support you need to write a substantial research paper.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Penelope Ismay

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II and History Major Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 3260 Study and Writing of History: Public and Private in the Age of Revolution Spring 3
Course Description

During these years Ireland experienced dramatic and often violent social and political change. Major events included the emergence of colonial nationalism and Republicanism, the Revolution of 1798, and the Act of Union. Traditional historiography has explored these events through the personalities of the major political leaders involved. More recent historical work has focused on political ideologies and social dynamics that underlie these developments. This course will take a different perspective by exploring Irish society through the experiences of a small rural community. Using the personal diaries, letters and papers of one rural Irish woman, Mary Shackleton of Ballitore, Co. Kildare, we will explore the use of personal papers in the writing of social and political history.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kevin O'Neill

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II and History Major Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 3262 Study and Writing of History: Social and Political Violence in the 20th Century Spring 3
Course Description

The aim of this course is to enable students to pursue an in-depth study of the history of Ireland’s violent past in its 20th century manifestation. This will initially take the form of a general survey of the revolutionary generation 1913-23 and how this set the pattern for violent encounter with both the British and Irish states for the rest of the century. Students will then opt to look at one aspect of social and political violence and write a 25 page paper exploring these themes.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II; History Major Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 3270 Study and Writing of History: History of Emotions Fall 3
Course Description

Do fear, anger, love, and sadness have a past? And if so, is it possible to write their history? This writing-intensive course provides an introduction to an exciting new field of historical inquiry: the passions of the past. It looks at the ways in which historians and other social scientists have sought to grasp emotions and how they may use these to shed light on broader historical questions across different times and cultures. The course functions as a methodological reflection on the tools and skills of the historian, and leads to the production of a scholarly research essay.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Thomas Dodman

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II; History Major Standing; Not open to graduate students

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 3271 Study and Writing of History: The Melancholy of War Fall 3
Course Description

This course explores the history of war trauma and attempts to grapple with the psychological harm produced by modern warfare. It considers three perspectives and sets of sources: medical and psychoanalytic theories of war neuroses from nostalgia and neurasthenia to shell shock and post traumatic stress disorder; soldiers’ letters and journals that provide access to the lived experience of armed conflict; and attempts to mediate the horrors of war in literary and art works. This course serves as an introduction to the tools of the historian and to the crafting of a research essay based on primary sources.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 3279 Study and Writing of History: Russian Revolutions Fall 3
Course Description

The cataclysmic transformations occurring in the Russian Empire and the Soviet Union from the late 1860s through the 1930s encompassed revolutionary ideas about transforming human beings and society in the realms of art, urban space, gender relations, and the sciences. Approaches to the study of revolutions will be combined with a focus on the personal voices of those who participated in and witnessed them. Students will produce a 25-page paper using primary and secondary sources on topics such as late Imperial Russian workers’ autobiographies, new attitudes on gender and sexuality, Soviet science fiction utopias, and avant-garde visual arts, including cinema.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Nicole Eaton

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II; History Major Standing; Not open to graduate students

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 3280 Study and Writing of History: Life and Death in the Bloodlands of the Eastern Front Spring 3
Course Description

This course introduces students to the practice of history through intensive reading, research, and writing about the lives of ordinary people living "the Bloodlands," the areas of Eastern and Central Europe caught in cycles of violence during Hitler’s and Stalin’s rules. Through reading historians’ interpretations and primary source documents of soldiers, civilians, perpetrators, victims, and bystanders, students will develop an independent research project and produce a 25-page paper based on original research. Knowledge of German, Slavic, or other applicable languages beneficial but not required.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Nicole Eaton

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II; History Major status

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 3300 Study and Writing of History Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 3361 Study and Writing of History: Narrating and Documenting Latin America Fall 3
Course Description

Students will write a study of how documents and texts produced in the United States present an important person, whether artist or politician, or an event, be it a natural disaster or a controversial election. The course focuses on the different types of clues about truths that sources offer.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Deborah Levenson

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 3362 Study and Writing of History: Early Maps and Distant Places Spring 3
Course Description

This course is built around maps of the early modern world. Paraguay, Madagascar, Turkey, China, Ireland, and New England: whether near or far, these are some of the many places captured cartographically on printed pages prior to 1800. Topics include conceptions of mapping, the history of cartography, and the related histories of empire and exploration. Students will write research papers on individual maps, groups of maps, or travel accounts. Our principal sources will be drawn from the Burns Library, but students are welcome to research at other libraries (like the Boston Public Library, which also has an excellent map collection).


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Sylvia Sellers-Garcia

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II; History Major Status

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 3365 Study and Writing of History: Visual Culture: Images Make History/History Makes Images Fall 3
Course Description


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Deborah Levenson

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II; History Major Status

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 3411 Study and Writing of History: Colonial Indian Wars Spring 3
Course Description

The European invasion of North America inspired a number of deadly conflicts between settlers and Indians during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. In this seminar we will examine the causes, contexts, and consequences of these struggles. Most of our common readings will focus on New England, though we will take detours to New Mexico and Pennsylvania. Students will be free in their independent projects to investigate any war involving Indians and colonists from 1492 to 1776.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Owen Stanwood

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II; History Major Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 3435 Study and Writing of History: Slavery and Memory: The WPA Narratives and Antebellum Slavery Fall 3
Course Description

This course has one central database that students will use as their primary source(s): the over 2000 accounts of former slaves collected by Works Progress Administration interviewers during the depression. These sources are problematic, and raise interesting questions about the difference between history and memory, how to use sources that are deeply prejudiced and slanted, and about horrific experiences, like enslavement, can be represented. Students will write on some aspect of antebellum slavery or its memory using the WPA narratives and the secondary sources that contextualize them. Writing and reading intensive.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Cynthia Lyerly

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II; History Major Status

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 3436 Study and Writing of History: Ku Klux Klan Violence in the Post-Civil War South Fall 3
Course Description

Students in this course will write original research papers based on analysis of the Joint Select Committee’s investigation into KKK violence in the post-War South. The Joint Committee interviewed hundreds of people, both victims of violence and the alleged perpetrators to determine the extent of domestic terrorism. Possible paper topics include: the politics of the hearings, the KKK, relations between freedmen and their former masters, racial thought, African American resistance, terrorism, the post-war economy, culture, the justice system, government, policing, gender relations, and sexual violence, among many others.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Cynthia Lynn Lyerly

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II; History Major Status

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 3451 Study and Writing of History: Abraham Lincoln Fall 3
Course Description

This course will consider the life and thought of America’s most influential president. Students will write a major research paper on one theme or topic concerning Lincoln and U.S. history, with options including slavery and antislavery, immigration and nativism, economic policy, the foundations of democracy, military leadership, plans for Reconstruction, and historical memory. Students will work very closely with the instructor and with their peers in locating sources, using these sources as evidence for historical arguments, and learning how historians write and interpret the past.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kevin Kenny

Prerequisites: History Core I and II; History Major Standing; Not open to graduate students

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 3460 Study and Writing of History: Catholicism in Boston Spring 3
Course Description

TBD


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Charles Gallagher

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II; History Major Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 3466 Study and Writing of History: Religious Exemptions: Arguments and Consequences Spring 3
Course Description

Religious exemptions to neutral and generally applicable state and federal laws (vaccination, schooling, military service, employment, medical care, sacred land, zoning, and prison discipline) are a relatively recent phenomenon with deep historical roots. Students will analyze the political and constitutional rationales for the enactment and consequences of religious exemptions in the United States.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Alan Rogers

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II; History Major Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 3467 Study and Writing of History: U.S. Bill of Rights Spring 3
Course Description

This course challenges you to produce a major research paper focusing on the legal and constitutional history of a case(s) that illustrates how the Bill of Rights protects peoples' rights to liberty and equality. We will focus on four major issues: religion, speech, discrimination, and privacy.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Alan Rogers

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II; History Major Standing; Not open to graduate students

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 3472 Study and Writing of History: Race, Gender, and American Empire Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores histories of race, gender, sexuality, and US empire during the 19th and 20th centuries. How did ideologies of race and gender/sexuality intersect and shape how the US acted as an imperial power and how American citizens and colonized subjects understood those actions? Rather than examining geopolitical or diplomatic history, we will examine how high politics manifested in the everyday lives, social interactions, and cultures of US empire, formal and informal, at home and abroad. At the same time, we will pay attention to history "from the bottom up" to see how ordinary people influenced politics and policy making.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Arissa Oh

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II; History Major Standing; Graduate students are not permitted

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 3479 Study and Writing of History: Gender and Violence in American History Spring 3
Course Description

Gender-based violence has a long history in the United States, one that has been shaped by changing gender norms, racial ideologies, and class relations. This course will look at the history of rape and sexual violence in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries to understand how definitions of those offenses have changed over time. By examining several key historical cases, we will explore the experiences of accusers, assailants, and third parties, while assessing the impact of feminism, nativism, and white supremacy in the outcomes. During the course of the semester, students will use primary sources to write a major research paper analyzing a historical case or topic of their own choosing.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Marilynn Johnson

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II; History Major Standing; Not open to graduate students

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 3483 Study and Writing of History: Balance of Terror: U.S. During the Cold War Spring 3
Course Description


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Seth Jacobs

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II; History Major Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 3484 Study and Writing of History: Happy Days: American Families from the Bomb to the Sexual Revolution Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines the history of the American family from the end of World War II to the late 1960s. We will use a range of primary and secondary sources to explore major issues and themes connected to the family, including the Cold War, the civil rights movement, domesticity, work, and consumption. We will pay special attention to how family life – both ideal and lived – interacted with changing ideas about gender roles, sexuality, race, and class.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Arissa Oh

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II and History Major Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 3486 Study and Writing of History: Korea: America's Forgotten War Fall 3
Course Description

The first hot war of the Cold War, the Korean War is typically referred to as 'the Forgotten War.' But why? What was the impact of the Korean War on U.S. society? How do different historians interpret and understand the war and its status as 'forgotten'? In this course, we will examine the Korean War through American, Korean and Korean-American eyes and try to understand how different groups – for example, American and Korean civilians, American GIs – experienced the war then, how they remember the war, and how the Korean War continues to impact their lives today.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Arissa Oh

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II; History Major Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 3491 Study and Writing of History: The Clinton Presidency Fall 3
Course Description

The first two-term Democratic president since FDR and only the second president to be impeached, Bill Clinton ranks among the most controversial chief executives in modern American history. Even today, twenty-four years after Clinton assumed office, his presidency sparks sharply differing assessments. Is it either a model to be emulated, especially in economic matters, or a legacy to blame for the polarization that has a stranglehold on our politics today? This course examines the major events, policies, and personalities, including Hillary Clinton, of the Clinton years. It also gives students an opportunity to learn the historian's craft by researching and writing an original paper on a specific aspect of the Clinton presidency.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Patrick Maney

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II; History Major Standing; Graduate students not permitted

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 3501 Study and Writing of History: Jesuits and Slavery Fall 3
Course Description

This course will introduce students to the processes of historical research through an examination of the role of slavery in early Jesuit missions in America, from the colonial period through the Civil War. After initial readings in the history of Jesuits in the United States, students will identify a topic of interest and will conduct research in original sources, available on this campus and elsewhere. They will prepare a major research paper summarizing their findings.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): James O'Toole

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II; History Major Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 3803 Study and Writing of History: Understanding Visual Images in the Americas Fall 3
Course Description

Historians use visual texts, such as paintings, monuments, buildings, photos, or gardens to understand a range of problems about change, control, ideology, class, race, gender and more. Visual texts are part of the production and reproduction of history and of historical knowledge. Students will write papers that utilize visual texts as sources that tell us about larger historical issues.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Deborah Levenson

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II; History Major Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4001 Early Modern Japan, 1600-1890: Samurai, Geisha, and Other Traditions Fall 3
Course Description

This course introduces upper-division undergraduates to broad political, social, economic and cultural developments in Tokugawa Japan (1600-1868) through the early Meiji transition. Powerful shoguns, brave and local samurai, and beautiful geisha conjure up images of an exotic, traditional Japan long gone. But what did it feel like to live in the eighteenth century? How have we--and the Japanese--come to think of that era as tradition? Lectures, readings and class discussions seek to integrate political and social relations and show how they were conditioned by an increasing awareness of the wider world around Japan.


Instructor(s): Franziska Seraphim

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

HIST 4002 Japan in the 20th Century Spring 3
Course Description

This course focuses on the emergence of Japan as an international, industrialized, and democratic country from the late nineteenth through the end of the twentieth century. We will read about Meiji society as it was imagined and lived, examine ideas and realities of Japanese imperialism in Asia, discuss the nature of wartime facism compared to ultranational regimes elsewhere, and tackle contradictions that characterize postwar society, a society that grew out of the war experience while conceiving of itself as the war's obverse. Finally, we will assess the changes and challenges in the 1990's in relation to Japan's long postwar.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Franziska Seraphim

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfils Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

HIST 4003 Public Culture in Postwar Japan Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores the themes in Japanese public culture since 1945 from a historical perspective. They include the place of war memory in public life, changing social values concerning women and family, cultures of political protest, ethnic diversity, new (and old) religions, and icons of popular culture. The readings focus on major recent works by historians, anthropologists, psychologists, and literary scholars designed to broaden our view of postwar Japan from critical new perspectives. Students will also have the chance to do some research into an area of their particular interest. Some background in twentieth century Japanese history is recommended.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Franziska Seraphim

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

HIST 4004 Japanese Cultural Icons in Modern Times Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4005 The Asia Pacific War Fall 3
Course Description

Co-taught by a Japanese and Chinese historian, this course explores the Second World War in Asia from multiple historical and historiographical perspectives. The term "Asia-Pacific War" explicitly links the conflict between Japan and the United States known as the Pacific War (1941-45) to Japan's expansionist ventures in Korea, Taiwan, the Chinese mainland, and Southeast Asia, and considers the cultural and intellectual dimensions of the war (and the way it is remembered) along with the political and military ones.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Franziska Seraphim and Yajun Mo

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

HIST 4006 Rebuilding East Asia Spring 3
Course Description

Conceived as a sequel to HIST 4005 Asia Pacific War (though not formally linked), this course engages students to examine how people living in the Asia-Pacific region rebuilt their families, communities, cities, nations, and transnational relations after empire and war in the mid-20th century. The emphasis lies on the changing dynamics of regional relations informed by the legacies of past conflicts and the realities of the Cold War to better understand the political, social, and cultural issues affecting East Asia today.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Franziska Seraphim and Yajun Mo

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4007 Global Japan since the 1970s Fall 3
Course Description

This course challenges students to engage with cutting-edge ethnographic and historical writings on social conflict and change in Japan since the 1970s. Beginning with an understanding of the dynamics of civil society, we explore the dynamics of gender, class, ethnicity, and youth in urban, rural, and transnational settings to complicate “Japan” as a national entity. Each topic is examined via primary and secondary sources, public debates and popular culture, and with respect to historical experiences and linkages abroad.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Franziska Seraphim

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4008 Listen to the Voices of the Dead: World War II in Asia Fall 3
Course Description

We will collect, read, contextualize, and analyze a variety of first-hand accounts by ordinary and extraordinary people in Japan, China, Korea, Southeast Asia, the Pacific Islands, and America who lived through the Asia-Pacific War (1931-1945) and its aftermath. Focused on reading, class discussion, and short writing, we engage with textual, oral, and visual sources from grassroots as well as elite perspectives, civilian and military, women and men within a cross-national and comparative framework. The course involves students in a digital humanities project that contributes valuably to scholarship and gives students agency in the interpretation of this war.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Franziska Seraphim

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4038 Women and Gender in Modern East Asia Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines gender systems and the lives of women in East Asia-China, Taiwan, Japan, North Korea and South Korea-from the 18th century to the present. Course readings and lectures place women's lives within the historical context of gender codes across East Asia and the women's liberation movements, revolutions and wars of the late 19th and 20th centuries. Select lectures and readings also address gender issues pertaining to East Asian men. Students will explore the gendered dimensions of topics covered in thematic units, including Confucianism, marriage, childbirth, medicine, slavery, sexuality, work, war, and revolution.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Nicole Barnes

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfils Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

HIST 4039 War and Revolution in Modern East Asia Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines East Asia-China, Korea, and Japan-from the mid-nineteenth century to the present, focusing on the revolutions and wars that have ravaged the region throughout this period. Students will understand why China is now split into mainland China and Taiwan, how North and South Korea became divided, and why Japan is the only nation to have remained intact. We will discuss popular uprisings as a category of revolution, the spread of socialism and Communism, and the role that social traumas have played in determining the current political boundaries on ongoing tensions between the nations of East Asia.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Nicole Barnes

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

HIST 4040 Modern East Asia: Politics, Society & Popular Culture Fall 3
Course Description

This course will examine the political, social, economic, and cultural history of East Asia (including Southeast Asia) from the end of World War II through the end of the Cold War, ending with a look at recent developments in the region. In addition to the conventional interpretation of the Cold War as a bipolar ideological conflict, we will explore several alternative frameworks for understanding the period in the East Asian context. Major topics to be examined include the legacy of imperialism, nation-building, political ideologies and civil conflict, technological transformation, changing work and family life, urbanization, economic development, and environmental pollution.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Steven Pieragastini

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfils Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

HIST 4041 Hero, Criminal or Dreamer? The First Emperor of the Qin Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores the life of the First Emperor of China (259-210 BCE), his short reign, his mysterious death, the spectacular afterlife he created for himself, a two-millennia-long imperial tradition he designed for China, and the physical world and thoughts that he lived in and committed to reshape. Using a great variety of materials (literary, archaeological, and multimedia), this course introduces students to the historical complexity of early China and to its most renowned, controversial figure. Who is this man? What historical roles did he play or fail to play?


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Ling Zhang

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

HIST 4042 China Regionalized: Environment, History & Culture Fall 3
Course Description

Do Beijing and Shanghai look the same to you? Why do Sichuan (Sze-chuan) people eat spicy food whereas those in the southeast prefer sweet? How different is living in wooden buildings in Jiangnan's watery towns from maintaining the cave dwelling on the semi-arid Loess Plateau? What prompted capitals of Chinese dynasties to move from the northwest to the eastern plains? All these questions speak to our fundamental curiosity: are we talking about a homogeneous China? Obviously not. This course explores the historical formation and transition of environmental, economic, social, and cultural diversities in a highly regionalized China.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Ling Zhang

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

HIST 4043 Environment, Economy and Politics in Medieval China Spring 3
Course Description

During the tenth through thirteenth centuries, China was believed to have experienced a “Medieval Economic Revolution.” Production surged; markets mushroomed. The Chinese enjoyed a higher living standard than people in the rest of the world. Questions are: How did this happen? And why didn’t it continue to grow into an industrial economy? This course explores these questions by investigating the environmental, political, and socio-economic transitions during this period.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Ling Zhang

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4044 The Environmental History of China Spring 3
Course Description

Do Beijing and Shanghai look the same to you? Why do Sichuan (Sze-chuan) people eat spicy food whereas those in the southeast prefer sweet? How different is living in wooden buildings in Jiangnan's watery towns from maintaining the cave dwelling on the semi-arid Loess Plateau? What prompted capitals of Chinese dynasties to move from the northwest to the eastern plains? All these questions speak to our fundamental curiosity: are we talking about a homogeneous China? Obviously not. This course explores the historical formation and transition of environmental, economic, social, and cultural diversities in a highly regionalized China.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Ling Zhang

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4045 The History of Medicine in China Fall 3
Course Description

This course covers fundamental concepts of Chinese medicine from its textual foundations in the Han dynasty (ca. 206 BCE-220 CE) to the present, illustrating the plasticity of China's medical traditions across the ages. Two-week units cover Chinese medicine from its philosophical and practical foundations through the formation of state medicine in the twentieth century. The class introduces Chinese medicine as a conglomeration of multiple traditions and bodies of knowledge that have suited distinct purposes throughout the course of history, and presents China's medical system as a living component of society, simultaneously responding to and shaping Chinese people's needs and desires.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Nicole Barnes

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

HIST 4048 Women and Gender in Modern China Spring 3 or 3
Course Description

How have Chinese defined what it means to be a proper "man" or a "woman"? How have these gender norms and ideologies shaped the life experiences and self-perceptions of individual men and women in modern China? How have they shaped Chinese social, political, economic, and cultural institutions? We will explore these questions by focusing primarily on Chinese women’s lives—and the changes in shared social ideas about what women should do and be—from the mid-19th century to the present. The central question animating the course is this: when we foreground gender as a category of analysis, how does history look different?


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Yajun Mo

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4050 Beyond Ricci:Christian History in China Since 1552 Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines Christianity in China from 1552, referencing the role of Jesuits during the late Ming-early Qing dynasties. It also integrates the Spring 2011 Burns Library exhibition - Binding Friendships: Ricci, China and Jesuit Cultural Learnings. Students consider the growth of the Chinese Christian communities as well as issues of cross-cultural exchange, in terms of religion and (perhaps surprisingly) also in disciplines like science, map-making, diplomacy and art. Topics include the decline of the Portuguese padroado, French expansionism and life since 1949. Students also participate in building an online site that responds to the exhibition.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jeremy Clarke

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfils the Non-Western Requirement for History majors

HIST 4075 From Sun Yat-sen to the Beijing Olympics Spring 3
Course Description

The World's Fair was held in Shanghai in May 2010. Sun Yat-sen was declared the first president of the Republic of China almost one hundred years earlier, thereby ending centuries of dynastic history. In the years since, in addition to great leaps forward and long marches, there have been wars civil and international, revolutions cultural and economic, and an Olympics thrown in as well. This survey course of twentieth-century Chinese history encompasses these tumultuous events as well as aspects of the political system, minorities, environment, human rights, and contemporary culture.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jeremy Clarke, S.J.

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills Non-Western requirement for History majors.

HIST 4076 Democracy Movement and Contemporary China Fall 3
Course Description

This course explores the Tian'anmen Movement as event, experience, and memory. It engages students to examine the rapid and often destabilizing shifts in China since the late 1970s - a period conventionally referred to as "the reform era." Using a variety of readings on the movement (including memoirs, official documents, propaganda, media coverage, and cultural productions in music and art), we will trace the effects of China’s earlier experiment with revolutionary socialism on the market-driven present, attending to ways in which the past shapes and haunts the contemporary situation.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Yajun Mo

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

HIST 4077 China Off Center Fall 3
Course Description

This course challenges the enduring image of China as a homogeneous society and culture by looking closely at many "marginalized" communities in Chinese society. Divided into different themes (such as language, ethnicity, region, religion, gender and sexuality, social economic class), it engages students to examine the cultural and social categories that made "China" diverse throughout its modern history. Scrutinizing how the image of a centralized "China" was created in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, this course also underlines the oftentimes-violent processes of homogenizing or erasing the immense variety of cultural lives and practices in China.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Yajun Mo

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4090 Introduction to Modern South Asia Spring 3
Course Description

This course is a survey of the history of the Indian subcontinent from Mughal times to Independence. Topics to be covered will include: the decline of the Mughal Empire, the rise of British rule and its impact, the Mutiny and Civilian Revolt of 1857, the invention of a traditional India in the nineteenth century, law and gender in British India, Gandhi and Indian nationalism, and independence and partition.


Instructor(s): Prasannan Parthasarathi

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

HIST 4122 Odysseys in the Western and Islamic Traditions Spring 3
Course Description

Bridging the traditional divide between "East" and "West," "Christendom" and "Islamdom" and viewing cultural production as rooted in the human experience, this course focuses upon similar literary and intellectual trajectories across Europe and the Middle East from antiquity to the late eighteenth century. We will examine a series of parallel texts that span the genres of epic, poetry, biography, autobiography and travel narrative. Students will be asked to read these texts in two ways: as an individual perspective (male or female) and as an odyssey - a literary repository of socio-cultural transformation and exchange.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Dana Sajdi and Sarah Ross

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

HIST 4125 Islamic Spain/Al-Andalus:Word,Monument&Image Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ICSP2260 ARTH2226

Comments:

HIST 4130 Islam and Christendom: Renaissance & Revolution,1400-1800 Spring 3
Course Description

Despite the assumption of an abiding abyss between Islam and the so-called West, the civilizations of Christendom and the Islamic world have developed paradoxically in close albeit, at times, conflicting parallel. This was particularly true in the Mediterranean world during the early modern period. This course demonstrates that the major historical developments from this period such as the Renaissance, Exploration, Expansion, Exploitation, the Reformations, state-building, and the Enlightenment can best be understood if they are set in the widest cultural context. It concentrates on how the intertwining of Christians, Muslims, and Jews shaped this era.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Benjamin Braude

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4131 History of the Ottoman Empire Fall 3
Course Description

The Ottoman Turks founded an empire spanning the three continents of the eastern hemisphere and enduring for nearly three-quarters of a millennium. Despite nomadic origins they established a stable political structure, which grafted the high traditions of Islamic culture onto an ethnically, linguistically, and religiously diverse society. This course explores the evolution of this remarkable enterprise from its origins on the frontiers of Byzantium and Islam through its heyday under Suleyman the Magnificent to its military decline and first steps toward reform.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Benjamin Braude

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

HIST 4132 Nationalism in the Middle East Compared: Pan-Turkism, Pan-Arabism & Zionism Spring 3
Course Description

Middle Eastern nationalism developed in a distinctive way. In contrast to Europe it placed more stress on religion than it did on language. In contrast to Africa it emerged prior to the rise of anti-colonialism. Although nationalist movements in the Middle East have spawn conflicts within themselves and with each other, they have displayed remarkable similarities to each other. One consistent similarity is their fraught attempts to distinguish the nation from the religious traditions out of which each emerged. This course will also address the thorny problem of how to define the phenomenon that it studies.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Benjamin Braude

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

HIST 4133 Mid-East Nationalisms Compared: Arab-Turkish-Jewish Fall 3
Course Description

Nationalisms in the Middle East developed in a distinctive way. In contrast to Europe, religion was more important than language. In contrast to Africa, they emerged prior to the rise of anti-colonialism. Although nationalisms in the Middle East have spawned conflicts within themselves and with each other, they have displayed remarkable similarities to each other. One consistent similarity is their fraught attempts to distinguish the so-called nation from the religious traditions out of which it emerged. This course will address these questions through comparing Arab, Jewish and Turkish nationalism in the 19th and 20th centuries.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Benjamin Braude

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

HIST 4134 The Ottoman Empire, 1300-1924 Fall 3
Course Description

The Ottoman Turks founded an empire spanning the three continents of the eastern hemisphere and enduring for nearly three-quarters of a millennium. Despite nomadic origins they established a stable political structure, which grafted the high traditions of Islamic culture onto an ethnically, linguistically, and religiously diverse society. This course explores the evolution of this remarkable enterprise from its origins on the frontiers of Byzantium and Islam through its heyday under Suleyman the Magnificent to its military decline and first steps toward reform.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Benjamin Braude

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

HIST 4135 History and Historiography of the Arab-Israeli Conflict Fall 3
Course Description

This course introduces students to the history of the Arab-Israeli conduct from the inception of the Zionist movement in the 19th century until the end of the 20th century. Given that history itself is a site of contestation in this conflict, the course will focus equally on the various and conflicting historical narratives and will explore fundamental issues in the relationship between history writing and ideology, especially the use of history as a tool for the shaping of collective identities and for legitimizing and justifying nationalist claims.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Dana Sajdi

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills Non-Western requirement for History Majors

HIST 4140 The Middle East in the Twentieth Century Spring 3
Course Description

Through the last eighty years the Middle East has been the site of many wars and conflicts. More recently it has become the most important source of the world's energy. This combination of strife and economic power has made it a vital and sensitive area for the entire globe.


Instructor(s): Benjamin Braude

Prerequisites: History Core, Part I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

HIST 4150 Modern Iran Fall 3
Course Description

This course will analyze the trends and transformations in the political, social, and cultural history of Iran from the late nineteenth century to the present. Particular emphasis will be placed on the following topics: Iran's encounter with the West in the nineteenth century and its impact on the country's economy and society, social and religious movements in the nineteenth century; the causes and consequences of the Constitutional Revolution of 1905-1909, Iran's modernization and political development under the Pahlavis (1925-1979), the causes and consequences of the Iranian Revolution of 1979, and Iran's postrevolutionary experience as an Islamic Republic.


Instructor(s): Ali Banuazizi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: POLI2420

Comments:

HIST 4190 Decolonization and the Cold War in Africa Fall 3
Course Description

After decades of organizing and protest, African colonies began to gain independence from imperial rule in the late 1950s. Newly sovereign nation-states were born into a turbulent Cold War world, which both provided unprecedented opportunities for political experimentation and posed significant threats to young Third World countries. Caught in the middle of geopolitical contests between Western and communist powers, Africans strove to navigate these complex global dynamics while forging nation-building programs and continuing to support ongoing liberation struggles. This course reflects upon this era of political upheaval and transformation, focusing on case studies from across sub-Saharan Africa.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Priya Lal

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with: AADS4190

Comments: Fulfills Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

HIST 4202 The Culture of Athenian Democracy Spring 3
Course Description

A political and cultural history of Athens during the creation and height of its democracy (circa 480-400 B.C.E.). The course will consider the Persian Wars and their effect on political and constitutional developments in Athens, the workings of the Athenian Democracy under Pericles, and the eventual collapse following the Peloponnesian War. Readings in translation include Thucydides, Plutarch, Aristotle, Xenophon, Plato, and the Greek playwrights (Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes). Emphasis will be on integrating historical, literary, and archaeological evidence to provide as complete a picture as possible of this dynamic period of ancient history.


Instructor(s): Gail Hoffman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: CLAS2254

Comments:

HIST 4211 Roman Religion Fall 3
Course Description

The Romans lived in a world full of gods; religion affected every part of Roman life, from politics to warfare to entertainment. Christianity took shape within this world, and Roman religion, especially the mystery cults, has often been regarded as a model for the early church. Yet the Roman concept of ‘religion’ has very little in common with modern, Judeo-Christian-influenced notions. In this class we will explore the theory and practice of religion in the ancient Roman world, as reflected in ancient literary texts, as well as in epigraphic and archaeological evidence. Themes include the nature of Roman worship, from state cult to magic and mysteries, the interplay between religion and politics, and the development of Christianity in its pagan context.


Instructor(s): Kendra Eshleman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: CLAS2242 THEO2241

Comments:

HIST 4220 Romans and Barbarians Fall 3
Course Description

One of the chief objectives of this course is to understand Rome's metamorphosis in the West, after the empire's fall, and to come to grips with changing notions of Romanitas--"Romaness"--from the second through the eighth centuries. The other objective is to understand the construction of power during this period: who had it, who lost it, how it was flaunted and used. We will discuss new sources of power invented in the period: relics, asceticism, military brotherhoods, elaborate burial, and ethnogenesis. The course will emphasize archaeological evidence as much as traditional textual evidence.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robin Fleming

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments: Not open to students who have taken HS 261

HIST 4221 The Vikings Spring 3
Course Description

This course will begin with an examination of fabled Norse cosmogony and then explore the "Old Sagas" and the "Icelandic Family Sagas," the former largely dedicated to heroic and epic/fantastic deeds, and the latter representative of life on a remote, often inclement, island. One primary goal is to explore how reliable sources are - annalistic, literary, and archeological. The course will also question how the Vikings influenced the world - from North America to Byzantium. It will close with an examination of "Viking assimilation," paying particular attention to the Anglo-Danish regnum, embodied in Cnut I, the "Viking" king of England.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robin Fleming

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4222 Animals Spring 3
Course Description

Animals—as pets, food, victims, endangered species or exhibits—traditionally have been defined by their relationship to human beings. Those relationships, however, change over time and do not always presuppose the animal’s biological reality. Hence people put pigs on trial for murder, kept weasels to control the population of basilisks, and made a dog into a saint. This course examines the history of animals until the cusp of the modern age through four themes: the science of animals, the utility or danger of animals in agrarian life, laws pertaining to animals, and the religious symbolism and power of animals.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Zachary Matus

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4224 Health and Healing in the Middle Ages Fall 3
Course Description

This course investigates the diagnosis, treatment, and social implications of ailments in the medieval West. Through discussion of secondary and primary source material, we will consider the ways in which scientific and religious assumptions informed and were informed by medieval concepts of human health. Topics of the course include herbal, magical, and alchemical remedies; medieval notions of disability; saints, shrines, and miracles; and the professionalization of medicine.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Zachary Matus

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4225 The Witch, the Church, and the Law Spring 3
Course Description

During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries a convergence of political, social, and religious movements produced thousands of trials for crimes of witchcraft, sorcery, and superstition throughout Europe and in North America. This course explores these trials, particularly emphasizing their legal and ecclesiastical aspects. Related issues of popular belief in sorcery, magic, and diabolical activity will also be considered. Attention will be devoted to the question of why women were so frequently among the accused.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Virginia Reinburg

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II; Not open to graduate students

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4230 The Age of the Renaissance Spring 3
Course Description

During the late fourteenth century, Europe was attacked by the Four Horsemen of the apocalypse: Disease, War, Famine, and Death. In the face of widespread catastrophe, men and women began to seek stability and truth in new ways, within and beyond the confines of state and church. The sum of the many solutions they found is what we call the Renaissance (1350-1650). This course introduces students to cultural and intellectual developments in Italy and Northern Europe, as well as European encounters with the New World.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Sarah Ross

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4231 History, Literature, and Art of Early Modern Rome Spring 3
Course Description

See course description in the Romance Languages and Literatures Department. Not open to students who have taken HS 232.


Instructor(s): Stephanie Leone, Franco A Mormando and Sarah Ross

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ARTH4480

Comments:

HIST 4232 Michelangelo and His World Spring 3
Course Description

An interdisciplinary exploration of the life and works of Michelangelo Buonarroti, sculptor, painter, architect and poet, one of the greatest artistic geniuses of Western civilization. Against the historical backdrop of the High Renaissance in Italy, we will study his works, both artistic and literary, examining their roots in the political, philosophical, religious, artistic, and cultural debates of his age as well as in his personal biography.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Benjamin Braude and Franco Mormando

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with: ITAL5521

Comments:

HIST 4239 Early Printed Books and Their Readers Fall 3
Course Description

In this course we will learn by both studying and making books. The course's topic is the revolution in ideas, culture, and technology spurred by Johan Gutenberg's invention of the printing press (c. 1450). We will read about printing, and study books from the Burns collections published before 1800. Finally, we will work with Barbara Adams Hebard in the book conservation lab, learning about paper, leather, and vellum, and making our own pamphlets and books to display in the lobby of O'Neill Library. Everyone will write a research paper and blog post.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Virginia Reinburg

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4240 The Reformation Fall 3
Course Description

This course will explore the religious and social history of the Protestant and Catholic Reformations. We shall examine in detail the major theological and ecclesiological questions of the sixteenth century. We shall consider these questions by focusing on the ideas and activities of Erasmus, Luther, Calvin, Ignatius Loyola, and Teresa of Avila. However, we shall also devote considerable attention to the opinions and religious practices of the ordinary believer, Protestant and Catholic, female and male, peasant and aristocrat.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Virginia Reinburg

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4241 The English Reformation Spring 3
Course Description

This lecture/discussion course will explore and analyze the developments in church polity, theology, worship, ministry, popular religion, and parish life that occurred in the Church in England from the reign of Henry VIII to the restoration of the monarchy following the English Civil Wars. A major objective is to understand the English religious experience as a lengthy process of multiple "reformations" that continued well into the seventeenth century. In sum, how the English became Anglicans.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Thomas Buckley, SJ

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4243 Religion and International Relations Fall 3
Course Description

This course aims to look at the role of religion in international affairs in historical perspective, beginning with the Peace of Westphalia of 1648. We will examine how religion was either causal or tangential, or some variation of the two, in the shaping of relations between nations over the past 500 years, with a particular focus on the 20th century. We will study several major world religions and explore how religious beliefs shaped diplomatic practice. We will consider: sovereignty, communism, clerical-fascism, religious "fundamentalism," Islam and the West, global political Catholicism, India and Hindu nationalism, China and the new Confucianism.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Charles Gallagher, S.J.

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4244 Global Political Catholicism Fall 3
Course Description

This class asks the question, "What has led to the creation and historical persistence of Catholic mass politics?" It begins its historical perspective in modernity, anchored by the publication of the social encyclical Rerum Novarum (1891) and ending with Catholic policy in the Obama Administration. We will look at how political parties, movements, and theologians interacted with the Vatican and the wider church. The European Church's phenomenon of "clerico-fascism" during the World War II era will be investigated. Regionally, we will look at how Catholicism has shaped political activism in China, Latin America, Europe, and the United States.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Charles Gallagher, S.J.

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4245 500 Years of Michelangelo's Chapel in History and Imagination Fall 3
Course Description

From 1508 to 1512 Michelangelo painted the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel in Rome. From 1536 to 1541 he completed its altar wall, "The Last Judgment." Together these works constitute one of the most amazing individual achievements in the history of imagination and creativity. They coincided with the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, the rising power of the Ottoman empire, and the achievements of the Renaissance. This course will set Michelangelo's works within their artistic, religious, political, and intellectual contexts and explore their significance.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Benjamin Braude

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with: THEO4409

Comments:

HIST 4246 From Diatribe to Dialogue Spring 3
Course Description

Christians and Jews, living together, have never ignored one another. Only in our times have these encounters begun to include positive affirmations of the other. To provide the student with a background for the contemporary situation, this course will explore various theological facets of the Jewish-Christian encounter, from the diatribes of earliest Christianity through the medieval disputations, concluding with the contemporary dialogue. Readings will be drawn from Jewish and Christian primary sources in translation.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Charles Gallagher and Ruth Langer

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4248 The Enlightenment Fall 3
Course Description

Debate over the meaning of “Enlightenment” began in the Eighteenth Century and has continued unabated ever since. Back then, Enlightenment “thinkers” from different countries pondered the nature of man and God; they questioned existing opinions on education, slavery, gender, and war; they shared revolutionary ideas about science, economics and politics. Ever since, scholars have grappled with the legacy of their insights, at once defending and criticizing the modern notion of “progress” that these spawned. This course offers an introduction to the many facets of Enlightenment thought, looking at both texts from the time and subsequent interpretations of this era.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Thomas Dodman

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4250 Human Rights as History Fall 3
Course Description

One of the major developments in world history since World War II has been the rise of a universal human rights culture. This course will explore this development in historical perspective, tracing the origins of the language of human rights back to the eighteenth century and the French Revolution and interrogating its development in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will examine the potential of "human rights" in international politics but also the limitations of human rights claims. We will ask who has rights and when and who the major actors are in pushing rights claims: governments, revolutionaries, and NGOs.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Devin Pendas

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4251 History of Ethnic Conflict&Genocide/20th Century Spring 3
Course Description

This course focuses on the history of ethnic conflict and genocide in the twentieth century. It begins with the Armenian genocide, and will include the starvation of millions of Ukrainians under Stalin, the Holocaust, and ethnic cleansing in Yugoslavia. The goal of the class will be to develop analytical tools to distinguish the causes of genocides in the twentieth century. To give a global perspective to these problems, there will also be several weeks devoted to the mass murders committed by the Khmer Rouge Regime in Cambodia, the Rwandan genocide, and the current crisis in the Sudan.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Balazs Szelenyi

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4252 History of Terrorism Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the genesis and shifting development of the phenomenon of terrorism in the modern era. We will investigate ideas and arguments behind the various forms of political terror that have emerged in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Emphasis will be placed on problematizing and historicizing the relationships between violence and democracy. Primary topics include the Terror of the French Revolution, anarchism, and totalitarian state terror. We will also have occasion to touch on anti-colonial violence, 1960s radicalism, and, obviously, Al-Qaeda and jihadism.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Julian Bourg

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4253 History of Racism Spring 3
Course Description

A broad chronological survey of a topic of major social significance. Themes are drawn from different cultures in order to establish what is distinctive to racism in the modern Euro-American world. Moving beyond white-black polarities in the United States, this course will complicate our understanding of race and racism, categories which themselves must not be taken for granted but instead must first be analyzed before the phenomena they supposedly define can be studied. These problematic categories must then be set in time and place so that we can understand how, when, and where they do or do not emerge.


Instructor(s): Benjamin Braude

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with: AADS3360

Comments:

HIST 4254 Century of Famine: Nineteenth Century Social Crisis Spring 3
Course Description

The nineteenth century is often conceptualized as a century of progress, both technological and social. The cost of that progress is less often explored. This course traces the relationship between the rapid economic development of an Industrial and Imperial Europe and the crisis of survival faced by many rural societies. Particular subjects of inquiry include the relationship between globalization and food security, trans-Atlantic ecological exchange, demographic and agricultural interactions, and the social and political consequences of famine. The first half will cover the Great Irish Famine of 1845-51; the second half will explore famine in China, India, and Brazil.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kevin O'Neill

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4259 Theories of Violence Spring 3
Course Description

This course exams critical theories of violence in their historical contexts. The unprecedented destruction of the twentieth century generated new ways of thinking about symbolic, structural, psychic, and bodily harm. Beyond traditional moral vocabularies such as just war theory, we will read challenging thinkers such as Hannah Arendt, Walter Benjamin, Carl Schmitt, Frantz Fanon, and Slavoj Zizek who have addressed the distinctive qualities of the violence of our own modern age. Our goal will be to grasp what these worthwhile theorists were saying as well as to grapple with the times in which they wrote.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Julian Bourg

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4260 The French Revolution and Napoleon Spring 3
Course Description

Few periods in history have been debated, attacked, and glorified, as much as the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Empire. The period 1789-1815 both ended the “old regime” and signaled the dawn of the “modern” world. It ushered in an age of liberty and equality, built nations and empire, generated terror and total war. This course provides an introduction to these extraordinary years, looking at the social, political, and cultural upheavals that affected France, Europe, and the Caribbean in this age of “democratic revolution."


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Thomas Dodman

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4261 French Visions of Empire Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines plans and practices of French overseas expansion from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries. From the Atlantic world to Africa and the Far East, it explores evolving forms of French colonialism including mercantile settlements, slave plantations, religious missions, scientific expeditions, settler and penal colonies. The course aims to historicize these in relation to questions of political economy, race, war, utopianism, and the contradictory impulses of Republican liberalism, ultimately attempting to view Haiti, Egypt, Algeria, Indochina, or Guiana as integral, if displaced, parts of metropolitan France. Open to graduate students and advanced undergraduates. No knowledge of French required.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Thomas Dodman

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4265 A 'polite and commercial' or a 'mad, bad and dangerous people': Imperial Britain in the Long 18th Century Fall 3
Course Description

The `long eighteenth century' in Britain was a period marked by great change but also by remarkable stability. Political, financial, and agricultural revolutions opened the period, the Enlightenment flourished throughout and the industrial revolution began to pick up steam at the close. And yet, the monarch, aristocracy and established church not only persisted, these foundational structures of the ancien régime grew stronger and more entrenched. In this course, we will examine this paradox. If Britain was the `first modern nation,' what role did tradition play in its making?


Instructor(s): Penelope Ismay

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4269 Irish Revolutions, 1580-1916 Fall 3
Course Description

This course will consider the long durée of political violence in Ireland. It is occasioned by the Centennial of the 1916 Revolution, April 24, 1916/2016 and will seek to place this 20th Century nation-forming event in the context of the history of colonialism and political violence during the modern era of Irish History. While political history will be a central theme, we will also consider the social and cultural dimensions of colonialism and resistance.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kevin O'Neill

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4270 Making it Irish: Cultural Revival and Revolution Spring 3
Course Description

This interdisciplinary course will explore the relationships between visual, literary and material culture, with examination of the early Medieval Irish sources for the nineteenth century Celtic Revival. Its focus is the 2016 McMullen Museum of Art exhibition, The Arts and Crafts Movement: Making it Irish, which will constitute the primary visual course text. The Arts and Crafts movement in Ireland occurred alongside the more prominent Literary Revival—both arising during a period of growing nationalist pressures that would culminate with the 1916 Easter Rising and in 1921, with independence. Scholars from Boston College and Ireland working on this exhibition will present lectures and lead workshops during the semester


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kevin O'Neill, Nancy Netzer, Robert Stanton and Vera Kreilkamp

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with: ARTH3318 ENGL3362

Comments:

HIST 4271 Early Modern Ireland: 1550-1800 Spring 3
Course Description

This course offers a survey of the main religious, social, economic and political changes that occurred in Ireland over the period 1550-1800. A particular feature of the course will be a focus on debates among historians concerning key developments such as the Reformation in Ireland, plantations in Ireland, rebellions in 1641 and 1798, and the economic development of the country. The course will conclude with an examination of the background to and reasons for the Irish Act of Union, 1800.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Tom Bartlett, Burns Scholar

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4272 Rural Ireland: The Inside story Spring 3
Course Description

This interdisciplinary course will explore the relationships between visual, textual, and material culture. Its focus is the 2012 McMullen Museum of Art exhibition "Rural Ireland: the Inside Story." It will explore the relationship between the material culture of rural Ireland in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and the different media that have attempted to represent it. Readings include historical sources as well as literary texts by authors such as William Carleton, John Synge, Flann O'Brien. Curators and scholars from Boston College, Ireland, and the U.S. who are working on this exhibition will present lectures and lead workshops during the semester.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Department of English, Department of History, Kevin O'Neill and Vera Kreilkamp

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with: ENGL2243

Comments:

HIST 4273 Irish Material Culture:1770-1930 Spring 3
Course Description

In 2012 the McMullen Museum will mount an exhibition about Irish "things" by displaying paintings of and artifacts from rural interiors. In anticipation of that exhibition, this interdisciplinary course explores the lives of Ireland's rural people by drawing upon the evidence of material culture. By examining written and visual historical records that document the fabrication, dissemination and use of ordinary objects like furniture, crockery, and religious icons the course will provide a new perspective on Irish rural economy and society. We will also explore the growing body of theory about the role and meaning of the things that surround us.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kevin O'Neill and Vera Kreilkamp

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4274 Eighteenth-Century Ireland Fall 3
Course Description

Ireland experienced dramatic and often violent social, economic and political changes as its place within the British political system and Atlantic culture emerged. These global changes coincided both with the emergence of a vibrant colonial culture represented by figures such as Jonathan Swift , Richard Brinsley Sheridan and Edmund Burke, and a persistent indigenous culture, outside the view of Anglo culture. This course will explore the interaction of Anglo and Gaelic Irish and the major historical events of the period: the emergence of the Penal system, colonial nationalism, republicanism, the Revolution of 1798 and the Act of Union.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kevin O'Neill

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4275 Politics and Literature in Eighteenth-Nineteenth Century Ireland Fall 3
Course Description

This course will examine the relationship between literature and politics in eighteenth and nineteenth century Ireland. Major works of Irish literature of the period will be considered in the light of their social and political origins, their subsequent effect on political conceptualization and action, and their place in the development of the Irish literary tradition. Among the writers to be considered are Swift, Merriman, Maria Edgeworth, William Carlton, Charles Kickham.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robert Savage

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4276 The Politics and Literature of the Irish Nation, 1800-1922 Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores Irish literature and history during a century of turbulent social and political change as Ireland moved from Union with Great Britain (1800) to rebellion and independence. (1921). By studying some key works of fiction, poetry and drama, we will examine contesting visions of national identity as well as evidence about Ireland's material culture. We will also explore the connections between literary works and the political rhetoric and actions of a rapidly changing society. Whenever appropriate, we will look at the cultural evidence of visual art as well.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kevin O'Neill

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with: ENGL4417

Comments:

HIST 4277 Ireland: Union to the Treaty Spring 3
Course Description

This course will examine the political, cultural, and social history of Ireland from the Act of Union (1801) that united the kingdoms of Ireland and Great Britain to the Anglo-Irish Treaty of 1921 that began their separation. Topics considered in detail include the Act of Union, Daniel O'Connell and the struggle for Catholic Emancipation, the Great Famine, the Land War, the Home Rule Crisis, the 1916 Rising, the War of Independence, and the Treaty of 1921.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robert Savage

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4278 Ireland Before the Famine Spring 3
Course Description

The course will focus on the social and economic determinants of Irish political history during the early Penal era, the Age of Revolution, the struggle for Catholic Emancipation, and the mid-century crisis. Themes explored will include economic development, sectarianism, republicanism, colonialism, and women's studies.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kevin O'Neill

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments: Not open to students who have taken HIST2450

HIST 4279 Ireland Since the Famine Spring 3
Course Description

This course will explore the complex political, cultural, and social history of Ireland since the Great Famine. Topics considered will include the Irish Famine, the emergence of the Irish Republican Brotherhood, Parnell and the Land War, Unionism, and the Crisis of Home Rule. We will also address the Gaelic and literary revival, woman's suffrage, the struggle for independence, Civil War and the partition of the island, economic development, The Troubles, and the emergence of the Celtic Tiger that has transformed Ireland over the past decade.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Oliver Rafferty, S.J.

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4280 Twentieth-Century Ireland Spring 3
Course Description

This course will explore the political, cultural and social history of Ireland in the twentieth century. Topics covered will include the Gaelic and literary revival, women's suffrage, the struggle for independence, civil war and the partition of the island. We will also examine economic development on both sides of the border and look at the civil unrest that has plagued Northern Ireland over the past thirty years. Particular attention will be devoted to the unfolding peace process and the role played by British, Irish and American leaders in trying to find a solution to "The Troubles."


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robert Savage

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4281 Film, Media and Modern Ireland Spring 3
Course Description

This course will use a variety of sources, including feature and documentary film, to address the transformation of twentieth century Irish society. Students will work with an array of primary and secondary sources to consider how the development of an indigenous film industry and an electronic media challenged and ultimately undermined a conservative political, cultural, and religious consensus that dominated life in post-independence Ireland.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robert Savage

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4282 History of Northern Ireland, 1912 to the Present Spring 3
Course Description

This course will explore in detail the origins of the political crisis in Northern Ireland. Particular attention will be paid to political, economic and social developments in the province. The turbulence of the last 28 years and the peace process which has successfully produced the landmark "Good Friday Agreement" will be examined. The course will consider the challenges that remain for the new Northern Ireland Assembly and how that body will function within Northern Ireland and work with the British and Irish governments.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robert Savage

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4283 Disunited Kingdom Fall 3
Course Description

This course will provide an overview of British and Irish history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries by exploring issues of nationalism and culture within both the United Kingdom and Ireland. Although Ireland and Irish-British relations will be the primary focus of the course, students will also consider how Scotland and Wales have developed dual identities which enable citizens of both nations to consider themselves "British" as well as Scottish or Welsh.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robert Savage

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4285 The Ends of Human History: 20th Century European Intellectual History Fall 3
Course Description

This course charts the development of European worldviews from 1870 to the present. Beginning with various crises in late-nineteenth-century rationalism, we will subsequently examine theoretical and artistic movements such as decadence, vitalism, psychoanalysis, futurism, surrealism, phenomenology, fascism, existentialism, structuralism, feminism, deconstruction, and postmodernism. The unifying thread in this story traces the gradual intensification of the modernist critique of modern life, a critique that ultimately fragmented in what has been understood as the postmodern moment. We will ask what meaning history and human beings can have in the wake of the catastrophes of the twentieth century.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Julian Bourg

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4286 History of Psychology Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

A hundred years ago, psychology was a tiny academic specialty called mental philosophy. In a matter of decades, however, psychology burgeoned into an enormous field influencing both scholars and the popular imagination (think IQ test, think analyst's couch). What accounts for the rise of psychology to its all-powerful position? This course will examine the twentieth century trajectory of psychology, asking how it has shaped, and been shaped by, cultural, social, and political conditions, and exploring major thinkers such as William James, Sigmund Freud, B.F. Skinner, Stanley Milgram, Abraham Maslow, and others.


Instructor(s): Nadine Weidman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL5590 PSYC5590

Comments:

HIST 4287 Reason and Revolt: Nineteenth Century European Intellectual History Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the history of European ideas from the mid-eighteenth century to the late nineteenth century. During this era, between the Enlightenment celebration of reason and the emergence of a revolutionary religion of progress, a triumphant and contradictory European modernity emerged. We will investigate this historical field by engaging works of philosophy, art, and political theory, exploring the many "-isms" of the nineteenth century: romanticism, realism, socialism, Marxism, liberalism, conservatism, anarchism, impressionism, naturalism, positivism, and scientism. Thinkers considered include Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Immanuel Kant, Edmund Burke, G.W.F. Hegel, John Stuart Mill, Karl Marx, Gustave Flaubert, and Charles Darwin.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Julian Bourg

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with: PHIL4287

Comments:

HIST 4288 The Ends of Man: Twentieth Century European Intellectual History Spring 3
Course Description


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Julian Bourg

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with: PHIL4288

Comments:

HIST 4290 Nazi Germany Spring 3
Course Description

Nazi Germany stands as one of the most obvious examples of evil in world history. Yet to think about the Third Reich historically means to understand that evil in all of its multiple dimensions: as a popular dictatorship, based on a radical social agenda domestically and an aggressive, expansionist foreign policy, and above all, in both cases, as a state based on explicit principles of racial community. This course will consider the Nazi regime as a social, political, military and ideological phenomenon, tracing it from its origins through its murderous apex to its final apocalyptic demise.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Devin Pendas

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4291 War Crimes Trials Fall 3
Course Description

The twentieth century has proven to be one of the most murderous in human history. The massive and in many ways unprecedented use of sytematic atrocities in this century have provoked an equally unprecendented response--so-called war crimes trials. In reality, this tem covers a broad range of legal responses to systematic mass atrocity international trials, domestic trials, and truth and reconciliation commissions. We will consider examples of all of these and the advantages and disadvantages of each approach before concluding with a general consideration of the limits and possiblities of the law in confronting such enormous crimes.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Devin Pendas

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4292 War and Genocide Spring 3
Course Description

Genocide has been one of the most tragic and disturbing global phenomena of the twentieth century. It has been truly global in scope, striking Asia, Africa, the Americas and Europe. In this course, we will explore the history of genocide and its relationship to war in global perspective, from the colonial genocides of the 19th century, the Armenian genocide in WW I, the Holocaust in WWII and the postcolonial genocides since 1945. We will also ask what might be done on an international level to combat genocide - either through military intervention or through legal prosecution.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Devin Pendas

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4293 Hitler, Churches, and the Holocaust Fall 3
Course Description

This course will examine the anti-Semitism and nationalism that weakened the churches' response to Hitler's policies. It will also analyze the theological and institutional resistance that emerged in response to totalitarianism and to the Holocaust as well as consider the post-Holocaust paradigm shift in theology.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Donald Dietrich

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4295 The End of History Fall 3
Course Description

The ending of the Cold War and the collapse of socialism prompted a lively and intense debate about "the end of history." This course will investigate how such a strange notion could have arisen and attracted such serious attention, and whether this debate has any continuing effect on historical understanding and interpretation. More specifically, does it retain any useful meaning more than a decade after the end of the Cold War and in the aftermath of September 11? Major events that led to the idea will provide perspectives with which to assess its relevance to the post-Cold War world.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): James Cronin

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4296 After the End of History Spring 3
Course Description

The end of the Cold War was both an end to a lengthy and bitter conflict but also the beginning of a new world. How would this new world be organized, who if anyone would dominate it, what issues, problems and conflicts would beset it? Would the institutions and values embodied in the post-Cold War framework prove applicable to the more global world in which they would have to operate? The course will begin by looking closely at the post-Cold War order and then examine its functioning in the contemporary world.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): James Cronin

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4297 Russia to 1917: Autocracy and Empire Fall 3
Course Description

In 1721, Peter the Great declared that Russia would be an Empire. That empire survived for almost two hundred years. This course will survey central issues in imperial Russian history, focusing on how the rulers of the Romanov dynasty solidified their rule and incorporated peoples of diverse cultures. Although Peter’s dream collapsed in 1917, the key question to be asked in this course is: given all the forces threatening to tear the Russian Empire apart for so long, how was it that it survived—and even expanded—for so long?


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Nicole Eaton

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4298 The Soviet Experiment Fall 3
Course Description

This course follows the rise and fall of the world's most influential socialist experiment. Combining lectures and discussions, the course explores the nature of the socialist revolution, the rapid and brutal transformation of city and countryside, the role of terror and belief in Soviet communism, the tragedy of the Second World War and ultimate victory, the Cold War, the collapse of communist regimes in 1989, and the fate of the Soviet successor states.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Nicole Eaton

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4301 Mexican Revolution Fall 3
Course Description

This course is an in-depth study of the Mexican Revolution, one of the most important developments in Latin America and the world's first social revolution of the twentieth century. Although we will focus on the years of revolutionary violence (1910-1917), the course begins with Mexican independence in 1810 and traces the roots of the Mexican Revolution through the pre-Revolutionary Porfiriato (1867-1910). We will also focus on the socioeconomic and political impact in the post-Revolutionary period between 1920-1940. In short, the Mexican Revolution will be a vehicle for studying the emergence of the modern Mexican nation.


Instructor(s): Zachary Morgan

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

HIST 4335 Religion in Latin American History Spring 3
Course Description

This upper level course looks at the various ways in which religious thought and practice have been inseparable from the course of Latin American and Caribbean history from the Pre-Conquest period to the present era. Emphasis is placed on the spiritual praxis of the pre-Conquest Andes and the subsequent consequences of the Christian conquest, debates about Christianity and Conquest on Hispaniola in the 1500s, Islam and slave rebellion, Vodun in the Haitian history, the Church and the Mexican Revolution, and Theology of Liberation.


Instructor(s): Deborah Levenson

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfils Non-Western requirement for History majors

HIST 4336 Latin American Women Represent Themselves Fall 3
Course Description

After reading one general history of women and gender in Latin America, students will read testimonies by Latin American women. We will deal with the problem of the structure women give to their own lives in their narratives, as well as with more straightforward issues such as the sexual division of labor, and the nature of family and of gender relations in Latin America. The testimonies will be used as windows into objective and subjective history and the ways in which these two intersect.


Instructor(s): Deborah Levenson

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

HIST 4341 Revolutionary Cuba: History and Politics Fall 3
Course Description

This course has as its focus Cuba's foreign and domestic policies since the revolution. Because Cuba is, in Fidel Castro's words, a "Latin African" country, some attention will be focused on the issue of race and the revolution in Cuba. Likewise, the history of Cuba's policies in Africa and the Caribbean will be looked at closely. It is, however, not a traditional course in diplomatic history. It explores the interface between domestic and foreign policy throughout, relating this to the specific case of Cuba since 1959.


Instructor(s): Frank Taylor

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with: AADS3325

Comments: Fulfills Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

HIST 4342 The Caribbean During the Cold War, 1962-1989 Spring 3
Course Description

The focus is the Caribbean, a vitally strategic area as attested to most recently by the U.S. invasions of the Dominican Republic in 1965, Grenada in 1983, and Panama in 1989. The efforts of these small states to overcome their vulnerabilities provide a most fascinating subject. Of added interest is the fact that outside of Africa, the Caribbean countries are virtually the only sovereign communities of people of African descent in the world. We will analyze the historical ambiance within which the states of the Commonwealth Caribbean operate and evaluate their attempts at maximizing their independence.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Frank Taylor

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with: AADS3329

Comments: Fulfills the Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

HIST 4343 Slave Societies in the Caribbean and Latin America Fall 3
Course Description

Over 90 percent of slaves imported into the Americas during the Atlantic slave trade were brought to the Caribbean Islands and South America. The Caribbean Islands received 42.2 percent of the total slave imports and South America 49.1 percent. Among the topics covered are the rise and fall of slavery, the economics of slave trading, slave demography, patterns of slave life, slave laws, slave resistance, slave culture, social structure, and the roles of the freed people. The compass of the course embraces a variety of English, French, Portuguese, Spanish, and Dutch speaking countries and a comparative approach.


Instructor(s): Frank Taylor

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with: AADS3373

Comments: Fulfills Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

HIST 4360 Modern Brazil Spring 3
Course Description

This course covers the making of the modern Brazilian state, from the rise of the Brazilian Empire in 1808 through the modern day. Through readings and the analysis of both popular and documentary films, we focus on the importance of race, class, and violence in the abolition of slavery, the rise of the state, the militarization of government, and the foundation of Brazil's modern government.


Instructor(s): Zachary Morgan

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with: AADS3211

Comments: Fulfills Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

HIST 4361 Slaves, Soldiers and Citizens: Afro-Latin America Fall 3
Course Description

The course examines the impact of slavery on the Americas, shifting the focus outside of the United States. We will examine the growth of the modern plantation in the 19th century (especially in Brazil and Cuba), examine the various paths to abolition we see throughout Latin America, and through a series of case studies, examine various forms of African-American identity and community. Additionally, we will look at the comparative abolition of slavery in the U.S. and Cuba as well the role of race in the struggle between Haitians and Dominicans on the island of Hispaniola.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Zachary Morgan

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

HIST 4362 Populism and Military Rule in Latin America Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the broad dynamics of political change in twentieth century Latin America by focusing on two specific models of governance. It examines Latin American politics from the rise of populism in the 1930s to the widespread collapse of democracy and establishment of military regimes in the 1960s-1970s. Through these patterns, we will consider the causes and consequences of industrialization, nationalization, authoritarianism, democratization, and neo-liberalism. The course will focus primarily on Argentina, Brazil, and Chile. We will consider theoretical approaches to Latin American history to understand both the general processes of change and differences that exist among these countries.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Zachary Morgan

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with: AADS3324

Comments: Fulfills Non-Western Requirement for History Majors; Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement

HIST 4370 Travelers in Latin America Fall 3
Course Description

This mixed lecture and discussion course for advanced students focuses on the travelers who have explored, described, and depicted Latin America from the colonial period to the 20th century. Travel diaries, autobiographies, novels, and artwork will illuminate the experience of travel and the condition of foreignness in Latin America. We will consider not only how travelers experienced Latin America, but how they created Latin America for readers in their home countries.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Sylvia Sellers-Garcia

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

HIST 4371 The Inquisition in Spain and Spanish America Spring 3
Course Description

This lecture and discussion course for advanced students will consider the development of the Spanish Inquisition from its medieval roots to its early nineteenth-century demise. Divided roughly between Spain and the Americas, we will consider the following topics: the medieval co-existence of Jews, Muslims, and Christians in Spain; the "re-conquest" of the Iberian peninsula in the 15th century and the formation of the inquisition; the theological debates of the 16th century that determined the scope of heresy. Our focus will be on using the Inquisition as an insight into early modern culture in both Spain and the Americas.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Sylvia Sellers-Garcia

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

HIST 4372 Memoir of Latin America Spring 3
Course Description

This course considers the history of Latin America, from the colonial period to the twentieth century, through memoir. The course has two themes: identity and evidence. Memoirs allow us to examine how authors construct their individual identities, but they also offer opportunities to reflect on how authors imagine and construct the national/imperial identity. Memoirs also give us the opportunity to think about methodology, in particular questions relating to evidence. How do authors remember the past? How do they change it when they write about it? To what extent are memoir writers more or less reliable as authors of history?


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Sylvia Sellers-Garcia

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4398 Perspectives in Latin American History Fall 3
Course Description

Throughout the twentieth century, Latin Americans addressed questions of history, political economy and cultural identity with urgency and passion. Whether defined in terms of populism, development, modernization, reform or revolution, social change and social justice were major themes of 20th century America. This course looks at some of the major discussions and discussants of the last century. We will study texts by individuals such as Roberto Swartz, Eduardo Galeano and Elena Poniatowska as well as those produced by movements.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Deborah Levenson

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments: Not open to students who have taken HS 676

HIST 4401 Early Modern British Expansion Spring 3
Course Description

During the Tudor and Stuart period (1485-1715), England set out to colonize the world, starting with Ireland and moving to North America and the Caribbean. In this course we will examine these colonial endeavors and attempt to answer several questions. Why did the English expand during this period? What were their primary motivations? How did they relate to the indigenous people? And most importantly, how did the conquest of Ireland relate to the simultaneous exploration and exploitation of the New World? Our sources will include primary accounts by English and Irish people as well as major historical scholarship.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Owen Stanwood

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4402 Natives and Newcomers in Early America Fall 3
Course Description

During the colonial period, North America transformed from a native place to a cultural melting pot where a variety of American, European, and African peoples vied for control of the continent. This course will examine the transformation of the continent from the perspective of its original inhabitants, viewing the changes in native lives and intercultural relations from the fifteenth to nineteenth centuries. Topics include trade and communication between Indians and Europeans; Indian slavery; transmission of Christianity; conquest and dispossession of native lands; development of political alliances and pan-Indian movements; and Indian policy in the early United States.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Owen Stanwood

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4403 Persecution and Toleration in the Atlantic World Spring 3
Course Description


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Owen Stanwood

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4404 The Papacy from its Origins until 1216 Spring 3
Course Description

The course will indicate the main developments in the papal office from the time of St. Peter until the end of the reign of Pope Innocent III. How did popes get to be rulers of central Italy? When and why do they use such titles as Sovereign Pontiff and Vicar of Christ? What is the extent of the power that the papacy claims for itself? Using primary and secondary texts the course will aim to give some understanding of the development of the papal office, and in particular look at the struggles between the sacred and the secular.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Oliver Rafferty

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4405 Colonial North America Spring 3
Course Description

This course covers the history of North America during the era of European colonization, roughly 1550-1800. Our focus is the process of colonization itself: the attempts by various Europeans to build new communities and societies. We begin with exploration and analyze the rationale behind colonization. The course will compare Spanish, French, English, Dutch, and Russian colonial projects, examining how colonists dealt with each other, their native and African neighbors, and the North American environment. Our task is to examine how all these peoples created a new world that was neither European nor American, but an odd hybrid of several cultures.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Owen Stanwood

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4407 The Old South Spring 3
Course Description

The course analyzes the settlement patterns, sectional distinctiveness, political ideology, development of slavery and the plantation system, abolitionism and the slavery defense, and the growth of Southern nationalism; and it evaluates the influence of these factors, particularly the South's commitment to slavery, in shaping Southern society.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Cynthia Lyerly

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4408 The Italian Renaissance Spring 3
Course Description

This course will explore the political, social, cultural, and religious developments in Italy between the thirteenth and sixteenth centuries. Reading a wide range of primary and secondary sources, we will critically address the concept of Renaissance and its usefulness for understanding this period of Italian and European history.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Alizah Holstein

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4410 Eighteenth Century America Spring 3
Course Description

The eighteenth century was a time of extreme paradox and rapid change in American history. It brought wider freedoms for whites yet slavery's expansion; the growth of cities yet the idealization of the rural farmer; and growing secularism and faith in reason alongside the emotional fervor of the Great Awakenings. In this course, we will explore the society, culture, and world views of eighteenth century Americans. The course will consist of reading and discussion, with some lectures and workshops on art and music.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Cynthia Lyerly

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4412 American Revolution, 1760-1805 Spring 3
Course Description

The revolutionary crisis in British America started small - as an arcane debate over parliamentary taxation - but by the end of the eighteenth century had helped to create a new world order. It created a new nation, divided what had been a remarkably cohesive British Empire, and provided a salient example to other people fighting against arbitrary power in such diverse locales as France, Ireland, and St. Domingue. This class will examine the causes, course, and outcomes of the Revolution - not just in the future United States, but from Europe to the Caribbean and the North American interior.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Owen Stanwood

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4420 American Civil War and Reconstruction Fall 3
Course Description

In this course, we will study how the wrenching changes of the Civil War era created modern America. We will study political and military developments from 1861 to 1865 and will also focus on changes in government, economy, and society in the North, South, and West during and immediately after the war years.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Heather Richardson

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094.

Cross listed with: AADS5514

Comments:

HIST 4421 1863: One Year in History & Literature Spring 3
Course Description

Boston College's founding took place in 1863 against a backdrop of local, national, and global transformation. This course will explore the historical and literary dimensions of that revolutionary year for the city of Boston and its surrounding communities as well as on the battlefields of the American Civil War. Particular attention will be paid to the following themes: the politics of emancipation; the evolution of transatlantic reform movements; emerging ideas in liberal political thought; and literary reflections on a revolutionary age.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): David Quigley

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4422 Race, Riots, and Rodeos: U.S., 1865-1900 Spring 3
Course Description

In this course we will study the years from the end of the Civil War to the beginning of the twentieth century. While these decades often seem confusing in texts that treat them topically, they are, in fact, some of the most exciting and coherent years in American history. We will look at Reconstruction, urbanization, cowboys, industrialists, laborers, Indians, immigrants, and so on, to see how Americans made sense of the dramatic changes of the post-Civil War years.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Heather Cox Richardson

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4423 The Plains Indians Spring 3
Course Description

This course will examine the changing experience of Plains Indians, primarily the Lakota, Cheyenne, Kiowa, Comanche, and Apache people-- from prehistory to the present using a number of different approaches, including autobiography, archaeology, environmental history, photography, and law.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Heather Cox Richardson

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4424 Age of Decision: Challenges to Industrial America,1877-1929 Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines some of the major personalities, events, and issues that shaped American history between the end of Reconstruction through the 1920s. These were pivotal years in which a modern economy took shape, and the U.S. emerged as a major force in world affairs. Yet, at every step of the way the American people disagreed sharply, sometimes even violently, over fundamental issues. By the 1920s, the U.S. had emerged as the world's leading industrial capitalist nation, and there would be no turning back.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Patrick Maney

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4425 The Frontier in the American Mind Spring 3
Course Description

This course will examine the conflict between image and reality in American history by focusing on the American West from the Colonial Era to the present. As we study historical events, music, books, and films, students will learn about "western" figures such as Daniel Boone, Jesse James, Red Cloud, Laura Ingalls Wilder, John Wayne, Lynyrd Skynyrd, and Sarah Palin, and examine why they are important for Americans' understanding of their country.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Heather Richardson

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4449 United States, 1929 - 1960 Fall 3
Course Description

This course will explore the significant political, economic, and social developments in the United States between the election of Woodrow Wilson and the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt. Among the topics to be examined are the Progressive Spirit, the emergence of a consumer society, the ethnic and religious tensions in American life, the Great Depression and the New Deal, and American involvement in this century's two World Wars.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Patrick Maney

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments: Course not open to students who have taken HIST4849.

HIST 4450 The U.S. Since 1960 Spring 3
Course Description

This course will explore the significant political, economic, and social developments in the United States since the end of World War II. Although the focus will be on domestic affairs, foreign policy will also be discussed to the extent that it affected internal events. Among the topics to be examined are post-war prosperity, the Red Scare, the struggle for racial and sexual equality, student protests in the 1960s, the problems of the modern presidency, and the contemporary crisis in the American economy.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Patrick Maney

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments: Course not open to students who have taken HIST4850

HIST 4451 Church and State in America Fall 3
Course Description

This course will explore the intersections of religion and law in American history. After initial lectures and readings about the origins of the American religious "settlement" as expressed in the First Amendment to the Constitution, it will examine both the legal and the religious issues involved in such controversial subjects as abortion, marriage, assisted suicide, and individual religious expression.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Alan Rogers and James O'Toole

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4452 Women and Religion in America Spring 3
Course Description

Religion has been a force for both repression and liberation in American women's lives. In this course we will explore the impact religions and religious ideas have had on women, the influence women have had on religion, and the way religion has functioned in women's lives. Themes we will cover include women in reform (from temperance, antislavery, western missions, opposition to war, and the civil rights movement), fundamentalism and the New Right, and racial, class, and ethnic diversity in religious experience, and religious expression in literature and music.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Cynthia Lynn Lyerly

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4453 Gender in American History Spring 3
Course Description

This course will explore changing and competing conceptions of manhood, womanhood, and gender relations in American history. Particular attention will be paid to the ways various constructions of gender have served the interests of a race, ideology, or class in American history, the relational nature of gender roles, and the ways prevailing gender ideals influenced men's and women's experiences in America.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Cynthia Lynn Lyerly

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4454 Early American Women Fall 3
Course Description

This lecture-discussion course explores American women from European contact to the Civil War. Themes include the diversity of women's experience, views of women, the family, social movements, work and the law.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Cynthia Lyerly

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4455 Modern American Women Spring 3
Course Description

This lecture-discussion course explores American women from the Civil War to the present. Themes include sexuality, the media, work, women in public life, suffrage and women's rights, and the diversity of women's experience.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Cynthia Lyerly

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4456 Seminar in College Teaching: Women's Studies Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

See course description in the History Department.


Instructor(s): Emily McWilliams

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL5603

Comments: Fulfills the Women Writers requirement for EN/LSOE majors.

HIST 4457 Gender and Migration Fall 3
Course Description

How does gender shape immigration and migration? How does it influence the lived experiences of migrants in the workplaces, families and communities? How does it shape migrants' perceptions and assimilation into U.S. society? How does it intersect with transnational practices and imaginaries? We will consider these questions through a study of migration to and within the United Sates from the late-19th-century to the present. The class considers a broad range of racial and ethnic groups while also attending to certain categories of migrants in an effort to understand the role of gender, race, and class in migration.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Arissa Oh

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4458 Nannies, Maids, and Mail Order Brides: Gender and Migration in U.S. History Fall 3
Course Description

How does gender shape immigration and migration? How does it influence the lived experiences of migrants in the workplaces, families and communities? How does it shape migrants' perceptions and assimilation into U.S. society? How does it intersect with transnational practices and imaginaries? We will consider these questions through a study of migration to and within the United Sates from the late-19th-century to the present. The class considers a broad range of racial and ethnic groups while also attending to certain categories of migrants in an effort to understand the role of gender, race, and class in migration.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Arissa Oh

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments: Not open to students who have taken HIST4457

HIST 4459 American Masculinities Spring 3
Course Description

This course surveys the history of masculinity in the United States from the colonial era to the late twentieth century. It explores how men and women have constructed ideas of manhood; how those ideas have been shaped by other categories of identity such as race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, and region; and how men have performed their identities as gendered beings. This course will examine the ways in which masculinity has been historically constituted in the United States and how men and women of varying backgrounds have affirmed, contested, and/or disrupted these historically-constituted meanings of manhood.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Martin Summers

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with: AADS4405

Comments:

HIST 4460 Reel Life: America's Workers in History and Film Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores the history of working-class America through history and film. Focusing on the twentieth century, we'll look at the changing American workplace and how different groups of workers - immigrants, African Americans, and women - experienced it and organized for change. At the same time, we'll also examine the "production" of history through film, assessing popular representations of workers from Charlie Chaplin's "Modern Times" to recent films about migrant labor and the globalization of work.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Marilynn Johnson

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4461 U.S. Constitutional History I Spring 3
Course Description

This course focuses on U.S. Constitutional history from the birth of the republic to the Civil War.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4462 U.S. Constitutional History II Spring 3
Course Description

This course focuses on the United States Supreme Court's interpretation of the Constitution. The presumption is that the Court's decisions reflect and shape American society's political, economic, social, and cultural history.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Alan Rogers

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4463 U.S. Bill of Rights Fall 3
Course Description

In 1791 the Bill of Rights were added to the United States Constitution. Aimed at protecting citizens' rights and liberties, they have alternately expanded and contracted throughout our history, largely because statements alone cannot guarantee rights and the proper role of government. Some groups within American society have sought to limit and others have worked to expand the reach of the Bill of Rights. This very issue has often divided the Supreme Court of the United States. These historic debates about how best to interpret and protect the rights of Americans are the focus of this course.


Instructor(s): Alan Rogers

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4464 The Death Penalty in American History Fall 3
Course Description

The death penalty is intertwined with the whole of American history. This course is about the many changes in capital punishment over the years -- changes in the arguments pro and con, in execution methods and rituals, in the laws, in the interpretation of the U.S. Constitution's Eighth Amendment, and in the public's perception of the need for, and efficacy of, the death penalty. We will explore this history and hopefully arrive at a better understanding of the paradoxes of the death penalty and why it exists.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Alan Rogers

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4465 Law and American Society Fall 3
Course Description

An examination of the role of the law in American life from colonial times to the present. This course is designed to acquaint the student with the influence of legal institutions upon the development of American political, social and economic patterns. Special attention will be given to the part played by the legal profession in the shaping of American society. This is not a course on the fine points of judicial logic, but a study of how Americans have viewed the law and use it to achieve their vision of a good society.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Mark Gelfand

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4466 Adoption and Kinship in America Fall 3
Course Description

In this class we will examine ideas of family and kinship by studying the history of adoption and family-making in the United States. How have Americans defined and enacted family and kinship? What is the relationship between these ideas and concepts of race, culture, class, gender, nation, rights, citizenship and identity? What do American practices of adoption tell us about how these concepts have changed over time? This course covers the period from the late 19th century to the late 20th century and examines policies, cultural representations, experiences and controversies through a variety of sources.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Arissa Oh

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4467 U.S. Constitutional History Spring 3
Course Description

Ratified in 1788, the United States Constitution is a remarkably terse document. Its brevity has required Americans and the Supreme Court of the United States to interpret the meaning of its provisions over time. For this reason, the legal issues that come before the Court chart the changes talking place in American society. We will follow those changes case by case.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Alan Rogers

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4469 American Catholic History Spring 3
Course Description

This course will examine the history of the Roman Catholic church in America from 1492 to the present. Though the territory which became the United States was first settled by Europeans, Catholicism has existed in a largely non-Catholic America. We will examine how the church defined itself in that context, exploring such issues as: the establishment of the organization of the church throughout the country; the role of priests and religious women; immigration and the changing nature of the Catholic population; nativism and anti-Catholicism; and the growth of education as a charitable institution.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): James O'Toole

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4470 Journalism and American Democracy Fall 3
Course Description

"Were it left to me," wrote Thomas Jefferson in 1787, "to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers, or newspapers without a government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter." The press (or to use the modern word, the media) occupies a unique place in the American system of government, acting as a watchdog on those exercising power and as a facilitator of public debate on major issues. Although the course will explore government efforts to stifle dissent, the focus will be on the media's efforts to inform and thereby shape the national agenda.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Mark Gelfand

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4471 Boston: History, Literature and Culture I Spring 3
Course Description

Covering the period from the arrival of the Winthrop Fleet in 1630 through the Civil War, this is the first half of a two-semester, interdisciplinary course on Boston's history, literature and culture broadly defined. Team-taught by a history and an English professor, and drawing on experts in the other areas (including music and visual arts), the class reads poetry, drama, fiction and nonfiction connected to Boston in relation to political and social developments. Site visits will take students out to the streets, museums, and archives of one of the most historic cities in the United States.


Instructor(s): Owen Stanwood and Paul Lewis

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL4501

Comments: Satisfies the pre-1900 requirement for the English major

HIST 4472 Boston: History, Literature and Culture II Fall 3
Course Description

Covering the period from the Civil War to the present, this is the second half of a two-semester, interdisciplinary course on Boston's history, literature, and culture. Team-taught by a History and an English professor, and drawing on faculty in other departments and experts in the Boston area to provide insights into Boston's culture broadly defined, the class examines Boston's literature, film, art, music, and other cultural forms in relation to political and social developments. Site visits will take students out to the streets, museums, and archives of one of the most historic cities in the United States.


Instructor(s): Carlo Rotella

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL4502

Comments:

HIST 4474 A Tale of Two Cities: New York and Boston Spring 3
Course Description

Although New York City is more than a dozen times larger than Boston (according to the 2010 Census, Gotham has nearly 8.2 million people and the Hub about 620,000), the two cities followed remarkably parallel courses through the 20th century. Both metropolises witnessed important transitions in the ethno-religious composition of their political leadership as well as significant divisions along racial lines. From schools to downtown development to transportation to cultural trends, a comparison of New York and Boston offers excellent insights into the American urban experience over the past 100 years.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Mark Gelfand

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4475 History of the American West Fall 3
Course Description

This course surveys the economic, political, social and cultural development of the trans-Mississippi west. Beginning with early European conquest of the region, the course explores the history of the Western frontier as a zone of contact and conflict between Euro-Americans, Indians and Asian immigrants. We will also examine the rise of the modern urban West to a position of power in the twentieth century.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Marilynn Johnson

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4476 Social Action in America Spring 3
Course Description

This service-learning course examines the history of social action in twentieth-century America. In an effort to understand how systems of power have shaped race, class, and gender relations, fostered inequality, and spurred activism, we will conduct case studies of several liberal and radical social movements including settlement houses, the labor movement, Alinsky-style community organizing, southern civil rights, and the War on Poverty. Students in the class must also participate in a local community service/action project for at least 3 hours per week, the functions and history of which will be the subject of classroom discussion, service reflection, and research.


Instructor(s): Marilynn Johnson

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with: AADS5570

Comments:

HIST 4481 History of Black Nationalism Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the evolution and diversity of Black Nationalism and nationalist ideologies in the United States from the early nineteenth century through the present. Detailed study of several distinct nationalistic strategies, including emigrationist, separatist, cultural, and accomodationist, and their proponents will allow students to analyze and compare the forces influencing the evolution, proliferation, retrenchment, and resurgence of nationalist constructs at various points in African American history.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Karen Miller

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with: AADS4481

Comments:

HIST 4482 Ghana and the U.S.: Historical and Cultural Connections Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines selected historical and cultural intersections between Ghana, West Africa and the United States. We explore "African" and "American" components of African American identity through course readings, film and lectures that focus on four connected areas: slavery/slave trade, civil rights/independence movements, emigration/immigration, and identity/cultural exchange. Ghana is uniquely situated for such comparative study because of its recurring presence in the unfolding of African American history, including its roles as inspiration to Martin Luther King, home to scholar WEB DuBois, haven to African American emigrants, and producer of the kente cloth many wear.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Karen Miller

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II.

Cross listed with: AADS4482

Comments: Satisfies AADS Minor Requirements.

HIST 4483 African American Life Stories Fall 3
Course Description

A recurring theme in African American life histories is the narration of the moment when the black subject or author first becomes aware of himself/herself as a racial being in a society in which blackness has meaning. This course examines how these kinds of moments shaped individual perspectives of personal and racial identity and uses narratives and autobiographies to analyze how meanings of blackness are shaped by region, class, gender, sexuality, and historical context.


Instructor(s): Karen Miller

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with: AADS4483

Comments:

HIST 4484 Gender and Sexuality in African American History Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the intersections of gender and sexuality as both categories of identity and modes of power in the shaping of the historical experiences of African Americans. Through readings and lecture, we will explore three broad and interconnecting themes: how cultural understandings of race have impacted cultural understandings of gender and sexuality (and vice versa); how dominant cultural notions of gender and sexuality have underpinned relations of power between blacks and whites; and how gender and sexuality have shaped relationships within African American communities.


Instructor(s): Martin Summers

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with: AADS3340

Comments:

HIST 4485 History of Medicine and Public Health in the African Diaspora Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the historical relationships between race, medicine, and health care from the era of New World slavery to the age of AIDS. In doing so, we will pay particular attention to the role of ideas of racial difference in the production of medical knowledge, the historical persistence of racial disparities in the delivery of health care, and folk and professional healing within the African American community.


Instructor(s): Martin Summers

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with: AADS5533

Comments:

HIST 4486 Health and Disease in the African American Experience Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines the historical relationships between race, medicine, and health care from the era of New World slavery to the age of AIDS. In doing so, we will pay particular attention to the role of ideas of racial difference in the production of medical knowledge, the historical persistence of racial disparities in the delivery of health care, and folk and professional healing within the African American community.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Martin Summers

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with: AADS5385

Comments:

HIST 4491 American Immigration I: to 1924 Fall 3
Course Description

This is the first half of a two-semester sequence on American immigration. The first half covers the period up to 1924 and the second half from 1924 to the present. Each half can be taken independently of the other. This semester we focus on the interaction between Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans; voluntary and involuntary migration; the impact of the American Revolution; the onset of mass immigration from Europe; the politics of nativism, slavery, and citizenship in the era of the Civil War; and the onset of federal regulation of immigration in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kevin Kenny

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with: AADS5565

Comments:

HIST 4492 American Immigration II: (from 1924) Spring 3
Course Description

This is the second half of a two-semester lecture course on American immigration. The first half covers the period up to 1924 and the second from 1924 to the present. Each half can be taken independently of the other. This semester we examine the history of Irish, Italian, Jewish, Latino, and Asian Americans since the Immigration Restriction Act of 1924, with particular attention to the overseas origins of migration; patterns of settlement and mobility; questions of ethnicity, race, labor, and class; anti-immigrant sentiment; and government policy.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4494 Asian-Americans & U.S. Wars Fall 3
Course Description

Wars have been central to the relationship between the United States and Asia and to the history of Asian Americans. This course explores the ways in which twentieth century American wars, in Asia and elsewhere, have transformed migrations between Asia and the U.S. as well as war's impact on Asian Americans, social, economic, political, and cultural life. Rather than emphasizing geopolitics, we will focus on themes of migration, citizenship and U.S. imperialism, nationalism, and transnationalism. The broad scope of this course will also allow us to examine such concepts as race, gender, national identity, power, and cultural representations.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Arissa Oh

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4495 U.S. Foreign Policy I Fall 3
Course Description

This course is the first half of a two semester survey of the history of U.S. foreign relations from the Revolutionary War through the present day. Students will examine conflicting interpretations of America's role in the world and trace how that role has changed as the nation grew from thirteen isolated, parochial communities on the Atlantic coast to the greatest military and economic superpower in history. Important topics include the territorial expansion of the American empire, the development of - and debate over - constitutional powers, and the struggle for American markets in Asia and elsewhere.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Seth Jacobs

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4496 U.S. Foreign Policy II, 1945-Present Spring 3
Course Description

The continuation of HIST4495


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Seth Jacobs

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4497 Terrorism in America Spring 3
Course Description

The aim of this course is to show how terror and violence have affected the United States from the late nineteenth century up to 9/11 and through the current U.S. military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. It aims to show that while differing in scope and human loss, the latter events, including the so-called Global War on Terror, have certain antecedents in the U.S. experience. The course will concentrate on the theme of terror, both domestic and foreign, and examine the government response to terror and subversive groups aiming to overthrow the government or inflict harm upon its citizens.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Charles Gallagher, S.J.

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4498 The American Pacific Fall 3
Course Description

This course explores the U.S.’ role in constructing and perpetuating an American Pacific. How have Americans imagined, understood and interacted with the people and nations in and around the Pacific Ocean? How have relations with the nations of the Pacific Rim influenced Americans' view of themselves? How have economic, cultural and military activities contributed to America's rise as an imperialist power in this region? Rather than focusing on high politics and diplomacy, we will examine the American Pacific as a cultural, gendered, racial, military and political project, and explore themes such as empire, migration, race, sex and war.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Arissa Oh

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4502 History, Memory, Media in the Twentieth Century Fall 3
Course Description

This discussion-based course introduces students to the main theories, debates, and practices of historical memory from interwar modernism and wartime propaganda to the postwar crisis of memory in the face of mass atrocities and contemporary struggles with truth claims in the age of historical restitution. The course takes a global view with examples from around the world, but the memory of World War II-related injustices in Europe and Asia looms large. Emphasis is placed on exploring different media of memory, including rituals, memorials, trials, literature, and art.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Franziska Seraphim

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4503 The Papacy from its Origins until 1216 Fall 3
Course Description

The course will indicate the main developments in the papal office from the time of St. Peter until the end of the reign of Pope Innocent III. How did popes get to be rulers of central Italy? When and why do they use such titles as Sovereign Pontiff and Vicar of Christ? What is the extent of the power that the papacy claims for itself? Using primary and secondary texts the course will aim to give some understanding of the development of the papal office, and in particular look at the struggles between the sacred and the secular.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Oliver Rafferty

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4507 Jesuits and the Making of Religious Pluralism Fall 3
Course Description

This course explores the making of religious pluralism from a global perspective—how religions have moved from the Mosaic monotheistic distinction of “true” and “false” religion and the related system of classification of one “true religion” in opposition to all others—“schismatics” (Orthodox Christians), “heretics” (Protestants sects), “infidels” (Jews and Muslims) and “pagans” (idolatrous heathens). This course will help develop an understanding of the historical roots of religious pluralism, recognize the influence of the Jesuits on its emergence; and encourage the sense of tolerance that results from an understanding and awareness of the histories of different religions in global perspective.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robert Maryks

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4551 American Hate Spring 3
Course Description

Racism is, unfortunately, as American as apple pie and baseball. This course explores the roots of racial hatred and the changes in American racism over time. In addition to studying the ideas that buttress racism, this course will examine case studies of racism in practice, such as the Tuskegee syphilis experiment, convict leasing, segregated recreation, the Trail of Tears and Japanese internment.


Instructor(s): Cynthia Lynn Lyerly

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4552 Race, Rights and the Law Fall 3
Course Description

This course is organized around a question recently raised by Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor: What role should the long dark history and the contemporary reality of racism in the United States play in the Court’s decision making? Students will explore the checkered relationship between race, rights - both civil and criminal - and the law, beginning with slavery and culminating with the so-called Ferguson effect. Students will read, discuss and write about major Court decisions, look behind the law for evidence of cultural and political bias, and note how American politicians and jurists have "played the race card."


Instructor(s): Alan Rogers

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4601 Capstone: Boston College/Your Life Spring 3
Course Description

This seminar will focus on the historical development of Boston College and the continually evolving interaction between its traditions and its students. Students will do archival research on some aspect of Boston College in which they have a personal interest and will record oral histories with faculty, administrators, and alumni who can describe the ambiance and personalities of different periods that have shaped the modern university. All students will write a series of reflective essays on their experience with Boston College traditions and the impact it has had on their own personal views of themselves, their pasts, and their futures.


Instructor(s): J. Joseph Burns

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: UNCP5532

Comments: You can take a Capstone class only as a senior or second-semester junior.
Capstone classes may not be taken Pass/Fail.
You may take only one Capstone class before graduation.

HIST 4701 Ecological History of the Atlantic World Fall 3
Course Description

This course will explore several major themes of environmental history in an Atlantic context. Major topics will include: the settlement of North America, the development of the plantation system, the Industrial Revolution, and the development of a world market in environmental resources. Our goal is to gain both an understanding of the historical process of ecological change, and the way in which historians and others have tried to understand these changes. Readings will include both pioneering historical works and recent works that have brought this field into more of a popular historical discourse.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kevin O'Neill

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4702 Feast or Famine? Food and the Environment Spring 3
Course Description

Through most of history the primary quest of humans has been to obtain sufficient food for survival. This course will explore the evolving relationships between that quest and the environment. Topics will include: climate change, the domestication of plants and animals, the development of settled agricultural societies, the Columbian exchange of biota, plantation and state sponsored agriculture, and the emergence of agro-business. We will explore the role of both individual crops/commodities such as sugar, chocolate, cod, corn and the potato, and the environmental systems of which they were part.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kevin O'Neill

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4703 Environmental Histories of Water Spring 3
Course Description

This course introduces students to the practice of environmental history with a thematic focus on water. While offering students a basic theoretical and methodological training of environmental history, the course guides students through intensive reading about various water bodies and water-related issues (ecological, political, social, economic, cultural, conceptual, etc.) in different parts of the world during both pre-modern and modern eras. In addition to lectures, readings, and discussion, each student will identify a specific water body or water issue as his or her research topic and carry out an individual project.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Ling Zhang

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4704 "This Land is Your Land": U.S. Environmental History Fall 3
Course Description

This courses surveys main themes and events in the environmental history of the United States. We move forward from colonial-era differences in land use through contemporary environmental debates. We ask how American communities have used, defined, and fought over places and resources, from bison herds to nuclear stockpiles. We investigate intriguing aspects of our local Massachusetts environment: the Emerald Necklace of parks, the brass hoof prints of Harvard Square, even our nearby reservoir. No background in history is necessary to thrive in this class. Students in the sciences are welcome.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Conevery Valencius

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4711 The War That Never Ends Spring 3
Course Description

TBD


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Seth Jacobs

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Course not open to students who have taken HIST2475, The Viet Nam War

HIST 4803 Late Imperial China Fall 3
Course Description

In the course of the three centuries between 1600 and 1900, the Chinese empire soared to new heights of expansion and power and sank to fatal depths of disunity and revolt. By 1912, the last imperial dynasty had been overthrown in the name of nationalism, democracy and revolution.This course traces the complex history of this time by examining how the empire was constructed and deconstructed—culturally, socially and politically. Class assignments will help uncover a variety of Chinese voices, both as mediated by scholars, filmmakers and others, and as expressed more directly in primary sources in translation.


Instructor(s): Rebecca Nedostup

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills Non-Western requirement for History Majors.

HIST 4805 Nationalism and History Wars in East Asia Fall 3
Course Description

This discussion-based course explores the relationship between nationalism, collective memory, and public commemoration in East Asia. Conflicts among China, Korea, and Japan are not limited to apologies for wartime atrocities but extend to temporal and spatial boundaries and “ownership” of the region’s ancient kingdoms. Focusing on a variety of current territorial disputes, we will examine issues surrounding historical facts and interpretations as they relate to questions of sovereignty, both ancient and modern.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4806 Borderlands in Modern Chinese History Spring 3
Course Description

This course will trace the origins of Chinese cultural identity, the identities of groups on the shifting frontiers of China, and the history of interactions between these communities. We will begin with terminology: what do terms like culture, ethnicity, nation, and identity mean? What do they mean when applied to China? We will then discuss the expansion of China’s borders in late imperial times and the development of ideas about nation, ethnicity, and race in the early twentieth century. Finally, we will explore the Chinese Communist Party's conceptions of nominal autonomy for ethnic minorities and a "unity of nationalities."


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Steven Pieragastini

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the non-Western requirement for History Majors

HIST 4810 Black Modernity Fall 3
Course Description

An interdisciplinary approach will be used to examine the historical, social, and cultural contexts for Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man. Specifically, bringing historical and cultural analysis to bear on a single work of fiction, this course will survey key themes in African American life from 1899 to 1950 including migration, urbanization, the black modern aesthetic, black radicalism and black nationalism. With W.E.B. DuBois' concept of "double consciousness" in mind, the course explores how the black subject is in many ways both outside of, yet central, to the modern experience.


Instructor(s): Davarian Baldwin

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments: Not open to students who have previously taken HS 510/BK 510 "Ellison's Invisible Man"

HIST 4811 African Slave Trade Spring 3
Course Description

From antiquity to the late nineteenth century Black Africans were sold as slaves to the far corners of the world. This course examines the origins of this nefarious trade with particular emphasis on the trans-Atlantic slave trade that began in the sixteenth century. Topics include the economic, political, and moral dimensions of the trade, including ways in which slaves were obtained in Africa, their transport to the New World, the slave systems that were established there, and the campaign to end the trade in African slaves.


Instructor(s): David Northrup

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfils Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

HIST 4812 Race, Class, and Ethnicity and the Struggle for Human Rights in America, 1941 to Present Spring 3
Course Description

This course will explore the history of cities in the United States, and the role of race and ethnicity in shaping urban America. Using an array of scholarly texts and primary source documents, as well as music, film, and visual art, this course will trace the social and cultural history of U.S. cities. Topics will include: the formation of early-twentieth century immigrant/ethnic communities from Europe, Latin America, and Asia; the Great Migrations of African Americans to the urban North; white flight and urban economic decline after WWII; radical anti-racism in the 1960s and 70s; and the rise of "Global Cities."


Instructor(s): Llana Barber

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4816 Chinese Politics as Cultural Experience Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines politics of everyday life in China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong during the past 150 years, beginning with the cultural system of the imperial state and continuing through the rise of the nation-state, colonialism, and the development of parties and mass political participation. We will consider the influence of trauma, humiliation, pride, localism, and universalism as modern political themes. Readings and media explore the street theater of democracy and protest; the role of grass-roots, student, and worker associations; religion and ritual; feminism; environmentalism; and other movements outside of high-level maneuverings. This course is reading and discussion intensive.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Rebecca Nedostup

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills Non-Western requirement for History Majors.

HIST 4817 The Making and Unmaking of Memory in 20th Century America Fall 3
Course Description

This course will explore the dynamic interrelationship between memory and history in twentieth-century America. The contested creation and perpetuation of memories are often grounded in contemporary concerns and are crucial to the formation of personal and public identities. Students will be introduced to the interdisciplinary methods and theory behind the historical study of memory and mediums of memory including the state, monuments, museums, films, and photography. The course will conclude with several case studies - the American Civil War, New England living history, the Vietnam Memorial, the Enola Gay, and 9/11 - to further illuminate the understanding of historical memory.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Sarah Nytroe

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4818 Twentieth-Century Catholic Imagination: Beyond Morality Into Mystery Spring 3
Course Description

Late nineteenth-century positivism reduced the boundaries of the "real" to the "observable." In reaction, Catholic philosophers, writers and artists constructed their own world which took them from "morality into metaphysics." This course will sample some of those representations of mystery throughout the twentieth-century, including philosophers Marcel and Maritain; memoirs of Raissa Maritain and Dorothy Day; fiction of Mauriac, Bernanos, Greene, Flannery O'Connor, Jack Kerouac, Andr Dubus and Fenton Johnson; essays of Annie Dillard; poetry of Denise Levertov; painting by Denis and Rouault; music of Messiaen and Durufl; and films by Bresson, Fellini and Kieslowski.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Stephen Schloesser, S.J.

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4821 Irish Women Emigrants: The Irish and American Contexts Fall 3
Course Description

An outstanding characteristic of emigration from Ireland to North America was the large number of women in the emigration stream. This seminar course will examine Irish women and emigration beginning with a study of conditions in Ireland that resulted in women leaving in such large numbers. Following that will be an examination of their experience as immigrants in North America. Emphasis in the course will be on the use of research tools in historical work on Irish women, utilizing primary source materials such as estate papers, the letters women wrote home, and database characteristics of Irish women in America.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Ruth Ann Harris

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4822 Church and State in 20th Century Ireland Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines select themes in the history of church and state in Ireland from the outbreak of World War I to the end of the century. Using primary sources, it analyzes the response of the Catholic Church and the Holy See to revolution in Ireland between 1916 and 1922 and reviews its role in building the Irish state. Particular emphasis is laid on the history of the writing of the 1937 constitution. The reaction to modernization in the 1960s is examined, as are the reasons for the growing clashes between church and state in the 1980s and 1990s.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4823 Ireland at War in the Twentieth Century Fall 3
Course Description

Twentieth century Ireland seemed a country imbued with violence. This was not simply because of the Easter Rising of 1916 and the War of Independence, 1919-21. The warlike propensities of the Irish had already been demonstrated by Irish involvement in the Boer War 1899-1902. These events set the parameters of what happened in Ireland in the rest of the century and included such things as the Civil War 1922-23, the activity of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) in the 1930s, 40, and 50s. Ireland’s participation in both world wars and the violence of The Troubles 1969-98 will also be examined.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Oliver Rafferty, S.J.

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4824 Making Memory: History, Story, Image Fall 3
Course Description

1916 marks the 100-year anniversary of the Easter Rising that began Ireland's struggle for independence and the fateful Battle of the Somme that witnessed the decimation of the 36th Ulster Regiment during WW I. Both events proved seminal within a divided Ireland and both were defined as "blood sacrifices." The goal of this course is to explore the contested history of Ireland and Britain by focusing on these events and the commemorations that will mark the upcoming centenary. An interdisciplinary course, we will work with Philosophy and Studio Art.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Richard Kearney, Robert Savage and Sheila Gallagher

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with: PHIL6686 ARTS3345

Comments:

HIST 4825 Twentieth-Century Britain Fall 3
Course Description

A survey of Great Britain since 1900, concentrating on social and economic history. The course deals with such topics as the decline of Britain's economic superiority, changes in social structure, the rise of the working class, changes in political ideologies, and the growth of the welfare state.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Peter Weiler

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4828 Religion in Chinese Society Fall 3
Course Description

Categories that we take for granted, such as church/state, sacred/secular and supernatural atural, do not always fit how religious phenomena either occur or are discussed in Chinese society. Daoism, Buddhism and the monotheisms have both intermingled with popular practices and the imperial cult, and opposed them. This course looks at the wide variety of Chinese religion in historical context, exploring its relation to such topics as gender, class, village and urban life and social rest and unrest. It will also address how the rise of the nation-state and notions of modernity have altered the perception and practice of religion.


Instructor(s): Rebecca Nedostup

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfils Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

HIST 4832 Afro-Latin America Fall 3
Course Description

The course examines the impact of slavery on the Americas, shifting the focus outside of the United States. We will examine the growth of the modern plantation in the 19th century (especially in Brazil and Cuba), examine the various paths to abolition we see throughout Latin America, and through a series of case studies, examine various forms of African-American identity and community. Additionally, we will look at the comparative abolition of slavery in the U.S. and Cuba as well the role of race in the struggle between Haitians and Dominicans on the island of Hispaniola.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Zachary Morgan

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with: AADS3331

Comments: Fulfills Non-Western requirement for history majors

HIST 4843 Eastern and East Central Europe during the Short Twentieth Century Fall 3
Course Description

This course explores the turbulent and violent history of Eastern and East Central Europe during the short twentieth century (from 1918 to 1994). Its goal is to give students a comparative international perspective of the different historical evolutions of Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Romania, and Yugoslavia from the end of World War I to the collapse of Communism and the breakup of Yugoslavia. We will focus on the following topics: the rise of fascism; World War II; the Holocaust; the adoption of the Soviet model; the impact of Stalinism; the collapse of communism; and finally, the civil war in Yugoslavia.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Balazs Szelenyi

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4845 Facing the Past in Post-World War II Europe: Nazis, Collaborators, Bystanders, Resisters Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the political and intellectual legacies of the interwar years and World War II in Europe. Across the continent, people did not only face the challenge of material rebuilding, but they were also forced to confront the intellectual and political consequences of fascism, National Socialism, collaboration, resistance, and civil war. We will study European societies on both sides of the Iron Curtain and ask to what degree the processes of confronting the past in Eastern and Western Europe were influenced by the specific postwar conditions.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Philipp Stelzel

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4846 The Holocaust: A Moral History Spring 3
Course Description

The tragic event that ruptured modern western morality will be examined from a variety of perspectives. We shall study the testimony of both its victims and its perpetrators. Special attention will be given to consideration of the intellectual and moral factors which motivated resistance or excused indifference. We shall conclude with interpretations of its meaning for contemporary morality and of its theological significance for Christians and Jews.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): James W. Bernauer, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: THEO4456 PHIL4456

Comments:

HIST 4849 Emergence of Modern America, 1917-1945 Fall 3
Course Description

Covers U.S. domestic and foreign affairs from World War I through World War II. Topics include World War I; the 1920s - myths and realities; Depression America; Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt and the emergence of the modern presidency; and World War II, at home and abroad.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Patrick Maney

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4850 Paths to the Present: U.S. Since 1945 Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines some of the major personalities, events, and issues that shaped American history from the end of World War II to the Present. Topics include the Cold War and McCarthyism, the turbulent 60s, Vietnam, the civil rights and women's movements, Watergate, the rise of conservatism, and the modern presidency from Truman to Obama.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Patrick Maney

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4853 Russia and the Cold War Fall 3
Course Description

A survey of twentieth century foreign relations and military history under successive Russian leaders from Lenin to Putin, with particular emphasis on the period after World War II. Topics to be covered include the Russian Revolution and its challenge to the international order, the two World Wars, the Cold War, the nuclear arms race, Dtente, the fall of Communism and disintegration of the USSR, withdrawal from Eastern Europe, the two Chechen Wars, and Putin's efforts to emerge from Russia's crisis and diplomatic isolation via Entente with China, the U.S., and NATO in the new War Against Terrorism.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Roberta Manning

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4854 Twentieth and Twenty-First Century Russia Spring 3
Course Description

Whither Russia? What does the future hold in store for the world's largest nation, which has long surprised, amazed, horrified, and astonished outside observers? We will seek to answer this question by surveying this nation's stormy course from Tsar Nicholas II to Putin and Medvedev, with emphasis on the Soviet period. Topics include the revolutionary movement, the Revolutions of 1905 and 1917, the Civil War, the NEP, Stalinism, industrialization, collectivization, political terror, World War II, the Cold War, de-Stalinization, Stagnation, Perestroika, the Fall of Communism, the dissolution of the USSR, the Great Post-Soviet Depression, and revival under Putin and Medvedev.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Roberta Manning

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4855 Irish Women Emigrants: The Irish and American Context Fall 3
Course Description

An outstanding characteristic of emigration from Ireland to North America was the large number of women in the emigration stream. This seminar course will be an examination of Irish women and emigration beginning with study of conditions in Ireland that resulted in women leaving in such large numbers. Following that will be an examination of their experience as immigrants in North America. Emphasis in the course will be on the use of research tools in historical work on Irish women, utilizing primary source materials such as estate papers, the letters women wrote home, and database characteristics of Irish women in America.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Ruth-Ann Harris

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4857 Stalin Fall 3
Course Description

We will study Stalin's formative years, his career as a revolutionary before 1917, his rise to political power, industrialization, collectivization, political terror, World War II, post-war recovery and the Cold War. We will read the first and the latest biographies of Stalin, the moving memoirs of a Terror victim, and recent scholarship on the origins of the Cold War. The course will draw on a number of feature and documentary films (including the recent Oscar winning "Burnt by the Sun") and a new PBS series on World War II, "Russia's War."


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Roberta Manning

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4858 St. Petersburg/Leningrad: From Peter the Great to Putin Fall 3
Course Description

Through historical works, memoirs, film and literature, we will experience daily life and culture in Russia's second capital from its construction as a city of palaces on a swamp by day laborers to the present day. We will study Petersburg's monarchs, aristocrats, writers, artists, terrorists, serfs and the new industrial working class that toppled the monarchy and brought the Communists to political power for 75 years. We will examine Stalinism and the Terror in Leningrad, the city's heroic 900-day Siege in World War II, and the postwar blue collar Leningrad childhood of Russia's President Putin.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Roberta Manning

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4860 The Enlightenment in Western Thought and Culture Spring 3
Course Description

We will examine the broad intellectual and cultural movement of the eighteenth-century Enlightenment and its continuing legacy in Western society. The Enlightenment produced some of the founding ideas of modern Western society, some which are indelibly inscribed into our existing political, religious, and cultural institutions. Through an examination of primary and secondary texts, this course will trace the development of these ideas up to the present day. Some of the topics to be discussed are the promises and perils of Enlightenment thought; the cultural origins of ideas; the relationship between the Enlightenment, the American and French revolutions; and anti-Enlightenment movements.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jason Cavallari

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4861 Early Christian Ireland Spring 3
Course Description

Among other things, this seminar will consider the sudden widespread acceptance of Christianity in 6th-century Ireland, the concomitant rise of monasticism, the great 7th-century Easter controversy, and the promulgation of the Patrick legend in the settlement of that dispute. No knowledge of Irish Gaelic required.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Gene C. Haley

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4863 The Ends of the Earth: Irish Identity Formation and Expression Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores the impact of the coming of literacy and Christianity to Ireland, and how this new learning shaped identity, concepts of authority, morality, and views of the past. It explores how the newly formed literate elite readily assimilated texts and ideas from continental Europe and from the past and adapted them to local circumstances. In the process, they formed a new cultural identity for their own people, situated them within the wider contemporary world and its history, altered the way the rest of the western world looked at them.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Damian Bracken

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4865 Ireland and Empire Spring 3
Course Description

Study of the interactions between Ireland and various world empires. The major emphasis will be Irish interaction with the British Empire, but there will also be discussion of Ireland’s interaction with other global empires. Topics will include Ireland’s place in the early modern Atlantic World; the role of Irish missionaries, soldiers, and civil servants in the British Empire; Irish resistance to Empire; and Irish-Indian connections.”


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jason Knirck, Burns Scholar

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4871 Twentieth-Century Jesuit Intellectual Tradition Fall 3
Course Description

A survey of the writings of Jesuit scholars who lived and/or were published in the twentieth century such as: Gerard Manley Hopkins; Henri Bremond; George Tyrrell; Pierre Teilhard de Chardin; Alfred Delp; Yves de Montcheuil; Karl Rahner; Henri de Lubac; William F. Lynch; Walter J. Ong; Michel de Certeau; John W. O'Malley; Roger Haight.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Stephen Schloesser, S.J.

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4872 European Social & Economic History Since 1870 Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4875 New England from Winthrop to Walden Spring 3
Course Description

The Puritan settlement of New England in the seventeenth century created one of the most distinctive societies in the Atlantic world. This course will examine its development in a wider English Atlantic world, focusing on such topics as the development of Puritanism; popular religion and witchcraft; daily life in the colonies; relations with Indians, the French, and the wider British Empire; the region's role in the revolutionary crisis; and its uncomfortable place in American cultural and political life in the early republic. Students will also be encouraged to visit historic sites in the Boston area.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Owen Stanwood

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4876 American Studies Seminar: New England Fall 3
Course Description

This interdisciplinary seminar will explore both the persistence and the evolution of regionalism in American culture through a semester-long study of New England. Course readings will incorporate some historical material but the primary interest will be the varieties of contemporary New England life. Among the themes examined will be the transformation of maritime communities; post-industrialism in the region's small cities; the complexities of environmentalism; and the meanings of popular sport. Forms to be considered include contemporary non-fiction. Sudents will pursue a journalistic research essay on a topic of their own choosing.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): David Quigley and Dean of A&S

Prerequisites: Must have permission of the instructor

Cross listed with:

Comments: American Studies Minors Senior Seminar

HIST 4890 American Environmental History: From Columbus to Climate Change Spring 3
Course Description

Environmental history looks at the interactions between people and the natural environment over time. It explores how people have thought about and altered the natural landscape and what the consequences have been for the environment and humans alike. This course examines the impact of American Indians on the environment before the arrival of Europeans; the ecological revolution of European settlement; the expansion of slavery and the Western frontier during the 19th century; the exploitation and degradation of environmental resources through urbanization; the rise and influence of environmental activism; and the emergence of global environmental concerns like climate change.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): John Spiers

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4891 Science and Religion in American History Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores the complex interactions of science and religion in the United States, with a particular focus on their roles in democratic politics. Beginning with the Scopes trial of 1925, it looks back to the nineteenth century's "pan-Protestant establishment" and Darwinian controversies, and then proceeds forward through the twentieth century to contemporary debates on issues such as biotechnology and climate change. Students read a wide range of primary sources and examine visual material.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Andrew Jewett

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4894 Animals&Attitudes:Changing Perceptions&Treatment Spring 3
Course Description

This course will examine select topics in the history of animals and of human-animal interactions and relations. Topics will include classification and the identification and description of new species; the beginnings of comparative anatomy, paleontology, ornithology, and other specialties; extinction and the origins of conservation; the humane movement and animal rights; pet-keeping and the introduction and acclimatization of alien species; changing cultural and pictorial representations of animals; and the history of zoos, aquaria, natural history museums, and menageries.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Rory Browne

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4899 Hacking the Humanities: Programming and Analysis for Literary and Historical Studies Fall 3
Course Description

This course will introduce humanities students to a variety of digital research methods. Students will learn the basics of Python programming for literary and historical studies, encounter a number of tools widely used by digital humanists (such as MALLET, Gephi, and GIS programs), and engage with theoretical works that underpin the field. While we will encounter open questions and the epistemological justification for digital research, this class is primarily a methods one. After completing this course, students will be able build or apply digital tools in their own research. Designed for graduate students/upper-level undergraduates. No programming or command-line experience required.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL4899 LING4328 RLRL3310

Comments:

HIST 4901 Readings and Research: Independent Study Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Students who wish to pursue a semester of directed readings with individual faculty members under this category must secure the permission of the faculty member and the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Lists of faculty members and their fields can be obtained from the Department.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Permission of professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies; History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4921 Advanced Independent Research Fall 3
Course Description

Proposals for possible designation as scholar's projects should be submitted to the Director of Undergraduate Studies early in the spring. Details of dates and required materials are available either from the Director's Office or from the office of the Dean of Arts and Sciences. All proposals must be approved by the Director and the Departmental Honors Committee.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Approval through the Honors Committee

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4922 Advanced Independent Research Spring 6
Course Description

See course description under HIST4921


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Approval through the Honors Committee

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4941 Senior Colloquium Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: HIST3300 The Study and Writing of History

Cross listed with:

Comments: History Major Standing

HIST 4942 Senior Seminar: Containment Culture: America Society During the Early Cold War Fall 4
Course Description

The cold war is ancient history for today's undergraduates. If they think about America's crusade against international communism at all, they conceive of it as a series of diplomatic and military actions, a foreign-policy phenomenon. Yet the cold war also influenced America's domestic social order, shaping journalism, education, art, politics, and popular entertainment. This course examines a broad sweep of mid-century American culture, from the Beats to National Review, from Bishop Sheen to Mickey Spillane. It acquaints students with how the cold war conditioned what Americans said, thought, wrote, heard, read, and viewed in the 1950s and early 1960s.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Seth Jacobs

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094; HS 300 The Study and Writing of History

Cross listed with:

Comments: Senior History Major Standing

HIST 4951 Making History Public Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

In this course students will collaborate to produce a public exhibition displayed in the new Stokes Hall. With help from the instructor and librarians, students will explore the riches of Boston College's special collections and rare books, determine what story to tell using this material, choose and research items, and write labels for the exhibition--all with an eye to teaching those who view the exhibit something important and compelling about the past. Students will also create an online version of the exhibition. This course allows students to make historical knowledge public via exhibitions both real and virtual.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: History Core; Permission of the Instructor

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4961 Honors Seminar Fall 3
Course Description

This course, required for seniors doing an honors thesis or an advanced independent research project, will guide thesis writers through the art and mechanics of writing a thesis. In the seminar, students will regularly report on their progress, master citations and bibliographies, learn how to structure and outline a project of this length, and by semester's end will prepare a draft of the introduction and first chapter.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Approval through the Honors Committee

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 4962 Honors Thesis Spring 3
Course Description

Students who have the approval of the History Department to enroll in a special honors project will carry this course as the credit vehicle for the paper produced in that project. This course is open only to students who have been given approval to enroll in an honors project.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Approval through the Honors Committee

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 5005 Senior Colloquium: U.S. Occupations of Japan and Germany after WW II Spring 3
Course Description

The total defeat of Japan and Germany in 1945 resulted in a prolonged time of military occupation of both countries by the United States and other powers. These early years of "starting over" on the behest of the victors proved crucial in the making not only of postwar Japan and Germany and their respective regions, Asia and Europe, but also of the United States. In this course, students become comparative historians as they examine similarities and differences between these two experiences of occupation, from demilitarization and democratization to the making of America's most committed allies at the opening stage of the Cold War.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Franziska Seraphim

Prerequisites: Senior History Major Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 5110 Senior Colloquium: Cities of the Islamic Mediterranean Spring 3
Course Description

Islamic culture has often been described as decidedly urban. While this view is colored by an evident bias deriving from the extant sources, Islamic urban history remains one of the richest subfields. In addition, given their location in the heartland of the Old World, and their status as major trading centers, many cities of the Islamic Mediterranean constituted living testaments of entangled histories. This colloquium offers a history of the cities of the Islamic Eastern Mediterranean, on the one hand, and examines and juxtaposes different approaches to the study of the city, on the other.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Dana Sajdi

Prerequisites: Senior History Major Status

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 5190 Senior Colloquium: Nations and Nationalism Spring 3
Course Description

Where do national identities come from? Why is the world divided into discrete nation-states? How has nationalism been imagined and practiced at different times and in different places? This course explores the history of nationalism and the nation form, covering a range of theoretical literature and a variety of case studies from across the nineteenth and twentieth-century world. Special attention will be given to the relationship between empire and nationalism, issues of gender and race, and the position of diaspora and political internationalism in the modern world.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Priya Lal

Prerequisites: Senior History Major Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 5191 Senior Colloquium: The University in the Modern World Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores the diverse and changing intellectual, institutional, social, and political cultures of universities across the modern world. Our inquiry will be global and comparative in scope; we will examine a wide range of case studies with particular attention to twentieth-century and non-Western contexts. Themes covered will include student activism, the politics of intellectual labor, the role of higher education in colonial and national development, knowledge production and social movements, the racial and gendered dimensions of university life, and debates about academic obligations and freedoms.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Priya Lal

Prerequisites: Senior History Major Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 5192 Senior Colloquium: Environmental History Fall 3
Course Description


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Ling Zhang

Prerequisites: Senior History Major Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 5225 Religious Dissent, Repression and Toleration in the Middle Ages Fall 3
Course Description

Religious difference was fact of high and late medieval life. Christendom was home to Jews, Muslims, heretics, and other dissenters. This colloquium will ponder the history and historiography of religious difference and the conditions that led to moments of toleration, conflict, and repression. Was medieval Europe a “persecuting society” as many scholars have argued? Or were episodes of religiously motivated violence and repression a product of specific historical conditions that interrupted a state of de facto tolerance for others?


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Zachary Matus

Prerequisites: Senior History Major Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 5230 Senior Colloquium: Fighting Sexism and Racism in the Renaissance Spring 3
Course Description


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Sarah Ross

Prerequisites: Senior History Major Status

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 5270 Senior Colloquium: A History of Social Trust: Revolution and Society in Modern Europe Spring 3
Course Description

Social trust is absolutely critical to the functioning of any society. And yet the history of trust is rarely considered. In this course, we will examine three discrete historical episodes where the basis for trust was significantly altered - Britain during the Scientific and Financial Revolutions, Revolutionary France, and post-Revolution Soviet Union. In each episode, contemporaries were faced with unfamiliar sources of authority, with competing systems for determining truth, and with increasingly illegible indicators of trustworthiness. We will focus on how trust broke down and what kinds of cultural resources were drawn on in the effort to rebuild it.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Penelope Ismay

Prerequisites: Senior History Major Status

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 5279 Senior Colloquium: Intellectual History of Capitalism Fall 3
Course Description

What is capitalism? The answer may seem obvious; it’s an economic system involving private property, markets, free enterprise, and the profit motive. Yet intellectuals have debated the nature and essence of capitalism for at least the last 250 years. Is it a beneficial system that produces general prosperity? A system of exploitation in which only the rich benefit? Does it produce wealth at the cost of beauty and spirituality? Can it be managed, or must it be given free rein? We will encounter answers to these and other questions from Adam Smith, Karl Marx, J.M. Keynes, Milton Friedman and others.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Devin Pendas

Prerequisites: Senior History Major Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 5280 Senior Colloquium: Marx, Nietzsche, Freud Fall 3
Course Description

The philosopher Paul Ricoeur famously described Karl Marx, Friedrich Nietzsche and Sigmund Freud as "masters of suspicion," that is as experts at unmasking and demystifying through interpretation. They sought to lift the veil on the hidden workings of capitalism, religion, and the psyche among others, in sustained efforts to understand the modern world. This seminar offers close readings of their major theoretical statements and of the tradition of critical social theory that they spawned.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Thomas Dodman

Prerequisites: Senior History Major Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 5290 Senior Colloquium: Reagan and Thatcher: Together Against the World Fall 3
Course Description

Margaret Thatcher came to office in May, 1979; Ronald Reagan in January 1981. They each confronted serious crises at home and abroad. The two leaders shared a similar vision of the world: a strong belief in the market and an equally intense anti-communism. On both counts they represented a break with the prevailing consensus and had to fight hard for their ideas. Their alliance and friendship was a major resource in winning or losing the battles they chose. The course will provide an opportunity for students to examine the context in which these two leaders came to office, their ideas and their relationship.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): James Cronin

Prerequisites: Senior History Major Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 5301 Senior Colloquium: Chocolate and Sugar, Silver and Gold: Latin America and its Commodity Empires Fall 3
Course Description

From the pursuit of spices and gold in the fifteenth century to the banana boom of the twentieth, commodities, and the desire for commodities, have deeply influenced the economic, social, and cultural history of the last five hundred years. Focusing on the history of the Americas, this course will explore how the acquisition of commodities helped to drive imperialism and how the consumption of commodities have shaped colonizer and colonies alike.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Sylvia Sellers-Garcia

Prerequisites: Senior History Major Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 5302 Senior Colloquium: Visual Culture: Pictures of the Americas Fall 3
Course Description

Seeing plays a vital part in knowing the world and establishing our place in it. Visual texts are part of the historical landscape. "Visual Culture: Pictures of the Americas" explores how the visual offers a means for understanding broader historical forces, subjectivities, systems of knowledge and hierarchies of power. By looking at examples that range from Mexico’s iconic Virgin of Guadalupe to today’s urban wall murals, the course examines how the visual gets created and interpreted, mediates experience and acquires agency.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Deborah Levenson

Prerequisites: Senior History Major Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 5401 Senior Colloquium: Empires of the Atlantic World Fall 3
Course Description

During the early modern era England and France each built far-flung empires that stretched from Europe to the Americas and beyond. But while the British and French overseas empires grew up together, they developed in different ways. Among the topics covered: what imperialism and colonialism meant in an early modern context; how the English and French perceived the New World and its indigenous peoples; how domestic politics and religion influenced overseas expansion; how they attempted to make their empires profitable; and how the two empires interacted, especially in the eighteenth century, when Britain and France were almost constantly at war.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Owen Stanwood

Prerequisites: Senior History Major Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 5404 Senior Colloquium: U.S. Energy History Fall 3
Course Description

Daily lives depend on oil, gas, and electricity, and yet many of us know little of how our energy arrives at homes and businesses or why our energy systems function as they do. This Senior Colloquium focuses on the companies that produce American energy, the networks that transport it, the cities that use it, and the citizens and companies that buy it and fight over it. Students will read books and articles, discuss them critically, write several short analysis papers, and write a research analysis. Main skills to be honed: keen writing, sharp analysis, clear oral presentation, sensible research.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Conevery Valencius

Prerequisites: Senior History Major Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 5450 Senior Colloquium: Spy Books: Primary Source Readings in U.S. Intelligence History Spring 3
Course Description

The case of former CIA employee and NSA contractor Edward Snowden has brought the problems of government secrecy and mass surveillance to the forefront of public discourse. This course examines these problems from an historical viewpoint and explores the intersections of surveillance and civil liberties. The methodology includes reading books and monographs written by spies, alleged spies, and intelligence defectors. The books will be works which shifted the contemporaneous conversation about the limits of government surveillance. These works include the speeches of Tyler Gatewood Kent, Herbert O. Yardley’s The Black Chamber, Kim Philby’s My Secret War, The Death House Letters of Ethel & Julius Rosenberg, and Philip Agee’s Inside the Company. The books will provide fulcra toward a better understanding of a survey of modern U.S. intelligence history since World War I.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Charles Gallagher

Prerequisites: Senior History Major Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 5463 Senior Colloquium: U.S. Bill of Rights Spring 3
Course Description

U.S. public opinion polls reveal that most Americans are ignorant of the contents of the Bill of Rights and if read to them separately they tend to react negatively to their intent to protect American’s fundamental rights. This course will track the judicial, political, and social history of the Bill of Rights from its origins to tomorrow’s Supreme Court decisions.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Alan Rogers

Prerequisites: Senior History Major Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 5480 Senior Colloquium: Contested Cities: Race, Class, and Sexuality Fall 3
Course Description

This course will explore how racial and ethnic newcomers encountered the American city in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Looking at various groups - older European and Asian immigrants, black migrants from the South, sexual minorities, and recent arrivals from Latin America and the Caribbean - we’ll look at how these newcomers worked, played, organized, and claimed space in the city. We’ll pay particular attention to social and political struggles over urban spaces including neighborhoods, commercial districts, amusement areas, and public parks. Students will conduct research on migrant communities in Boston and collaborate in the production of digital public history projects.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Marilynn Johnson

Prerequisites: Senior History Major Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 5490 Senior Colloquium: American Immigration Fall 3
Course Description


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kevin Kenny

Prerequisites: Senior History Major Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 5491 Senior Colloquium: Topics in U.S. Immigration History Fall 3
Course Description

This senior colloquium will delve into a number of topics in U.S. immigration history since the mid-19th century that we do not ordinarily have time to discuss in more general immigration history classes. The readings will therefore be arranged thematically rather than chronologically. Some of the topics we will cover are deportation, refugee admissions and resettlement, immigration fraud, smuggling, and trafficking. Students will research and write a paper on a subject of their choice that will demonstrate mastery of historical methods and analysis.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Arissa Oh

Prerequisites: Senior History Major Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 5492 Senior Colloquium: Health and Disease in United States' History Spring 3
Course Description

This course is intended to introduce history majors to the main currents and historiographic debates in the history of medicine. While it acknowledges the biological reality of health and disease, the course is interested in examining the social dimensions of these categories and how they have been understood and experienced by medical practitioners, sufferers and their communities, public health authorities, and the state. As such, this course will explore how health, disease, and medicine have historically been sites of conflict and struggle as much as arenas of collaboration and altruism.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Martin Summers

Prerequisites: Senior History Major Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 5501 Making History Public: Boston College Spring 3
Course Description

In this course, students will work together to plan and produce a semester-long exhibition that will be displayed in the public spaces of Stokes Hall. This exhibit will document the 150 years (1863-2013) of the history of Boston College itself. Using the documentary, photographic, and other resources of the University Archives in Burns Library, students will identify themes (such as the changing nature of student body, the curriculum, and the campus) and the sources that best illustrate those themes. Students will select the items to be exhibited, prepare captions and other explanatory materials, and consider how best to display the results of their research.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): James O'Toole

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 5502 Making History Public: Monuments and Monumentality Fall 3
Course Description

What are monuments? Why are they erected? And why are monuments so central to any introduction to, or history of, a place or city? What do we get from viewing, experiencing, and learning about monuments? In short, the theme of this course is how we make monuments and how monuments make us. We will explore rare historical books found at the John J. Burns Library, which describe and represent buildings and monuments in various times and places. The course will result in an exhibition of both excerpts of the books and the monuments therein.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Dana Sajdi

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 5503 Making History Public: Propaganda and the Great War Spring 3
Course Description

World War I is often described as the first ‘modern war,’ a conflict that witnessed massive loss of life due to advances in weaponry technology. But the war also exploited a growing popular culture in the production of visual imagery. This course will consider how governments used a variety of media including posters as propaganda, especially when recruiting for the Great War. Students will also examine personal memoirs and diaries that are part of the Burns Library Special Collection to help gain an appreciation of how the conflict changed the lives of those involved in the conflict.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robert Savage

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 5504 Making History Public: Righting Historical Wrongs since the 1990s Fall 3
Course Description

The last quarter-century witnessed a global boom in public efforts to confront historical injustices, including legal trials to return Nazi gold, compensation for Native Peoples' land claims, Japanese government apologies for wartime sexual slavery, and Latin American truth commissions. These and other measures aim to establish belated reconciliation between victims and perpetrators of mass atrocities. The course will 1) teach basic data visualization techniques, including GIS mapping and network analysis, to investigate the global spread of historical restitution cases and the emergence of collective apology and individual compensation as a new global "norm"; 2) result in a student-curated exhibition in the History Department.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Franziska Seraphim

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 5505 Making History Public: History Down the Toilet Spring 3
Course Description

The City of Boston Archaeology Program has excavated three sites that help tell the story of Boston’s nineteenth-century immigrants. Two middle-class North End houses––the Paul Revere House and the Clough House, were transformed c. 1800 into rental housing for poor immigrants. Dorchester’s Industrial School for Girls was a privately funded charitable institution, which took in indigent girls, most of whom were immigrants. We will study artifacts recovered from these three sites in order to recover something of the lived experience of Boston’s immigrant communities. The course is group-project oriented and will culminate in a public exhibition and an i-book.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robin Fleming

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 5506 Making History Public: Jesuits on Race and Religion Fall 3
Course Description

Students will work together to produce an exhibition to document some of the successes, failures, and misunderstandings of Jesuit discourse on the intrinsic relationship between race and religion. Using textual, documentary, visual, and other resources in Burns Library and elsewhere, students will identify themes in Jesuit relations with various religious, ethnic, and social groups, and the sources that illustrate those themes. Students will select the items to be exhibited, prepare explanatory materials, and consider how best to display the results of their research. The exhibition will be displayed in the public spaces of the History Department in Stokes Hall.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robert Maryks

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 6690 Slavery, Race, and Abolition in America Spring 3
Course Description

This course will explore the central moral conflict in early America through the lens of cultural, religious, intellectual, and social history. We will examine the rise of abolition and the change in antislavery ideology and tactics over time, the proslavery argument, the way debates over slavery influence American culture and society, racism and efforts to combat it, and the widening moral and cultural rifts between North and South over slavery. We will explore these issues by reading both the original pamphlets, newspapers, and books of the era and the pivotal interpretative works by historians.


Instructor(s): Cynthia Lyerly

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7101 Readings and Research: Independent Study Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Graduate students who wish to pursue a semester of independent readings with individual faculty members under this category must secure permission of the faculty member. Lists of faculty members and their fields can be obtained from the Department.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor; Graduate Student Status

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7201 Colloquium: Early Modern European History Fall 3
Course Description

This course is designed to assist graduate students with European history concentrations as they prepare for their comprehensive exams, as well as other students for teaching in the Core and entering into broader scholarly conversations. Each week focuses upon a major topic, from Renaissance humanism to the French Revolution. The selected books and articles provide both reliable information and compelling revisions of standard narratives. Students who engage seriously the material, seminar discussions, weekly book reviews and final review essay will become conversant with central developments in Europe from 1400-1800, as well as important new trends in the historiography.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Sarah Ross

Prerequisites: Graduate Student Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments: Required for all incoming Ph.D. students

HIST 7202 Graduate Colloquium: Modern European History Spring 3
Course Description

This colloquium will serve as a broad introduction to major themes, controversies, and historiographic developments in modern European history. The focus will be largely upon social and economic history.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Devin Pendas

Prerequisites: Graduate Student Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments: Required for all incoming Ph.D. students

HIST 7301 Graduate Colloquium: Nation, Religion, and the Meaning of Modern Fall 3
Course Description

Whereas it was once presumed that affiliation to the nation would replace religion as a universal experience of modernity, it is clear that religion has been both part and parcel of the rise of the nation-state and one of the greatest sources of tension within projects of state-sponsored modernization. Furthermore, the secularization thesis and the notion of "church" and "state" increasingly seem less like norms and more like anomalies. We will explore the state of the field on religion and nation, and use this topic as a means of introducing broad questions about modernization in Western and non-Western contexts.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Rebecca Nedostup

Prerequisites: Graduate Student standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7302 Graduate Colloquium: Religion and History Fall 3
Course Description

This colloquium will focus on major theories of religion developed in the twentieth century and the interpretation of those theories in contemporary historical scholarship. The goal of the course will be to present students with key questions and problems involved in the historical study of religion and religious peoples. Readings of classic theorists will be paired with contemporary interpreters. Themes will include the nature of religious experience, religion as culture, and ritual.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Zachary Matus

Prerequisites: Graduate Student Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7303 Colloquium: Gender History and the Scholar's Craft Today Spring 3
Course Description

Familiarity with the issues and concepts of gender history constitutes essential preparation for graduate students entering the historical profession today. This course offers an introduction to the theories, methods and sources of gender history. Engaging scholarship from the 1980s to the present, we will examine gender history's divergence from social and women's history, convergence with post-structuralism and the linguistic turn and impact upon new lines of inquiry the history of sexuality, transnational and global history. The final component of the course is a tailored practicum: students will assess recent applications of gender analysis in their own research field.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Sarah Ross

Prerequisites: Graduate Student Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7304 Archeology in the Classroom Spring 3
Course Description

This course is designed to introduce history teachers to recent work in archaeology that will translate well into the classroom. The beauty of archaeology is not only that it captures students' imaginations, but that much of the work archaeologists now do is scientific. Integrating archaeology into the classroom allows history teachers to develop a curriculum and set of assignments that help students improve their skills not only in reading, writing, and analytical thinking, but in scientific and quantitative thinking as well.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robin Fleming

Prerequisites: Graduate Student Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7305 Colloquium: Archives and Historical Sources Spring 3
Course Description

TBD


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Sylvia Sellers-Garcia

Prerequisites: Graduate Student Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7306 History and Memory in Theory and Politics Spring 3
Course Description

TBD


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Franziska Seraphim

Prerequisites: Graduate Student Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7307 Colloquium: Spaces and Places in History Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar focuses on one large question: how have people historically given meaning to seemingly random physical spaces? In other words, how have they turned physical spaces into familiar places with purpose and function. As we examine how people visualized, built, used, and narrated places, students will be exposed not only to the various theories of space but also to the different sub-fields related to the study of space ranging from geography, to anthropology, to architecture, to urban history and topography, to literary studies, studies of religious ritual and public performance.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Dana Sajdi

Prerequisites: Graduate Student Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7308 Colloquium: The Big Picture: The Mediterranean, the Red Sea, and the Indian Ocean Spring 3
Course Description

One ocean, two seas, and three continents constituted the heart of the Islamic world in medieval and early modern times. Given this unique situation, this "heart" also functioned as a crossroad. The seminar is about reading some major canonical works and recent studies that explore a large region or body of water with a view of the economic and cultural exchanges that occurred therein. This will be done while paying special attention to the role of Muslim states and empires and their relations to the religiously and ethnically varied communities of seafarers, merchants, traveling scholars, traffickers, and corsairs.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Dana Sajdi

Prerequisites: Graduate Student Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7309 Graduate Colloquium: International History: Markets, States, and the Transnational Spring 3
Course Description

Historians have increasingly sought to transcend the limits of purely national or local history, but their success has been mixed. It is hard to imagine, let alone research or write, truly global history. What is possible is to examine processes that are by definition transnational by focusing on the mechanisms and institutions that connect people, economies and political systems across borders. The course will emphasize moments when projects to order the relationship between states and economies were most visible and insistent - typically after major wars and financial crises - and the success or failure of such grand projects.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): James Cronin

Prerequisites: Graduate Student Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7310 Graduate Colloquium: Global Migration and Diaspora Fall 3
Course Description

The world has experienced an upsurge in migration in recent decades, which many commentators see as part of a new process of globalization. But, just as the origins of globalization go back several centuries, the nature of contemporary migration cannot be understood outside its deeper historical context. Mass migration has been central to human history from the very beginning. This graduate readings course, based on historiographical analysis rather than primary research, will examine the history of migration from its origins to the present, with coverage of all main areas and a particular emphasis on the concept of diaspora.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kevin Kenny

Prerequisites: Graduate Student Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7311 Colloquium: Law and History Fall 3
Course Description

A range of modern thinkers and scholars, notably Hannah Arendt, Jean-Paul Sartre, as well as Gavin Langmuir have explored the history of Jew-hatred in an attempt to fathom its causes, continuities, and discontinuities. This course will examine their writings as well as other works in order to understand the religious, social, economic, psychological, and political reasons that have been suggested as sources of the phenomenon.


Instructor(s): Devin Pendas

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7312 Graduate Colloquium: Empires in World History Fall 3
Course Description


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Owen Stanwood

Prerequisites: Graduate Student Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7313 Graduate Colloquium: Race, Culture and Power Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines a wide variety of literature on race, culture, and identity. It will introduce students to major theories of race and provide an overview of the historiography of race through a selection of case studies from across the world. In particular, we will aim to make sense of how the category of race operates in relation to broader configurations of power within such social, political, and economic formations as empires, nations, and capitalism during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. In doing so, we will pay close attention to intersecting forms of identity, such as gender, class, and religion.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Priya Lal

Prerequisites: Graduate Student Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7315 Graduate Colloquium: Islamic History Fall 3
Course Description

This colloquium is an introduction to pre-modern Islamic history for advanced students with a focus on the areas surrounding the Mediterranean. The first month of the course will be devoted to reading and discussing Marshall Hodgson's classic, Venture of Islam, 3 vols. (Chicago, 1974), which covers the entire Islamic world. The readings for the rest of course will be chosen around a specific theme with special attention to historiographical, methodological, and theoretical issues.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Dana Sajdi

Prerequisites: Graduate Level Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7510 Colloquium: Soviet History Fall 3
Course Description

Study of major historical works on Soviet history from the 1917 Revolution to World War II, with an emphasis on current historical issues, the controversial Stalin period, domestic developments, and political and social history. Particular attention will be paid to the impact that the opening of Soviet archives has had on historical writing and our knowledge of Soviet history. Students will be required to write a series of analyses of assigned books culminating in either a major review article comparing a number of works on a particular topic or a research paper utilizing newly classified documents.


Instructor(s): Roberta Manning

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7520 Colloquium: European Intellectual History Fall 3
Course Description

This graduate course will survey key debates in the historiography of late modern European intellectual life (c. 1880-2000). The goal of the course is to approach intellectuals, movements, and ideas in light of the methodological concerns of the historians who study them. We will examine key figures from Friedrich Nietzsche to Jurgen Habermas and pivotal schools of thought from positivism to neo-liberalism.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Julian Bourg

Prerequisites: Graduate Level Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7521 Colloquium: Critical Modernities Spring 3
Course Description

TBD


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Julian Bourg

Prerequisites: Graduate Student Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7530 Colloquium: Modern Political Violence Spring 3
Course Description

This graduate course will examine various forms of political violence in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries (riots, rebellions, revolutions, individual terrorism, state terror, insurgency, and war). Although the focus will be on Europe, students interested in extra-European topics are encouraged to attend and introduce other geographic fields and issues.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Julian Bourg

Prerequisites: Graduate Student Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7540 20th Century Europe: Problems and Perspectives Summer 3
Course Description

Europe has never been a peaceful place. Yet even by low standards of that bloody continent, the 20th century had a rather bad start. This makes the second half of the 20th century all the more surprising, as Europe emerged from two world wars into a difficult, divided, but stable postwar period, one marked by integration and prosperity in the West and stagnation and repression in the East. This course will examine the political, cultural and economic dimensions of Europe's dark century.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Devin Pendas

Prerequisites: Graduate level standing or permission of instructor

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7541 Graduate Colloquium: History and Theory Before and After the Cultural Turn Fall 3 or 3
Course Description

This course examines major social theoretical works and the historiographical trends they have shaped in the last half-century, from the advent of social history to the cultural turn and beyond. The course grapples with questions that are at once methodological (why should I care about how theory—or the apparent absence thereof—informs my work as a historian?); substantive (what are the dominant objects of study, categories of analysis, and epistemological frameworks of historical research at different moments?), and self-reflexive (how do we account for historiographical trends in relation to their time and context?).


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Thomas Dodman

Prerequisites: Graduate Student Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7542 Graduate Colloquium: Modernity, Modernism, Postmodernism Summer 3
Course Description

This course will examine key thinkers and themes in the history of modernity, critical cultural modernism, and postmodernism. We begin with a brief overview of the complex phenomenon of modernity and the centuries-long process of modernization. We will then focus on the intellectual and cultural expressions of modernism in the years it flourished (c. 1850–1960) as modernity’s self-conscious or self-critical side. Next, we will investigate the various meanings of “the postmodern” during the 1980s and 1990s. In conclusion we ask: What comes “after” postmodernism? and What relevance do the terms modernity, modernism, and postmodernism have today?


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Julian Bourg

Prerequisites: Graduate level standing or permission of instructor

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7701 Colloquium: Popular and Elite Culture in Ireland: 1750-1850 Fall 3
Course Description

During the century under consideration Ireland experienced dramatic and often violent social and political change. Major events included the emergency of colonial nationalism and Republicanism, and Revolution 1798, the Act of Union, the movements for Catholic Emancipation and Repeal, and the Revolution of 1848.This course will explore the ways in which popular culture growth, increased contact with the Continental and Atlantic worlds, popular religion, increases in education and printing resources, and the development of the first mass democractic politics in Europe gave Irish people an unprecedented opportunity to participate in events of this era.


Instructor(s): Kevin O'Neill

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7702 Graduate Colloquium: Ireland Before 1850 Spring 3
Course Description

This colloquium will explore some of the major issues in Irish history before 1850. The focus will be upon the development of a new post-revisionist Irish historiography. Reading will concentrate on works published in the last decade.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kevin O'Neill

Prerequisites: Graduate Student Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7703 Colloquium: Modern Irish History Spring 3
Course Description

This colloquium will explore some of the major issues in Modern Irish History. Its primary focus will be on Revisionism and related developments in the writing of Irish social, economic and political history over the last two decades.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robert Savage

Prerequisites: Graduate Student Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7704 Colloquium: Ireland and Europe in the Twentieth Century Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines the development of Irish foreign policy and cultural relations with Europe since the foundation of the state, analyzing links in the 1920s with Britain and the Dominions, France, Germany and the Holy See. It reviews Eamon de Valera's foreign policy during the 1930s and 1940s, including the Spanish civil war and World War II. The course discusses Ireland and the cold war and Dublin's mutilateral diplomacy at the United Nations. Case studies are also included on Ireland and European integration, on Anglo-Irish relations in 1969/73, the Falklands' crisis in 1982 and the peace process in the 1990s.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7801 Graduate Colloquium: U.S. History to 1877 Spring 3
Course Description

This course is designed to familiarize students with critical issues and interpretations in the field of American history up to Reconstruction.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Cynthia Lynn Lyerly

Prerequisites: Graduate Student Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7802 Colloquium: U.S. History from 1877 Spring 3
Course Description

This course is designed to familiarize students with critical issues and interpretations in the field of American history since Reconstruction. We will pay particular attention to the relationship between recent developments in historiography and traditional approaches to modern American history.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Marilynn Johnson

Prerequisites: Graduate Student Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7803 Colloquium: U.S. Legal and Constitutional History Spring 3
Course Description

Readings in American Legal and Constitutional history from 1789 to present.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Alan Rogers

Prerequisites: Graduate Student Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7804 Colloquium: American Slavery Spring 3
Course Description

No field in American history has been more dynamic and more debated than the history of slavery in the United States. This course covers a broad range of critical questions and historical debates about slavery in the United States, including the evolution of slavery over time, slavery and gender roles,the position of free blacks in a slave society, slave religion, and the impact of slavery on the nation. From a few of the classic texts on slavery to the most recent and acclaimed scholarship, we will explore some of the more controversial, innovative, and provocative works in the field.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Cythnia Lyerly

Prerequisites: Graduate level standing or permission of instructor

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7805 Colloquium: Religion in America Spring 3
Course Description

This course will review the historical literature on religion in America. After examining overview texts, we will explore the historiography of selected topics, including: Native American religion and European contact; the Great Awakenings and the origins and development of evangelical religion; indigenous religious movements in America; and the interplay of race, ethnicity, and religion.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): James O'Toole

Prerequisites: Graduate Student Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7806 Colloquium:Social Criticism in America Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7807 Colloquium: American Hate: Racial Thought in American History Summer 3
Course Description

This course explores scholarship on the history of racism in America—the ideas about native Americans and Africans that Europeans brought with them to North America, the way slavery affected racial thought, scientific racism of the fin-de-siècle, thinking beyond the black-white binary, racism and culture, and racism and policy.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Cynthia Lynn Lyerly

Prerequisites: Graduate Student Standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7808 Grad Colloquium: Race, Gender, Sexuality, and the State in Modern U.S. History Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the historical role of the state in shaping processes of racial, ethnic, and gender identity formation as well as relationships of power between dominant cultures and marginalized groups. Focusing on a number of different loci of state power, including institutions such as the military, school, prison, and asylum and agents such as public health authorities, reformers, immigration officials, and other bureaucrats, we will explore the ways in which the state engages in the construction and maintenance of normative categories of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and citizenship.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Martin Summers

Prerequisites: Graduate Student standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7809 Colloquium: U.S. Foreign Relations, 1898-2003 Spring 3
Course Description

The point of this course is to examine American foreign policy from the Spanish-American War to the onset of the Second Gulf War. The course showcases multiple ways of approaching the study U.S. foreign policy. We will identify the questions that bedevil diplomatic historians, and by reading competing interpretations, evaluate the strategies by which these historians—and sometimes political scientists and even journalists—address them. By the end of the course, students will have a better understanding of the methods of doing U.S. diplomatic history and of the field as it is.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Seth Jacobs

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094

Cross listed with:

Comments:

HIST 7810 Colloquium: U.S. Imperialism & the Pacific World Fall 3
Course Description

Although the concept of the "Atlantic World" is a staple in the study of history, the "Pacific World" has not received the same attention. This course explores the idea of a Pacific World and the United States' role in its construction and perpetuation. Focusing on relationships among and between the various countries of East and Southeast Asia and the U.S., we will examine the political, cultural, and social connections of the Pacific Rim and consider how American economic, cultural, and military activities have contributed to its rise as an imperialist power in this region.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Arissa Oh

Prerequisites: Graduate Student standing

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HIST 7901 Colloquium for Masters Students Fall 3
Course Description

This graduate colloquium is required for first and second year masters students in history. In it, we will explore the basics of a career as a professional historian, exploring the concepts of history, historiography and theory, and practicing how to conduct research, write a variety of historical pieces, teach, design courses, and create museum exhibits. We will also look at how to apply the skills used in graduate school to finding a future either in the academy or as an #altac.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Required Course for History M.A. Students

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HIST 8000 Colloquium: Introduction to Doctoral Studies Fall 3
Course Description

This graduate colloquium is required for and limited to first-year doctoral students in history. The course will explore a range of theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of the past. Exemplary works from a range of regional historiographies will constitute a significant portion of the course reading. The course aims to introduce entering students to central traditions and debates in the discipline.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Prasannan Parthasarathi

Prerequisites: Graduate Student Standing

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HIST 8101 Interim Study Fall/Spring 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

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HIST 8201 Seminar: Writing History Fall 3
Course Description

This course combines a passion for history and a dedication to writing. We will examine the process of writing a significant piece of work from idea to publication. We will explore ways in which historians write well, in diverse manners, for their particular audiences. Students will work on their own significant project and workshop the projects of others.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Heather Cox Richardson

Prerequisites: Graduate Student Standing

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HIST 8205 Seminar:Transnational and Comparative History Spring 3
Course Description

This seminar is designed for students with research interests that transcend national history to engage transnational flows of people, goods, and ideas, or to develop comparative perspectives on more localized historical processes. Common readings in global and comparative historiography and a system of peer-reviewing guide students through the process of writing a major research paper based on original sources. Students select their own topics depending on prior work and language skills and in collaboration with the professor.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Franziska Seraphim

Prerequisites: Graduate student standing.

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HIST 8210 Graduate Seminar: Medieval History Fall 3
Course Description

Students in this seminar will write original research papers on some topic in medieval social, economic or political history. The topic will be one upon which the student and professor have agreed, and will be based primarily on original sources. Students will not only be required to write a paper, but to read and critique all papers written in the seminar. The final paper will be a polished and rewritten piece incorporating the critiques of the professor and other graduate students in the seminar.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robin Fleming

Prerequisites: Graduate Student Standing

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HIST 8215 Graduate Seminar: Modern European History Spring 3
Course Description

This course is designed to provide a structured setting within which students of modern European history can conceive and execute major research papers. The classes will focus primarily on historiography. Students will be free to select topics dealing with any aspect of modern European history and they will be encouraged to work in whatever national or regional setting they prefer and for which they have command of the language.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Thomas Dodman

Prerequisites: Graduate Student Standing

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HIST 8220 Seminar: U.S. Before 1900 Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Heather Richardson

Prerequisites: Graduate Student Standing

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HIST 8221 Graduate Seminar: U.S. since 1900 Spring 3
Course Description

TBD


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): James O'Toole

Prerequisites: Graduate Student Standing

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HIST 8225 Seminar: Nineteenth Century America Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar will explore selected topics in nineteenth-century American history. We will examine issues surrounding the identification, criticism, and use of primary sources, conventions of scholarly usage, and forms of historical argumentation. Each member of the seminar will identify a research topic, develop a proposal, conduct research in local archives, and present a substantial research paper for critique and revision.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Alan Rogers

Prerequisites: Graduate Student Standing

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HIST 8226 Seminar: Twentieth Century U.S. History Spring 3
Course Description

This course is designed to allow students to explore in depth a topic of interest in the history of the United States in the twentieth century. Based on extensive research in archival and other primary sources, students will prepare a substantial research paper, suitable for publication in a scholarly journal. In addition, students will complete a number of research exercises, designed to improve their skills in the identification and interpretation of historical sources. Students will read and critique drafts of one another's work, and each student will make a presentation of their paper in the format of a scholarly conference.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): James O'Toole

Prerequisites: Graduate Student Standing

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HIST 9898 Dissertation Seminar Spring 3
Course Description

The aim of this course is to bring together students beginning dissertations in various fields to discuss the substance of their research and problems of theory, method, and organization. Students will be expected to report on their dissertation proposal and to present, by the end of the semester, a section of the dissertation itself.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Prasannan Parthasarathi

Prerequisites: Graduate Student Standing

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HIST 9899 Dissertation Workshop Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

All history graduate students, except non-resident students, who have finished their comprehensive examinations are required to enroll in the Dissertation Workshop.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

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HIST 9901 Doctoral Comprehensives Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

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HIST 9911 Doctoral Continuation Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

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