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French Courses (FREN) College of Arts and Sciences


Subject Area Course # Course Title Semester Credit Hours Expand
FREN 1009 Elementary French I Fall 3
Course Description

This beginning course is designed for students with no prior French experience and those who have studied French before and have placed into this level. True beginners should also sign up for FREN1011, the Elementary French I Practicum. Emphasis is on building oral and written communication skills and exploring the cultural specificities of life in France. Elementary French I is a film-based course and is supplemented with web-based assignments and an online language lab.


Instructor(s): Andrea Javel (Coordinator) and The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Classes are conducted primarily in French.
Students with prior French experience admitted only by placement test.

FREN 1010 Elementary French II Spring 3
Course Description

This course is a continuation of FREN1009 (Elementary French I) and is also open to students who have placed into this course without having completed FREN1009. Course goals include laying a foundation for Intermediate French, expanding vocabulary, and building oral proficiency. Elementary French II is a film-based course supplemented with web-based assignments and an online language lab.


Instructor(s): Andrea Javel (Coordinator) and The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Classes are conducted primarily in French.
Students with prior French experience admitted only by placement test.

FREN 1011 Elementary French Practicum I Fall 1
Course Description

This intensive 50-minute course is open to students enrolled concurrently in Elementary French I (FREN 1009) and need further reinforcement of structures and vocabulary studied in Elementary French I. This course is limited to 10 students so that there is optimum student / teacher interaction and frequent student participation. It is highly recommended to students who struggle with foreign languages and those who are true beginners.


Instructor(s): Andrea Javel (Coordinator) and The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

FREN 1012 Elementary French Practicum II Spring 1
Course Description

This intensive 50-minute course is open to students enrolled concurrently in Elementary French II (FREN 1010) and need further reinforcement of structures and vocabulary studied in Elementary French II. This course is limited to 10 students so that there is optimum student / teacher interaction and frequent student participation. It is highly recommended to students who struggled with Elementary French I.


Instructor(s): Andrea Javel (Coordinator) and The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

FREN 1013 Intermediate French Practicum I Fall 1
Course Description

This intensive 50-minute course is open to students enrolled concurrently in Intermediate French I (FREN 1109) and need further reinforcement of structures and vocabulary studied in Intermediate French I. This course is limited to 10 students so that there is optimum student / teacher interaction and frequent student participation. It is highly recommended to students who have struggled with foreign languages in the past.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

FREN 1014 Intermediate French Practicum II Spring 1
Course Description

This intensive 50-minute course is open to students enrolled concurrently in Intermediate French II (FREN 1110) and need further reinforcement of structures and vocabulary studied in Intermediate French II. This course is limited to 10 students so that there is optimum student / teacher interaction and frequent student participation. It is highly recommended to students who struggled in Intermediate French I.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

FREN 1065 Intensive Reading in French Summer 3
Course Description

The course objectives are (1) to develop the ability to read French readily and accurately through the study of grammatical structures and vocabulary; (2) to develop techniques for the reading of French-language material; and (3) to provide practice in the translation of French texts in general and of texts related to the students' major fields of study and research. This course may be taken for a grade, for pass/fail, or audited (as a registered auditor). Students desiring a pass/fail grade must file this grading preference with the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

FREN 1109 Intermediate French I Fall 3
Course Description

The emphasis will be on building upon prior study and developing a practical knowledge of the French language, as spoken by native speakers in contemporary France. Our goal is to help students develop oral and written proficiency in the language. The emphasis is on contemporary French culture and history, vocabulary expansion, accuracy of expression, and interactive language use. Short literary and cultural readings will provide authentic insight. Classroom work will be supplemented with web-based assignments and an online audio program.


Instructor(s): Andrea Javel (Coordinator) and The Department

Prerequisites: FREN1010, FREN1042 or Admission by placement

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French

FREN 1110 Intermediate French II Spring 3
Course Description

This course is a continuation of FREN1109 (Intermediate French I) and is also open to students who have placed into this course. Students will continue to expand their vocabulary and develop their fluency, both written and oral. Emphasis is on active student participation and a broadening of historical and cultural knowledge. Francophone culture will be explored through literary excerpts by authors from France, Africa, and the Caribbean. Classroom work will be supplemented with film, web-based assignments and an online audio program.


Instructor(s): Andrea Javel (Coordinator) and The Department

Prerequisites: FREN1109 or Admission by placement test

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French. Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency core requirement.

FREN 1184 France: Intensive Intermediate French Fall 6
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

FREN 2203 Summer Independent Study in Paris Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

FREN 2209 French Conversation, Composition, and Reading I Fall 3
Course Description

This course will focus on the further development of oral and written language skills. Films, videos, songs, selected literary and cultural readings, interviews, and internet activities will form the basis for classroom discussions and compositions. This course is especially recommended for students who intend to use French to increase their professional opportunities, to broaden the scope of their social interactions, and to enrich their travel and study experiences abroad.


Instructor(s): Jeff Flagg (Coordinator) and The Department

Prerequisites: FREN1110, FREN1182 or Admission by placement test

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French.
An elective towards the French minor when taken as first course in sequence. Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency core requirement.

FREN 2210 French Conversation, Composition, and Reading II Spring 3
Course Description

This course will focus on the further development of oral and written language skills. Films, videos, songs, selected literary and cultural readings, interviews, and internet activities will form the basis for classroom discussions and compositions. This course is especially recommended for students who intend to use French to increase their professional opportunities, to broaden the scope of their social interactions, and to enrich their travel and study experiences abroad.


Instructor(s): The Department and Jeff Flagg (Coordinator)

Prerequisites: FREN1110, FREN1182 or Admission by placement test

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French
Counts as an elective towards the French major or minor when taken as first course in sequence. Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency core requirement.

FREN 2217 French CCR Practicum I Fall 1
Course Description

Students preparing to study in France or another Francophone country and students desiring extra conversation, listening, reading, and writing practice are invited to register for this one-credit, 50 minute weekly supplementary practicum.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

FREN 2218 French CCR Practicum II Spring 1
Course Description

Students preparing to study in France or another Francophone country and students desiring extra conversation, listening, reading, and writing practice are invited to register for this one-credit, 50 minute weekly supplementary practicum.


Instructor(s): Jeff Flagg

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

FREN 3300 The French and the Peoples of America Fall 3
Course Description

From the early modern period to the present, letters, travel accounts, engravings, essays and narrative fiction have borne witness to attempts of the French to understand peoples different from themselves in the Americas. We will explore issues of cultural diversity and commonality as we analyze accounts of their encounters with Native Americans, descendants of African slaves, Colonial Boston's Puritans, New Yorkers of the 1940s, and New England's university students, politicians, and writers. Students will also work on topics of French grammar through guided exercises.


Instructor(s): Jeff Flagg

Prerequisites: Four years of high school French or FREN2210

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French
Elective for French major or minor
Fulfills A&S Literature & Cultural Diversity Core requirement

FREN 3301 Boston's Francophone Connections Spring 3
Course Description

A crossroads where Americans and peoples of France and other Francophone regions have met since the seventeenth century, Boston has served as common ground, battlefield and laboratory. In today's Boston, street designs, buildings, works of art, and cultural and commercial institutions bear witness to the continuing relationship between Boston and the French-speaking world. We will explore the development of Boston's Francophone connections through an examination of newspaper articles, diaries, letters, essays, paintings, monuments, architectural works, musical compositions and historic sites.


Instructor(s): Jeff Flagg

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Counts as an elective towards the French major. Conducted in French.

FREN 3305 Introduction to Drama and Poetry Fall 3
Course Description

This course is open to any students interested in expanding their linguistic and cultural horizons while developing their literary skills through writing in French. Guided compositions will help students to gain precision and sophistication in their written French and in their writing in general. Selected poems and plays explore a chosen theme and allow students to learn the basics of literary analysis in each genre. Grammar review is tied to the readings. This course will prepare students for 400-level courses in literature and culture.


Instructor(s): Stephen Bold (F)

Prerequisites: Four years of high school French or FREN2209 or FREN2210

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French
Fulfills one of the 3000 level requirements for the French major. Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency core requirement.

FREN 3306 Introduction to Narrative Forms Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course is designed to help students with a good background in French to progress to the next level. Students in this course will continue to solidify their mastery of French grammar through structural exercises tied to readings, discussion, and written analysis of selected short stories, novels, and narrative film. The stories have been chosen and presented to allow students to progress substantially both in their basic reading skills in French and in their awareness of critical aspects of storytelling such as narrative voice, point of view, and plot structure.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Joseph Breines (F) and The Department (S)

Prerequisites: Four years of high school French or FREN2209 or FREN2210

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French
Fulfills one of the 3000-level requirements for the French major. Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency core requirement.

FREN 3307 Masterpieces of French Literature Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

An introduction to the history of the French literary tradition through a selection of great works on a specific theme. The selected works will be studied from a variety of literary, historical, and cultural perspectives. This course will prepare students for 4000-level courses in literature and culture.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Four years of high school French or FREN2209 or FREN2210

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French. Open to majors, prospective majors and interested non-majors. Fulfills one of the four 3000-level requirements for the French major and is designed to prepare students for 4000-level courses in literature and culture.

FREN 3308 Advanced Language Studies Spring 3
Course Description

This course will help you deepen your mastery of the structures of written French, develop your appreciation of style, and enrich your vocabulary. Selected topics of advanced grammar and stylistics will be examined in context in order to help you prepare for a wide range of exercises in written composition. Special attention will also be given to the enrichment of your active vocabulary. As you develop your analytical reading skills, you will use a wide variety of textual models for your own writing.


Instructor(s): Joseph Breines (S)

Prerequisites: Four years of high school French or FREN2209 or FREN2210

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French
Fulfills one of the 3000-level requirements for the French major. Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency requirement. Spring topic: Phonetics

FREN 3309 Topics in French Culture and Civilization Spring/Fall 3
Course Description

This course introduces students to the study of French culture and its tradition by exploring questions related to contemporary France, its cultural history, monuments, and institutions. Discussions and students' work focus on a selection of relevant documents chosen from a variety of print and audio-visual documents. Students also continue to work on advanced topics of French grammar through structural exercises and guided written compositions. This course prepares students for 400-level courses in culture and civilization.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Anne Kearney

Prerequisites: Four years of high school French or RL 209 or RL 210.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French
Fulfills one of the 3000-level requirements for the French major

FREN 3315 Madmen,Hysterics&Criminals:Inventing Deviance Spring 3
Course Description

In this seminar we address three major questions, guided by a broad selection of readings from German, French, British, and American literature and theory from 1800 to the present: How do we as readers define the abnormal and the deviant? What aesthetic practices does literature employ to represent these threshold experiences, and what is their history? How might we rethink our own notions of normality when faced with their artificiality? Literary, theoretical, and musical texts by Balzac, Bernhard, Büchner, Freud, Genet, Kracht, Plath, Stevenson, and others help us establish a history both of abnormality and our own cultural self-understanding.


Instructor(s): Daniel Bowles

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL2210 GERM2221

Comments: Conducted in English. Counts toward German major, German minor, and German Studies minor.

FREN 3350 Jewish Writers in French Literature Fall 3
Course Description

The course will introduce French Jewish literature from the nineteenth century to the present. Students will research and discuss the main events that have shaped the recent history of France and influenced French Jewish writers such as Patrick Modiano, Georges Perec, Elie Wiesel and others. The works of these writers will be examined in several contexts: social, historical, intellectual and personal, with the goal of both enriching the students' knowledge of French literature and developing their critical thinking.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Nelly Rosenberg

Prerequisites: Four years of high school French or FREN2209 or FREN2210

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French.
Elective for French major or minor.
Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency core requirement.

FREN 3357 Memory and Literature Fall 3
Course Description

This course explores the dynamic interaction between literature and memory across time and genre. Readings include extracts from Genesis (Joseph's story), Augustine's Confessions (Book 10), essays by Montaigne (eg, I, 9 on liars; II, 6 on practicing to die), the opening movement of Proust's great novel In Remembrance of Time Past, Sebald's Austerlitz, and Manea's The Hooligan's Return, a Memoir. Secondary readings from Freud and recent scientific research on memory and the brain, as well as the film Memento, will support our literary excursions.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Matilda Bruckner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in English.
Fulfills one of the 3000-level requirements for the French major or minor.
Fulfills A&S Literature Core requirement. Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency core requirement.

FREN 3374 What is Africa to Me?: Comparative African Literatures Fall 3
Course Description

In his poem "What is Africa to Me?" the African-American Countee Cullen considers what writing about Africa means to those living in the United States. Similarly, this course explores how different African writers have used literature to express various aspects of their identities including race, class, ethnicity, religion, and gender. This course crosses national boundaries to broaden perspectives on studying the African continent from a literary perspective. Bringing together African studies, comparative literature, and postcolonial studies, this course will introduce students to major topics in each of these areas through the study of authors from Francophone and Anglophone Africa.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): R�gine Jean-Charles

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in English.
Elective for French major or minor.

FREN 3376 Conversational Approach to Contemporary France Spring 3
Course Description

This course is designed to familiarize students with the political and social features of contemporary France while helping them to develop oral communication skills in French. Using authentic documents (television, videos, films, songs, newspapers, and magazines), we will discuss current events and socio-political issues. Students will develop their vocabulary, increase their knowledge of idiomatic expressions, and further their command of spoken French by engaging in structured dialogues based upon real-life situations.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French
Counts as an elective towards the French major or minor. Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency core requirement.

FREN 3377 Prison, Trial, and Judgment Fall 3
Course Description

This course will focus on the theme of imprisonment in selected novels of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, examining in each case the social, moral, and artistic implications of the author's treatment of the subject matter. Students will read Stendhal's The Red and the Black and The Charterhouse of Parma; Hugo's Les Miserarables and The Last Day of a Condemned Man; Malraux's Man's Fate; and Camus's The Stranger.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Norman Araujo

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in English.
Elective for the major in French.

FREN 3393 Literatures of the World: Life Stories Fall 3
Course Description

This course will concentrate on texts following the path of a person on his/her journey from alienation, loss, hardship, through a turning point. We will read stories of people who were caught in a major life crisis but who managed to keep a deep connection with themselves and the world: people who survived to share their experience with others. We will read three books and a play, as well as letters, book extracts, and Nobel Prize addresses in a coursepack. Some films will be discussed. The course will be discussion based.


Instructor(s): Anne Bernard Kearney

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in English
Elective for the French major. Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency core requirement.

FREN 4406 Versailles: A Cinematic Look at French Culture of the Grand Siecle Spring 3
Course Description

This course will focus on the cultural moment when modern France was born: the age of Louis XIV and his palace at Versailles. We will study the grandeur and the conflict that define this summit of French history through a variety of documents, including a number of recent films that reconstruct the period, and contemporary masterpieces of painting, architecture and music. We will also read a variety of literary, historical, and eyewitness texts that portray the age as it was or wanted to be.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Stephen Bold

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency Core Requirement
Conducted in French

FREN 4412 Exploring Provence through Literature and Film Fall 3
Course Description

An exploration of the "Midi," the culture of southern France, through film, literary, historical and cultural documents. Topics include love and power politics (troubadours and trobairitz), rural and urban life (Pagnol's Marseilles in the Fanny trilogy; his autobiographical writings; Jean de Florette and Manon des sources), religious and spiritual struggles (Montaillou & Catharism, Conques & pilgrimage, the nature of evil explored in Bernanos' novels), regional differences (including language, geography, and customs) vs. a centralized France.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Matilda Bruckner

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French.
Undergraduates Only.

FREN 4413 Violence: Medieval French Responses Spring 3
Course Description

This course asks students to look at one of the perennials of human experience to explore the relationship between violence and human nature in the context of medieval French culture. What can the Middle Ages teach us today about violence then and now? How does art interact with and transform violence? A selection of texts will include a variety of genres: romance (Le Conte du Graal); chansons de geste (Roland, Raoul de Cambrai, Charroi de Nîmes); animal fables (Renart; by Marie de France); theater (Jeu d'Adam); and poetry (Le Testament, by Villon).


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Matilda Bruckner

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French.
Elective for French major or minor.

FREN 4420 Performing the Middle Ages Spring 3
Course Description

"Performing the Middle Ages" invites students to discover the dramatic potential of medieval French literature, which continues to come alive in our own experience, as it did in the life and times of medieval France. Reading in and off the written page, we'll examine a variety of texts from the 11th c. to the 15th, including lyric poetry, theater, and short narratives. Our focus on the dynamics of performance will involve both what we can learn about medieval representation and reception of these works, as well as what the students' own performances can reveal.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Matilda Bruckner

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French.
Elective for French major or minor.

FREN 4424 Renaissance France: Humanism and Reformation Spring 3
Course Description

In this course we will examine the cultural revolution that ushered in the modern age, known as the Renaissance. The renewal of the arts and sciences created the conditions for creative innovation, modernization of public institutions and also for fierce debate and dissent within the Christian church that led to a violent division within the French nation. Readings will include Erasmus’ Praise of Folly, Rabelais’ Gargantua, selections from the Pléiade poets and from Marguerite de Navarre’s Heptaméron and period and modern accounts of the tragic Saint Bartholomew’s Day massacre.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Stephen Bold

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French.

FREN 4425 Animals in Medieval Literature Fall 3
Course Description

Foxes and lions, dragons and werewolves exercise their fascination over the medieval imagination. Animals, whether domestic or wild, real or imaginary, speak to our human need to explore ourselves and our world—the overlapping boundaries between the natural and the unnatural, the human and the nonhuman—as we try to define ourselves and fix our identity. The medieval French texts chosen from the twelfth to the fourteenth centuries suggest that such a project was as complex and ever shifting in the Middle Ages as it remains in the modern world.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Matilda Bruckner

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French.

FREN 4427 Studies in Rabelais and Montaigne Fall 3
Course Description

We will be reading selected works of the two great prose writers of the French Renaissance: Rabelais' Pantagruel and Montaigne's Essais. Some critical writing on these authors will also be considered, including essays by Bakhtine, Auerbach and Starobinski.


Instructor(s): Joseph Breines

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French

FREN 4430 French Poetry of the Renaissance Fall 3
Course Description

This course will focus on the poetic revolution undertaken by Joachim du Bellay and Pierre Ronsard, leaders of the group known as the Pliade. Their return to classic Greek and Roman sources paradoxically established the standards for modern French poetry through to the twentieth century. Most importantly, we will read some of the most beautiful and most intriguing poems ever written in French.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Stephen Bold

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French
Fulfills one of the 400-level requirements for the French major or minor

FREN 4431 Classicism in Seventeenth Century French Literature Fall 3
Course Description

This course offers an advanced introduction to the literature of France's classical age. We will conduct a close reading of some of the century's greatest works by its greatest writers (Corneille, Descartes, Racine, Pascal, Lafayette, et al.) and covering the major genres (tragedy comedy, philosophical essay, novel). Along the way we will come to understand better the meaning of Classicism in French literature, the complex and delicate doctrine of simplicity that tries to capture light not in a bottle but in a text.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Stephen Bold

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French.

FREN 4432 Faith and Reason Spring 3
Course Description

The French seventeenth century, commonly referred to as France's "grand siecle," is also known as both the century of saints and the beginning of the age of reason. The double impetus of faith and reason brought about enormous creativity and, at times, considerable conflict. In this course we will explore these fundamental poles of French classical literature in thought through the study of major authors, including Saint Francois de Sales, Descartes, Pascal, and Cyrano de Bergerac, as well as selections from Bossuet, Malebranche, Bayle, and Leibniz.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Stephen Bold

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French.
Fulfills one of the 300-level requirements for the French major or minor.

FREN 4435 Tragedy Fall 3
Course Description

This course will focus on the interrelated problems of morality, destiny, and esthetics as they affect the construction of the early modern hero.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Stephen Bold

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French

FREN 4436 Moliere Fall 3
Course Description

This course will offer an in-depth survey of all aspects of Moliere's work, from his farces to the "grandes comédies" and the "comédies ballets."


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Stephen Bold

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency Core Requirement
Conducted in French

FREN 4438 La Fontaine and Perrault Spring 3
Course Description

Jean de La Fontaine and Charles Perrault occupy special places in the history of seventeenth century French literature: though they practiced forms apparently aimed at a young audience (fables and fairy tales) they also played crucial roles in cultural and political debates that divided intellectual of the times. We will rediscover these minor classics with new eyes and multiple perspectives.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Stephen Bold

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French
Fulfills one of the 400-level requirements for the French major or minor

FREN 4440 Images of the Family in Eighteenth-Century French Literature Fall 3
Course Description

This course will study the emergence of the private sphere in the Enlightenment by focusing on the changing representation of the family in eighteenth-century French literature and culture. A selection of novels and plays from the period will be read, as well as theoretical texts and artistic documents.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Ourida Mostefai

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French.

FREN 4441 Literature and Culture of the French Enlightenment Fall 3
Course Description

This course seeks to examine the idea of "Lumires" in eighteenth-century France through the reading of the major texts of the period. We will analyze the concepts central to the French Enlightenment: tolerance, progress, nature, and culture, as they are formulated both in the fiction (tales and novels) and in the major theoretical texts of Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, and the Encyclopedists.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Ourida Mostefai

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French. Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency requirement.

FREN 4443 18th-Century French Theater Spring 3
Course Description

This course offers an advanced introduction to theater in 18th-century France. We will read some of the major plays of the period by Voltaire, Lesage, Marivaux, Diderot and Beaumarchais, and essays on theater written at that time, as we consider the ways in which theater was used as a means of disseminating philosophical ideas of the Enlightenment.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Joseph Breines

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French.

FREN 4445 Rousseau's Legacies Fall 3
Course Description

This course will be devoted to the study of the reception of Rousseau's writings since the eighteenth century. Modern interpretations of Rousseau's thought will be examined in order to analyze the myth surrounding the person and the writer. The major texts of Rousseau will be read, including the two Discours, La Lettre d'Alembert, Julie, ou La Nouvelle Hlose, Du Contrat Social, Emile, Les Confessions, and Les Rveries.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Ourida Mostefai

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French.

FREN 4446 Eighteenth-Century French Novel Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines the development of the novel as a genre in eighteenth-century France. We will read some of the major novels of the period (by Prévost, Marivaux, Crébillon, Rousseau, Laclos and Diderot), focusing in particular on the questions of class, gender, and education.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French

FREN 4448 The French Revolution Fall 3
Course Description

This course will study the literature and culture of the revolutionary period in France. Through a variety of media (books, pamphlets, songs, plays, films, and art) we will analyze some of the most profound changes in French society during the period: the abolition of privileges, the declaration of rights, freedom of the press, and national festivals. We will also examine the contradictions of the French Revolution, including the failure of the anti-slavery movement, the exclusion of women from citizenship, and the suppression of regional languages. Works by Rousseau, Sade, Mercier, Robespierre, Danton, Olympe de Gouges, as well as contemporary films.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Ourida Mostefai

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments:

FREN 4449 The 18th Century Novel: Libertinage Spring 3
Course Description

Libertinage in eighteenth-century France is characterized by the desire for a radical emancipation from all constraints and the systematic pursuit of pleasure. This course will focus on this cultural and intellectual phenomenon, which has recently received much critical attention. We will trace its evolution and analyze its multiple manifestations in ancien-régime French society: in religion, politics, morals, literature, philosophy and the arts. Readings will include pieces of fiction and philosophy of major authors (Crébillon, Marivaux, Diderot, Laclos, Sade) as well as lesser-known writers. Painters (Boucher, Watteau, Fragonard) and other artists who participated in this important movement will also be studied.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Ourida Mostefai

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French

FREN 4450 Becoming: Metamorphosis in 19th Century Fall 3
Course Description

19th-century France is obsessed with "becoming." Realist novels often explore this metamorphosis in terms of upward mobility and sexual freedom: the bumpkin-turned-metrosexual, the cross-dresser, etc. But narratives of becoming also play with fantasy and horror: animate statues, creepy dolls, robots, and the secret life of fashion all explore the weird relationship between the animate and the inanimate and probe existential questions about the very meaning of "alive." We'll analyze various narratives of becoming in literary texts, visual art, essays to ask what the fantasy of metamorphosis tells us about the interchangeable status of human and thing in the modern world.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Lauren Ravalico

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French

FREN 4451 Between Nature & Culture: Francophone Caribbean Novels & Environment Fall 3
Course Description


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Regine Jean Charles

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

FREN 4452 Realism in French Literature Fall 3
Course Description

This course will offer a study of realism in French poetry, drama, and narrative literature of the nineteenth century. Gautier and Leconte de Lisle will be examined as poetic representatives of the Art for Art's Sake doctrine and the Parnassian movement respectively. Flaubert, Fromentin, and Zola will be used to illustrate the trajectory of the novel from Realism to Naturalism, the latter movement also being exemplified in the short stories of Daudet and Maupassant and in the theater of Becque. Finally, Rostand's dramatic virtuosity will be appreciated as an idealistic reaction against the excesses of naturalism.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Norman Araujo

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French.

FREN 4453 Paris: Capital of the Nineteenth Century Fall 3
Course Description

Victor Hugo called Paris the "focal point of civilization," and Walter Benjamin labeled it the "capital of the nineteenth century." This course investigates the significance of the French metropolis's rise to preeminence in the century following the French Revolution. Examining nineteenth-century literary and visual representations of Paris alongside histories of the city, we will explore how culture intersects with the urban environment. How did writers and artists map urban space? How did the city shape cultural trends?


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Anne Linton

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments: All readings, assignments, and discussions will be in French.

FREN 4454 Contemporary Francophone Women Writers Fall 3
Course Description

This course explores the specificity of francophone women's writing in a contemporary context, examining narratives from a wide variety of geographic locations including the Caribbean, North Africa and Sub-Saharan Africa. The question of genealogy is central to this course as we attempt to delineate a matrilineal francophone literary tradition. As such we will also consider these narratives in relation to feminist theory, history, socio-cultural politics, culture and ethnicity. Some of the themes we will study include silence and voice, the female body, mother-daughter relationships, migration and immigration, and canon formation.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Regine Jean-Charles

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with: AADS2208

Comments: Conducted in French
Elective for French major or minor

FREN 4455 I See You: Exoticism, Ethnography, and the French Colonial Empire Spring 3
Course Description

This course probes the experiences of the modern Francophone traveler. 19th-century France witnessed an upsurge in business and pleasure travel, especially to countries in Africa that were under French colonial rule until the mid-20th century. We will study written and visual media from the 19th-20th centuries to examine how travelers use sensory impressions, especially vision, to bring the foreign to life and to illustrate its psychological effect on the traveler. Focusing on two ways of depicting otherness-exoticism and ethnography-we will consider the aesthetics and politics of these representational modes. Works by Flaubert, Sand, Gauguin, Gide, Breton, Camus, Glissant, et al.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Lauren Ravalico

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French
Fulfills one of the 400-level requirements for the French major or minor
Elective for French major or minor. Satisfies Foreign Language Proficiency core requirement.

FREN 4457 Passion Staged and Upstaged: Nineteenth-Century French Theater Fall 3
Course Description

Through its study of Romanticism, Realism, and Naturalism in the French drama of the nineteenth century, this course will show how Romantic passion is progressively subverted and defeated as the materialistic values of a bourgeois society successfully combat it, finally substituting for the Romantic hero the unscrupulous businessman. Students will read Hugo's Préface de Cromwell, Hernani and Ruy Blas; Musset's Les Caprices de Marianne and Lorenzaccio; Vigny's Chatterton; La Dame aux Camélias by Dumas fils; Becque's Les Corbeaux; and Rostand's Cyrano de Bergerac.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Norman Araujo

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French

FREN 4458 Contes et Nouvelles in the Nineteenth Century Fall 3
Course Description

While devoting proper attention to the general evolution of the conte in the nineteenth century, the course will center on the most significant works of Mrime, Maupassant, and Daudet.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Norman Araujo

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French.

FREN 4459 Balzac Spring 3
Course Description

In this course we will study the work of Honoré de Balzac, one of the most important writers in modern times. We will read a selection of novellas and novels from Balzac’s Comédie humaine, a multi-volume literary project that aimed to paint a sociological portrait of nineteenth-century France. Our goal will be to gain a profound understanding one author and also to read the Comédie as a cultural artifact of a certain place and time. The course will therefore be both a literary and a cultural study that will include analyses of paintings, excerpts from the press, and historical documents.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Lauren Ravalico

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French

FREN 4460 Poetry in Prose Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores the nature and meaning of prose poetry in French from the eighteenth through the twentieth centuries. It begins with the necessary question of definition, asking whether any objective criteria for making distinctions between prose and poetry exists. A first emphasis on the act of writing will subsequently lead to a consideration of the way reading and interpretation intervene in any determination of form. Readings focus on the way prose poetry tends to arise where reflection upon nature, the city, intersubjective consciousness, and language itself becomes particularly acute. Authors include Rousseau, Nerval, Baudelaire, Mallarmé, Michaux, and Ponge.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kevin Newmark

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French.

FREN 4461 From Olympus with Love: Hugo's Literary Revolution Spring 3
Course Description

The course focuses on the impact of Hugo's personality and creative genius on the development of French poetry and prose in the nineteenth century, indicating how and why this titanic man of letters, who managed to surpass his early literary model Chateaubriand in prestige and influence, became the most dominant literary figure in France in the first half of the nineteenth century and the conscience of the nation during his exile in the second half. The exploration of his work in different literary genres will focus on that work's revolutionary originality: its remarkable realization of the fecund potential of Romanticism.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Norman Araujo

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments:

FREN 4462 French Cinema: Time and Space Fall 3
Course Description

This course will introduce students to the history and development of French cinema, from silent films of Georges Mlis and the Lumire brothers to the works of the modern French filmmakers. The films from the major directors and movements of French filmmaking will be approached through the thematic framework of Time and Space. Exploring the various ways in which camera, performer, and setting engage with space and time and analyzing different film techniques by which cinematic time and space are rendered, well study the works of such masters as Lumire, Mlis,Carn, Vigo, Renoir, Truffaut, Godard, Marker, Resnais, Varda, and others.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Larysa Smirnova

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French

FREN 4464 Existentialism from A to Z Fall 3
Course Description

This course will examine some of the fundamental literary, philosophical, and historical components of French Existentialism. It will examine the way that the major writers of this movement in twentieth-century thought developed their ideas against the backdrop of Surrealism in literature, existential phenomenology in philosophy, and the historical upheavals of World War II. Of primary concern will be the manner in which the themes, concepts, and experiences of Meaninglessness, Engagement, Occupation, Resistance, and Liberation are confronted and rearticulated in the texts considered. Authors will include Sartre, Camus, Malraux, de Beauvoir, Duras, Ponge, and Blanchot.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kevin Newmark

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French

FREN 4465 Between Nature and Culture: Caribbean Literature and the Environment Fall 3
Course Description

The flora and fauna of tropical landscapes, lushness of the mangroves, the flow of great rivers, the crashing waves of the Atlantic, the heights of mountainous lands, the shock of natural disasters—the natural world is an important site of Caribbean artistic and cultural production. Applying eco-criticism to the field of francophone Caribbean literature, the goal of this class is to examine the ways that fiction explores the relationship between literature and the environment in the Francophone Caribbean context. We will read novels by canonical authors from Haiti, Guadeloupe and Martinique in which nature plays a dominant and transformative role


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Régine Michelle Jean-Charles

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French

FREN 4466 Francophone Sub-Saharan Cinema Spring 3
Course Description

This course proposes to explore Francophone Sub-Saharan cinema—from its birth until the present day—as a means of reflecting, depicting and constructing national and personal identity. We will investigate the works of major representatives of Sub-Saharan cinema, placing them in their historical, cultural and aesthetic contexts and analyzing them from the following perspectives: colonialism, post-colonialism, modernity vs. traditions, personal alienation and quest for self, African women's identity, and African cinematographic identity.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Larysa Smirnova

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French

FREN 4467 19th Century French Novel: Le roman juste Spring 3
Course Description

This course will offer a study of the poetics of some of the greatest French novels in 19th century by Stendhal, Balzac, Flaubert and Zola. Prompted by the epigraph of Le Rouge et le Noir, “The truth, the harsh truth,” and echoed in Flaubert’s indefatigable pursuit of “le mot juste,” the question of truth will necessarily be raised in this seminar: the truth of/and novelistic imagination, literary expression, and writing.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Larysa Smirnova

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French

FREN 4468 The Poetry of Modernity: Baudelaire and Mallarmé Fall 3
Course Description

This course will examine the inauguration by Charles Baudelaire of the poetic, historical, and critical concept of modernity. What is modernity, and what makes poetry essential for a genuine experience of modernity? The course will address these questions by treating key examples of lyric poetry, prose poetry, and prose criticism from both Baudelaire and his first major "reader" Stéphane Mallarmé. It will also consider the reception of these two poets by Paul Valéry, Walter Benjamin, Jean-Paul Sartre, Maurice Blanchot, Paul de Man, and Jacques Derrida, among others.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kevin Newmark

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following RL305, RL306, RL307, RL308, RL309

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French

FREN 4469 Literature and Liberty Fall 3
Course Description

This course asks what literature has to do with the concept and practice of liberty. Freedom of thought and freedom of speech imply the possibility of imagining and writing things independently of criteria that govern other aspects of human behavior. In fact, this possibility can be taken as one sense of the word "fiction." How do literary texts interrogate and exemplify individual acts of freedom? What sort of promise and/or pitfalls do such acts hold out to us? Readings will be taken from texts by Diderot, Sade, Baudelaire, Mallarmé, Lautréamont, Gide, Breton, Sartre, Beckett, and Duras.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kevin Newmark

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments:

FREN 4470 Paris Noir Fall 3
Course Description

Since the Negritude movement of the 1930s, Africans and the diaspora have been making their mark on Paris. This course explores Black Paris through the different manifestations of the French fascination with Blackness, the presence of African-Americans during the Harlem Renaissance, and in various forms of cultural expression (literature, film, autobiography and music) by Black Parisians themselves. Taking on subjects as different as the "Venus Hottentot," Negritude poetry, performances by Josephine Baker, French rap, and "banlieue" films and novels by Calixthe Beyala and Bernard Dadie, among others. We will consider different ways of imagining Blackness in the Parisian context.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Regine Jean-Charles

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French

FREN 4471 Sanctuary, Asylum, and Sacred Space Fall 3
Course Description

“Sanctuary!” Quasimodo exclaims as he saves the gypsy Esmeralda from imminent execution by whisking her into the great cathedral of Victor Hugo’s Notre-Dame de Paris. But what exactly does Quasimodo understand the word “sanctuary” (asile) to mean? In this course, we will investigate of concept of sanctuary in Nineteenth-Century France, considering examples drawn from literature, civil and religious law, philosophy, and the arts. Topics to be covered include architectural and psychological constructions of sacred space, the emergence of a political right to asylum, the role of the church in the structure of sanctuary, and the invention of the “insane asylum.”


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Liesl Yamaguchi and The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French. Fulfills one of the 4000-level requirements for the French major or minor.

FREN 4472 The French New Wave Fall 3
Course Description

This course will focus on the history and aesthetics of the Nouvelle Vague. We will start by familiarizing ourselves with the theoretical and artistic precursors of this movement. While focusing on the most productive decade in the history of this group (from the late 1950s through mid-60s), we will also look at the post-Nouvelle-Vague works of some of these film directors and explore their influence on the French and world cinema of the last quarter of the 20th century. The works of the following filmmakers will be discussed: Godard, Truffaut, Rohmer, Chabrol, Marker, Resnais, Varda, Franju, Demy, among others.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Larysa Smirnova-Elentuck

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308,FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments:

FREN 4473 Haiti Cherie: Haitian Literature and Culture Spring 3
Course Description

This course will focus on the formation of a Haitian literary tradition, along with the historic and cultural factors that have influenced them. We will consider the major movements and themes, such as the 19th century literary movements, the politics of literature, and the role of the Haitian diaspora. How has Haitian literature developed over the years? How have socioeconomic, historical, and political factors been represented? How have Haitian writers taken on the question of language in their writing? Using a chronological approach to chart a timeline of Haitian literature, we will observe various cultural trends in relation to history.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Regine Jean-Charles

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with: AADS3322

Comments: Conducted in French

FREN 4474 Venal Muses : prostitution in 19th century French literature Spring 3
Course Description

This course will examine the representation of prostitutes in the 19th century French literature, and analyze the fascination that contemporary novelists (from Hugo and Balzac to Maupassant and Zola) and artists (Manet, Toulouse-Lautrec, Guys, Degas) had with prostitution. What social anxieties were conveyed by this obsession? Did prostitutes’ idiosyncratic lifestyle entitle them to a perfectly “novelistic destiny”? What was their role in the creation of romantic, realist or naturalist aesthetics? How did the workers of the “world’s oldest profession” come to illustrate the idea of modernity? These are some of the questions that will be raised in this course.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Larysa Smirnova

Prerequisites: Prerequisite: Two courses from the following: FREN3305,FREN3306,FREN3307,FREN3308,FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French

FREN 4475 Poetry and Freedom Spring 3
Course Description

Poetry today contains within it a notion of freedom: ours, we say, is the age of “free verse.” But what is our poetry free from, or more free to do? This course will investigate French understandings of poetic freedom in the century following the Revolution: the century to which we owe not only vers libre, but also a particularly powerful notion of liberté. Through texts by Hugo, Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Mallarmé, and others, we will reflect on notions of positive and negative liberty, the collision of poetic form with reactionary politics, and the historical specificity of what it means to be “free.”


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): The Department and Liesl Yamaguchi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French. Fulfills one of the 4000-level requirements for the French major or minor.

FREN 4477 Twentieth-Century Fiction Fall 3
Course Description

This course engages in a detailed study of some exemplary literary texts written in French during the twentieth century. Questions of meaning will be addressed by way of theme as well as form. Theoretical issues such as modernism, existentialism, feminism, post-modernity, and post-colonialism will also be considered in passing. Works will be chosen from authors such as Proust, Gide, Breton, Colette, Queneau, Bataille, Sartre, Fanon, Blanchot, Camera Laye, Duras, Perec, Ben Jelloun, Djebar, Des Forêts, Modiano, among others.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kevin Newmark

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French

FREN 4480 Marriage & Modernity Spring 3
Course Description

In this course we will investigate how heterosexual marriage has shaped modern French culture. The French have a particularly interesting marriage history because the 1789 Revolution led to the legalization of divorce and an early feminist awakening that called into question the sanctity of marriage and its promise of happiness. Reading stories of perfect marriage, desperate housewifery, "spinsterhood", and prostitution, we will study the relationship between the ideal of marriage and the lived reality of womanhood in the post-Revolutionary 19th century. We will conclude by examining French marriage in film 100 years later during the Sexual Revolution of the 1960s.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Lauren Ravalico

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French
Fulfills one of the 400-level requirements for the French major or minor
Cross-listed in Women's and Gender Studies, see their website for more information.

FREN 4483 Twentieth-Century French Theater Spring 3
Course Description

This course will study a number of plays written in French during the twentieth century. Authors will include Cocteau, Anouilh, Giraudoux, Sartre, Beckett and Genet. As many of the plays are remakes of Greek tragedies and legends (the Oedipus Cycle, the Trojan War, for instance) we will be posing questions such as: How does one explain the flurry of remakes at this time in France? How are classical notions of causality (Fate, Destiny) transposed in the modern versions? In what ways do the modern plays self-consciously express their status as remakes? Theoretical writings on theater will also be considered.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Joseph Breines

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French

FREN 4484 Fantastic Short Stories in French Fall 3
Course Description

This course will offer a study of the most representative texts (and some films) of the genre le fantastique examining them from several perspectives. We will explore the historical reasons for the emergence and popularity of the genre in the 19th century France. Drawing on various theories of the fantastique (e.g.Todorov, Freud), we will define its particularity in relation to neighboring genres (such as fairy tale, horror, and science fiction) and see how fantastic imagination echoes the modern crisis of interpretation. The following authors will be discussed: Nodier, Mrime, Gautier, Maupassant, Balzac, Villiers de lIsle-Adam, among others.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Larysa Smirnova-Elentuck

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

FREN 4485 Consumption & Self Spring 3
Course Description

The French are among the worlds most discerning consumers of the finer things in life: food, wine, fashion, etc. In this course we will examine the cultural history of French consumptive practices to better understand their role in shaping modern French culture. We will discuss the pleasures and problems of consumption in the literature, press, and visual art of the 19th century, when France developed into a capitalist democracy with Paris as its economic and cultural hub. Works by Balzac, Baudelaire, Flaubert, Sand, Zola, et al. We will also take museum excursions to study works by, Degas, Manet, Renoir, etc.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Lauren Ravalico

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French
Fulfills one of the 400-level requirements for the French major or minor
Elective for French major or minor

FREN 4486 Short Fiction in the 19th Century Fall 3
Course Description

While approaching the texts from a narratological perspective, this course will study short fictions of the most significant French authors of the 19th century, including Balzac, Flaubert, Maupassant, Mérimée and d’Aurevilly.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Larysa Smirnova

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following FREN3305, FEN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with:

Comments:

FREN 7704 Explication de Textes Fall 3
Course Description

This course offers graduate students an advanced introduction to the practice of close reading and textual analysis in the French mode. A variety of shorter works and excerpts selected from a wide chronological and generic spectrum will be used to help students read texts analytically and organize their commentaries effectively. Students will have the opportunity to work extensively on their written French and to discuss their progress during regular consultations with the instructor.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French.
First-year masters' candidates in French are very strongly encouraged to enroll in this course as an introduction to graduate studies in literature.

FREN 7750 Reading Jacques Derrida Spring 3
Course Description

This course will examine some of the fundamental ways that the work of Jacques Derrida has contributed to altering the context in which the humanities can be understood and studied within the modern university. It will take examples from Derrida’s repeated interventions in such disciplines as literature, philosophy, theology, and history. By situating Derrida’s work at the margins where accepted demarcations between the disciplines begin to blur, the course will suggest new possibilities for conducting interdisciplinary work in the future.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kevin Newmark

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL7753 PHIL7753

Comments: Open to undergraduates with permission of instructor

FREN 7752 Mirror or Mirage in the Realistic Novel? Spring 3
Course Description

This course traces the evolution of the realistic novel in the nineteenth century, endeavoring to determine what realism meant for each of the novelists studied, what devices were selected to represent it in a work of fiction, and how much success was achieved in this representation. This success will be appreciated in the broader framework of inquiry as to the novel's ability, as a literary genre, to accommodate realism. Students will read Stendhal's Le Rouge et le Noir and La Chartreuse de Parme; Balzac's Le Père Goriot and La Cousine Bette; Flaubert's Madame Bovary and L'Education sentimentale.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Norman Araujo

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Conducted in French.
Undergraduates may enroll with permission of the instructor.

FREN 7780 Readings in Theory Spring 3
Course Description

This course is organized as an introduction to the reading of literary theory for graduate students in various disciplines. Its aim is to develop an awareness of and sensitivity to the specific means and consequences of interpreting literary and extra-literary language today. The course allows students to acquire a basic familiarity with some of the most formative linguistic, philosophical, and anthropological antecedents underpinning any attempt to understand and account for the special status reserved for rhetorical language in literature or beyond it. Readings from Saussure, Lvi-Strauss, Jakobson, Barthes, Lacan, Ricoeur, Geertz, Austin, Derrida, and de Man, among others.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kevin Newmark

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL7780 ENGL7780

Comments: Conducted in English
Open to undergraduates with permission of instructor only
Fulfills a Ph.D. requirement in Romance Languages and Literatures