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German Courses (GERM) College of Arts and Sciences


Subject Area Course # Course Title Semester Credit Hours Expand
GERM 1001 German A (Elementary I) Fall 3
Course Description

Students are introduced to the basics of the German language: vocabulary, grammar, communicating in every-day situations, reading, listening comprehension, and writing. The course is supplemented with a workbook, online videos, and audio programs. This beginning course is intended for those with no prior knowledge of German as well as those with some high school background.


Instructor(s): Rachel Freudenburg, Ruth Sondermann and Ursula Mangoubi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Students are encouraged to sign up for GERM 1003.

GERM 1002 German A (Elementary II) Spring 3
Course Description

This course is a continuation of GERM 1001. Students are introduced to the basics of the German language: vocabulary, grammar, communicating in every-day situations, reading, listening comprehension, and writing. The course is supplemented with a workbook, online videos, and audio programs. Intended for those with one semester of college-level German or at least three years of high school German.


Instructor(s): Rachel Freudenburg, Ruth Sondermann and Ursula Mangoubi

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed GERM1001

Cross listed with:

Comments: Students who need additional review and reinforcement should enroll in GM 1004 concurrently.

GERM 1003 Elementary German Practicum I Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

This intensive one-hour supplementary course gives students extra help mastering concepts presented in GERM 1001 through review and recycling of material. It is open to all students concurrently enrolled in GERM 1001 that feel they need more "time on task." This class is an excellent opportunity to practice conversation in a smaller, more informal group.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

GERM 1004 Elementary German Practicum II Spring 1
Course Description

This intensive one-hour supplementary course gives students extra help mastering concepts presented in GERM1002 through review and recycling of material. It is open to all students concurrently enrolled in GERM1002 that feel they need more "time on task." This class is an excellent opportunity to practice conversation in a smaller, more informal group.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

GERM 1050 Intermediate German I Fall 3
Course Description

The emphasis will be on further training in active use of the language, with emphasis on reading and conversation. The course includes readings in twentieth-century German prose, fiction, and non-fiction; German culture and society; grammar review; and discussion and composition. Auditors must register.


Instructor(s): Daniel Bowles, Geraldine Grimm and Michael Resler

Prerequisites: GERM1001-1002 or equivalent

Cross listed with:

Comments:

GERM 1051 Intermediate German II Spring 3
Course Description

This course is a continuation of GERM1050 (Intermediate German I) and provides further training in active use of the language, with emphasis on reading and conversation. The course includes readings in twentieth-century German prose, fiction and non-fiction; German culture and society; grammar review; and discussion and composition.


Instructor(s): Daniel Bowles, Geraldine Grimm and Michael Resler

Prerequisites: GERM1050 or admission by placement test.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted primarily in German.
Counts toward German minor. Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency core requirement.

GERM 1061 Intensive Reading in German Summer 3 or 1.0,3
Course Description

Although the Department of German Studies does not offer a graduate degree, the following course is available to graduate students from various departments. This course is intended to prepare the student for either a graduate language reading examination or the standardized Princeton type of test and provides him or her with the ability to read general or specialized material in his or her own major field as well as in related areas.


Instructor(s): Ruth Sondermann and Ursula Mangoubi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: No previous knowledge of German is required.
This is a 3 credit course, but students in GA&S have the option of taking this course for one credit.

GERM 1063 Triumphs and Failings of Modern Man Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course focuses on a number of themes that characterize human existence in our time but are at the same time perennial themes: death, life, illness, suffering, war, and the role of the scientist in the modern world. Twentieth century German, Swiss, and Austrian writers will be discussed. The following works will be discussed in class: Thomas Mann, The Magic Mountain; Sigmund Freud, An Outline of Psychoanalysis; Erich Maria Remarque, All Quiet on the Western Front; Wolfgang Borchert, The Man Outside; Heinrich Böll, Stories; and Friedrich Dürrenmatt, The Physicists.


Instructor(s): Daniel Bowles

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in English with all texts in English translation.
Counts toward German major, German minor, and German Studies minor.

GERM 1066 The Quest for Justice: Kafka and Kleist Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

The term "poetic justice" implies that when we are wronged, literature can put it right even if our environment cannot. In this course, we read two of Germany's most enigmatic authors: Heinrich von Kleist and Franz Kafka. Though hailing from two different centuries, both grapple with the task of defining a universal standard of justice in a diverse world. Is there really justice for all when racism and sexism inform not only our thinking but also our social institutions? Can we ever really know what justice is, after we realize that all human knowledge is subjective?


Instructor(s): Rachel Freudenburg

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in English with all texts in English translation.
Counts toward German major, German minor, and German Studies minor.

GERM 1067 The Romantic Experience Fall 3
Course Description

This course traces a number of themes which were first expressed in the writings of European Romantics during the early nineteenth century and which shaped European and American intellectual history throughout the twentieth century. Such themes are, for example, love, emotion, nature, spirit, solitude, the miraculous, the sublime, and mental insanity. Texts (three novels, an autobiographical memoir, a short story, an essay, poems, letters, and fairy tales) include works by Rousseau, Goethe, Jane Austen, the Grimm brothers, E.T.A. Hoffmann, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Jack Kerouac.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Daniel Bowles

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in English.
Counts toward German major, German minor, and German Studies minor.

GERM 1068 The Quest for Justice Practicum Fall 1
Course Description

This is an optional German language discussion group for students in GERM1066. These students are encouraged to read the assigned dual language readings in German rather than in English.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in German.

GERM 1166 The Quest for Justice: Kafka and Kleist Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

The term "poetic justice" implies that when we are wronged, literature can put it right even if our environment cannot. In this course, we read two of Germany's most enigmatic authors: Heinrich von Kleist and Franz Kafka. Though hailing from two different centuries, both grapple with the task of defining a universal standard of justice in a diverse world. Is there really justice for all when racism and sexism inform not only our thinking but also our social institutions? Can we ever really know what justice is, after we realize that all human knowledge is subjective?


Instructor(s): Rachel Freudenburg

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL1166

Comments:

GERM 1175 Business German Spring/Fall 3
Course Description

An introduction to the language and structure of business in the German-speaking countries, this course will focus on daily business practices, on texts related to business in German, and on cultural differences in the German-speaking business world. A semester's work includes the practice of skills necessary to understand and perform basic business transactions (role-playing); the exploration of business in German in different media, such as television and the Internet; and the praxis-oriented expansion of applying the German language in a professional context. Not suitable for native speakers of German.


Instructor(s): Ruth Sondermann

Prerequisites: GERM 1051 or the equivalent

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in German.
Counts toward German major, German minor, and German Studies minor.

GERM 2201 German Composition and Conversation I Fall 3
Course Description

This course is designed to improve fluency in spoken and written German. Review of grammar will be restricted to a few selected, difficult items. Short German compositions will be written periodically. Course work includes systematic vocabulary building (including German idiomatic expressions and compound nouns and adjectives), listening comprehension, speaking exercises (spontaneous and guided dialogues), and reading.


Instructor(s): Daniel Bowles

Prerequisites: GERM1050-1051 or their equivalent

Cross listed with:

Comments: Auditors must register.
Required for German major and German minor.

GERM 2202 German Composition and Conversation II Spring 3
Course Description

This course is designed to improve fluency in spoken and written German. Review of grammar will be restricted to a few selected, difficult items. Short German compositions will be written periodically. Coursework includes systematic vocabulary building (including German idiomatic expressions as well as compound nouns and adjectives), listening comprehension, speaking exercises (spontaneous and guided dialogues), and reading. This is not so much a course in which the student progresses from phase to phase as one in which continuous practice and frequent intensive exposure to the foreign language will lead to progress in overall proficiency.


Instructor(s): Daniel Bowles

Prerequisites: GERM 2201 or its equivalent

Cross listed with:

Comments: Auditors must register.
Required for German major and German minor. Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency core requirement.

GERM 2210 History of German Literature I Fall 3
Course Description

An introduction to the study of German literature, including field trips and a special unit on Goethe's Faust. Selected texts from the Middle Ages to 1800 will be analyzed against the background of historical events, European literary movements, philosophy, music, art, and architecture. In addition, various language learning activities, such as a review of advanced grammar points, vocabulary building exercises, short writing assignments, and oral reports help students improve their overall proficiency in German.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Rachel Freudenburg

Prerequisites: GERM 1050-1051 (with a B- or better) or the equivalent

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in German.
Required for German major.
Counts toward German minor and German Studies minor.
Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency core requirement.

GERM 2211 History of German Literature II Spring 3
Course Description

A continuation of GERM 2210, this course is an introduction to the study of German literature. Selected texts from 1800 through the 20th century will be analyzed against the background of historical events, European literary movements, philosophy, music, film, art and architecture. Includes field trips as well as special units on the Holocaust and "minority" authors. This course incorporates activities to boost students' German proficiency.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Rachel Freudenburg

Prerequisites: GERM 1050-1051 (with a B- or better) or the equivalent

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in German.
Required for German major.
Counts toward German minor and German Studies minor.
Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency core requirement.

GERM 2218 German Feature Film: A Survey Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

An introduction to feature films from Germany and Austria from the 1920s to the present. Questions of personal, cultural, gendered, sexual, religious, and national identity give the course thematic cohesion. Films to be discussed are: Das blaue Licht (The Blue Light), M, Die Mörder sind unter uns (The Murderers Are Among Us), Sissi, Das Boot (The Boat). Deutschland bleiche Mutter (Germany Pale Mother), Memphisto, Taking Sides, Hitlerjunge Salomon (Europa, Europa), Männer (Men), Lola rennt (Run Lola Run), Ich bin meine eigene Frau (I Am My Own Woman), Aimee und Jaguar, Nirgendwo in Afrika (Nowhere in Africa), and Goodbye Lenin.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Rachel Freudenburg

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in German
Counts toward German major, German minor, and German Studies minor. Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency core requirement.

GERM 2221 Madmen,Hysterics&Criminals:Inventing Deviance Spring 3
Course Description

In this seminar we address three major questions, guided by a broad selection of readings from German, French, British, and American literature and theory from 1800 to the present: How do we as readers define the abnormal and the deviant? What aesthetic practices does literature employ to represent these threshold experiences, and what is their history? How might we rethink our own notions of normality when faced with their artificiality? Literary, theoretical, and musical texts by Balzac, Bernhard, Büchner, Freud, Genet, Kracht, Plath, Stevenson, and others help us establish a history both of abnormality and our own cultural self-understanding.


Instructor(s): Daniel Bowles

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL2210 FREN3315

Comments: Conducted in English. Counts toward German major, German minor, and German Studies minor.

GERM 2222 Music and Word: The German Musical Heritage Fall 3
Course Description

Beginning in the Middle Ages and running through to the middle of the twentieth century, this course will examine the fusion of German-language texts with musical expression in the context of their social and cultural environment. A central focus of the course will be the great age of German music during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries—including among others the works of Bach, Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Michael Resler

Prerequisites: GERM1050-1051 or the equivalent

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in German.
No formal knowledge of music required.
Counts toward German major, German minor, and German Studies minor. Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency core requirement.

GERM 2224 Modern German Novels in Translation Spring 3
Course Description

This course focuses on trendsetting examples of the conventional narrative form which have had a profound influence on both German literature and world literature. The historical contexts stand in an evolving counterpoint to the thematic content. Texts include works by Franz Kafka, Thomas Mann, and Günther Grass. See section description for more details.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Daniel Bowles

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL2267

Comments: Conducted in English with all texts in English.
Counts toward German major, German minor, and German Studies minor.

GERM 2226 Germany in Its European Context Fall 3
Course Description

Hyphenated German writers are bi-lingual and bi-cultural. Famous examples include 2009 Nobel prize winner Herta Müller (Romanian )and Zafer Senocak and Fatih Akin (both Turkish). Questions of migration, identity, and otherness are typical topics in their texts and films. With every text in this course, students view Germany from a different perspective, a view from the outside in. In the end, the image of contemporary Germany will look quite original, quite different from the Germany depicted by "German Germans."


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Monika Totten

Prerequisites: GERM1050-1051 (with B- or better) or the equivalent.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in German.
Counts toward German major, German minor, and German Studies minor.
Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency core requirement.

GERM 2239 Knights, Castles, and Dragons Spring 3
Course Description

A study of the masterpieces of the first great blossoming in German literature including The Nibelungenlied, Tristan, and Hartmann von Aue's Erec. Central to the works of this age are (1) the rise of knighthood and (2) the spreading to Germany of the legend of King Arthur and the knights of the Round Table. In addition, older Germanic-heroic influences will be examined in certain of the works. The literature will be discussed in the larger context of its sociological and historical background. The literary traditions of France will be systematically linked to contemporary developments in Germany.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Michael Resler

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL2282

Comments: Conducted in English with all texts in English translation.
No knowledge of German is required.
Counts toward German major, German minor, and German Studies minor.

GERM 2240 King Arthur in German Literature Spring 3
Course Description

A study centering on the most popular and enduring of all medieval legendary figures. We will examine the early texts from which the Arthurian mythology took root and contributed to the eventual spread into Germany of the tales of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table. We will then focus on a close reading of four or five of the most significant Arthurian romances within the German tradition. In addition, we will systematically trace the relationship between this highly idealized world of literary knighthood and real-life contemporary historical and social events of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Michael Resler

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL3304

Comments: Conducted in English with all texts in English translation.
Counts toward German major, German minor, and German Studies minor.

GERM 2242 Germany Divided and Reunited Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course provides a multi-dimensional look at post-war Germany, East and West. Politics, social and economic structure (East versus West), music, art, literature, philosophy (Critical Theory), the crisis and reform of the West German university system, the young generation, and Americanization will be discussed. Other topics include radicalism/extremism/protest movements (including terrorism), coping with the past (National Socialism), the Revolution of November 1989, and the legal ramifications and unsolved problems deriving from reunification.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Daniel Bowles

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HIST2270

Comments: Conducted in English.
Required for the German Studies minor.
Counts toward German major and German minor.

GERM 2250 Literature of Migration: Diaspora, Exile, and Home Spring 3
Course Description

Students will analyze how the boundaries between these three ideas, which are at ostensible odds with each other, have collapsed during the ruptures of the twentieth century. How do authors in exile deal with the conflicting desires to return home to a country that does not want them, for example. Students will be introduced to post-colonial theory/-ies of transnationalism to offer entry points to texts across a variety of genres. Of specific interest is the way that fiction allows migrant and post-migrant authors to reflect and position their individual story within a universal framework. The historical scope of the course reaches back to Greek literary nostos (homecoming) and medieval literature to position modern literature from the Holocaust, African Diaspora, and Israeli-Palestinian conflict, with authors including Dante Aligheri, Frantz Fanon, Tony Morrison, Else Lasker-Schüler, Yoko Tawada, Bertolt Brecht, Ghassan Kanafani, Benedict Anderson, Homi Bhabha, and Edward Said.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL2251

Comments: Conducted in English.

GERM 2290 Advanced Reading in German Spring 3
Course Description

This course will sharpen students' skills in reading advanced texts in German. It serves as a bridge between the department's language courses and the various practical and academic settings in which a strong reading knowledge of German is required. Texts will be taken from a wide spectrum of sources: German history, thought, literature, music, and modern media. The course will facilitate vocabulary development and offer an insight into the German Geist. It is recommended for students planning to study abroad and is open to graduate students planning to conduct research in the German language.


Instructor(s): Hanni Myers

Prerequisites: GERM 1050-1051 or the equivalent

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in German.
Counts toward German major and German Studies minor. Required for German minor. Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency core requirement.

GERM 2299 Reading and Research Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

The course includes supervised readings within specific areas for the solution of individual problems of research. Students may sign up for this course only after the need for a special program has been established and a faculty member has agreed to supervise the project.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Permission of the chairperson

Cross listed with:

Comments: By arrangement

GERM 3310 Middle High German&Mittelhochdeutsch Spring 3
Course Description

An introduction to the German literary language of the high Middle Ages. This course will focus on the reading, translating (into English) and grammatical analysis of texts composed in Middle High German (Mittelhochdeutsch), the literary language which served as vehicle for the chivalric and courtly literature of the late twelfth and early thirteenth centuries. Students will work with a standard Middle High German grammar and with short texts in Middle High German. In addition, one longer work will be read in its entirety.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Michael Resler

Prerequisites: Four semesters of college German (with a grade of B+ or higher) or the equivalent.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted chiefly in German.

GERM 3311 Gothic Spring 3
Course Description

How to read Gothic texts. The grammatical and linguistic features of Gothic, the earliest Germanic literary language (4th-6th century AD); the place of Gothic among the Germanic and Indo-European languages; the analysis of Gothic texts, 
beginning with an inductive reading from Ulfila’s Bible. Some previous study of linguistics or of an inflected language such as German or Latin will be helpful, although not necessary.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Rebecca A.B. Colleran

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: LING3234

Comments:

GERM 3320 German Business and Trends in Europe Spring/Fall 3
Course Description

This advanced level German language course offers an insight into business practices, such as hiring and firing, labor laws, the developing entrepreneurship scene in Germany, and the ever changing role of the European Union. Aging population, immigration, a changing education system, and a reduced social benefit system are some of the trends that can be observed in many European countries; and businesses have to adapt to them. The opportunity of taking the Zertifikat Deutsch für den Beruf ZDfD and extensive practice for this test will be provided in the class.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Ruth Sondermann

Prerequisites: GERM 2202 (with a B- or better) or the equivalent

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in German.
Counts toward German major, German minor, and German Studies minor. Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency core requirement.

GERM 3325 Living Literature: the Contemporary German Novel Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

If German literary history has often been cleaved into eras according to tumultuous political events, recent writing in German would seem to stand apart and alone, not yet categorized. In this seminar we examine a central genre, which has historically been used as a snapshot of a nation, to take the pulse of a culture with its newest novels. What can living authors tell us about our world? Topics include history and fiction; future and the fantastic; sex, drugs, and rock ‘n’ roll; gender; memory; satire; and others. Authors may include Fritsch, Goetz, Herrndorf, Jelinek, Kracht, Müller, Meinecke, Timm, Zaimoglu.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Daniel Bowles

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed GERM2201 or Permission of German Studies required

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in German. Counts toward German major, German minor, German Studies minor.

GERM 3333 The Linguistic Structure of German Spring 3
Course Description

An analysis of the major features of modern German with some reference to earlier versions of the language: sound system, grammar, structure and meanings of words, and properties of discourse.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): M.J. Connolly

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: LING3333

Comments: Prior study of German or Linguistics not required but recommended.

GERM 6601 Advanced Independent Research Fall/Spring 6
Course Description

Proposals for possible designation as scholar's projects should be submitted to the Chair early in the spring. Details of dates and required materials are available from the office of the Dean of Arts and Sciences. All proposals must be approved by the Chair and the Departmental advisor.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Approval through Honors Committee

Cross listed with:

Comments:

GERM 6699 Honors Thesis Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

The honors thesis in German Studies is offered to interested students who maintain a cumulative average of at least 3.3 in German. These students may begin a six credit research project that will lead to a 60 to 80 page honors thesis completed during the fall and spring of their senior year. The thesis is a major scholarly enterprise entailing independent research and writing; the final product is an essay embodying the results of original research and substantiating a specific view of the subject matter. Interested students should initiate the preparatory planning during junior year.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Permission of the chairperson

Cross listed with:

Comments: By arrangement