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English Courses (ENGL) College of Arts and Sciences


Subject Area Course # Course Title Semester Credit Hours Expand
ENGL 1009 First Year Writing Sem/English Language Learners Fall 3
Course Description

Designed for students whose first language is not English, this course aims to develop the writing skills necessary for success at Boston College. Students will gain practice in the writing of academic essays, focusing on a range of English rhetorical styles from narrative to research. The composition process from brainstorming, drafting, revision, and editing will be considered. Grammar is taught in the context of student-generated writing. This course may be taken in place of ENGL1010, First Year Writing Seminar, and fulfills the Writing Core requirement. Students place into this course based on the English placement exam taken in late August.


Instructor(s): Lynne Anderson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Department permission required

ENGL 1010 First Year Writing Seminar Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Designed as a workshop in which each student develops a portfolio of personal and academic writing, the seminar follows a semester-long process. Students write and rewrite essays continuously, discuss their works-in-progress in class, and receive feedback during individual and small group conferences with the instructor. Students read a wide range of texts, including various forms of non-fiction prose. In addition to regular conferences, the class meets two hours per week to discuss the writing process, the relationship between reading and writing, conventional and innovative ways of doing research, and evolving drafts of class members.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Limited to 15 students.

ENGL 1011 Writing as Activism Spring 3
Course Description


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Eileen Donovan-Kranz

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Limited to first-year PULSE

ENGL 1063 Triumphs and Failures of Modern Man Fall 3
Course Description

The hallmarks of modernity—urbanization, industrialization, democratization, and the advent of scientific positivism, among others—ushered in dramatically new paradigms for life in the early 20th century: technological advancement but horrific new wars, unimagined knowledge but a questioning of the very means by which we know, a novel science of the soul but growing alienation from reality and the self, new rights and privileges for the disenfranchised but stark contrasts in urban and rural life. This course examines the crises of modernism while seeking to understand how arts and letters give voice to the triumphs and failings of modern humankind. Among the texts discussed are works by Expressionist poets, Weimar films, modernist visual art, and the prose of Franz Kafka, Thomas Mann, Sigmund Freud, and others.


Instructor(s): Daniel Bowles

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: GERM1063

Comments:

ENGL 1079 Literary Forms for English Language Learners Spring 3
Course Description

This course is designed for students whose first language is not English. It may be taken in place of ENGL 1080 and satisfies the literature core requirement. Students will have ample opportunity to participate in group discussion as they explore a variety of literary genres from short fiction to poetry to drama, with a focus on American literature. Support for language issues including those related to writing is an important component of the course.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Offered in the spring only Limited to 15 students Department permission required

ENGL 1080 Literature Core Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

In Literature Core, students explore the principal motives which prompt people to read literature: to assemble and assess the shape and values of one's own culture, to discover alternative ways of looking at the world, to gain insight into issues of permanent human importance as well as issues of contemporary urgency, and to enjoy the linguistic and formal satisfactions of literary art. Literature Core will strive to develop the student's capacity to read and write with clarity and engagement, to allow for that dialogue between the past and present we call history, and to provide an introduction to literary genres.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 1090 Introduction to Literary Studies Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 1093 An Introduction to Modern Irish I Fall 3
Course Description

This course offers beginners an enjoyable introduction to the language and culture of Ireland. We’ll learn how to speak Gaelic and read modern Irish texts and poetry. And we’ll examine major themes in Irish history and culture associated with the rise and fall of the language over its long history. This courses count towards your Irish Studies minor, and one towards your English major. In the spring semester, you can build on what you’ve gained and, if you wish, satisfy the Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences language proficiency requirement by completing the four-course cycle the following year.


Instructor(s): Joseph Nugent

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course continues in second semester as ENGL1094

ENGL 1094 An Introduction to Modern Irish II Spring 3
Course Description

Following on from ENGL1093, this course offers a continuing introduction to the Irish language for American students. We will continue along our examination of Irish culture and literature through the Irish language. You can look forward to reading contemporary texts, poetry, and drama, and to enlarging your understanding of the cultural heritage out of which the language emerged. Completion of this and Continuing Modern Irish I and II will fulfill the Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences language proficiency requirement.


Instructor(s): Joseph Nugent

Prerequisites: ENGL1093

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 1153 Women and Russian Literature (in translation) Fall 3
Course Description

A study of the representations of women in Russian literary works from the Kievan period to date, with a special emphasis on classical and post-modern literature. An exploration of the notions of the "strong woman" versus the "superfluous man", and of "terrible perfection", a discussion of the utility of these concepts in characterizing the literary representations.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Cynthia Simmons

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SLAV2175

Comments: All texts read in English translation

ENGL 1166 The Quest for Justice: Kafka and Kleist Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

The term "poetic justice" implies that when we are wronged, literature can put it right even if our environment cannot. In this course, we read two of Germany's most enigmatic authors: Heinrich von Kleist and Franz Kafka. Though hailing from two different centuries, both grapple with the task of defining a universal standard of justice in a diverse world. Is there really justice for all when racism and sexism inform not only our thinking but also our social institutions? Can we ever really know what justice is, after we realize that all human knowledge is subjective?


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Rachel Freudenburg

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: GERM1166

Comments:

ENGL 1503 Beyond Price: Markets, Cultures, Values Spring 6
Course Description

This course is about wealth and values—the condition of our “knowing the price of everything and the value of nothing.” Given the glamour and power surrounding money and the super-rich, we examine issues concerning the economy, values, and the dominance of the market over our environment and personal lives. We look at markets, incentives, ecology and ethics through a combination of literature and economics. We also take up specific case studies that will enable us to better understand the relation between business decisions or market interests and their impact on the ordinary lives of working men, women, and children.


Instructor(s): Can Erbil and Kalpana Seshadri

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ECON1501

Comments: Core Renewal course: Complex Problems

ENGL 1596 Eire/Land: Culture, Politics and Irish Landscape Spring 1
Course Description

Eire/Land charts the cultural responses to the land in Celtic times, and from the late 18th to the 20th centuries. We will trace the history and development of Irish landscape painting and read key works of literature. The McMullen Museum exhibition and its lecture series will be incorporated into the course.


Instructor(s): Katherine Nahum and Robert Savage

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Prerequisite: Any two semesters of HIST1001 through HIST1094

ENGL 1702 Reading the Body Fall 3
Course Description

This course will use literature to explore how the experience of embodiment shapes human identity in contexts including illness, obesity, poverty, disability, pregnancy, trauma, and aging. Through the analysis of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, we will consider the way that bodily experiences, material conditions, and cultural constructions of normalcy shape our understanding of identity in sickness and in health. In our class discussions, we will consider how literary representations of bodies in sickness and health might influence real world actions and interactions by establishing distance or constructing empathy through the act of reading.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Laura Tanner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal Course:Enduring Questions. For freshmen only

ENGL 1703 Humans, Nature, and Creativity Fall 3
Course Description

While nature is routinely imagined as something apart from humans, there is also an age-old tradition of mixing them up. Nature has often taken on human qualities and humans have become naturalized. This course explores this collapsing with the help of literature from antiquity to the present. These include works by Virgil, Sophocles, Marvell, Shakespeare, Thoreau, Rachel Carson, and Emily St. John Mandel. In what contexts might we want to maintain this distinction? Can critiquing this distinction help us to think about pressing environmental issues in insightful and original ways? What kind of balance can we strike between these categories?


Instructor(s): Min Song

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal Course:Enduring Questions. For freshmen only.

ENGL 1709 Living in the Material World Spring 3
Course Description

What are the humanistic principles that ground our understanding of the relationship of the human to the material world? Three units—human-matter, human—animal, human-machine—will introduce students to “New Materialisms,” that is, a range of disciplinary attempts to understand human embodiment in a world of matter. Students might read excerpts from philosophy, as well selections from the history of science. Literary texts will include novels like Robinson Crusoe and excerpts from poetry. Less familiar genres like the “It narrative” may also be included to help students think about the objects they use daily. We may also watch recent movies like Wall-e and Her.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Elizabeth Kowaleski Wallace

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal Course: Enduring Questions
For Freshmen Only

ENGL 1712 Roots & Routes: Reading Identity, Migration, and Culture Spring 3
Course Description

We will read texts by 21st-century writers who have emigrated to the US as children or young adults, as well as portraits of immigrant communities. We will encounter recurrent themes around diaspora, exile, choice, national and transnational identities. Looking closely at language itself, we will think about multilingualism in the twinned contexts of our texts and the students’ own linguistic experiences. Students will perform literary analysis through informal and formal writing assignments. They will make a vodcast that arises out of the field research they do in the Writing Seminar and go on several field trips into immigrant communities.


Instructor(s): Elizabeth Graver

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal Course: Enduring Questions. For freshmen only
This course welcomes students from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds. Advanced English-language learners and OTE students are especially encouraged to register. Interested students should contact for permission to enroll.

ENGL 1713 Roots & Routes: Writing Identity, Migration, and Culture Fall 3
Course Description

Building on the themes of culture and identity explored in the paired literature course (ENGL1712), we will write in a variety of genres from creative narratives and shorter spoken word-style pieces to critical essays drawn from interviews and field research. We will delve into the questions of immigration, community, homeland, and choice, and consider what it means to write in a second language. Students will be encouraged to compose fresh, innovative prose and learn to give and receive productive feedback. On occasion, student writers will present their polished work to their peers in the classroom and online.


Instructor(s): Lynne Anderson

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal Course: Enduring Questions. For freshmen only.
This course welcomes students from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds. Advanced English-language learners and OTE students are especially encouraged to register. Interested students should contact for permission to enroll.

ENGL 1714 Reading the Fate of Man, the Face of God, and the Malevolence of the Whale in Herman Melville's Moby-Dick Spring 3
Course Description

Moby-Dick (1851), arguably the greatest American novel, raises questions fundamental to human existence: What is fate? freedom? the meaning of life? the world? Can we know it? This course examines how characters, narrative voice, genre, and plotting create an almost biblical text; how depictions of whaling become parables; how historical references reflect contemporary politics; and how fiction can bring us to reflect on our own lives. Like Queequeg’s tattoos, it presents a “mystical treatise on the art of attaining truth . . . whose mysteries not even [he] himself could read” while its value resides in simply raising the questions.


Instructor(s): Michael Martin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal Course: Enduring Questions

ENGL 1715 Revolutionary Media: How Reading Changes Us Spring 3
Course Description

As digital media have become more prevalent, studies have shown that they have changed the way we read and that various modes of reading shape our thinking, our feelings, and even our brains in varying ways. We read textbooks differently than we read poems, tweets differently than we read novels. This course centers on the cognitive and social contexts of reading, and will read a range of texts in different media, from 1450 to the present, that deal in some way with the nature of reading itself, including pamphlets, poems, novels, a graphic novel, film, and social media. We will also work on developing strategies for effective reading and writing.


Instructor(s): Mary Crane

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal Course: Enduring Questions

ENGL 1716 Metamorphosis: Story-Telling as an Attempt to Manage Change Spring 3
Course Description

Taking its cue from the literary explorations of human bodily change composed from antiquity to modern times, this course explores a range of writings created in vastly different places and cultures. It aims to promote reflection on change and variety as basic features of reality and therefore of human experience. While not a writing course per se, it gives substantial attention to the technology of writing as a means of transforming our private mental experience into forms that can readily be shared with others.


Instructor(s): Dayton Haskin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal Course: Enduring Questions

ENGL 1717 Fictions of Development: Adolescence in Historical Context Spring 3
Course Description

How does scientific discourse intersect with literary, historical, and cultural forces? Does it matter that Peter Pan, who refused to grow up, appeared in the same year (1904) as the first major psychological treatise on “Adolescence”? What might the angsty white teenagers of “Rebel Without a Cause” (1950) and The Catcher in the Rye (1951) have to do with James Baldwin’s tale of coming of age in Harlem, Go Tell It On the Mountain (1953)? More recently, is there any relationship between the idealized teen world of “Clueless” and the dystopian high school in Never Let Me Go (2005)?


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Maia McAleavey

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal Course: Enduring Questions

ENGL 1718 Reading In/Justice: Literature as Activism from Abolitionism to #BlackLivesMatter Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines how literature addresses questions of racial, gender, and economic injustice. Topics include slavery, abolition, and civil rights; feminism and gender equality; labor reform; and global human rights.Readings range from poetry, drama, and fiction to journalism, memoir, and new media. Questions will include: Why are some works created for activist purposes considered art while others are not? How do literary works transcend the writer’s intentions to take on new meaning in the public sphere? How has the recovery of forgotten works by women and minority writers become an act of socio-political activism?


Instructor(s): Lori Harrison-Kahan

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal Course: Enduring Questions

ENGL 1719 Writing In/Justice: The Power of Response Spring 3
Course Description

In this writing workshop students will question, analyze, and respond to injustice through writing. By responding to readings, to the times we live in, and to their own long-burning questions regarding justice and injustice and the gap between, students will grow as college writers and thinkers. Education, discrimination in its many forms, economic inequality, and other topics determined by student interest will be examined. Texts will include Spiegelman's graphic novel MAUS, Freire’s Pedagogy of the Oppressed, Coates’ open letter to his son, Between the World and Me. Projects include letters, editorials, personal narratives, interviews, philosophical ponderings, a multi-genre research project.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Eileen Donovan-Kranz

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal Course: Enduring Questions

ENGL 1720 Creating the Modern Identity: Power, Politics, and Propaganda from the Renaissance to the 21st Century Spring 3
Course Description

Who and what influences modern identity? Is my place in society defined by my class, gender and education? What aspects of contemporary globalization emerge from the humanist ideals of the Renaissance? Is it an age of genius and entrepreneurship or of exploration and exploitation? How do the poems, paintings, letters and prayers created in this time of intellectual, political, and religious upheaval connect to our contemporary understanding of the self in relation to the other? Visits to museums and historic sites around Boston will offer students additional opportunities to interpret the subtle and overt examples of propaganda, past and present.


Instructor(s): Susan Michalczyk

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal Course: Enduring Questions

ENGL 2097 Continuing Modern Irish I Fall 3
Course Description

This is a continuing course in modern Irish for those with a basic knowledge of the language. We’ll emphasize the ability to read contemporary literature in various genres. Texts from a variety of authors and historical periods allow students to taste different writing styles: contemporary fiction, journalism, literary criticism, historical and cultural texts, while we enjoy Irish-language short films and videos.


Instructor(s): Joseph Nugent

Prerequisites: ENGL1094 or equivalent

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 2098 Continuing Modern Irish II Spring 3
Course Description

In this completion of the two-year cycle of Irish language learning, we will engage deeply with modern texts and work with Irish through other media—sound and film. You will become familiar with contemporary texts and will engage in a sustained project of reading and translating in the original Irish one or more of the great works of literature written in Irish.


Instructor(s): Joseph Nugent

Prerequisites: ENGL2097

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 2101 Celtic Heroic Age Spring 3
Course Description

This course will explore the vernacular heroic literature of the insular Celts, that is, the Irish and the Welsh. Particular attention will be paid to the effect of Christian transmission on pagan source material, mythological survivals, the heroic worldview and value system, the nature of insular Celtic kingship, and the role of women in the heroic literature.


Instructor(s): Philip O'Leary

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1700 requirement.

ENGL 2102 Joyce in Ireland Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 2106 Undergraduate Pedagogy Lab Fall 1
Course Description

Teaching English Content is a one-credit workshop which will focus on issues and strategies related to teaching the subject matter of the course to which it is attached. It is highly recommended for Lynch School of Education students enrolled in the course, but is also open to any students interested in teaching.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 2110 Classical and Biblical Backgrounds of English Literature Fall 3
Course Description

The course is open to students of any major and in any year. Its goals include: (1) exposure to a broad range of Greek, Latin, and Hebrew literature in translation (myths, histories, authors, characters, plots, themes); (2) attentiveness to what is at stake, theoretically and practically, in translation into English; and (3) the development of comparatist practices of reading that respect and explore cultural differences. Emphasis on the Homeric epics, Greek tragedies, the more conspicuously literary parts of the Hebrew Bible, and the metamorphoses of the Greek and Hebrew traditions in the Roman world during the transition to the Common Era.


Instructor(s): Dayton Haskin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 2111 Drama and Society in Ancient Greece Fall 3
Course Description

Greek drama offered the people of one ancient society, Athens, a medium for debating the great issues of their time: how can society best be governed? How should citizens behave in times of war? How can women take an active role in a man’s world? What is the role in society of rational, intellectual discourse? Or the role of religion? Can literature help guide us through these questions? Greek writers rarely provide clear answers, but their plays invite us to join the debate. By critically reading a selection of Greek dramas – both tragedies and comedies – in their social context, we will confront a series of issues that are still debated today and discuss how one society approached them.


Instructor(s): Mark Thatcher

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: CLAS2260

Comments:

ENGL 2121 The Linguistic Structure of English Spring 3
Course Description

An analysis of the major features of contemporary English with some reference to earlier versions of the language, including sound system, grammar, structure and meanings of words, and properties of discourse.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Claire Foley, M.J. Connolly and Margaret Thomas

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: EDUC6323 LING3323

Comments:

ENGL 2122 Language in Society Fall 3
Course Description

This course provides an introduction to the study of language in its social context, including varieties of language associated with social class, ethnicity, locale, and age; bilingualism; pidgin and Creole languages; proposals about the relationship of language, thought, and culture; and the structure and role of discourse in different cultures. Sociolinguistic issues of contemporary interest, including language and gender, language planning, and language and public policy will be studied.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Margaret Thomas

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: LING3362 SOCY3362

Comments:

ENGL 2123 Language and Ethnicity Spring 3
Course Description

An examination of how we use language to regulate power relations among social groups and of how individuals define personal identity through speech. Case studies include: the linguistic representation of social class membership, dialect geography, Native Americans and U.S. language policy, the Ebonics controversy, and arguments for and against maintaining public language standards. Emphasis on the status of language and ethnicity in the United States, viewed in cross-cultural perspective.


Instructor(s): Margaret Thomas

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: LING2379 SOCY2275

Comments:

ENGL 2125 Introduction to Feminisms Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This introductory course offers both an overview and a foundation for understanding the various movements that make up what has come to be called the feminist movement in the U.S. Because systems of privilege and disadvantage shape women's and men's identities and social positions in multiple and unique ways, Introduction to Feminisms analyzes gender from an interdisciplinary approach and applies numerous academic disciplinary methods to the study of gender, including history, literature, psychology, and sociology, and explores women's and men's experiences within various cultural contexts, including socioeconomic class, race and ethnicity, religion and spirituality, nations of citizenship, origin, and generation.


Instructor(s): Andrew Owens

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HIST2502 SOCY2225 COMM2225

Comments: Fulfills Women Writer's requirement for ENGL/LSOE majors.

ENGL 2127 Language and Language Types Fall 3
Course Description

Researches the diversity of natural languages and the limits of that diversity. How are human languages similar, and how are they different? What factors control the attested range of cross-linguistic variation? Focus is on morphological and syntactic data, with some discussion of the genetic (historical) relationships among the world's languages and methodological problems facing modern linguistic typologies.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Margaret Thomas

Prerequisites: LING3101/ENGL3527 (SL311/EN 527) and at least one other course in linguistics recommended.

Cross listed with: LING3103

Comments: Undergraduate linguistics major elective.

ENGL 2131 Studies in Poetry Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

The goals of the course are close reading of poetry, developing the student's ability to ask questions which open poems to analysis, and writing lucid interpretative papers.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 2133 Studies in Narrative Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course introduces students to questions that they might bring to the study of narrative works—primarily novels, tales, and non-fictional narratives, though it may also include drama, film, and narrative poems. It aims to introduce the various critical frames through which we construct interpretations. As part of the process of reading, students will be introduced to common critical terms; narrative genres, conventions, and discourses; the construction of the character and the ways of representing consciousness; and the ordering of narrative time. The course will also expose the student to the implications of taking critical positions.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 2141 American Literary History I Fall 3
Course Description

American Literary History 1 follows the development of American literary history from the landing of the Mayflower to the tumultuous decade of the 1850s, moving from such early writers as Bradstreet, Rowlandson and Taylor through such writers of the Revolution and Early Republic as Equiano, Franklin, and Rowson to such antebellum writers as Child, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Poe, Douglass, Whitman, and Melville. Course assignments include regular participation in class discussions, mid-semester and final examinations, and either one ten-page or two five-page essay(s). Students considering careers in secondary English education will be given the option of writing about approaches to teaching course texts.


Instructor(s): Paul Lewis

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Students need not take these courses in chronological order.
Fulfills the pre-1900 requirement.

ENGL 2142 American Literary History II Fall 3
Course Description

The seventy-five years following the American Civil War defined the era when transformative changes in U.S. culture--the demise of the slave system and the rise of segregation; the emergence of corporate society and successive waves of immigration; new experimentation in the arts; new roles for women and new ideas imagined for reordering society--transformed the face of American writing. Through interdisciplinary lectures on historical and biographical background, and close discussions on authors such as Mark Twain, Theodore Dreiser, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Sui Sin Far, Stephen Crane and others, this course provides an introduction to the emergence of modern American writing.


Instructor(s): Christopher Wilson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills pre-1900 requirement.

ENGL 2143 American Literary History III Spring 3
Course Description

This course will provide an introductory overview of literature written in America from the First World War to the early 21st century. We will use selected texts to address representative thematic, cultural and literary concerns. In our analysis of primary texts, we will pay close attention to literary techniques as we explore constructions of national identity, governing myths of the American Dream, the influence of changing technology and the development of commodity culture, the place of the family, the significance of space in domestic and urban/rural settings, the construction of narrative subjectivity, and issues of gender, race and class.


Instructor(s): Laura Tanner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 2150 African and African Diaspora Literature Spring 3
Course Description

By studying creative writing by African writers and writers of African descent, this course examines how diasporic Africans created viable lives for themselves in the "New World." Questions that define this study include: how were Africans in the diaspora able to negotiate the complex social, political, and cultural spaces they encountered? What ancestral traces have they retained and how do these traces co-exist within New World realities?


Instructor(s): Rhonda Frederick

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: AADS1108

Comments:

ENGL 2154 Introduction to Adolescent Fiction Spring 3
Course Description

First of all, what is a young adult? And second of all, what is a hero? We will be delving into both of these issues, as well as the relationship between them. We will be looking at heroes who function in real worlds and some who function in fantasy worlds. We will attempt to assess the impact of heroes in contemporary life, especially in relation to the young adults who need them. And are there any more heroes for our young adults? In what ways do female heroes differ from male heroes?


Instructor(s): Bonnie Rudner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 2165 Nineteenth Century Irish Literature Survey Fall 3
Course Description

This course will survey 19th century Irish literature written in English, including fiction (Edgeworth, Owenson, Carleton, Lawless), poetry (Ferguson, Mangan, Davis), and drama (Boucicault, and Yeats). In the process we will consider the social, political and historical contexts represented therein, e.g., the Act of Union, the Young Irelanders, the Great Famine, the Land War, Home Rule, the Anglo-Irish, and the origins of the Literary Revival. Classes will be a mixture of lecture and discussion.


Instructor(s): James Smith

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Students contemplating an Irish Studies Minor and/or exploring study abroad options are also welcome.
Fulfills the pre-1900 requirement.

ENGL 2170 Introduction to British Literature and Culture I Fall 3
Course Description

The British Isles were home to an exceptionally vibrant early literary tradition spanning English, French, Irish, Latin, and other languages. British writing connected rulers and rebels, merchants and monks, brewers and bureaucrats. This course is a survey of British literature from the beginnings to the early eighteenth century. Most texts are in English; some are read in translation. The course focuses on connections between literature, power, and the formation of literary canons. The survey covers all major genres of early British literature. Texts and authors will include Beowulf, Marie de France, Chaucer, Margery Kempe, Shakespeare, Milton, Aphra Behn, and Swift.


Instructor(s): Eric Weiskott

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1700 requirement.

ENGL 2171 Introduction to British Literature and Culture II Spring 3
Course Description

This lecture course explores great British writers from 1700 to the present. This period includes (among much else) the great essayists and satirists of the eighteenth century, the Romantic poets and Victorian novelists of the nineteenth, the modernists of the twentieth, and the world writing that follows the break-up of the British empire. We consider these works in light of the cultural context in which they were written.


Instructor(s): John Anderson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1900 requirement.

ENGL 2172 The City in Literature and Film Fall 3
Course Description

We examine how American literature and film have responded to the challenge of representing the city—from Sister Carrie to Blade Runner, The Street to Do the Right Thing and Native Speaker to Gangs of New York. Exploring the fit between the hard facts of city life and the creative choices that artists impose on them, we consider how novels and movies reckon with the formal, social, and conceptual problems posed by cities. We touch upon several cities and various genres: migration narratives, crime stories, science fiction, neighborhood novels, and more.(Note: students who took EN 172 under the old course-numbering system may not take this course.)


Instructor(s): Carlo Rotella

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 2181 Irish Literature Survey--Twentieth Century Fall 3
Course Description

This course introduces students to twentieth-century Ireland's literature and culture. Early in the semester we read key literary figures, including Yeats, Synge, and Joyce. Students then turn their attention to post-Revival authors, including Kavanagh, O'Flaherty, Heaney, and N Dhomhnaill. The class discusses significant social, political and cultural developments, e.g., cultural nationalism and the formation of identity, the importance of the Gaelic language and problems with translation, women's role in post-independent Ireland, and Northern Ireland and the peace process.


Instructor(s): James Smith

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course is most suitable for underclass students. Students contemplating an Irish Studies Minor and/or exploring study abroad options are also welcome.

ENGL 2184 The Ballad Tradition Spring 3
Course Description

This course surveys the English-language ballad traditions of England, Wales, Scottland, Ireland, North America, and Australia. Beginning with the medieval Continental roots of the form, we will consider how the ballad became a popular medium for news, politics, protest, and memorialization. Case studies include Child Ballads, Jacobite songs, emigration and famine songs, Union songs, the Folk Revival, and Celtic Rock.


Instructor(s): Ann Morrison Spinney

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: MUSA3340

Comments: No musical experience is assumed.
Open to M.A. students for credit.
Fulfills the pre-1900 requirement for English majors
Fulfills study abroad prerequisite in Ireland

ENGL 2199 Introduction to Caribbean Writers Spring 3
Course Description

The Caribbean, merely viewed through the lens of colonial history, often does not reflect the diversity and complexity of the region. From a colonial perspective, therefore, the Caribbean is both "known" and "unknown." Our work for this course compares and contrasts versions of the region by examining colonial histories and current literary traditions. We will pay particular attention to the ways oppositional cultures and identifies manifest in Caribbean literature. Themes of this course include: colonialism, History/histories, gender, geography ation, sexuality, class, and culture. Varied texts and media will assist in our interpretations of the Caribbean and its diaspora.


Instructor(s): Rhonda Frederick

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: AADS2199

Comments:

ENGL 2201 Versions in Black: Genres of Black Women's Writing Fall 3
Course Description

The phrase "Black Women's Writing" suggests that such writing is a fixed or homogeneous body of work that can be neatly defined and represented. Our course constitutes itself against this idea. By re-thinking these works, we also re-examine notions of literary canon, race, gender, sexuality, community, and history. Significantly, we "de-construct" common notions of Black Women's Writing by examining the varied genres these writers use to express their imaginings. Required readings come from the fields of science fiction (Octavia Butler), prose/experimental (Gayl Jones and Martha Southgate) novels, drama (Suzan-Lori Parks), poetry (Elizabeth Alexander), and autobiography/memoir (Toi Derricotte).


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Rhonda Frederick

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: AADS2201

Comments:

ENGL 2202 Beast Literature Spring 3
Course Description

From Mother Goose’s fairy tales to lolcats, we imagine animals often speaking as we do. But what are we saying when we use animals to talk with and about one another? And what does literature featuring articulate animals say about our attitudes towards humans, animals, and the lines we draw between them? This course explores “beast literature” in its various forms (fable, comedy, the novel, epic, debate poetry, etc), examining its incarnations through ancient Greece and Rome, Medieval Europe, and the modern world.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Christopher Polt

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 2204 Dangerous Women in Classical Myth Spring 3
Course Description

Demeter sticks a baby in the fire, Amazons cut off one breast and live far away from men, Clytemnestra kills her husband in his bath. In this course we will investigate how Greeks and Romans used stories about female figures - goddesses, monsters, and humans - as a way of talking about a range of conflicts, tensions, and fears. While we focus on the ancient world, we will also look at how these figures are used in later periods and think about which stories we tell about women - and why.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): DEPT

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: CLAS2240

Comments:

ENGL 2206 Literature and Business Fall 3
Course Description

The course looks at businessmen as they are portrayed in short stories, plays, a novel, and films from the Middle Ages to the present. It takes as a premise the revolutionary nature of the businessman, and literature will serve as the microcosm to explore society's evolving ideas about business. Questions include the role of businessmen in urban development, the arts and philanthropy, business and meritocracy, reputation and the need for privacy/secrecy, price vs. value, the ambivalent symbolism of currency, the commodification of the human body ature, the anxiety of poverty and of wealth, and inherited vs. earned money.


Instructor(s): Laurie Shepard

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ITAL3314

Comments: Conducted in English
Elective for Italian major and minor.

ENGL 2208 Explore the Irish: An Introduction to Irish Studies Fall 3
Course Description

How can a tiny island and its diaspora have so shaped the literature, film, music, art, science, and politics of the world? From charming backwater to center of technology, from bastion of Catholicism to gay marriage, through peace and conflict, Irishness (and Irish-Americanness) is an ever-unstable proposition. Exploring through categories such as gender, sexuality, and ethnicity its manifold mutations, this course will investigate the troubled stream of Irish history and culture from Jonathan Swift to Stephen Colbert, from W.B.Yeats to Riverdance, from JFK to U2—from Celtic Christianity to Celtic Tiger.


Instructor(s): Joseph Nugent

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 2209 Jamaican Culture & Globalization Fall 3
Course Description

This course focuses on "culture," specifically Jamaican culture, as an important global commodity. We will consider how Jamaican culture moves into global markets and is transformed into products and identities that are often at odds with the ideologies and values of the people who made it. We will examine definitions of globalization and then locate the role of culture within it. We will then consider how globalization influenced definitions of Jamaican culture and cultural values. Lastly, we will investigate how and/or if globalization has created opportunities for re-thinking nationalism, commodities, and in/formal economies.


Instructor(s): Rhonda Frederick

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: AADS2223

Comments:

ENGL 2210 Madmen,Hysterics&Criminals:Inventing Deviance Spring 3
Course Description

In this seminar we address three major questions, guided by a broad selection of readings from German, French, British, and American literature and theory from 1800 to the present: How do we as readers define the abnormal and the deviant? What aesthetic practices does literature employ to represent these threshold experiences, and what is their history? How might we rethink our own notions of normality when faced with their artificiality? Literary, theoretical, and musical texts by Balzac, Bernhard, Büchner, Freud, Genet, Kracht, Plath, Stevenson, and others help us establish a history both of abnormality and our own cultural self-understanding.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Daniel Bowles

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: GERM2221 FREN3315

Comments: Conducted in English. Counts toward German major, German minor, and German Studies minor.

ENGL 2212 Introduction to Medical Humanities Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course will use literature as a springboard to consider the psychological, social, ethical, and experiential dimensions of health and illness. In addition to exploring questions of physical and mental health, we will address topics including disability, aging, pregnancy, trauma, obesity, poverty, and care giving. Through the analysis of novels, poems, short stories and non-fiction, we will consider the way that bodily experiences, material conditions and cultural constructions of normalcy shape our understanding of identity in sickness and in health. A series of student presentations will also allow us to analyze representations of illness and medicine in film, television, and popular culture.


Instructor(s): Laura Tanner and Amy Boesky

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 2214 Writers of New England Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 2220 Classical Mythology Fall 3
Course Description

This course explores the mythology of ancient Greece, Rome, and the Near East within its cultural, political, historical, and religious contexts. You will meet (or renew your acquaintance with) mythical figures like Zeus, Gilgamesh, Medusa, and Helen as they appear in multiple literary genres and other artistic media. In order to analyze and interrogate these myths we will use ancient and modern frameworks for thinking about what mythology is and what it does. What can a myth tell us about the civilization that created, adopted, or adapted it? What do our uses of Classical mythology - and our creations of our own myths - tell us about ourselves?


Instructor(s): Hanne Eisenfeld

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: CLAS2230

Comments:

ENGL 2221 Introduction to Creative Writing Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

An introductory course in which students will write both poetry and short fiction and read published examples of each. We will experiment with the formal possibilities of the two genres and look at what links and separates them. The course is workshop-based, with an emphasis on steady production and revision. Through exercises and/or open and directed writing assignments, students will produce a portfolio of short fiction and poetry.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 2223 Russian Literary Forms Spring 3
Course Description

This course will use the prism of literary form to explore some of the achievements of Russian literature. Poetry, drama, the novel, and the short story will be our examples. Pushkin, Lermontov, Mandelshtam, Brodsky, and Elena Shvarts in poetry; novels by Turgenev and Venedikt Yerofeev; short fiction from Gogol, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Kharms, Bunin, and Tolstaya; dramas by Chekhov, Bulgakov, and Petrushevskaia in theatre. The course will combine lectures outlining the history of literary forms in Russia and discussions of the assigned readings.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Thomas Epstein

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SLAV3176

Comments:

ENGL 2224 Post-Soviet Russian Literature Fall 3
Course Description

Since the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991, dramatic cultural shifts have transformed Russian literature—writers no longer work under the “red pencil” of censorship, but like writers in the West, under the “censorship” of the marketplace. Crime fiction vies with more highbrow literature, and post-modern themes and devices prevail among a younger generation less influenced by a classical or Soviet heritage. Diversity (e.g., gender and ethnic identities), newly acquired tastes, and a predictable tension between Soviet and post-Soviet values characterize works by Boris Akunin, Valeriia Narbikova, Viktor Pelevin, Nina Sadur, Vladimir Sorokin, Olga Slavnikova, and Liudmila Ulitskaia.


Instructor(s): Cynthia Simmons and Maxim D. Shrayer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SLAV2163

Comments:

ENGL 2225 War Stories Spring 1
Course Description

War has been a subject of stories across the centuries. This one-credit seminar will focus on nineteenth- through twenty-first-century accounts of war in novels, stories, nonfiction, poems, and films. We will analyze how texts create war stories that are celebratory or cynical, and sometimes both at once, with a focus on issues such as heroism, psychology and trauma, violence, sacrifice, and national belonging. Students will write five short reflection papers (approximately 2 pages each) and a take home final exam with an essay format.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Aeron Hunt

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: 1 credit course

ENGL 2227 Classics of Russian Literature (in translation) Fall 3
Course Description

A survey of selected major works, authors, genres, and movements in nineteenth-century Russian literature, with emphasis on the classic works by Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, and Chekhov.


Instructor(s): Cynthia Simmons and Maxim D. Shrayer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SLAV2162

Comments: All readings and lectures in English. Undergraduate major elective. Russian Major requirement

ENGL 2228 Twentieth-Century Russian Literature (in translation) Spring 3
Course Description

Study of major landmarks of Russian literature in light of Russia's turbulent history in the twentieth century. Works by Akhmatova, Babel, Belyi, Berberova, Bunin, Venedikt Erofeev, Gladkov, Olesha, Platonov, Solzhenitsyn, Trifonov, and others.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Cynthia Simmons and Maxim D. Shrayer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SLAV2173

Comments: Readings and lectures in English. Undergraduate major elective. Russian major requirement.

ENGL 2229 Literature of the Other Europe Fall 3
Course Description

A survey of outstanding and influential works of and about the political and social upheavals of the twentieth century in Central and Southeastern Europe. A study of the often-shared themes of frontier and identity (political and religious), exile, and apocalypse in the works of selected leading writers, such as Witold Gombrowicz (Poland), Bruno Schulz (Poland), Bohumil Hrabal (Czech Republic), Milan Kundera (Czech), Dubravka Ugresic (Croatia), Mesa Selimovic (Bosnia), Muharem Bazdulj (Bosnia), and Emilian Stanev (Bulgaria).


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Cynthia Simmons and Maxim D Shrayer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SLAV2069

Comments: All readings in English translation

ENGL 2231 Science Fiction and Humans Fall 1
Course Description

An introduction to the genre of science fiction, including a discussion of its roots in Gothic literature, that will consider the question raised by much of science fiction: how do humans fit in (or not) with a world made of machines and governed by science? Readings will range from Jules Verne to Octavia Butler. Class meets once a week, and students will be required to write one 5-7 page final paper for course credit.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Thomas Kaplan-Maxfield

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 2237 Studies in Children's Literature: Disney and the Wondertale Spring 3
Course Description

Disney films have remained outside the critical landscape because they have been considered either beneath artistic attention or beyond reproach. The goal of this course will be to explore the issues presented in such Disney films as The Lion King, Aladdin, Prince of Egypt, and Pocahontas. To do this, we will read source material (The Arabian Nights, Hamlet, tales about Pocahontas, Bible stories about Moses, Exodus, etc.) and secondary studies.


Instructor(s): Bonnie Rudner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 2240 Modern Theatre and Drama Spring 3
Course Description

This upper-level theater studies course traces the development of modern European drama from Ibsen to Beckett, or roughly speaking, from 1875 to 1975. Other major dramatists to be studied include Strindberg, Chekhov, Shaw, Pirandello, Brecht, Genet and Ionesco. The various movements within modernism--naturalism, symbolism, expressionism, futurism and surrealism --are also examined.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Scott T. Cummings

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: THTR3387

Comments:

ENGL 2241 Playwriting I Fall 3
Course Description

This writing-intensive course offers a practical introduction to the art and craft of writing for performance. Students will engage in numerous writing exercises that highlight the special demands and opportunities of writing for the stage. Emphasis is placed on finding ways to contact and release the theatrical imagination and on mastering the basics of writing a solid dramatic scene. Exemplary plays by established playwrights will be studied as appropriate, but the overwhelming emphasis is on student writing.


Instructor(s): Scott T. Cummings

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: THTR3362

Comments:

ENGL 2243 Rural Ireland: The Inside story Spring 3
Course Description

This interdisciplinary course will explore the relationships between visual, textual, and material culture. Its focus is the 2012 McMullen Museum of Art exhibition "Rural Ireland: the Inside Story." It will explore the relationship between the material culture of rural Ireland in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and the different media that have attempted to represent it. Readings include historical sources as well as literary texts by authors such as William Carleton, John Synge, Flann O'Brien. Curators and scholars from Boston College, Ireland, and the U.S. who are working on this exhibition will present lectures and lead workshops during the semester.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Department of English, Department of History, Kevin O'Neill and Vera Kreilkamp

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with: HIST4272

Comments:

ENGL 2246 Introduction to Asian American Literature Spring 3
Course Description

This course is a broad introduction to Asian American literature, criticism, and culture. This means that we will read at least one book-length work from each of the following ethnic groups: Filipino, Japanese, Chinese,Korean, South Asian, and Vietnamese. Together, the readings provide us with an opportunity to reflect on the long sweep of Asians in America struggling to give expression to their experiences. Discussion will often touch on many sensitive topics, so I wish to emphasize the importance of keeping an open mind, being respectful of others' opinions, and keeping up with the reading.


Instructor(s): Min Song

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 2248 Playwriting II Spring 3
Course Description

This laboratory course continues the work begun in Playwriting I on an advanced level and a more independent basis. In addition to in-class writing and take-home assignments, students will write a fully developed full-length play or two complete one-acts. The course places particular emphasis on the completion of lively, well-structured, rehearsal-ready scripts, and in that interest, a major revision of a work-in-progress is important.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Scott T. Cummings

Prerequisites: THTR3362 or permission of instructor

Cross listed with: THTR4462

Comments: Attendance at local productions of new plays is expected.

ENGL 2249 Contemporary Theatre and Drama Spring 4
Course Description

Please see course description THTR3382 in Theater Dept.


Instructor(s): Scott T. Cummings

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 2251 Literature of Migration: Diaspora, Exile, and Home Spring 3
Course Description

Students will analyze how the boundaries between these three ideas, which are at ostensible odds with each other, have collapsed during the ruptures of the twentieth century. How do authors in exile deal with the conflicting desires to return home to a country that does not want them, for example. Students will be introduced to post-colonial theory/-ies of transnationalism to offer entry points to texts across a variety of genres. Of specific interest is the way that fiction allows migrant and post-migrant authors to reflect and position their individual story within a universal framework. The historical scope of the course reaches back to Greek literary nostos (homecoming) and medieval literature to position modern literature from the Holocaust, African Diaspora, and Israeli-Palestinian conflict, with authors including Dante Aligheri, Frantz Fanon, Tony Morrison, Else Lasker-Schüler, Yoko Tawada, Bertolt Brecht, Ghassan Kanafani, Benedict Anderson, Homi Bhabha, and Edward Said.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: GERM2250

Comments: Conducted in English.

ENGL 2255 Introduction to Post-Colonial Literature Fall 3
Course Description

India, Nigeria, Colombia, Haiti: all four were at one point ruled by European powers. In this course we will examine colonialism's impact on nations around the world by reading a diverse array of novels written by the formerly colonized. In addition to learning about the history of colonialism, we will explore how colonialism's legacy continues to shape the world through the perspectives of those it has affected most.


Instructor(s): Amelie Daigle

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: AADS2254

Comments:

ENGL 2258 Sin and Evil in Medieval Literature Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines works of literature from the eighth to fifteenth centuries through their treatments of, and navigation through, the concepts of sin and evil. Beginning in the Anglo-Saxon period, we trace our theme through a wide array of sources (heroic, elegiac, and epic poetry, sermons, saints' lives, mystical visions, sagas, fables, biography, drama) and evaluate its functions in the interplay between literary text and historical context. Where do evil and sin lie -- in the individual, in society, or external to both? -- and in what forms?


Instructor(s): Richard Burley

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: All texts are in English translation. Fulfills the pre-1700 requirement.

ENGL 2267 Modern German Novels in Translation Spring 3
Course Description

This course focuses on trendsetting examples of the conventional narrative form which have had a profound influence on both German literature and world literature. The historical contexts stand in an evolving counterpoint to the thematic content. Texts include works by Franz Kafka, Thomas Mann, and Günther Grass. See section description for more details.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Daniel Bowles

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: GERM2224

Comments: Conducted in English with all texts in English.
Counts toward German major, German minor, and German Studies minor.

ENGL 2269 Medicine and Literature Spring 3
Course Description

Works by creative writers who were members of the medical profession; representation of medical issues in literature. An examination of European and Anglo-American literature in combination with a discussion of contemporary biomedical scholarship will enable students to understand the intimate connections between artistic creativity and the challenges of medicine and healing. This course should be of particular interest to premed students. The authors include: Albert Camus, Anton Chekhov, Ray Bradbury, Mikhail Bulgakov, Ernest Hemingway, Milan Kundera, Sinclair Lewis, Thomas Mann, W. Somerset Maugham, Boris Pasternak, Abraham Verghese, William Carlos Williams and others.


Instructor(s): Maxim D. Shrayer

Prerequisites: No Prerequisites

Cross listed with:

Comments: Course offered annually; All works read in English

ENGL 2270 Ireland: Past, Present and Future Summer 3
Course Description


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 2272 The Short Story Tradition Fall 3
Course Description

In this class we will read short stories written by some of the most important writers in this genre. The authors will be selected from this list: Anton Chekhov, James Joyce, Franz Kafka, Ernest Hemingway, Italo Calvino, Flannery O'Connor, William Trevor, and Alice Munro.


Instructor(s): Paul Doherty

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 2277 Introduction to American Studies Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course offers an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of American culture. It is not a survey of American cultural history; rather, we will concentrate on approaches, methods, and themes of interest as we assemble critical skills for making interpretive arguments about aspects of culture in their historical moment. The forms we analyze will include examples from literature, film, painting, music, theater, landscape, and architecture, among others. Members of the American Studies faculty will present guest lectures to highlight various aspects of the field.


Instructor(s): Lori Harrison-Kahan

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 2280 Imagining the City:Why Writers Love Venice Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 2282 Knights, Castles, and Dragons Spring 3
Course Description

A study of the masterpieces of the first great blossoming in German literature including The Nibelungenlied, Tristan, and Hartmann von Aue's Erec. Central to the works of this age are (1) the rise of knighthood and (2) the spreading to Germany of the legend of King Arthur and the knights of the Round Table. In addition, older Germanic-heroic influences will be examined in certain of the works. The literature will be discussed in the larger context of its sociological and historical background. The literary traditions of France will be systematically linked to contemporary developments in Germany.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Michael Resler

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: GERM2239

Comments: Conducted in English with all texts in English translation.
No knowledge of German is required.
Counts toward German major, German minor, and German Studies minor.

ENGL 2283 Comparative Drama Fall 3
Course Description

This comparative literature course is designed to explore plays from two richly productive periods of the drama in Western history. It takes up the Greeks, especially works by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, and examines the foundational theory of tragedy in the Poetics of Aristotle. It also attends to work by great playwrights of early modern England: Marlowe, Shakespeare, Jonson, and others. The course includes an orientation towards production and affords modest opportunities for experimenting with what may be learned in performance.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Dayton Haskin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1700 requirement

ENGL 2284 Race and Visual Culture Spring 3
Course Description

This course considers representations of race in U.S. film, television and the visual arts. We will consider how the U.S.'s history of racial conflict and cooperation is imagined in various genres including art installations, t.v. and film. We will consider how such depictions are enabled or limited by their particular genre. How do police procedurals handle race differently than do sci-fi or family dramas? What typical metaphors, characters and/or visual signs arise and which topics seem particularly prevalent or taboo? Texts under consideration may include The Wire, Battlestar Galatica, Torchwood, For Coloured Girls, the Siege, The Help.


Instructor(s): Cynthia Young

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: AADS2280

Comments:

ENGL 2286 Town and Country in Victorian Fiction Spring 3
Course Description

The realism of the Victorian novel, in all its variants, was an attempt to encompass the experience of the individual within the context of society. But what was society? Was it a web of individuals (as in the work of George Eliot) or an agglomeration of changing social, economic or cultural forces (as in Thomas Hardy)? Could the tensions around gender be uncovered in the rendering of the micro-society of a country house (Wilkie Collins) or an operative ideology such as utilitarianism be exposed in an allegorized version of the city (Dickesns)? We will be exploring these and other questions in a class during which we will be reading eight novels from a period of historical change from the rural to the urban as the industrial revolution led people from the country to the town.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): James Murphy

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1900 requirement.

ENGL 2288 God and the Imagination: Epitaphs for the Journey Fall 3
Course Description

An undergraduate course devoted to classic works dealing with questions of death, annihilation, tallies and losses, and the things that remain: love, faith, justice, hope, the endless questioning, & the endless quest. Readings will include passages from the Bible, especially Genesis, the Psalms and the Gospels, St. Augustine, Dante, Donne, Herbert, Hopkins, W.B. Yeats, Seamus Heaney, Isaac Rosenberg, Hardy, William Carlos Williams, Hart Crane, T.S. Eliot, William Kennedy, Flannery O’Connor, Wallace Stevens, Larkin, Berryman, Anthony Hecht, Robert Hayden, Lucille Clifton, Anne Sexton, Cormac McCarthy, Denise Levertov, Philip Levine, Naomi Shihab Nye, and Franz Wright. It will also include references to sacred and profane painting, iconography, Ekphrastic poetry, history, music and drama.


Instructor(s): Paul Mariani

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 2291 Boston's French Connections Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ADRL1163

Comments:

ENGL 2295 Ancient Comedy Fall 3
Course Description

This course explores comedy from ancient Greece and Rome. Reading plays by Aristophanes, Plautus, and Terence, we will examine what the ancients considered "comic," how comedy was performed, and what comedy contributed to contemporary society. Along the way we will consider how comedy promotes, questions, and lampoons ancient values and ideas about warfare, slavery, gender and sexuality, etc. All readings will be in English and there will be substantial performance opportunities.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): DEPT

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 2297 Utopia, Dystopia, Soviet and Surreal Fall 3
Course Description

This course looks at literary responses to the experience of Soviet life: from futuristic nightmare to irony and the grotesque; from resistance to reconciliation.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Thomas Epstein

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SLAV2174

Comments: Lectures and readings in English, with optional readings in Russian.

ENGL 2298 Digital Detectives: Sherlock Holmes Spring 3
Course Description

In this course we will read and analyze the Sherlock Holmes novels and short stories in their historical context using a variety of digital tools. These include, but are not limited to, tracking character movement using mapping software, visualizing changes in characters’ social networks, and comparing stylistic shifts in the works. We will also use a variety of contemporary historical materials such as digitized newspaper articles and case files. The course will culminate in an analytical or creative digital project that will employ skills learned during class: possibilities include projects that feature mapping, timelines, 3D modelling, or game building.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HIST2802

Comments:

ENGL 2299 Comtemporary American Literature Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines works of fiction published within the past two decades with a special focus on the novel. It considers a wide range of topics, including the growing diversity of authors and works who are gaining the most attention, the struggle to maintain the written form's cultural prestige in the midst of fast-paced technological change, and the graying difference between popular genre and serious literature.


Instructor(s): Min Song

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 2317 The History and Literature of South Africa Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: AADS3363 HIST2681

Comments:

ENGL 2348 Modern Middle Eastern and Arabic Literature (in translation) Spring 3
Course Description

The complex, multicultural nature of the Middle East by surveying the twentieth- century literature of Arabic-speaking lands, Israel, and Turkey. Identity, culture, religion, nationalism, conflict, and minority narratives. Arabic works: the writings of Adonis, Darwish, and Qabbani. Hebrew works: the writings of Amichai and Bialik. Works written in French, English, Kurdish, Syriac, Turkish, and various Middle Eastern dialects: the writings of Andree Chedid, Mario Levi, Charles Corm, Louis Awad, Said Akl, and Orhan Pamuk.


Instructor(s): Franck Salameh

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: RLRL2292 NELC2161

Comments: All works are read in English translation.

ENGL 2470 Black and Popular: Speculative Fictions by Black Writers Fall 3
Course Description

This course asks: what do discussions of contemporary social issues look like when depicted in popular literatures written by writers of African descent? What is the benefit of fictionalizing these issues in genre literatures? Students address these questions by examining the forms of "speculative fictions" (specifically thriller, science fiction/fantasy, and mystery/detective) as well as urban romance to determine how each represents concerns of 20th/21st century black peoples in the US, Canada, Jamaica, and Martinique. Our focus on these genres' explorations of race, class, culture, incest, social engineering, and intimate relationships is complemented by socio-historical studies of these issues and countries.


Instructor(s): Rhonda Frederick

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: AADS2470

Comments:

ENGL 2482 African American Writers Fall 3
Course Description


Instructor(s): Jonathan Howard

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: AADS4410

Comments:

ENGL 2486 Drama of Harlem and Irish Renaissance Spring 3
Course Description

This course offers a comparative study of theatrical developments in two ethnic revival movements of the early twentieth century, the so-called Irish and Harlem `Renaissances.' Among topics to be discussed will be the intentions of the playwrights in both movements, their attempts to explore and define national and racial identities, their problematic relations with their audiences, and their use of myth, history, and dialect.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Philip T. O'Leary

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3001 Walking Infinite Jest Spring/Fall 3
Course Description

David Foster Wallace describes Enfield, Massachusetts—an important setting in his 1996 novel Infinite Jest—as “a kind of arm-shape extending north from Commonwealth Avenue and separating Brighton into Upper and Lower, its elbow nudging East Newton’s ribs and its fist sunk into Allston...”. Sound familiar? In this course, we’ll conduct a Bostonian's reading of Wallaces opus. Students will be required to write weekly critical reading responses, and should be prepared for the course’s non-traditional structure: weekly meetings won't begin until week three, and will sometimes be canceled in lieu of weekend on-site meetings in Brighton and Boston.


Instructor(s): Christopher Boucher

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3002 Detective Stories Spring 3
Course Description

This one-credit course focuses on reasons for the rise and popularity of this genre, and on two special themes -- the relationship between the (private) detective and the police, and the way the novels present specific cities in specific time periods through their crimes, criminals, and policing forces. We'll read Ellery Queen's New York City serial killer novel Cat of Many Tails, Robert B. Parker's kidnapping novel Looking for Rachel Wallace, and Sara Paretsky's prison-industrial complex novel Hard Time. A final assignment will be student's choice. Classes begin Wed. Jan. 29, and conclude on Wed. Apr. 2.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Judith Wilt

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3003 Horror Stories Spring 1
Course Description

However supernatural or extreme, Gothic Fiction is always about our human selves. This one-credit course will explore human/post-human ideas in three novels about “monsters”: R. L. Stevenson’s Doctor Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886), Anne Rice’s Interview with the Vampire (1976), and Alden Bell’s The Reapers are the Angels, a recent (2010) novel described by one reviewer, approvingly, as “like Flannery O’Connor with zombies.” We’ll consider contemporary ideas about what the Victorians are obsessing about in the Jekyll-Hyde concept, what post 1960’s Americans are responding to in Rice’s influential development of the vampire, and especially, what things might be fueling the 21st century’s fascination with the “zombie apocalypse.” The course will meet in seven two-hour seminars about these texts: in an eighth seminar students will report to each other on individually self-chosen Gothic novels. Film and TV texts are possible here, with some consultation. Two short papers.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Judith Wilt

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3004 Storytelling and Catholicism Spring 1
Course Description

Within the field of religion and literature the newer field of Catholic Studies has emerged, to pay close attention both to varieties of Catholic experience and to how the world at large experiences, or imagines, the Catholic. We’ll look at four short stories suggesting a multicultural dimension to the Catholic, and read two novels, A Flag for Sunrise, featuring Americans experiencing the political intrigue and spiritual intensity of Central America in the 1980’s, and Pearl, following the journey of an American into the still tense Ireland of the 2000’s. A final assignment is on a self-chosen film about the Catholic.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Judith Wilt

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3175 American Crime in Literature and Film Fall 3
Course Description

Gangsters. Gunslingers. G-Men. Why do these figures of crime—and, in turn, the policing of crime—so dominate the popular American imagination? And why do crime genres—noir mystery, prison melodrama, westerns, revenge narratives, police procedurals—populate American fiction and classic film alike? Finally, what do these stories of crime tell us about actual criminality, about corrupt cops and cities, or about how criminals and victims feel and act? This course focuses on the dominant crime genres in modern American literature and film, traveling through key figures of each: Hammett, Hitchcock, Highsmith, to name just a few.


Instructor(s): Christopher Wilson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Of special interest to American Studies minors.

ENGL 3200 The Body in Sickness and Health Fall 3
Course Description

This course will use contemporary literature to explore how the body shapes identity in contexts including illness, obesity, poverty, disability, pregnancy and aging. Literary texts may include fiction by Margaret Atwood, Rebecca Brown, Lorrie Moore and Jhumpa Lahiri, poetry by Mark Doty and Sharon Olds, and prose by Anatole Broyard, Sherwin Nuland and Atul Gawande. We will also explore portrayals of the body in film, photography and American popular culture. Although this class is open to all students, it may be of special interest to those considering careers in medicine or social work.


Instructor(s): Laura Tanner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3204 London: A History in Verse Spring 3
Course Description

This course aims to explore, and to enhance pleasure in, poems that span about six centuries of urban experience in one of the world’s great cities. (For counterpoint, there will be intermittent forays into the country by way of the occasional pastoral poem.) You can count on glimpses of the bridges and the River; famous buildings and infamous districts; the Underground, crowded streets, even the inner workings of some lonely poet’s mind. The city’s conspicuous and hidden history, far from precluding a plunge into the present and robust curiosity about the city’s future, will also inform our experience with contemporary poetry and song.


Instructor(s): Dayton Haskin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3205 Global Victorians Spring 3
Course Description

This course will consider the literature of Victorian Britain from an international perspective. Questions of empire, commerce, subjugation, tourism, war, and settler colonialism will be central to our purpose. In addition to advertisements, speeches, and poetry, key texts will include adventure stories, like Stevenson's Treasure Island, Conan Doyle's The Sign of Four, and Haggard's King Solomon's Mines; mystery novels, like Collins's The Moonstone and Stoker's Dracula; novels written by Britons living abroad, like Taylor's Seeta (India) and Clarke's His Natural Life (Australia); and critiques of the machinery of empire, like Conrad's Lord Jim and Schreiner's Story of an African Farm.


Instructor(s): Maia McAleavey

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies the pre-1900 requirement

ENGL 3211 Literature Wired: The Digital Humanities Spring 4
Course Description

Digital technology is reinventing how we play and how we study. Its remaking our literature, our classrooms, our universities. It's even reshaping your brain. In this experimental and experiential class, well spend a lot of time discussing ideas; more developing hands-on projects. You become not consumer, but producer of knowledge. By definition multidisciplinary, the course will equip you with tools for learning and living that can expand along a multitude of paths. No need for programming skills. Enthusiasm, creativity, and delight in collaboration, however, will be at a premium. Bring your imagination.


Instructor(s): Joseph Nugent

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3219 Reading Visual Culture Spring 3
Course Description

This course is an introduction to some aspects of the emerging field of Visual Culture. Among the areas we may explore are painting, photography, installation and performance art, texts incorporating word and image, public art, advertising, architecture. We will study how images are used both to impose and to subvert dominant constructions of race, class, gender and sexuality. We will be exploring these issues across a range of disciplines: In philosophy, history, literature, aesthetics, psychoanalysis, anthropology, sociology.


Instructor(s): Robin Lydenberg

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3230 Literature and Social Change Fall 3
Course Description

This course will examine the possibility of using literature as a force of social change in the twentieth century. We will explore the way in which literary worlds reflect, transform or revise contemporary attitudes towards topics such as racial violence in America, poverty and work, violence against women and domestic abuse. We will examine works that self-consciously assume the task of depicting specific social conditions, but our focus will not be limited to those works.


Instructor(s): Laura Tanner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3235 Second Voices: 21st Century American Immigrant Writing Fall 3
Course Description

This course will examine writing by 21st-century writers who have immigrated to the US, along with narratives about immigrant communities. We will think in layered ways about questions of diaspora, exile, choice, homeland, and identity. We will probe what it means for many of these authors to be writing in their second language and consider the narrative strategies and formal choices that characterize these stories of crossings. Texts by Edwidge Danticat, Junot Diaz, Anne Fadiman, Eva Hoffman, Dinaw Mengestu, Gary Shteyngart, André Aciman. Edwidge Danticat will visit campus. Students will attend two of her events outside of class.


Instructor(s): Elizabeth Graver

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3246 Cosmopolitan London: Communities and their Stories Summer 3
Course Description

A city of stupendous contradictions, London is as much home to grand traditions and manners as it is to the most irreverent and brazen of youth and working class cultures. Besides the fascinating spectrum of class relations secured by the monarchy, London is also one of the most diverse cities in the world where migrants from former colonies of the empire have put down deep roots thereby redefining the meaning of being British in relation to being English. Taking up the living history of its grand imperial past, this course samples contemporary London’s vibrant cosmopolitanism through art, literature, food, neighborhoods, and communities. We shall discover a globalized London that holds unusual secrets and overlooked treasures in places off the beaten track, or sometimes hidden in plain sight.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kalpana Seshadri

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3259 Introduction to Literary Theory Spring 3
Course Description

Intended primarily for English majors, this course will provide an introduction to literary theory by reviewing its history. We will begin with the great works of Classical literary theory by Plato, Aristotle, and Longinus, jumping to British criticism and theory of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, considering the Romantic theories of Coleridge, Shelley, and others, and adding American perspectives as we continue to move through the nineteenth century. A selective look at twentieth century theory will include key examples of formalist, psychological, Marxist, feminist, and cognitive approaches as well as several varieties of literary-cultural critique.


Instructor(s): Alan Richardson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills TAMI requirement

ENGL 3260 Talking Things in the 18th Century Spring 3
Course Description

Eighteenth-century texts through the lens of "thing theory," a theoretical approach addressing how inanimate objects help to form and transform human beings. During the eighteenth century, what did objects mean? How did people understand their things as things? We will read classic works, including Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, Pope's The Rape of the Lock, and Swift's Gulliver's Travels, among other works, alongside relevant thing theory. We will also explore how human beings were treated as objects under chattel slavery. This class offers expertise in the practice of "thing theory" and access to a eighteenth-century texts from a number of genres.


Instructor(s): Elizabeth Wallace

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3261 Writing The Self Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines the emergence of a variety of modes of "life writing" in the sixteenth andseventeenth centuries. How did early modern notions of "self" emerge alongside of (and sometimes as a consequence of) the genres which gave them form? Diaries, speeches and plays will be read alongside of portraits, films, and selections from modern criticism and biography. The "lives" studied may include Anne Askew, Thomas More, Elizabeth I, Anne Clifford, Margaret Cavendish, and Samuel Pepys.


Instructor(s): Amy Boesky

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1700 requirement.

ENGL 3263 Grand Masters Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3264 Saint Peterburg: Literary-Artistic Myths and Realities Summer 3
Course Description

Readings in the “Petersburg text of Russian literature” (from Pushkin to Andrey Bely and on to Mandelshtam and Brodsky, by way of Dostoevsky and Gogol) and an intense encounter with the city and environs of St Petersburg. Twelve classroom contact hours per week plus extensive walks in the city. Visits to the Russian Museum, the Hermitage, the literary museums for Dostoevsky, Blok, and Akhmatova. Operas at the Mariinsky Theater. Weekly excursions to the palaces (Tsarskoe Selo, Pavlovsk, Peterhof, Gatchina). Also a weekly guest lecture. .


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SLAV1162

Comments: A summer course, held in St Petersburg

ENGL 3301 Literature of the Beat Generation Spring 3
Course Description

This course will examine the work of the mid-twentieth century writers known as "The Beats"—Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, William S. Burroughs, Diane di Prima, Gary Snyder and others. Over the course of the semester we'll analyze these writers' aesthetic principles and study the cultural atmosphere in which the "Beat Generation" was born. To what, we'll ask, do we attribute these works' thematic concerns and stylistic traits? What led Kerouac to hit the road, and Ginsberg to howl?


Instructor(s): Christopher Boucher

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3302 Witches and Apocalypses in Young Adult Fiction Spring 3
Course Description

Recent young adult fiction seems oddly focused on both the supernatural and the post-apocalyptic. In our quest to understand why, we will trace the genre looking specifically at how supernatural entities might uniquely speak to adolescent readers; how post-9/11 fears have been translated into stories where the protagonist must survive in a post-apocalyptic world or navigate a pre-apocalyptic setting in which he or she must save the world. Finally, we will consider how earlier themes: social pressure, race and class tension, family dysfunction, and addiction find expression in the current strand of young adult fiction.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Cynthia Young

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: AADS3312

Comments:

ENGL 3303 Tolstoy and Dostoevsky (in translation) Spring 3
Course Description

A comparative study of two giants of world literature and their opposing perceptions of reality, art, and civilization. A reading of their principal novels and short prose, with a focus on psychological, moral, and religious questions and in light of twentieth-century literary theory.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Cynthia Simmons and Maxim D. Shrayer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SLAV2179

Comments: All readings in English translation.
Conducted entirely in English. For a Russian-language version of this course see SLAV3163 (SL308), when it is offered.

ENGL 3304 King Arthur in German Literature Spring 3
Course Description

A study centering on the most popular and enduring of all medieval legendary figures. We will examine the early texts from which the Arthurian mythology took root and contributed to the eventual spread into Germany of the tales of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table. We will then focus on a close reading of four or five of the most significant Arthurian romances within the German tradition. In addition, we will systematically trace the relationship between this highly idealized world of literary knighthood and real-life contemporary historical and social events of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Michael Resler

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: GERM2240

Comments: Conducted in English with all texts in English translation.
Counts toward German major, German minor, and German Studies minor.

ENGL 3305 Weird Style: Greatness and Strangeness in Medieval Writers Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines four extraordinary late-medieval authors: the Pearl-poet, Julian of Norwich, William Langland, and Geoffrey Chaucer. We will read major works by these authors and inquire into the differences between medieval literary traditions and our own. We'll historicize what we read by examining the cultural milieu in which these writings were produced. However, we'll also try to recover some of this literature's live aesthetic energy—that is, the radically unfamiliar imaginative and stylistic possibilities of poetry written more than six hundred years before today. Course assignments will be mostly analytical but with several creative projects as well.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Julie Orlemanski

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3306 Reading the Atomic Age Spring 3
Course Description

This class will consider the literature and culture of Cold War-era America and Britain, paying special attention to the place of nuclear weapons and nuclear power within the culture of the time. We will study the political, social and cultural history of the period in both Britain and America in order to explore and analyze the ways that literature and film, particularly, emerge from historical reality in forms that can challenge the status-quo. Possible topics include apocalyptic science fiction and the representation of nuclear protest groups. Texts may include:, The Four-Gated City, Kiss Me Deadly, Underworld and Godzilla.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Rowena Clarke

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3307 History of the English Language Spring 3
Course Description

This course provides a cultural history of English over 1500 years. We examine basic linguistic processes (meanings, sentence structure, sounds, spellings, word formation); follow the phases of English (Indo-European, Germanic, Old English, Middle English, Early Modern English, Modern English), and interrogate notions of correctness, "standard"/"non-standard," "literary" language, simplified language, spelling reform, pidgins and Creoles, the increasing dominance and variety of English around the world, and the powerful influence of cyberspace. Along the way, we will read historical events such as invasions, political and intellectual revolutions, immigration, emigration, and cultural assimilation as shaping forces in the living entity of the language.


Instructor(s): Robert Stanton

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies Lynch School of Education Requirements for English Majors (HEL/Grammer/Syntax) The class will be held at the days and times indicated.

ENGL 3308 Diving into the Antebellum Archive Fall 1
Course Description

Every other week the group will read a short work of American literature online in the digital version of the magazine in which it originally appeared (for instance, an essay by Fuller or Thoreau in the Dial; a story by Poe in the Southern Literary Messenger, Stowe in the Atlantic, or Hawthorne in the Democratic Review; a poem by Longfellow in the Knickerbocker or by Sigourney in the Children’s Miscellany). In each of the following weeks, we will discuss forgotten, contemporaneous works that students find in the digital archive—works that deal with ideas, images, or characters that figured in the work read the week before. During the last 2 weeks of the term, students will research and write a 6-page course essay that follows the method of the seminar by reading a known literary text along with forgotten, contemporaneous works that dealt with similar matters.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Paul Lewis

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3310 Shakespeare Spring 3
Course Description

In this class, we will read and discuss Shakespeare's plays with an emphasis on their status as performed texts with a variety of potential interpretations. How were these plays performed in Elizabethan England, and what shape do they take today? How might conventions of contemporary film and television empower us to reinterpret Shakespeare's genre and style? In addition to traditional readings and assignments, this course will involve in-class performance experiments and a creative project. Texts will likely include Richard III, The Taming of the Shrew, Much Ado About Nothing, Othello, and Cymbeline.


Instructor(s): Kelsey Norwood

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1700 requirement.

ENGL 3311 British Rule in India: Literature and Culture Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the complex dimensions of British rule in India (1757-1949) through novels, films, short stories, essays and historical documents. By focusing on the high points of that history with attention to political economy and culture, this course studies the shaping debates and issues of the time pertaining to education, sexuality, women, law and religion. The course aims to grasp British rule in India as fundamentally a relation of uneven exchange, a fraught transaction not only of money, goods, services and power, but also values, norms, pleasures, and identities. Interdisciplinary & challenging course readings.


Instructor(s): Kalpana Seshadri

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3313 Rags and Riches: Poverty and Wealth in Eighteenth-Century England Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines the representation of poverty and wealth in eighteenth-century England. Using poetry, prose, drama, fiction, and visual arts as our texts, we will ask how the century generated stories and theories to account for economic disparities in society. Among other questions, we will ask how the period understood such phenomena as upward and downward mobility. How did emerging economic theory alter existing attitudes about social relations? What can these eighteenth-century texts tell us about our own attitudes towards poverty and wealth? Authors include: Defoe, Swift, Pope, Gay, Equiano, Blake, and Adam Smith.


Instructor(s): Elizabeth Kowaleski Wallace

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1900 requirement.

ENGL 3314 Writing Out of Place Summer 3
Course Description

This writing workshop will take place in Mussoorie, India. It will focus heavily on questions of location and dislocation. Writing can be seen as a complex negotiation between what we know and what we imagine, what we see and what we project or interpret. Such negotiation is greatly intensified for the person "out of place"—a condition that one, as a traveler, chooses to inhabit.


Instructor(s): Suzanne Matson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3315 Searching for Poems in Early American Magazines Fall 1
Course Description

The migration of American magazines onto the Internet has made it possible to search for poems on specific subjects that have never or rarely been reprinted. Using The Citizen Poets of Boston: 1789–1820, an anthology researched in part by BC English majors, as a model, we will do preliminary searches of magazines from this period that were published in New York City. What was it like to move to New York in these years? What kinds of jobs did people have? What were courtship, marriage, and parenting like? Students will find a poem to share every week and write a short paper about one of them at the end of the semester.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Paul Lewis

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3316 Incendiary Poetics: Whitman and Ginsberg Spring 1
Course Description

Incendiary Voices: Whitman's Leaves of Grass and Ginsberg's Howl. This seminar will focus on the long poems of Walt Whitman and Allen Ginsberg, whose work arguably changed the course of American poetry. We'll look at the structure and content of the poems through close reading, with additional short readings to provide context and demonstrate both how revolutionary were the poems themselves, and the ways they continue to talk to each other about American ideals and exceptionalism. Students will be expected to lead discussions on self-selected topics, and to participate fully in dialogue about the poems, the poets, and their times. Short papers, one longer final paper of 5-7 pages.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Susan Roberts

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3317 Career Planning for English Majors Spring 1
Course Description

English Major Career Planning is a 10-week, 1-credit, P/NP course designed to facilitate planning and preparations for English majors who want to explore career paths in business, public relations, marketing, government, non-profits, the tech industry, and entrepreneurship. Representatives and recruiters from a variety of industries will be guest speakers, Career Center professionals will present hands-on workshops on cover letter and resume writing as well as interview techniques, and students will identify specific internship opportunities and prepare to apply for them.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Suzanne Matson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3318 Nineteenth Century American Poetry Spring 3
Course Description

A study of the four major canonical figures of 19th Century American poetry—Emerson, Poe, Whitman, and Dickinson—with briefer consideration of such "fireside" poets as Bryant, Longfellow, and Whittier, and some of the popular women poets, especially Lydia Sigourney.


Instructor(s): Robert Kern

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1900 requirement.

ENGL 3319 Hats, Suits & Corsets: Material Culture in the Victorian Novel Spring 3
Course Description

This course will consider the material culture of the Victorian novel; that is, the objects that fill the novels' pages, as well as the object of the novel itself. Questions of materiality, cultural frameworks, and the role of the object will be central to our purpose. Key texts will include novels by Dickens and Eliot, as well as a range of secondary sources including works by Elaine Freedgood and John Plotz.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Rachel Ernst

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies the pre-1900 requirement.

ENGL 3320 The Idea of Literature: From Work to Text Fall 3
Course Description


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robert Lehman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3322 Challenging Ulysses Fall 1
Course Description


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Joseph Nugent

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3323 Melville and the World Fall 3
Course Description


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Adam Lewis

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies the pre-1900 requirement.

ENGL 3324 Great Adaptations Spring 1
Course Description

How does a writer make a new story out of someone else’s old story? And why? Shakespeare did it, and James Joyce, and the author of Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. TV and film studios do it constantly. Adaptations, versions, retellings with a different angle or flavor: what are the delights, and dangers? This one-credit course will center on Dickens’s Great Expectations, move to Peter Carey’s “Neo-Victorian” adaptation Jack Maggs (1997), which features a version of Dickens himself as a character, and conclude with Alfonso Cuaron’s Americanized 1998 film of Great Expectations, which echoes both its source – and Huckleberry Finn.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Judith Wilt

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3329 Hard Fiction Spring 3
Course Description

“In essence,” writes Dave Eggers, “there are some people who feel that fiction should be easy to read. . . . On the other hand, there are those who feel that fiction can be challenging, generally and thematically, and even on a sentence-by-sentence basis . . . for the rewards can be that much greater when one’s mind has been exercised and thus (presumably) expanded.” This course is about the second kind—hard fiction by American writers like Faulkner, Nabokov, Pynchon, David Foster Wallace, John Barth, Donald Barthelme. Reading for the adventurous.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): James Wallace

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3331 Victorian Inequality Spring 3
Course Description

From “Dickensian” workhouses to shady financiers, Victorian literature has provided touchstones for discussions of inequality today. This course will investigate how writers responded to the experience of inequality in Victorian Britain during an era of revolution and reaction, industrialization and urbanization, and empire building. Considering multiple axes of inequality, we will explore topics such as poverty and class conflict, social mobility, urbanization, gender, education, Empire, and labor. We will read novels, poetry, and nonfiction prose; authors include Alfred, Lord Tennyson; Elizabeth Gaskell; Charles Dickens; Elizabeth Barrett Browning; Mary Prince; Arthur Morrison; and Thomas Hardy.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Aeron Hunt

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1900 requirement.

ENGL 3333 British Modernism Fall 3
Course Description

In this course, we will study the great works of modernism with an eye toward the ways in which this revolution in the arts became our own tradition. Though we will focus on British modernism in particular, the global character of modernism will necessitate some attention to American and Continental European influences. We will also have the opportunity to compare literary modernism to developments in architecture, film, and painting. Authors to be discussed include Samuel Beckett, Joseph Conrad, H.D., T. S. Eliot, James Joyce, Wyndham Lewis, Ezra Pound, Rebecca West, and Virginia Woolf.


Instructor(s): Robert Lehman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3335 Food Writing in Paris Summer 3
Course Description

ENGL3335 is a four-week course held in Paris during the month of June. Students interested in applying to the course can e-mail questions to suzanne.berne@bc.edu or visit www.bc.edu/international.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Suzanne Berne

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3336 Novels of the World Spring 3
Course Description

Focus on contemporary novels by authors from various places across the globe. We will explore the ideas, narrative structures, and styles of writers such as Mahfouz (Egypt), Kundera (former Czechoslovakia), Sebald (Germany), Pamuk (Turkey), Hosseini (Afghanistan), Tahar Ben Jelloun (Morocco), and Coetzee (South Africa). Through close reading, we will examine the aesthetic dimension of each novel, comparing the books as we proceed. We will also be attuned to their political, social, and historical dimensions. With as much sensitivity as possible, we will address questions of cultural difference. Relevant post-colonial and psychoanalytic theory will also be included.


Instructor(s): Frances Restuccia

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the Cultural Diversity Requirement

ENGL 3339 Digital Text, Material Image Spring 3
Course Description

In this practical, creative, and collaborative course, we'll explore the literature, art, music, imagery, and the material culture of Ireland leading up to the 1916 Rising. Our object?--to design and publish a digital guide to an exciting exhibition upcoming at the McMullen Museum. This electronic guide will be fully annotated, laid out, visualized, and edited by you in the classroom before publication on iTunes. The course will benefit innovative and creative students from all disciplines who are interested in imagery, photography, film, audio, marketing--but writing and publishing in particular. This Digital Humanities course will be a powerful addition to your college portfolio. No technological nous necessary. Having a Mac laptop isn't necessary, but it will be a help. (But bring your imagination). Contact nugentjf@bc.edu for more information.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Joe Nugent

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills TAMI requirement.

ENGL 3341 Fictions of Empire Fall 3
Course Description

In its day, the British Empire outdid Rome's power and grandeur. It reveled in ceremony and invented traditions and sustained itself with notions of the civilizing mission and illusions of permanence. The literary arts responded to these fictions in various ways and were an important accessory to imperialism. This course will take up the representative literature and select policy documents of the Empire to discover the stories that the English told themselves in order to justify their conquest and subjugation of others. Works will include poems, adventure tales, short stories and novels.


Instructor(s): Kalpana Seshadri

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3346 Asian American Experience Spring 3
Course Description

This course is a multidisciplinary introduction to the experiences of Asians in the United States. We will draw on history, literature, psychology, sociology, film, fine arts, and popular culture to understand how Asian Americans make, and remake, identities and cultures for themselves. We will explore the diversity and heterogeneity of a racial group that has long had a major, if frequently under-appreciated, impact on American society as a whole. Asian American studies faculty will give guest lectures to the class to share their expertise.


Instructor(s): Min Song

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3347 Disability Studies Fall 3
Course Description

This course explores constructions of “norms” and otherness in literature and culture. Readings include theoretical texts by Lennard Davis, Elizabeth Grosz, Tom Shakespeare, Simi Linton, Rosemarie Garland-Thomson, and Tobin Siebers. Literature drawn from several periods and perspectives (including Richard III, The Elephant Man, Autobiography of a Face, and The Curious Incident of a Dog in the Nighttime) will supplement our exploration of the dynamic (and problematic) representations of able-bodiedness as well as disability. Responsibilities include a midterm exam, short critical exercises, small group presentations, and a final substantive critical paper. (Counts as an advanced elective for medical humanities minors.)


Instructor(s): Amy Boesky

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3349 Irish Literary Revival Fall 3
Course Description

This course will introduce students to one of the most important literary and cultural movements of the 20th century--the Irish Literary Revival. We will study the poetry, prose, and drama of the Revival in their broader contexts, including works by W. B. Yeats, J. M. Synge, Augusta Gregory, and Douglas Hyde. We will also engage the Revival's critics, such as James Joyce and G. B. Shaw. In addition, students will learn how to work with the special collections related to the Revival in the Irish archives of the Burns Library.


Instructor(s): Marjorie Howes

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3350 Troy, in Love and War Fall 3
Course Description

This course traces a tension shaping the literature of Troy from Homer to Shakespeare — namely, the tension between the violent, public events of war and the romantic, private experiences of love. The backbone of the class will consist in a progression through Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde, Robert Henryson's The Testament of Cresseid, and Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida. We will also read from Homer, Virgil, Ovid, Augustine, various medieval chroniclers of Troy, Chaucer's House of Fame, and John Lydgate. The content will be primarily medieval, with some classical and early modern texts.


Instructor(s): Julie Orlemanski

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1700 requirement.

ENGL 3351 British Romantic Poetry Spring 3
Course Description

In this course we will read and discuss the poetry of Burns, Blake, Barbauld, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Hemans, Keats, Clare, and Landon. In addition to reading a few essays in literary criticism and theory by the poets themselves, we will consider a variety of critical perspectives, including formalism (the study of poetic and other literary devices and structures) and other approaches, such as feminism and the New Historicism, that bring out the cultural, social, and historical contexts of the poems.


Instructor(s): Alan Richardson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1900 requirement.

ENGL 3352 British Romantic Literature Spring 3
Course Description

A study of British Romantic literature, this course will examine the work of writers such as Jane Austen, William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and Percy and Mary Shelley. We will consider the coherence and validity of the term "Romantic," paying attention to the ways in which Romantic-era authors have contributed to thinking about art, nature, the individual, God, and other issues.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Yin Yuan

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies the pre-1900 requirement.

ENGL 3353 Contemporary Literatures of Migration Spring 3
Course Description

This course will examine fiction and non-fiction by 21st-century writers who foreground themes of migration and immigration. Topics will include globalism, exile, choice, national and trans-national identities. Looking closely at language itself, we will ask what means for some of these writers to write in a second language. Readings may include work by Edwidge Danticat, Junot Diaz, Anne Fadiman, Eva Hoffman, Gary Shteyngart, Andre Aciman. Writer Viet Viet Thanh Nguyen will visit campus. Requirements include several essays, weekly reflection posts, and a video interview with an immigrant or refugee.


Instructor(s): Elizabeth Graver

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3354 The Novels of Dickens Fall 3
Course Description

Popular showman and cultural critic, Charles Dickens was a publishing phenomenon in England and America: his novels defined a Victorian world teeming with energy but anxious about the very things it was celebrating—progress, national power, individual success, global commerce, personal desire. In the course we'll study the artist's development in the history of his times (1830's through 1860's) through Dickens's novels, journalism, and autobiography. Novels: probably Oliver Twist, Bleak House, Great Expectations, A Tale of Two Cities, and Our Mutual Friend, as well as the film version of Nicholas Nickleby.


Instructor(s): Judith Wilt

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills pre-1900 requirement

ENGL 3355 Eighteenth-Century Adventure Fiction Fall 3
Course Description

Eighteenth-century novels are rife with shipwrecks, seduction, and travels through unknown lands. Not merely entertainment, these books showcase the excitement and anxieties British writers and readers had about their rapidly changing world. We will analyze how such adventure fiction evolved alongside cultural shifts like the Scientific Revolution, the first professional female authors, the rise of modern economics, burgeoning colonial ideologies, and new opinions about government and individualism. The reading list includes the earliest science fiction novel (Cavendish), tales of exploration and survival (Defoe), the exploits of pirates and thieves (Fielding), and the escapades of the century’s most unsinkable heroines (Aubin, Lennox).


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Rebekah Mitsein

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1900 requirement.

ENGL 3359 The Single Girl in the Nineteenth Century Fall 3
Course Description

This course will approach nineteenth-century literature and culture through the lens of one figure: the unmarried woman. By considering major works—fiction and non-fiction—that feature all types of single ladies, from fallen women to eligible bachelorettes, career girls to widows and old maids, this course will address questions of gender and occupation in both ​literature and ​history. Texts range from novels by George Eliot and Charles Dickens to poems by Alfred, Lord Tennyson and Elizabeth Barrett Browning, as well as relevant criticism and theory.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3360 Victorian Violence Spring 3
Course Description

Victorian Britain has a well-known reputation for restraint. But violence was an inescapable part of the experience of Victorian writers and their publics, casting a shadow on their celebrations of the progress of civilization and their championing of the peaceful virtues of hearth and home. This course will examine representations of war, murder, domestic violence, and political violence—on the home front and around the globe—in Victorian fiction, poetry, prose writing, and performance. Authors may include Arnold, Emily Brontë, Carlyle, Conrad, Dickens, Kipling, Morrison, Stevenson, and Tennyson.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Aeron Hunt

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1900 requirement

ENGL 3362 Making it Irish: Cultural Revival and Revolution Spring 3
Course Description

This interdisciplinary course will explore the relationships between visual, literary and material culture, with examination of the early Medieval Irish sources for the nineteenth century Celtic Revival. Its focus is the 2016 McMullen Museum of Art exhibition, The Arts and Crafts Movement: Making it Irish, which will constitute the primary visual course text. The Arts and Crafts movement in Ireland occurred alongside the more prominent Literary Revival—both arising during a period of growing nationalist pressures that would culminate with the 1916 Easter Rising and in 1921, with independence. Scholars from Boston College and Ireland working on this exhibition will present lectures and lead workshops during the semester


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kevin O'Neill, Nancy Netzer, Robert Stanton and Vera Kreilkamp

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with: ARTH3318 HIST4270

Comments:

ENGL 3363 Town and Country in Victorian Fiction Spring 3
Course Description


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): James Murphy

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3364 Nineteenth-Century British Fiction Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines five major works in the development of the British novel: Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice (1813), Elizabeth Gaskell’s North and South (1855), Charles Dickens’s Bleak House (1852), George Eliot’s Middlemarch (1872), and Thomas Hardy’s The Return of the Native (1874). These classic (but long) novels will be considered in their cultural and historical contexts, with particular focus on gender roles, poverty, social justice, and the rise of the city. We will consider the aesthetic development of realism and experimental modes of narration, linking these artistic concepts, as our authors did, to questions of morality and community.


Instructor(s): Maia McAleavey

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills pre-1900 requirement

ENGL 3367 Non-Western Women's Literature Fall 3
Course Description

This semester we will read novels, poetry, essays and view some films by women from the Middle East, Africa, India, and the Caribbean. We will take up issues such as religion, material conditions, family relations, traditional values regarding marriage, sexuality, etc. through a close reading of several novels, films, and theoretical essays by women. The aim of this course is to acknowledge the diversity of women's lives the world over, and to recognize ways of forming international solidarity and alliances.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kalpana Seshadri-Crooks

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3368 Nineteenth Century British Women Writers Fall 3
Course Description

In the nineteenth century women writers came in force to the world stage. As novelists, poets, and essayists they explored and interrogated all facets of the life around them: politics and romance, religion and ambition, empire, the industrial revolution, new perspectives on class, gender, and psychology. We'll read novels by Jane Austen, Emily Bronte, Elizabeth Gaskell, George Eliot, Olive Schreiner, Mary Ward, and Virginia Woolf, and poems from Felicia Hemans, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Christina Rossetti, Amy Levy and others. Individual student projects will also explore the rich heritage of women essayists writing about gender spheres, politics, domesticity, passion, and art.


Instructor(s): Judith Wilt

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1900 requirement and might be of interest also to Women's Studies Minors and to Education Majors interested in conversation about teaching women's writing.

ENGL 3377 Medieval Arthurian Literature Spring 3
Course Description

Myth, legend, and history conspired to make the most popular and enduring set of characters in medieval literature: King Arthur, Guinevere, Machiavellian sorcerer Merlin, lustful Uther, Sirs Gawain, Lancelot, Perceval, and the other Knights of the Round Table. We will dig at the Celtic roots of the Arthurian tales, revel in the golden age of French romance, take a detour to medieval Iceland, and examine the transformative influence the tradition had on the mainstream of English literature. All texts will be read in Modern English translation except the Middle English ones, but no previous Middle English knowledge is required.


Instructor(s): Robert Stanton

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3382 Varieties of Shorter Fiction Fall 3
Course Description

This course means to explore the appeals, rewards, dangers, and logistics of narrative fiction generally, using short stories as a manageable focus that allows us to encounter a significant number of diverse examples in a limited time, with scintillating juxtapositions rather than orderly historical development or theoretical digestibility as our organizing principle. Studying a wide range of fictions from the nineteenth century to the present, we'll examine in detail how specific texts work, consider relations among different modes, and perhaps, warily, approach larger formal and theoretical questions about how literary stories function for tellers and audiences.


Instructor(s): Robert Chibka

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3383 Asian American Film Fall 3
Course Description

Focuses on films made by and about Asian Americans, exploring them as an art form and a medium for exploring Asian American experiences and identities. Topics include racial and gender stereotypes, the role of cinema in the Asian American movement, whitewashing, and sexual identity. We will watch Hollywood films, independent films, and documentaries. Films may include: Seeking Asian Female, The Motel, Harold and Kumar Go to White Castle, The Namesake, and Mysterious Skin. Notes: Requires one film screening per week outside of class time and weekly reading.


Instructor(s): Christina Klein

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: FILM3388

Comments: This course satisfies the Cultural Diversity requirement.

ENGL 3387 The Literary Essay Fall 3
Course Description

"The essay can do everything a poem can do," according to Annie Dillard, "and everything a short story can do — everything but fake it." We will study literary essays in a wide range of forms (e.g., personal, lyrical, satirical, experimental) in order to understand how they are similar to — but also different from — poems, short stories, and academic or journalistic articles. Reading and writing assignments will include both literary and scholarly essays. Authors on the reading list will include Swift, Woolf, Orwell, Baldwin, Didion, Wolfe, McPhee, Orlean, Dillard, and Sedaris.


Instructor(s): Lad Tobin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3388 Autobiography Fall 3
Course Description

In this course, we will focus on the form, theory, and history of autobiography. In our effort to understand the conventions, varieties, and rhetorical features of autobiographical writing, we will pay particular attention to the boundaries this genre shares with both biography and first-person fiction. Readings will include autobiographies; personal essays; graphic memoirs; and some short autobiographical fiction. Writing assignments will include both academic and autobiographical essays.


Instructor(s): Laurence Tobin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3392 Syntax and Semantics Spring 3
Course Description

An introduction to the concepts and operations of modern generative grammar and related models, as well as linguistic theories of meaning.


Instructor(s): Claire A. Foley, M.J. Connolly and Margaret Thomas

Prerequisites: LING3101 or equivalent.

Cross listed with: LING3102

Comments:

ENGL 3393 Chaucer Spring 3
Course Description

Geoffrey Chaucer (d. 1400) was the first poet writing in English who was lauded and studied as literature in his own time. His body of writing, covering a breathtakingly wide range of subjects, is a subtle mix of satire and the sublime. This course is an introduction to Chaucer’s poetry, including his masterpiece, the Canterbury Tales. It is also an introduction to the Middle English language. The course is structured around the different genres and literary forms invented or reinterpreted by Chaucer, from tales of courtly love to fabliaux (fables) and dream visions. No prior knowledge of Middle English required.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Eric Weiskott

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course will fulfill the pre-1700 requirement.

ENGL 3396 Contemporary Irish Literature and Culture Spring 3
Course Description

This course will explore the writings of contemporary Irish authors. We will read texts of the last few decades and consider the cultural transformations from which they emerged, e.g., economic turbulence, globalization, and emigration. Readings may include fiction by Colum McCann and Emma Donoghue, poetry by Seamus Heaney and Paul Muldoon, and drama by Marina Carr and Brian Friel.


Instructor(s): Trista Doyle

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3444 Major Irish Writers Spring 3
Course Description

For much of its history, Ireland has been a small, struggling nation. But it has produced a large proportion of the world's best Anglophone literature. This course will examine some of Ireland's most important and influential writers of prose, poetry, and drama and will explore their relationship to the country that made them.


Instructor(s): Marjorie Howes

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3460 American Short Story Fall 3
Course Description

In this class we will read a number of short stories, between seventy-five and one hundred. The featured authors will most likely be Flannery O'Connor, Raymond Carver, John Cheever, John Updike, Alice Munro, and Jhumpa Lahiri.


Instructor(s): Paul Doherty

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3472 Contemporary American Short Fiction Fall 3
Course Description

In this course, we will pay rigorous attention to the short story form by reading a range of contemporary American stories and critical/theoretical essays. Texts may include work by Donald Barthelme, Jhumpa Lahiri, Gish Jen, Edward P. Jones, Lorrie Moore, and George Saunders. What, we will ask, historically constitutes the short story form, and how do these writers draw on or push the boundaries? How do issues of class, gender, sexual, ethnic, national, and transnational identity come into play?


Instructor(s): Elizabeth Graver

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 3527 General Linguistics Fall 3
Course Description

An introduction to the history and techniques of the scientific study of language in its structures and operations, including articulatory and acoustic phonology, morphological analysis, historical reconstruction, and syntactic models. This course provides an intensive introduction to the study of what languages are and how they operate. Exercises in the analysis of fragments from various languages supplement the theoretical lectures and readings.


Instructor(s): M.J. Connolly

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: LING3101

Comments:

ENGL 3528 Historical Linguistics Spring 3
Course Description

The phenomenon of language change and of languages, dialects, and linguistic affinities as examined through the methods of comparative linguistics and internal reconstruction.


Instructor(s): M.J. Connolly

Prerequisites: LING3101 or equivalent and familiarity with an inflected language.

Cross listed with: LING3325

Comments:

ENGL 3533 British Novels of the Eighteenth Century Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores the origins and early development of what has become the dominant literary form: the novel. We consider such issues as the novelty of the genre and its ties to previous forms of discourse, tensions between historical/social "realism" and imaginative artifice, and interactions of moral, aesthetic, and cultural values and norms. Our texts are major works from the first century of British novels by such authors as Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Radcliffe, and Austen.


Instructor(s): Robert Chibka

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1900 requirement.

ENGL 3538 Major Twentieth-Century Irish Poets Fall 3
Course Description

This course will examine the twentieth century's most important Irish poets. We will consider topics such as modernism and postmodernism, poetry's use of folklore and myth, the Irish Literary Revival and Counter-Revival, and issues surrounding the Irish language. We will also examine poetry's response to Ireland's turbulent political, social and economic history. Poets to be studied include W.B. Yeats, Katharine Tynan, Patrick Kavanagh, John Montague, Eavan Boland, Seamus Heaney, Derek Mahon, Paul Muldoon, Nuala N Dhomhnaill, Eilan N Chuilleanin, and Paula Meehan.


Instructor(s): Marjorie Howes

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4002 Narrative Journalism in Peace and War Fall 3
Course Description

This course will engage with modern and contemporary examples of so-called "long form" journalistic narratives (essays, books, graphic and visual texts) that, by applying literary techniques to nonfiction, tell us a story about contemporary social life. Discussing matters of literary form and technique as well as journalistic norms, we will cover nonfiction texts that address both social conditions on the home front (inequality, Wall Street adventurism, street crime, police culture, Disneyfication) and international conflicts (including war and terrorism), generally involving the U.S. Writers covered will include figures such as Michael Lewis, Joan Didion, George Packer, William Finnegan, Dexter Filkins, Suki Kim, Isabel Wilkerson, Geraldine Brooks, Mike Davis, Naomi Klein, Tracy Kidder, Thomas Frank, Rajiv Chandrasekaran, Tony Horwitz, and others.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Christopher Wilson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4003 Shakespeare and Performance Spring 3
Course Description

Although Shakespeare became “Literature,” people originally encountered Shakespeare’s plays as popular entertainment rather than as literary texts. In this course, we will examine Shakespeare through the lens of performance, looking at how several of his key plays were produced in their own time and how they have been subsequently reimagined on stage and screen. As part of this re-examination, we will rehearse and perform scenes in small groups, as well as invent our own Shakespeare adaptations and attend a local production (if available). No previous performance experience or familiarity with Shakespeare is required, but enthusiasm is welcome.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Andrew Sofer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills pre-1700 requirement

ENGL 4004 Boom, Bust, Austerity Spring 3
Course Description

Ireland, in recent decades, has experienced the highs and lows of globalization and monetary crisis. The Celtic Tiger economy was the “fastest growing … in Europe” from 1995-2005. Three years later, the country entered recession, ultimately requiring an €85 billion “bailout” from the EU and IMF. Before long, international news outlets lauded Ireland as “the poster-child for implementing austerity programs.” Is this the typical trajectory for a postcolonial nation still carving out its economic position in the new Europe and beyond? This course focuses on recent Irish writers who engage these boom and bust years. It considers how literature represents a period of unprecedented economic, social and cultural transformation? It evaluates the creative and/or imaginative arts’ contribution to helping a society survive economic austerity? It examines representations of unemployment, emigration, bankruptcy, depression, as well as resiliency, entrepreneurial spirit, and community rebuilding.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): James Smith

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4005 "Is it about a bicycle?" Flann O'Brien and the Irish Comic Tradition Fall 3
Course Description

Flann O’Brien has been cited as a significant influence by a new wave of Irish comedians and writers and yet, despite tributes from James Joyce, Dylan Thomas, Graham Greene and Seán O’Casey, O’Brien’s reputation during his own lifetime rested more on his newspaper column than on his three extraordinary novels At Swim-Two-Birds, The Third Policeman, and An Béal Bocht [The Poor Mouth]. This course will explore Flann O’Brien’s work as part of an Irish comic tradition that extends from early and medieval Gaelic literature to the work of a new generation of contemporary Irish writers including Kevin Barry and Mike McCormack.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Louis de Paor

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course will be taught by the Burns Scholar in the Irish Room of Burns Library

ENGL 4006 Eco-Fictions: World Economy and the Meaning of Nature Fall 3
Course Description

The calls for climate justice and environmental ethics, though motivated by climate science, emerge largely from our everyday experiences with our environment. Here imaginative works of fiction and non-fiction, poetry, art, and cultural history provide inspiration. By focusing on the environment as a global (not merely an American) issue we shall study classic and contemporary works from around the world that raise awareness about the significance of human action upon the planet. The course will include a variety of genres and media such as film, art, theory, fiction, poetry, and creative non-fiction.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kalpana Seshadri

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4007 Literature of Mental Health Fall 3
Course Description

The complex mind—its mysteries and capacity, the short-circuiting caused by mental illness or trauma, even the emotions that begin here—is a rich subject for writers of literature. In this course we will study poetry, fiction, memoir, drama, and film, texts which explore the ideas of mental health and illness. Can madness ever be socially proscribed? What if the writer him/herself is “unbalanced”? What larger truths about the human condition can be gleaned from exploring literature that deals with sanity? Texts will include Hamlet and As You Like It ; work by poets Rilke, Plath, and Wright; fiction by Gilman, Stevenson, Silko, Morrison, Hadden, and McEwan; Styron’s memoir Darkness Visible; films Birdman and Nebraska; and critical essays on the subject.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Sue Roberts

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4008 Writing as Social Action Fall 3
Course Description

“You write to change the world, knowing. . .that you probably can’t,. . .The world changes according to how people see it, and if you alter, even by a millimeter, the way. . . people look at reality, you can change it.” —James Baldwin

This writing workshop explores how writing creates change within nonprofit organizations and the wider world. The class will partner with Cambridge’s Homeless Empowerment Project to practice grant writing, press releases, and social media writing. To explore activism, students will create projects to raise awareness about a social issue. Students will read, research, draft, revise, edit and circulate advocacy-based writing.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Paula Mathieu

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4009 Novels and Islam Fall 3
Course Description


Instructor(s): Frances Restuccia

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4010 Scribbling Women and Suffragettes: Human Rights and American Women's Writing, 1850-1920 Fall 3
Course Description

This course focuses on American women writers who engaged questions of difference and justice and played pivotal roles in social reform, ranging from movements for women’s and indigenous rights to abolitionism and labor activism. How did nineteenth-century women use print culture as a forum for political debate and a means of democratic participation prior to the Nineteenth Amendment? How did women writers work within the sentimental tradition and contribute to new developments in science fiction, literary journalism, and realism? Authors include Harriet Beecher Stowe, Harriet Jacobs, Maria Ruiz de Burton, Sojourner Truth, Susan B. Anthony, Zitkala-Sa, and Sarah Winnemucca.


Instructor(s): Lori Harrison-Kahan

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills pre-1900 requirement

ENGL 4011 Faulkner to Beyonce: New South Aesthetics Spring 3
Course Description


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Angela Ards

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4012 The Novel in English Spring 3
Course Description

A survey of major novels in English from 1719 to 2000 focusing on detailed textual readings: of narrative modes, voice, and focalization; style; the creation of characters and manipulation of sympathy; the structuring of plot. Developing our receptivity, in different registers and in different scales of attention, to the many, sometimes contradictory, effects of these texts, we will also ask questions about the genre over time: about its coherence as a tradition; how it represents (or doesn’t) interiority, desire, and embodied experience; how it understands (and perhaps shapes) domesticity, the public sphere, and various forms of affiliation and self-definition.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kevin Ohi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4013 Solitary Geniuses: Writing Communities in the Transatlantic 19th Century Spring 3
Course Description

“Solitary Geniuses;” Writing Communities in the Transatlantic 19th Century explores the cult of literary genius in the British and American Romantic movements. Poets and writers, like William Wordsworth and Ralph Waldo Emerson, are often depicted and discussed as solitary thinkers, wanderers alone in nature and gifted with extraordinary artistic ability. However, both artists were deeply connected and reliant on other writers, thinkers, and artists. Almost every reclusive sage was actively part of the life and culture of their time and country. How did this myth of the Romantic loner originate? How did these authors – as well as Thoreau, Coleridge, the Bronte sisters, and others – mindfully shape this persona? How has literary criticism refined and propelled this figure? And what can we learn from the intermediary realms between “solitary genius” and “social figure?” in regards to not only Romantic writing, but as well to imagination and creative thought at large.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Emma Hammack

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1900 requirement

ENGL 4014 Apocalyptic Modernism Fall 3
Course Description

The concept of apocalypse signifies both a thinking of “the end” and an uncovering, an unveiling, or revelation. Apocalypse, then, marks both the end and the beginning of… what? Focusing on modernist texts of the interwar period (1919-1939), this course explores the apocalyptic tone that permeates the philosophy, fiction, and poetry of the years following WWI and leading up to WWII. How does this tone shift from the post-war 1920s, to the pre-war 1930s? Writers may include Yeats, Eliot, Woolf, Benjamin, and Freud.


Instructor(s): Nell Wasserstrom

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4015 Women in Irish Literature Before 1900 Fall 3
Course Description

Long before Joyce, there was Sydney Owenson—a writer with as much wit and even more audacity. This course explores pre-1900 Irish literature and culture from the unique perspective of the Irish woman. Women came in all shapes and forms in early Irish and English writing: queens, faeries, hags, vampires, and, most importantly, writers themselves. We will study how women formulated the Irish novel, asking questions like, what is the relationship between history and sexuality, imperialism and literature, myth and reality, the “wild” native woman and the Landlord? Selected authors include: Sydney Owenson, Maria Edgeworth, W.B. Yeats, Elizabeth Gaskell, as well as Irish language poets.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Colleen Taylor

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1900 requirement

ENGL 4016 Reporting Civil Rights Spring 3
Course Description


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Angela Ards

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: JOUR2016

Comments:

ENGL 4020 Fake News: What's It Good For? Fall 3
Course Description

The term “fake news” has captivated popular consciousness seemingly overnight, but stories that present reader fantasies and fears as current events stretch across history, under various guises: medieval “false prophecies”; Russian kompromat; Orwellian Newspeak; The Onion. Drawing on literature, film and journalistic case studies, this course examines the history and uses of fake news, from state propaganda designed to control and deceive to hoaxes and satire designed to fool, amuse, and make better readers. Sample texts: 1984 (George Orwell); Enemy of the People (Henrik Ibsen); Essays by H L Mencken, Edgar Allan Poe, Janet Cook, and Nik Cohn; Satire and Dissent (Amber Day); Bob Roberts, dir Tim Robbins.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Angela Ards

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: JOUR2243

Comments:

ENGL 4114 Modernism and Visual Culture Spring 3
Course Description

In 1897, Joseph Conrad wrote that the task of the modern novelist is, “by the power of the written word, to make you hear, to make you feel—it is, before all, to make you see.” In this class we will concern ourselves with the relationship between literature and the visual arts as it unfolded over (roughly) the last century and a half – from 1863 (when Édouard Manet exhibited his scandalous Luncheon on the Grass at the “Salon of the Refused” in Paris) to the present. We will likely attend to works of painting (Manet, Picasso, Pollock, Twombly); literature (Conrad, Lewis, H. D., Woolf); film (Eisenstein, Vertov, Godard); and criticism (Fry, Greenberg, Jameson, Fried).


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robert Lehman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4238 Medieval Women Writers Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines a female-authored texts from the Middle Ages, ranging from the eighth to the fifteenth centuries. This body of work is remarkable for its size and range, given the limitations on women's writing: we will read Anglo-Saxon nuns letters, Old English women's songs, biography, autobiography, saints' lives, fables, love poetry, mystical and visionary literature, utopian literature, political theory, and the correspondence of aristocratic women. Can we find essential characteristics of female-authored texts, can we locate a female literary ethos in particular genres, or are we encountering a fortuitous selection of typical literature? All texts are in English translation.


Instructor(s): Robert Stanton

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills pre-1700 requirement.
Fulfills Women Writers requirement for LSOE/EN majors.

ENGL 4300 Solitude Spring 3
Course Description

What is the difference between solitude and loneliness? Does speech remediate the solitude of existence, or is solitude, on the contrary, the consequence of being the only animal who speaks? Topics might include: solitude in philosophy and psychoanalysis; skepticism and other minds; unrequited love in the English novel; masturbation and celibacy; solitude and speech; the solitude of childhood, of dreams, of religious ecstasy, of social protest, of aesthetic creation. Writers will include some of the following: Milton, Descartes, Rousseau, Thoreau, Austen, Dickens, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, Freud, Djuna Barnes, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Foucault, Welty, Truman Capote, Leo Bersani, and Stanley Cavell.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kevin Ohi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4309 James Joyce Fall 3
Course Description

This class will engage in a deep exploration of James Joyce's Ulysses, perhaps the most exciting twentieth-century novel that an adventurous student might undertake. I'm particularly interested in applying topographical and phenomenological notions such as "cityscape" and "sensescape" to Dublin on the edge of modernity. This highly interactive class will attract motivated students from across disciplines. In it we'll employ various technologies to retrace the space and time traversed by Stephen Dedalus and Leopold Bloom through the realm of the five senses.


Instructor(s): Joseph Nugent

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4315 Chaucer and Literary Voice Fall 3
Course Description

This course serves both as introduction and intensive exploration of the poetry of Geoffrey Chaucer. Since Chaucer's poems consistently foreground questions of "literary voice," we'll take "voice" as our guiding thread and ask throughout the semester: What is the relationship between the author's voice and his characters'? Between the narrator's voice and the author's? Between voices of authority and rebellious voices? Between speech and writing? Speech and nonsense? Speech and song? We'll animate Chaucer's Middle English with our own voices and have a look at manuscripts and illuminations from fourteenth-century England. No previous knowledge of Middle English required.


Instructor(s): Julie Orlemanski

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1700 requirement.

ENGL 4334 Advanced Topic Seminar: Gender Crossings: Theory and Representation Fall 3
Course Description

In this seminar we’ll be exploring how ideas about transgender and transsexual figures have developed and operated in different cultures and time periods. How do these crossed and crossing bodies help us think about how and why gender norms emerge and are policed? We will consider medical, legal, religious, literary, and first-person accounts of cross-dressers, hermaphrodites, drag kings, “manly” women and “effeminate” men, among others. We’ll supplement our readings with theoretical texts that query the two-gender model, how it is we “sex” the body, and what the possibilities (and limits) are of a genderless world. Texts will include: Paré, On Monsters and Marvels; Shakespeare, Macbeth; Lyly, Galatea; Foucault, ed., Herculine Barbin; Winterson, Written on the Body; Churchill, Cloud 9; Fausto-Sterling, Sexing the Body; Freud, Sexuality and the Psychology of Love; Halberstam, Female Masculinity; Butler, Gender Trouble; Bornstein and Bergman, Gender Outlaws.


Instructor(s): Caroline Bicks

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: TAMI course: Fulfills the Theory requirement. Interested students should email Prof. Bicks (bicks@bc.edu) describing previous experiences reading gender theory (if any) and telling her a bit about why they would like to take the course.

ENGL 4337 Victorian Marriage/Victorian Sex Fall 3
Course Description

The Victorian era may call to mind strict gender roles and romantic novels culminating in marriage. Yet this period also saw rampant prostitution, feminist agitation for rights, and debates over competing definitions of masculinity. This course explores the interrelation between Victorian literary forms and nineteenth-century debates about gender and sexuality. Our focus will be on fiction, most likely: Bront's Jane Eyre, Eliot's Adam Bede, Braddon's Lady Audley's Secret, and Hardy's Tess of the D'Urbervilles. Along the way, we will encounter a wide range of readings, from Sherlock Holmes stories to Victorian poetry, and from books of household advice to pornography. This course is reading intensive.


Instructor(s): Maia McAleavey

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1900 requirement.

ENGL 4340 Milton Spring 3
Course Description

Readings in early poetry will lead up to reading Milton's epic in its entirety. Some attention will be afforded to Milton's political writing as well. After reading Paradise Lost, we'll look into the experience of one of its most earnest readers, the unnamed creature at the center of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. There will be ample opportunities to read aloud in small groups outside our ordinary class-meetings.


Instructor(s): Dayton Haskin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills pre-1700 requirement.

ENGL 4352 Women In/And Avant-Garde Spring 3
Course Description

The literary and visual avant-gardes are often perceived as a predominantly white male domain, its female practioners reduced to companion or Muse, or socially marginalized by race, sexual orientation or madness. In this course we will examine the construction of the concept "woman" by male avant-garde artists and writers in (Dada, Surrealism, Futurism), but our main focus will be on a selection of avant-garde works by women in poetry, prose narrative, critical manifesto, and the visual arts.


Instructor(s): Robin Lydenberg

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4371 British Short Fiction, 1840-1940 Spring 3
Course Description

From 1840 through the twentieth century, we cover works in their historical, formal, ideological, and periodical contexts, with particular attention to the ways in which authors use short forms to test the boundaries of narrative, the expectations of fiction, and the purposes of storytelling. We will be reading a large variety of works—some as familiar as James Joyce's The Dead, others less famous. Course includes works by Charles Dickens, Anthony Trollope, Thomas Hardy, Oscar Wilde, Ada Leverson, Rudyard Kipling, D.H. Lawrence, E.M. Forster, Katherine Mansfield, Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, and Elizabeth Bowen, among others.


Instructor(s): James Najarian

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills pre-1900 requirement.

ENGL 4373 Korean Cinema Fall 3
Course Description

South Korea today is home to one of the most vibrant film industries in the world. It is also a cinema largely unknown to Americans. The course will introduce students to a broad range of Korean films, from melodramas made during the Japanese colonial era to contemporary horror films. Along the way we will explore Korean political history, the relationship to Hollywood and European cinematic conventions, questions of genre, and auteurism. Films to be screened may include: Madame Freedom, Old Boy, and Welcome to Dongmakgol.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Christina Klein

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: FILM3320

Comments: Requires one film screening per week outside of class time and weekly reading

ENGL 4393 Jane Austen and Her Contemporaries Spring 3
Course Description

In this class, we will read Jane Austen's six major novels through the lens of new historicism. Thinking about literature as social process, we will discuss the cultural work done by Austen and other writers of her era, such as Frances Burney, Maria Edgeworth, and Mary Wollstonecraft.


Instructor(s): Beth Kowaleski Wallace

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies the pre-1900 requirement.
Satisfies the Women Writers requirement for LSOE.

ENGL 4394 Psychoanalysis and Literature Fall 3
Course Description

In this course we will explore the intersection of psychoanalysis and literature by studying both psychoanalytic approaches to narrative fiction and the use of narrative techniques in theoretical and clinical psychoanalytic material. Our primary readings will include texts by Freud and Lacan as well as several literary works they discuss in detail. Secondary criticism responding to their work will bring us into contact with a wider range of psychoanalytic and other theoretical approaches as we explore a range of issues in dream interpretation, case studies, literary interpretation, and art criticism.


Instructor(s): Robin Lydenberg

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4395 Literary Theory Fall 3
Course Description

In this course, we will examine theoretical works that pose and attempt to answer the question: What is literature? What, in other words, does or does not make literature different from non-literary writings or from ordinary communicative acts? Though our primary focus will be on trends in twentieth-century literary theory – e.g., new criticism, formalism, structuralism, and deconstruction – we will also examine earlier attempts to determine the nature and the possibilities of literature. Authors may include Friedrich Schlegel, Cleanth Brooks, Boris Eikhenbaum, Maurice Blanchot, Paul de Man, Hélène Cixous, Barbara Johnson, and Jonathan Culler.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robert Lehman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: TAMI course: Fulfills the Theory requirement.

ENGL 4397 The Whitman Tradition Fall 3
Course Description

Our effort here will be to define and trace the development of a distinctive tradition in American poetry grounded in the formal strategies and philosophical assumptions of Whitman's Leaves of Grass, characterized by free verse, long lines, a radically democratic, anti-hierarchical ethos, and the call of the open road. To what extent, we will ask, do poets whose work looks very different from Whitman's still find a place in this tradition? Writers to be considered (other than Whitman himself) will include Emerson, Dickinson, Stevens, Williams, Ginsberg, Snyder, and others.


Instructor(s): Robert Kern

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1900 requirement.

ENGL 4400 Colonial American Literature and Culture Fall 3
Course Description

Literary and cultural forms of the Anglo-American settlements before the American Revolution. Central are the distinctive contributions of Puritan culture to the creation of an "American self" and a sense of national identity. Puritan histories, biographies, poetry and sermons make up much of the reading; we will study daily life at Plymouth Plantation, Ann Hutchinson, Merry Mount, Indian captivities, Salem witchcraft, and the religious revival of the 18th century. The goal of the course is to understand the forces that led to the Revolution and that entered into and still is a part of what it means to be "American."


Instructor(s): James Wallace

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1700 requirement.

ENGL 4401 Power, Performance, and the Body in Contemporary Drama Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines representations of the body in post-1945 European, North American, and South African drama. Topics will include sexual politics and feminism; racial identity and the divided self; colonialism and the “Other”; the implications of human cloning; the body as performed artwork; and the family in the age of AIDS. Our texts will likely include such classic works as M Butterfly and Angels in America as well as more recent plays. Requirements include a substantial paper; a review of a local production; and a final. No previous experience of drama is required, but students should be prepared for graphic language and content.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Andrew Sofer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4402 Film and Film Theory Spring 3
Course Description

This course will put film into dialogue with film theory—especially with psychoanalytic and feminist film theory. We will analyze films by directors such as Godard, Hitchcock, Kieslowski, Almodvar, Haneke, Egoyan, Campion, Lynch, and Kiarostami. We may look at recent political films such as Standard Operating Procedure and Waltz with Bashir. Kristeva's concept of the thought-specular, which involves the absorption by the film of the spectator's psychic material as a way of working-through it will be given much attention.


Instructor(s): Frances Restuccia

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4403 Hauntings: 20th Century Southern Fiction Fall 3
Course Description

This course will survey twentieth century Southern fiction, with an emphasis on the haunting role of memory, religion and history. We will explore issues of war, race, class, gender and community. Finally, we will ask how Southern literature is struggling to find new modes of representing both its ghosts and its hope for the future. Readings include novels and short stories by Charles Chesnutt, William Faulkner, Eudora Welty, Katherine Ann Porter, Toni Morrison, Wendell Berry, Cormac McCarthy and Barry Hannah.


Instructor(s): Maureen Benes

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4404 Literary Boston 1790-1860 Spring 3
Course Description

Walk the streets of Old Boston in this course that explores familiar and forgotten chapters of literary history. Spend a night at the Federal Street Theatre during the 1790s. Search early Boston magazines for forgotten treasures. Meet the poet buried on Boston Common. Find out why Edgar Allan Poe called members of the Boston literati "Frog-Pondians." And watch the American Renaissance flower. Authors studied will include Judith Sargent Murray, Lydia Maria Child, Charles Sprague, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Poe—Bostonians all! Visits to literary sites and explorations of online archival materials will help transport us back in time.


Instructor(s): Paul Lewis

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the Pre-1900 requirement

ENGL 4405 Melville and the World Fall 3
Course Description

Herman Melville traveled widely throughout the world, from the Pacific Islands and the Mediterranean to the streets of New York City and London. How does Melville’s writing critically and creatively map the world of the nineteenth century? In this course we will read a selection of Melville’s novels, including Moby-Dick, as well as some short fiction, with an eye toward the geographical, cultural, and political contexts in which he wrote them. We will consider how Melville’s writing takes up and engages popular and mass culture, American expansion and war, and conflicts over race and slavery.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Adam Lewis

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4406 Literary & Religious Traditions of India Spring 3
Course Description

India is home to some of the oldest and most vibrant religious and spiritual traditions in the world, including Hinduism, Islam, Christianity, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, and Zoroastrianism. This religious plurality has generated a highly syncretic society, hosting a variety of discourses on the most basic questions of humanity articulated through ritual, mythology, art, and festivals. In this course we will read a variety of texts: mythology, folklore, modern fiction, as well as accounts by western travellers on the place of the sacred in India in order to understand how religious belief impacts social and political life in India today.


Instructor(s): Kalpana Seshadri

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: THEO2406

Comments:

ENGL 4407 The American Renaissance: Natural Canons and Popular Culture Fall 3
Course Description

American literature flourished in the two decades before the Civil War. Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allan Poe, Walt Whitman, and other writers produced some of their most important work during this time. In addition, cheap (often scandalous) magazines, popular theater, dime novels and photography also flourished. This course will examine the relationship among literary masterpieces, including Melville’s Moby-Dick and Whitman’s Leaves of Grass, and the popular culture and entertainment of nineteenth-century America. Students will have the opportunity to do digital and archival research as we explore the connections and contrasts of the “high” and “low” culture of the era.


Instructor(s): Adam Lewis

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills Pre-1900 requirement

ENGL 4408 Towards the New Woman in British and Irish Victorian Fiction Spring 3
Course Description

The late nineteenth century saw the flowering of the “New Woman” movement in fiction. It coincided to a degree with First-Wave feminism and the struggle for women’s suffrage. It had literary debts to contremporary writers such as the Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen but also to women writers over the previous century from Maria Edgeworth to George Eliot. This course explores those roots while also attending to the work of some of the seminal New-Woman novelists themselves who came from Irish as well as British backgrounds. They include Olive Schreiner, Sarah Grand, Iota, Mona Caird and George Egerton.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): James Murphy

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4410 American Fiction to 1860 Fall 3
Course Description

The origin and development of the American tradition in the novel, from its local beginnings in sentimental fiction to its international triumph. We will read novels by such authors as Charles Brockden Brown, Catherine Sedgwick, James Fenimore Cooper, William Wells Brown, Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, and Elizabeth Stoddard. The contributions of such subgenres as the epistolary novel, bildungsroman, the historical novel, Gothic romance, and "woman's fiction" will be considered. The aim of the course is to understand the work American novels have done in the development of American political and cultural life.


Instructor(s): James Wallace

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1900 requirement

ENGL 4411 American Fiction and the Wild West Spring 3
Course Description

While cowboys, Indians, and ponies remain prevailing icons of the "Wild West," this course strives to complicate and supplement these images by studying American texts that recycle, reimagine, or otherwise reflect on the West. When does American literature need Western narratives, and how does it use them? How can literature remark on, reshape, or frustrate common Western themes like violence, exploration and discovery, authenticity, cross cultural contact, cowboy masculinity and domestic femininity, and the human-non human relationship? What role do politics, class, and labor play in imagining the literary West, given Manifest Destiny and America's often ruthless continental development?


Instructor(s): Kiara Kharpertian

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4412 Writing Workshop: Creative Nonfiction Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Over the past few decades, the best nonfiction being written has expanded to include not only such traditional forms as argument and exposition but also the mixed modes of creative nonfiction. As an intermediate-level course, we will build on the work of the First Year Writing Seminar and hone the skills needed in advanced writing electives. Students in this course choose their own topics and explore the range of possibilities now available to the nonfiction writer.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4414 Dickens, James, and Eliot Fall 3
Course Description


Instructor(s): Kevin Ohi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills Pre-1900 requirement

ENGL 4415 American Literature in the 1790s Fall 3
Course Description


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Paul Lewis

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4416 Dickens and His World Spring 3
Course Description


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Maia McAleavey

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4417 The Politics and Literature of the Irish Nation, 1800-1922 Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores Irish literature and history during a century of turbulent social and political change as Ireland moved from Union with Great Britain (1800) to rebellion and independence. (1921). By studying some key works of fiction, poetry and drama, we will examine contesting visions of national identity as well as evidence about Ireland's material culture. We will also explore the connections between literary works and the political rhetoric and actions of a rapidly changing society. Whenever appropriate, we will look at the cultural evidence of visual art as well.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kevin O'Neill

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with: HIST4276

Comments:

ENGL 4420 Donne to Dryden Spring 3
Course Description

The goals for the course include: 1) exposure to a number of early modern writers of enduring interest, including Donne, Ben Jonson, Aemilia Lanyer, Bacon, George Herbert, Milton, Marvell, Bunyan, Aphra Behen, and Dryden; 2) exposure to a range of kinds of writing, including tragedy, lyric, epic, political prose, allegory, romance, the novel, and the essay; 3) attention to changes in language, culture, and ideology with an eye to understanding how the literary periods known as "the Renaissance" and "the Restoration" have been made to tell stories about cultural history.


Instructor(s): Dayton Haskin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4421 Charlotte Bronte and the 20th Cent Novel Spring 3
Course Description

In this course, we'll be exploring the enduring life of Charlotte Bronte's novel Jane Eyre in a variety of twentieth-century and contemporary critical contexts. We'll be discussing both the background to the initial novel, and the many "rewrites" it has inspired, from novelists as diverse as Miles Franklin, Jean Rhys, Daphne du Maurier, and Jeannette Winterson, and from filmmakers like Jacques Tourneur and Alfred Hitchcock.


Instructor(s): Lisa Fluet

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4423 20th C American Fiction: American Dreams Spring 3
Course Description

This course will explore the notion of “the American Dream” as it is defined, tested and frequently undercut in twentieth-century American fiction. Our discussion of the works will focus on their exposure of the ideological and economic bases of the American dream. How, we will ask, does our understanding of the “All American” family reflect assumptions about race, class, gender and personal autonomy? How do literal and metaphorical notions of buying and selling relate to the construction of individual and collective American identities? What sacrifice is required of immigrants who wish to "buy into" America’s cultural mythology? Texts may include The Great Gatsby, The Day of the Locust, Bread Givers, The Bluest Eye, Independence Day and short stories by Diaz, Alexie, Banks and Lahiri.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Laura Tanner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4424 Middle English Alliterative Poetry Spring 3
Course Description

In the fourteenth century, there were two ways of writing poetry in English. Chaucer’s rhyming, syllable-counting iambic pentameter exemplifies one tradition. This course makes a survey of the other tradition, known today as alliterative poetry. Among the poems we will read are tales of King Arthur’s court, the story of a resurrected corpse discovered in London, and a wild allegorical dream-vision starring such characters as Bribery and Truth. We ask how this poetry is formally organized, where this form of writing comes from, and why medieval English writers chose to use it. No prior knowledge of Middle English required.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Eric Weiskott

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the Pre-1700 Requirement

ENGL 4425 Revival to Revolution: How Drama Shaped Modern Ireland Fall 3
Course Description


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4427 Topics in Theory: Psychoanalysis and Literature Fall 3
Course Description

In this course we will explore the intersection of psychoanalysis and literature by studying both psychoanalytic approaches to narrative fiction and the use of narrative techniques in theoretical and clinical psychoanalytic material. Our primary readings will include texts by Freud and Lacan as well as several literary works they discuss in detail. Secondary criticism responding to their work will bring us into contact with a wider range of psychoanalytic and other theoretical approaches as we explore a range of issues in dream interpretation, case studies, literary interpretation, and art criticism.


Instructor(s): Robin Lydenberg

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4429 The Filipino American Experience Spring 3
Course Description

What does it mean to be Filipino American? How is literature, film, and discourse by Filipino Americans integrated into or neglected by mainstream America? In this course, we will seek to understand texts by Filipino American authors, scholars, and filmmakers; write creative nonfiction that reflects students' ethnic heritage; and engage in discussion of history and contemporary issues particular to Filipinos in America (such as the U.S./Philippine War, immigration, culture). Possible texts include: Bulosan, Hagedorn, Ascalon Roley, Cordova, and prominent Pinoy poets. Designed as a topic seminar for concentrators in Asian American studies, this course is open to all students.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Ricco Siasoco

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Designed as a topic seminar for concentrators in Asian American studies, this course is open to all students.

ENGL 4430 Literature and Journalism in America Spring 3
Course Description

This is an upper-division elective that examines the development of mainstream and alternative American journalism over the last eighty years, with a special focus on the late twentieth and early twenty-first century. We will examine the border areas and conflicts between American nonfiction and news reporting in four areas: reporting on crime, the underclass, and transnational urban spaces; war and foreign correspondence; the New (and newer) journalism; and memoir. Our subject will be the interdependence of narrative forms and the social conditions they address.


Instructor(s): Christopher Wilson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4431 Contemporary American Poetry Fall 3
Course Description

The contemporary moment in American poetry is lively, diverse, and resists easy definition. Strong individual voices stake out widely differing poetic projects, and part of our work in this course will be to consider the poets with an eye toward their literary ancestors as well as their possible lines of contemporary kinship. We'll read poets writing today who will, in all likelihood, continue to be read several generations from now, as well as some newcomers about whose lasting power we'll make up our own minds.


Instructor(s): John Anderson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4432 Advanced Creative Nonfiction: Food and Culture Writing Spring 3
Course Description

In this creative writing workshop, the interconnection between food and culture will be explored from farm to table. Drawing on the city of Boston and its deeply rooted culinary traditions, we’ll consider the rituals connected to food-making and eating. Literary readings will highlight the early settlers who created a distinct New England cuisine, and the recent ethnic groups and artisanal food makers who have shaped today’s culinary landscape. Students will explore the way food and identity are inextricably linked by engaging in a variety of writing tasks from memoir to literary profiles of people, food, and place.


Instructor(s): Lynne Anderson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4433 Advanced Creative Nonfiction: Flash Nonfiction Spring 3
Course Description

In this writing workshop, we will focus on producing short creative nonfiction pieces, including micro-narratives; metaphor essays; segmented essays; lyric essays; apppropriate(d) form pieces; persona pieces; and informative sketches. To generate ideas and to test potential audience interest for each of your essays, we will generate tweets, texts, and status updates. To identify forms and techniques for this sort of writing, we will read and discuss flash nonfiction from a variety of sources, including an edited anthology of short creative nonfiction, magazine and newspaper columns, and online literary journals, websites, and blogs. Workshops will also be frequent and brief: each student will write and workshop a new or revised flash piece nearly every single week.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Lad Tobin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4434 Advanced Creative Non Fiction: Writing Mental Health Fall 3
Course Description

"Much madness is divinest sense—/to a discerning eye—" so begins one of Emily Dickinson's most famous poems. How do writers treat mental health as a subject? What are the issues and questions that arise when contemplating such a large and complex area? In this workshop students will write their own essays in a variety of non-fiction styles (reportage, opinion, profile, narrative, memoir) to address issues of mental health such as mental illness, addiction, neurology and neuropsychology, behavior, and medical history. We'll read short works from a wide selection of writers across disciplines that may include: TaNehisi Coates, Oliver Sacks, Elizabeth Wurtzel, William Styron, Mary Karr, Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung, Alice Miller, Leslie Jamison, and poems of Theodore Roethke, Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes, documentary, and photographic work of Dior Vargas.


Instructor(s): Susan Roberts

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4435 Global Anglophone Literatures: Asia, Africa, and the Middle East Spring 3
Course Description

This course opens a wealth of contemporary literature from the non-Western world mainly Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia that have expanded readers’ imaginations and enriched the English language in a variety of genres. We shall read fiction and non-fiction alongside cultural theory to deepen our understanding of the political, economic, and environmental issues that arise in these lands and the ways in which they impact the daily lives of people as delineated by some of the world’s most acclaimed authors. Readings may include works by Adhaf Souief (Egypt), Hisham Matar (Libya), Leila Aboulela (Sudan), Xiaolu Guo (China), Amitav Ghosh (India), Romesh Gunesekera (Sri Lanka), Mohsin Hamid (Pakistan), Samrat Upadhyay (Nepal), and others.


Instructor(s): Kalpana Seshadri

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: AADS4435

Comments:

ENGL 4436 ATS: The Hawthorne-Melville Perplex Spring 3
Course Description

Hawthorne and Melville met at a picnic in 1850 and enjoyed an intense friendship that ended, rather mysteriously just over a year later. In the interim they learned from and inspired each other. Moby-Dick, The House of the Seven Gables and The Blithedale Romance all benefitted from their contact. This seminar combines biographical and literary scholarship to analyze that relationship. Besides the novels, readings will include stories and letters, including the “Agatha” correspondence, and relevant scholarly essays.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): James Wallace

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4438 Victorian Selfies Spring 3
Course Description

Victorians didn’t have smart-phones but they still took selfies. This course will consider the literature of nineteenth-century Britain from a first-person perspective. All texts will be told as “I,” whether that be novels in the first person, autobiography, lyric poetry, letters, essays, or even self-portraits. We will also be reading some critical theory that relates to self-formation. We will examine how the “self” is represented and conveyed in Victorian literature and explore the questions that literature raises about what a self is and how we convey ourselves to others. Texts may include: The Moonstone, Browning’s Dramatic Monologues, Queen Victoria’s Diary, Woolf’s Moments of Being, and Jane Eyre.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Alyssa Bellows

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4443 Chekhov Fall 3
Course Description

A close examination of exemplary stories and of two plays by Anton Chekhov. Special attention to questions of structure and aesthetics, historical, religious and socio-political contexts, as well as to Chekhov's place at the crossroads of realism and modernism and Chekhov's influene on Anglo-American culture.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Maxim D. Shrayer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SLAV3162

Comments: All readings in English. Open to undergraduate and graduate students.

ENGL 4445 19th C American Literature and the National Imagination Fall 3
Course Description

Despite Jefferson’s 1776 appeal to “self-evident” truths about human beings and the nations they form, the history of the United States has been marked by fervent disagreement about the nation’s guiding ideals. How can a country cherish liberty while permitting chattel slavery? What happens to a nation’s vision of itself in the throes and aftermath of civil war, or amidst a rising capitalist culture? These questions preoccupied U.S. politicians, poets, novelists, and essayists, throughout the nineteenth century, and their answers to them will be our main focus. Writings may include works by Jefferson, Madison, Emerson, Melville, Douglass, Stowe, and Twain.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Scott Reznick

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1900 requirement

ENGL 4446 Empire and The Everyday Spring 3
Course Description

The British Empire was once the world’s foremost military, economic, and political power: it was “the empire on which the sun never sets.” Despite its colossal scale, life in the British Empire often looked quite different to those who inhabited its daily rhythms and felt smaller, though no less significant, reverberations of its power. In this course, we will explore how the empire exerted its influence on the everyday lives of its citizens, as well as how they sought creative ways of resisting it. Writers may include: E.M Forster, Leonard Woolf, Chinua Achebe, and Flora Annie Steel.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Irene Ruiz Dacal

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4447 The Poetics of Rap Spring 3
Course Description


Instructor(s): Allison Adair

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course investigates the relationships between rap and traditional poetry, not only in terms of their historical and cultural significance but also for their aesthetic value, as art forms involved in storytelling, music, and performance. Close analysis of poetry from oral and written traditions will offer new insight into rap’s dominant—and divisive—issues: free speech, consumerism, criminality, urban identity, regionalism, intellectual property, and the politics of race, gender, and sexuality. Readings include Tricia Rose’s Black Noise and The Hip Hop Wars, Jeff Chang’s Can’t Stop Won’t Stop, and Adam Bradley’s Book of Rhymes, among others. No experience necessary.

ENGL 4448 Britain in the Age of Revolution Fall 3
Course Description

In 1789, the French Revolution sent shockwaves across Britain; the hopes and fears that revolution might come to England next only deepened as the Industrial Revolution increasingly divided the country along class lines. In this course we will explore how British writers responded to this period's volatile political and economic climate in poetry, fiction, and polemics. We will explore writers recognized by the established canon (including Blake, Shelley, and Godwin) as well as underground figures in the radical underclass.


Instructor(s): Eric Pencek

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1900 requirement.

ENGL 4453 Form and Technique of Fiction Spring 3
Course Description

A course for students with an interest in examining fiction from a craft-oriented, writerly point of view. We will read essays on craft, as well as a range of short fiction. Student writing will include critical responses to the readings, along with various fictional experiments. Though some assignments will involve writing fiction, this course is not a writing workshop. Rather, it is a literature elective whose focus is the art and craft of fiction. The course is suitable for students who have previously taken a fiction workshop or have written fiction on their own in a sustained way.


Instructor(s): Elizabeth Graver

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4454 Developing Writing Skills Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4458 Rhetoric as Cultural Studies Spring 3
Course Description

Rhetoric is an ancient art focusing on how people or groups use language and images to negotiate, gain power, and make meaning in the world. Rather than studying rhetoric itself, this course will consider how selected ideas and concepts from rhetoric can serve as a toolkit for studying a wide range of "cultural texts," such as films, speeches, advertisements, images, or places. The goal of this course is to understand culture as dynamic and performative—to help us better understand the created nature of all human culture, while pointing to possibilities for acting and being in the world.


Instructor(s): Paula Mathieu

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4460 ATS: Global Crossroads in Eighteenth-Century Literature Spring 3
Course Description

Caribbean sugar, Indian spices, Chinese silk, and African gold, what was eighteenth-century "Britain" made of? The era's literature has a reputation for being obsessively nationalistic, even xenophobic. But given the influx of global goods into the country, what stories, discourses, and ideas might have come along with them? In this seminar, we will consider some international roots of the British literary tradition. The syllabus includes works by Aphra Behn, Daniel Defoe, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, Samuel Johnson, and Olaudah Equiano. We will use criticism and supplementary materials from early modern Asia and Africa to situate these texts in global contexts.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Rebekah Mitsein

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1900 requirement

ENGL 4461 Regionalism in America Spring 3
Course Description

“North, South, East, West: Explain.”
Everybody knows what a “Western” is—the frontier, Indians, adventure, the Code of the West—but what about “Easterns” or “Northerns” or “Southerns”? This course explores the concept of literary regionalism developed by Leslie Fiedler in The Return of the Vanishing American to explore the geography of a fictional America. Readings will include fiction by Jack Schaefer and Thomas Pynchon; Poe, Faulkner, and Flannery O'Connor; Hemingway, Edith Wharton and Louise Erdrich.


Instructor(s): James Wallace

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4464 Contemporary Novel in English Fall 3
Course Description

In this course, we'll be considering the contemporary novel in English, and we'll be looking primarily at novelists writing in English today with roots in, as well as relocations and connections to, Sri Lanka, Canada, India, Pakistan, Jamaica, the Dominican Republic, Zimbabwe, South Africa, and Japan, as well as Britain and the United States. Authors to be considered: Junot Diaz, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Doris Lessing, Kazuo Ishiguro, Zadie Smith, Jamaica Kincaid, Michael Ondaatje, J. M. Coetzee, Salman Rushdie, Dave Eggers, David Mitchell, and Colson Whitehead.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Lisa Fluet

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: An optional one-credit workshop will be offered which will focus on issues and strategies related to teaching the subject matter of this course.

ENGL 4465 Feminist Literary Theory Fall 3
Course Description

What is feminist literary theory and what difference does it make to how we read and understand literary texts? This class surveys major movements in twentieth and twenty-first century Anglo-American and French feminist literary theory. Though our main focus will be theories of textual analysis, some of our readings will draw from interdisciplinary subjects, such as psychoanalysis, history, anthropology, and biology. Possible authors include: Virginia Woolf, Adrienne Rich, Helene Cixous, Luce Irigaray, Julia Kristeva, Monique Wittig, and Judith Butler.


Instructor(s): Elizabeth Kowaleski-Wallace

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4469 Imagining Places in the Early Modern World Spring 3
Course Description

From New World expeditions, to the growing London metropole, to the worlds seen through Galileo's telescope, the early modern world experienced an explosion of places that sparked the English literary imagination. In this course we will explore this rich literature of imaginative places that includes utopias, descriptions of the New World, plays and closet dramas, romances, and even the newly charted world of the body in medical writing. Readings may include selections from More's Utopia, Spenser's Faerie Queen, Shakespeare's The Tempest, Sir Walter Raleigh's Guiana, Hooke's Micrographia, Behn's Oronooko, books of Paradise Lost, and others.


Instructor(s): Alice Waters

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1700 requirement.

ENGL 4471 Gothic Women Writers Fall 3
Course Description

After reading Horace Walpole's foundational Gothic text, The Castle of Otranto, we will examine a range of Gothic novels by women writers during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. How can we characterize Gothic texts? Why did tales of terror take on a prominent role in literary culture? Is there a special affinity between the Gothic tradition and women? Other texts may include Clara Reeve's The Old English Baron, Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, and Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights.


Instructor(s): Alison Fanous

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4478 Poe and the Gothic Spring 3
Course Description

Working with Poe as a central figure, this course examines the development of English and American Gothic fiction from The Castle of Otranto to "The Yellow Wallpaper" and beyond. In addition to Poe, we will read work by some of the following writers: Horace Walpole, Matthew Lewis, Jane Austen, C. B. Brown, Washington Irving, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Charlotte Gilman, H.P. Lovecraft, and Stephen King.


Instructor(s): Paul Lewis

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1900 requirement.

ENGL 4480 Convents, Covens, and Crusaders: Reading Groups of Women Fall 3
Course Description

From the virgin martyrs to the legendary Amazons to the witches of Macbeth, female groups play a central role in literary and non-literary texts. At their worst, they kill men, cast spells, and try to hurt other women; at their best, they confide in, instruct, and heal one another. The goal of this class is to examine the patterns of these portrayals in medieval and Renaissance writings and to ask why they carried (and, in some cases, continue to carry) the meanings that they did.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Caroline Bicks

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the Pre-1700 Requirement

ENGL 4481 Woolf and Hemingway Spring 3
Course Description

Writing at the same time, living lives of great achievement punctuated by episodes of madness culminating in suicide, embodying revolutions in literary style, Virginia Woolf and Ernest Hemingway defined and dramatized the dilemmas of modern manhood and womanhood as memorably as any figures of the twentieth century. Contrasts between the two leap first to the eye; startling and fertile comparisons exist too. Readings: Hemingway's In Our Time, The Sun Also Rises, A Moveable Feast, The Old Man and the Sea, The Gates of Eden; Woolf's The Voyage Out, Mrs. Dalloway, A Room of One's Own, The Waves, Between the Acts.


Instructor(s): Judith Wilt

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4484 The American Novel in the Last Century Fall 3
Course Description

This course will explore how American writers have used the novel to represent issues of space, immigration, regional identity, race and family in the last century. We'll frame our discussions with historical and cultural context and trace various manifestations of modernist and postmodern literary thought and practice. Particular areas of interest will be individual versus collective identities, the lasting effects of trauma, the role of language in making sense of the past, and definitions of love.


Instructor(s): Maureen Benes

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4487 American Modernisms Fall 3
Course Description

This course will explore the narrative and poetic strategies that writers between the first and second world wars employ to represent issues including family, space, objects, trauma, war, commodity culture, gender, race and class. As we explore the role of literature in picking up the pieces of American life after the First World War, we will focus on the way in which modern poets and novelists come to view the relationship between language and lived experience. The class will focus on a range of writers including Faulkner, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Hurston, Larsen, Stein, Eliot, Williams, Stevens and West.


Instructor(s): Laura Tanner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4491 18th Century Comic Constructions Spring 3
Course Description

What does a comedy do, besides make us laugh? How does it work? How might constructing entertainments in comic modes display, hide, or reframe cultural anxieties or complacencies and contribute to shaping the no-less-constructed social world outside the text? We'll encounter a variety of silly, sophisticated, sententious, salacious, scathing, scintillating plays and novels produced during a period when comedy flourished in both genres. Along with short readings in comic theory, we'll scrutinize works by the likes of Etherege, Behn, Congreve, Gay, Steele, Fielding, Sterne, Goldsmith, Burney, and Sheridan.


Instructor(s): Robert Chibka

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1900 requirement.

ENGL 4492 Queer Origins Fall 3
Course Description

How have thinkers responded to the question of queer origins? We will look at three overlapping categories: etiological accounts of the origin of homosexuality (Freud; physiological, biological, and environmental theories of sexuality; sexology; theories of gay desire by apologists, activists, and the (often violently) disapproving); mythological and philosophical accounts of desire (Plato's Symposium and Phaedrus, Narcissus, Orpheus, Oedipus, Deleuze, queer theory); and literary representations of gay initiation, seduction, and origination (including works by Shakespeare, Swinburne, Wilde, Proust, Nabokov, and contemporary queer writers). To take the course without its title appearing on your transcript, contact the instructor for alternative registration options.


Instructor(s): Kevin Ohi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4495 Asian Cinema Fall 3
Course Description

This class explores recent films from China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, South Korea, Japan, and India. Films will be approached through a variety of critical perspectives, including formalism, auteurism, and historicism. We will watch art films, commercial films, and films that fall between these two categories. We will ask how Asian film industries have been affected by globalization and how national cinemas are becoming increasing transnational. Note: Required weekly film screening Wednesdays 7 – 9 PM.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Christina Klein

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: FILM4495

Comments:

ENGL 4497 CNF: Argument and Commentary Fall 3
Course Description

This writing-intensive workshop will help participants develop a variety of skills of argumentation, including indirect descriptive arguments, reviews, editorial commentary and analytic arguments. Short nonfiction readings from writers like Junot Diaz, David Sedaris, Rebecca Solnit and Evan Watkins;as well as essays from a range of students;will be studied for their content ideas and rhetorical strategies. Students will draft a variety of short pieces, participate in whole-class and small-group workshops, and extensively revise three essays for a final portfolio.


Instructor(s): Paula Mathieu

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4498 Shakespeare and Marlowe Spring 3
Course Description

A comparative study of these two early modern writers with a focus on ways in which biographical narratives are often enlisted to explain and manage the interpretation of their works. In addition to reading recent biographies of Shakespeare by Stephen Greenblatt and of Marlowe by David Riggs, we will explore both problem dramas and erotic poems that teachers and editors have found to be sources of extraordinary self-revelation and sometimes of embarrassment. There will also be a component of the course that involves modest training in research.


Instructor(s): Dayton Haskin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1700 requirement.

ENGL 4500 Queer Cinema/Queer Theory Spring 3
Course Description

Queer readings of cinema make especially clear queer theory's departure from enterprises that made it possible: from feminism, psychoanalysis, gay studies, and the search for "positive" representations, for example. Offering an introduction to queer theory, this course will also ask broader questions about sexuality and film. How does queer theory influence one's thinking about spectatorship? Why do we find films sexy even when, in a sterner mood, we might nevertheless find them politically objectionable? What if we look at films not as "examples" to be glossed but as modes of thought that pursue questions of sexuality in their own terms?


Instructor(s): Kevin Ohi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: TAMI course: Fulfills the Theory requirement.

ENGL 4501 Boston: History, Literature and Culture I Spring 3
Course Description

Covering the period from the arrival of the Winthrop Fleet in 1630 through the Civil War, this is the first half of a two-semester, interdisciplinary course on Boston's history, literature and culture broadly defined. Team-taught by a history and an English professor, and drawing on experts in the other areas (including music and visual arts), the class reads poetry, drama, fiction and nonfiction connected to Boston in relation to political and social developments. Site visits will take students out to the streets, museums, and archives of one of the most historic cities in the United States.


Instructor(s): Owen Stanwood and Paul Lewis

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HIST4471

Comments: Satisfies the pre-1900 requirement for the English major

ENGL 4502 Boston: History, Literature & Culture II Fall 3
Course Description

Covering the period from the Civil War to the present, this is the second half of a two-semester, interdisciplinary course on Boston's history, literature, and culture. Team-taught by a History and an English professor, and drawing on faculty in other departments and experts in the Boston area to provide insights into Boston's culture broadly defined, the class examines Boston's literature, film, art, music, and other cultural forms in relation to political and social developments. Site visits will take students out to the streets, museums, and archives of one of the most historic cities in the United States.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): David Quigley and Carlo Rotello

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with: HIST4472

Comments:

ENGL 4503 Global Englishes: Literature and Transnational Flows Fall 3
Course Description

How and why did English become the language of international business and culture in the world today? Given that Asia will soon have the largest English speaking population in the world, what is the relation of the English language to the process of globalization and transnational cultural flows? How have former British colonies like India and Nigeria appropriated the English language to engender new national literatures in English? We shall study the dominance of the English language in relation to the British Empire and the US as a super power by sampling writings from under-represented parts of Asia such as the Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, as well as Mexico and Latin America.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kalpana Seshadri

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: INTL4503

Comments:

ENGL 4504 Revival to Revolution: How Drama Shaped Modern Ireland Fall 3
Course Description


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Lauren Arrington

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4505 Post-War American Poetry: Writing After Modernism Fall 3
Course Description

Beginning our inquiry into the vibrant literary culture of the 50s and 60s with earlier modernist poets like T.S. Eliot, Marianne Moore, Ezra Pound, and William Carlos Williams, this course will then focus on the works of American poets Robert Lowell, Elizabeth Bishop, Theodore Roethke, Randall Jarrell, and John Berryman, as well as selections from writers such as Gwendolyn Brooks, Allen Ginsberg, Frank O'Hara, Sylvia Plath, Anne Sexton, and Delmore Schwartz.


Instructor(s): Alex Shakespeare

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4506 The Works and World of Orhan Pamuk Fall 3
Course Description

A course on the fascinating writing of Orhan Pamuk. We will begin with Other Colours, which will introduce critical issues: e.g., the Western tradition of the novel that the Turkish Pamuk situates himself in, the Republic's wish to erase its history, women, the relation of Turkey to Europe, Islam and art, writing and sorrow, modernism and authenticity, Bellini and the East, and contemporary Turkish politics. These topics will resurface as we read novels (e.g., The New Life, The White Castle, Snow, My Name is Red, and The Museum of Innocence) and end with The Nave and the Sentimental Novelist.


Instructor(s): Frances Restuccia

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4508 Queer Theory Fall 3
Course Description

"Queer theory" names a group of texts that, divergent in assumptions, theoretical methods, and styles of engagement, is perhaps united by a shared commitment to understanding and combating structures of sexual oppression. Sexual oppression, it suggests, is not simply a matter of anecdotal opinion, nor is it to be countered by empiricism; it is inextricable from the largest structures of meaning, subjectivity, and sociality in Western thought. Without pretending to be exhaustive, this course will offer an introduction to some of the major modes of practicing queer theory, particularly work influenced by psychoanalysis, deconstruction, social construction theory, and film theory.


Instructor(s): Kevin Ohi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4510 Food & Culture Writing Spring 3
Course Description

The culture and rituals around food, cooking, and eating will be considered from farm to table in this workshop. Drawing on the city of Boston and its deeply rooted culinary traditions, we will write in a variety of genres from memoir and essay to journalistic profiles and reviews. The notion that food is a metaphor for cultural well-being will be examined by considering the various ethnic groups shaping today’s food landscape. Weekly workshop critiques will help participants develop a portfolio with the goal of publishing one fully developed piece. Readings will include works by Fisher, David, Trillin, Gopnik, Pollan, Kummer, and Thorne.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Lynne Anderson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4511 Faulkner Spring 3
Course Description

"A great writer," asserts Deleuze, "carves out a nonpreexistent foreign language within his own language": this is the exhilaration of Faulkner. Few writers have so made English their own: from his syntax and usage to the instantly recognizable cadences of a prosodic rhythm like no other, his is as a foreign language in the American tradition. Attending to this language and its pleasures, we will also explore Faulkner's America. For few writers have been as perceptive about the categories of American personhood—especially race, class, gender, and region—and their power to mark, with violence, human bodies and minds.


Instructor(s): Kevin Ohi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4512 Old Irish Spring 3
Course Description

A descriptive and historical examination of the linguistic features of Old Irish among the Celtic and Indo-European languages; the reading of Early Irish texts.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): M.J. Connolly

Prerequisites: Previous familiarity with an inflected language or with Modern Irish

Cross listed with: LING3206

Comments:

ENGL 4514 Literature and the Political:War&Human Body Spring 3
Course Description

What are the consequences to the human body in a situation of war? Using Michel Foucaults theories of Biopower as a guide, we will view war as the paradigm of contemporary force relations, as the organizing principle of society. We will take up themes such as the problem of internal displacement, conditions of refugees camps, the travails of migrants, war and psychic trauma, suicide bombers, children in armed struggle, sexual war crimes, and the efficacy of international law. We will read contemporary literature and much theory by figures such as Foucault, Giorgio Agamben, Cathy Caruth, Malcolm X, etc.


Instructor(s): Kalpana Seshadri

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Two papers, final exam and class presentations.

ENGL 4515 Eliot, James, and Woolf Fall 3
Course Description

Focusing on three of its greatest creators, this course will formulate different ways of thinking about the novel in English. Inevitably, we will be led to large questions—about the representation of reality and of human consciousness, about the novel's embeddedness in socio-political reality, about perspective and vision and the limits of human knowledge, for example. But our primary focus will be close readings, and we will need to develop ways of talking, concretely, about what novels do and about how they are put together. Readings will include novels, stories, and essays by George Eliot, Henry James, and Virginia Woolf.


Instructor(s): Kevin Ohi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4516 From Visual Text to Graphic Novel Fall 3
Course Description

This course will examine a range of works in which word and image converge. Selections will include: poetic texts—ancient to modern—that describe visual objects (Homer, Keats, Shelley, Stevens) or take the form of concrete poetry (Apollinaire, Cummings, Chopin); the Surrealist collage novel (Max Ernst, Aube Breton); graphic novel (Spiegelman, Ware, Herriman); and several contemporary artists creating visual narratives combining image and text (Simpson, Weems, Kruger, Walker). Course requirements will include midterm and final exams and several short essays.


Instructor(s): Robin Lydenberg

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4517 Seminar: Social Crisis in the Victorian Novel Fall 3
Course Description

The Victorian novel has often been criticized for being too conservative, too sentimental, and too long. In this course, we will challenge those first two premises by exploring how the dominant art form of the time registered and responded to the many social, spiritual, financial, and sexual crises that marked Queen Victoria's 64 year reign. We will attempt to make sense of the relationship between these historical crises and the novel's evolution during the nineteenth century. We will read works by such authors as Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Charlotte Bronte, Thomas Hardy, and Arthur Conan Doyle.


Instructor(s): Joshua Olivier-Mason

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Assignments will include a short paper, a research paper, and Blackboard discussions.

ENGL 4518 Reading Irish Childhood Spring 3
Course Description

“Why study Irish childhood now?” Representations of the child dominate recent Irish culture, from Oscar winning movies, to Pulitzer winning memoirs, and Booker winning novels. The course evaluates this important cultural turn while examining how understandings of the Irish child change over time. We will investigate the relationship between child and nation and ask how nostalgia and memory frame childhood. This course also considers siblings, education, play, adoption, abuse, and institutionalization. Texts include short stories by James Joyce and Kevin Barry, novels by Roddy Doyle, Anne Enright and Emma Donoghue, memoirs by Frank McCourt and Caitríona Palmer, poetry by Connie Roberts, and films and documentaries including The Butcher Boy, Philomena, and States of Fear. Students will participate in the visit to BC by Anne Enright, Kevin Barry, Caitríona Palmer and Connie Roberts.


Instructor(s): James Smith

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4522 Advanced Creative Nonfiction: Memoir, Biography, Profile Fall 3
Course Description

An advanced creative nonfiction workshop on writing memoir and literary profiles. Weekly readings by contemporary writers will serve as models for writing by each workshop member (4-5 pages of new work weekly through early November; the last month of class will focus on revision). Our emphasis will be on student writing and critique, with attention given to genre, audience, and revision. Workshop assessment and peer-review will be supplemented by conferences. Given the intensive nature of the workshop, attendance and participation are especially important. Final assessment by portfolio.


Instructor(s): Amy Boesky

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4523 4th Genre: Contemporary American Creative Nonfiction Fall 3
Course Description

The "fourth genre" refers to works of nonfiction that contain literary features more commonly associated with fiction, poetry, and drama. We will examine a few pioneers of the form, including Woolf and Thoreau, but our study will focus primarily on subgenres of contemporary American creative nonfiction, including immersion journalism, memoir, lyric essay, and travel writing. Readings will include work by Wolfe, Didion, Talese, McPhee, Dillard, Kincaid, Spiegelman, and Slater.


Instructor(s): Lad Tobin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4524 Advanced Topic Seminar: Irish Victorian Fiction Fall 3
Course Description

This class examines novels written about Ireland or by Irish authors during the Victorian period. It touches on issues such as the possession of land and relations between landlords and tenants, before and after the land war of the 1880s; the dynamics of rural society; Gothic and allegory in writing; realism in fiction; social satire and urban fiction; women novelists and the New-Woman Novel. The late nineteenth century has often been thought of as the great period for the novel in Britain and Europe. However, until recently, Irish novels from this period have been neglected for a variety of reasons, including the hostility of the Irish Revival and late twentieth-century literary criticism. Recently, however, there has been renewed interest in Irish Victorian fiction and it can open many opportunities for exciting research to scholars at all levels, including undergraduates. The class offers students the chance to write a research paper of significant length and depth.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): James Murphy

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1900 requirement

ENGL 4525 20th Century American Women Writers Fall 3
Course Description

Focusing on poetry and fiction written by American women in the last century, this course will explore issues of domesticity, work, race, power, violence, space, sexuality and embodiment, and gender. In approaching each literary text, we will aim to situate it within the context of American cultural tensions and to explore in detail its construction as a work of art that manipulates language and literary form. Writers may include Nella Larsen, Zora Neale Hurston, Anzia Yezierska, Anne Sexton, Jhumpa Lahiri, Toni Morrison, Louise Erdrich, Nicole Krauss, Lorrie Moore, Gish Jen, Marilynne Robinson, and others.


Instructor(s): Laura Tanner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4526 Shakespeare: Early Plays Fall 3
Course Description

This course will examine comedies, tragedies, and histories written by Shakespeare during the first half of his career. Plays may include The Comedy of Errors, Titus Andronicus, Richard III, Henry IV Parts I & II, Henry V, and The Merchant of Venice. We will also engage in archival research and read a variety of non-literary texts from the period in order to consider the cultural contexts in which these plays were produced and the ways that they explore notions of monarchy, gender, race, and recent royal history. We will think about how these plays resonate with modern audiences as well.


Instructor(s): Mary Crane

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills pre-1700 requirement.

ENGL 4527 Novels of the World Spring 3
Course Description

What counts as a “novel of the world”? We will focus on contemporary novels by authors across the globe. We will explore ideas, narrative structures, and styles of writers such as Mahfouz (Egypt), Marquez (Columbia), Kundera (former Czechoslovakia), Pamuk (Turkey), Hosseini (Afghanistan), Tahar Ben Jelloun (Morocco), Cha (Korea), and Coetzee (South Africa). Through close reading, we will examine the aesthetics of each novel, comparing the books as we proceed. We will be attuned to their political, social, and historical dimensions. With sensitivity, we will address questions of cultural difference. Relevant post-colonial (Said) and psychoanalytic theory (Freud, Kristeva) will be included.


Instructor(s): Frances Restuccia

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4529 Shakespeare: Later Plays Fall 3
Course Description

This is a discussion-intensive course in Shakespeare’s later plays and the culture within which they were written and performed. In addition to regular writing assignments, students will be asked to work in small groups throughout the semester to invent and produce a scene from one of the plays’ off-stage controversies. They should not take the course if their schedules cannot accommodate meeting for an hour a week outside of class to develop this project, or if they prefer not to work with a group. Plays will include: Antony and Cleopatra, Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello, All’s Well that Ends Well, and The Winter’s Tale.


Instructor(s): Caroline Bicks

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1700 requirement.

ENGL 4530 The City in Irish Literature Fall 3
Course Description

James Joyce described Dublin as "the centre of paralysis" in Ireland, a trap from which Irish writers and their characters struggle to escape. This kind of negative portrayal of the city is not uncommon in the country's literature. This course will examine representations of the city in Irish writing and will attempt to make sense of the urban landscapes these texts map. Studying poetry, prose and drama, we will address the historical and sociological contexts for these representations and the themes they evoke.


Instructor(s): Dathalinn O'Dea

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4531 Making Americans Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines the cultural diversity of American literature. It focuses on the themes of self-invention and re-invention in multi-ethnic texts with an emphasis on African American and immigrant writers. Genres and topics include: slave narratives, passing novels and the color line, coming-of-age stories, assimilation and Americanization, Orientalism, blackface performance, whiteness and the Africanist presence, transnationalism, urbanism and regionalism, multiracial and “post-race” identities, and post-9/11 immigrant experiences. Although the course will focus primarily on racial and ethnic diversity in American literature, we will also consider how gender, sexuality, and class intersect with ethno-racial difference.


Instructor(s): Lori Harrison-Kahan

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: AADS5400

Comments:

ENGL 4532 Advanced Creative Non-fiction: Text and Image Fall 3
Course Description

Through the reading and writing of creative non-fiction essays which employ both text and image, we will explore the creative tension between eye and ear that takes place in such works, as well as the implications for us as consumers of the constructed image and utterance. Students will construct four shorter essays and two longer ones. Shorter essays will focus on research and reflection concerning a single set of photographs, paintings, current political events, or steps on a pilgrimage, as suggested in texts by W.G. Sebald, Lawrence Weschler, John Berger, or Susan Sontag.


Instructor(s): Kimberly Garcia

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4533 ACNF: Writing About Place Spring 3
Course Description

Through the reading and writing of creative non-fiction essays, we will explore, chart, interrogate and depict various places in the natural and built world. Students will write and revise three ambitious, sustained essays over the course of the semester: the first about a place in nature; the second about a place with strong personal associations; and the third--a reported piece of immersion journalism--about a community or subculture in the Boston area. Readings will include work by Annie Dillard, Wendall Berry, Joy Williams, John McPhee, Joan Didion, Jamaica Kincaid and Viet Thanh Nguyen, who will visit campus this term.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Elizabeth Graver

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Enrollment by permission of instructor. Interested students should have taken a previous college level writing workshop (beyond FWS). To request admission to the course, e-mail Professor Graver (graver@bc.edu). Include a list of relevant coursework and writing experience and a 7 page (double-spaced) writing sample (preferably creative non-fiction, but fiction acceptable too. Sample may be a fragment of a longer piece). Students will be notified about admission by the first day of pre-registration.

ENGL 4534 Advanced Creative Nonfiction: Writing Across Cultures Fall 3
Course Description

Using creative non-fiction as a tool for cross-cultural inquiry, students will write a number of brief pieces and three long essays. Among the topics we will examine are the immigrant experience, the traveler's experience, and the writer as journalist-observer of a cultural "pocket" that brings you into new terrain. We will engage with the complexities of writing about a culture foreign to you, as well as the complexities of writing about your own culture(s). Students will do research, interviewing and reporting. Readings include work by Anne Fadiman, Darcy Frey, Andre Aciman, Jamaica Kincaid, Adrien LeBlanc, and Ruth Behar.


Instructor(s): Elizabeth Graver

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4536 Joyce's Ulysses Fall 3
Course Description

One class. One semester. One hugely important book. This course will be devoted to the pleasures and challenges of the 20th century's most important book, James Joyce's Ulysses. No prior knowledge of Joyce's works is required, just a willingness to tackle the difficulties of Joyce's masterpiece.


Instructor(s): Marjorie Howes

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4537 Advanced Topic Seminar: Analyzing James Joyce: A Digital Adventure Fall 3
Course Description

What’s the future for Ulysses? Can we, for example, imagine a totally immersive 3D experience? An author as prescient as Joyce deserves an approach as adventurous as we dare. In this interactive seminar we’ll design our own Digital Humanities Joycean project using all the imaginative and technical skills we can muster. Working together, we’ll bring as many analytical tools as we can to bear on this preposterous book. With mapping, network analysis, databases, and timelines, with our Oculus, and with our drone perhaps, we’ll explore and evaluate the future of Ulysses every which way we can imagine. nugentjf@bc.edu


Instructor(s): Joseph Nugent

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4539 Advanced Creative Nonfiction: Writing the Past Spring 3
Course Description

For the purposes of this course, we will define “the past” as at least 50 years ago. We will look into writing about family history, writing about an historical figure, and writing about an era by exploring a particular historic moment. Along the way, we will entertain practical questions involved in writing about the past as well as some of the more difficult philosophical ones. When, for instance, is it permissible to invent "facts"? How can we render "real" people fairly, whether they are relatives or public figures? And is it possible to avoid judging past events by present standards?


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Suzanne Berne

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4540 Advanced Creative Nonfiction: Flash Nonfiction Spring 3
Course Description

Focus on writing short (750 words or fewer) pieces of creative nonfiction in a variety of subgenres. To help us develop forms and techniques for this sort of writing, we will study and model many of our assignments on short lyric essays and prose poems in publications such as Brevity and In Short; quick profiles in New Yorker's Talk of the Town; human interest pieces in the Wall Street Journal's Middle Column; literary tweets; and flash fiction. Workshops will also be frequent and brief: each student will write and workshop a new or revised piece of short creative nonfiction weekly.


Instructor(s): Lad Tobin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4550 Advanced Nonfiction Workshop: Writing for Magazines Spring 3
Course Description

Students in this course will be selected on the basis of manuscript submission. Please submit up to 10 double-spaced pages of writing, which can be an entire piece, part of a longer piece, or a compilation of shorter ones. You can explain the nature of what you have submitted in an accompanying note. Be sure to include your name and email address. Materials should be submitted to Carlo Rotella via email (rotellca@bc.edu) as soon as possible. Students will be notified by email as to whether they have been admitted to the course.


Instructor(s): Carlo Rotella

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Permission of instructor required for admission.

ENGL 4551 Contemporary Literary and Cultural Theory Spring 3
Course Description

This course will introduce students to some major texts of contemporary theory. We will spend several weeks on psychoanalytic theory (Freud, Lacan, Kristeva). We will also read five or so essays from The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism to sample deconstruction, post-colonial theory, feminism, and other post-structuralist approaches. Theorists such as Benjamin, Foucault, and Agamben will be examined for political theory. This course is meant to enable students to participate in current national and international debates that, especially due to their political vitality, manage to touch on all literary fields.


Instructor(s): Frances Restuccia

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4552 London in the Novel Fall 3
Course Description

In some novels, London is not just a setting but a vital physical presence. Our readings will range from 19th century London in Charles Dickens's Our Mutual Friend and George Gissing's The Nether World, to early 20th century works like in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway and Sam Selvon's The Lonely Londoners, to later 20th century works like Penelope Lively's City of the Mind. We'll consider how a huge metropolis can be represented in fiction, the human connections enabled or disabled by urban spaces, and the history of war, immigration, and urban improvement that dramatically changed London between 1850 and 2000.


Instructor(s): Rosemarie Bodenheimer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4553 Advanced Creative Nonfiction: Writing the Service Experience Fall 3
Course Description

Can the service experience be accurately, compellingly, humanely articulated? This course invites students who have participated in service (local, domestic, and/or international) to recall and rewrite their experience, ever mindful of the traps of easy assumptions and condescension. Students will practice a range of techniques (descriptive writing, interviews, activist writing). We will read nonfiction writing about place and people (George Orwell to David Eggers; John Hersey to Nicole LeBlanc), and look to philosophical/theological texts for assistance and context. Students will leave the course with a portfolio of pieces about people, place, and service.


Instructor(s): Eileen Donovan-Kranz

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4557 Modern American Poetry and Poetics, 1914-1930 Fall 3
Course Description

An analysis of the rise of Modern American Poetry in the period between the early work of Pound (Personae and the early Cantos) and Eliot (Prufrock and The Waste Land), and the publication of Hart Crane's The Bridge (1930). Among the other poets we will study are such forerunners as Whitman, Dickinson, Hardy and Hopkins, as well as Yeats, the WWI poets, Robinson, Frost, Stevens, W.C. Williams, Edna St. Vincent Millais, Marianne Moore, H.D., Mina Loy, Langston Hughes and the Harlem Renaissance, and Cummings, and look at the effects of Experimental Art and Jazz on the poets of the time.


Instructor(s): Paul Mariani

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4558 Advanced Creative Nonfiction: Writing the Other/Writing the Self Spring 3
Course Description

Memoir writing is one of the most popular forms of creative writing today. It offers an opportunity to make sense of a thousand shards of memory and make of them a story which no one knows better than yourself. It's a chance to make sense of family, friends, adversaries, teachers, coaches, and fellow travelers on the journey, and to see them within a larger cultural and historical context. We'll look at childhood and adult relationships and the problematics of abuse, loss, desolation, and death, as well as the possibilities for growth and renewal.


Instructor(s): Paul Mariani

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4559 African American Writing 1860-1960 Spring 3
Course Description

This course is a survey of fiction, non-fiction, and poetry by African American authors from the Civil War to the beginning of the Civil Rights movement. It includes W. E. B. DuBois's foundational The Souls of Black Folk, groundbreaking novels by Richard Wright and Ralph Ellison, searing essays by James Baldwin, and many other works by writers like Paul Laurence Dunbar, Charles Chesnutt, and Nella Larsen, representing the remarkable breadth and rich depths of accomplishment over that period. Writing for his course will include two medium-length essays, a midterm, and a final exam.


Instructor(s): James Wallace

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4560 Making it Weird: 20th Century Experiments in Literature and the Arts Spring 3
Course Description

This course will examine radical experimentation in the arts in the 20th century. We will pair early and late works to measure how far challenges to tradition can be taken: Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot and Rockabye; Gertrude Stein’s Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas and Tender Buttons; William Burroughs’ Naked Lunch and The Soft Machine. We will also study a cluster of avant-garde practitioners who worked collaboratively in the latter part of the century: the artist Marcel Duchamp, the composer John Cage, and the choreographer Merce Cunningham, all of whom used elements of chance in their work.


Instructor(s): Robin Lydenberg

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4577 Writing Workshop: Poetry Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

A course in writing poetry in a variety of forms, with an emphasis on craft and revision. Students will produce roughly one poem a week and will workshop each other's drafts in group discussion.


Instructor(s): Kim Garcia and Allison Adair

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4579 Writing Workshop: Fiction Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Students in this course will study and practice elements of fiction writing: character development, point of view, voice, setting, imagery, sentence design, plot, pacing, and the use of time in a narrative. Enrollment in the course commits students to intensive writing, both in class and out, and full participation in the workshop editing process. Class time will be used for discussion of models from our anthology, in-class writing exercises, and group workshop focused on student writing. In addition to the feedback writers receive in workshop, they will meet with the instructor for editing conferences throughout the semester. Students will submit a final portfolio of polished, revised fiction.


Instructor(s): Suzanne Matson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Enrollment limited to 15.

ENGL 4580 Fiction: Second Workshop Fall/Spring 3
Course Description


Instructor(s): DEPT

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4583 Advanced Creative Nonfiction Workshop: Memoir & Autobiography Fall 3
Course Description

WRITING ABOUT THE PAST

Patricia Hampl's definition of memoir as "the intersection of narration and reflection, of story-telling and essay-writing" will serve as the stylistic foundation for this course, which focuses on using personal history to unlock events in general history. We will progress from writing about family background (memoir), to writing about an historical figure or someone connected to an historic event (biography), to writing about an era through exploring a particular historic moment (social history). Along the way, we will entertain practical questions involved in writing about the past as well as moral and philosophical ones.


Instructor(s): Suzanne Berne

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4584 Seminar: Science Fiction: Past Futures Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar considers a century's worth of science fiction novels envisioning human futures; we'll think about historical reasons for the rise and development of the field itself too. Opening conversations about books like Last and First Men will raise the question whether humankind has a future: readings will stage debates about future love and gender, war and social order, technology and psychology, nostalgia and progress. Classics from The Time Machine, Brave New World and Martian Chronicles through Dune and Neuromancer, with a look at more recent sci fi novels and research projects on other texts and films.


Instructor(s): Judith Wilt

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4586 Travel Tales of Empire Spring 3
Course Description

Strange places change us, alter the way we experience the world. We'll examine novels of exploration by authors such as Conrad, Forster, Orwell, and Sebald to uncover the shifts that happen to us when cast into new environments, when assailed by unexpected sensations. Studying how these authors saw, tasted, and smelt faraway cultures tells us about our own adventures into unknown places. Sensation will be our focus in a class that emphasizes participation, mapping, and the pleasures and hazards of travel.


Instructor(s): Joseph Nugent

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4588 Business Writing Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course is designed to expose students to the type of writing done on the job. It is a practical course where real-life examples are used to illustrate appropriate writing strategies, style, language and formats commonly found in a business setting. By the end of the semester, students will be proficient in producing business correspondence, instructions, reports, proposals, resumes, and presentation materials.


Instructor(s): Randi Triant

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: For Carroll School of Management students, the course is also available as BCOM6688.

ENGL 4593 Advanced Colloquium in Women's Studies Spring 3
Course Description

This is an interdisciplinary seminar required of those completing the Women's Studies Minor, taught by members of the Women's Studies Program. It is open only to senior Women's Studies minors. Components traditionally include readings in important new fields of feminist interest and on significant contemporary issues in feminism and Women's Studies.


Instructor(s): Caroline Bicks

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4599 Undergraduate Reading and Research Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4618 Seminar: Star-Crossed Lovers and the Novel Spring 3
Course Description

The tragedy of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliethas continued to haunt literature from its inception to the present day. By reading primarily 19th and 20th C novels, we will seek to understand the various psychological, religious, sexual, social, and political grounds by which these essential human relationships fail. Works may include George Eliot's The Mill on the Floss, Thomas Hardy's Tess of the D'urbervilles, Henry James's The Portrait of a Lady, and Ian McEwan's Atonement.


Instructor(s): Beth Tressler

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Course Fulfills Pre-1900 requirement.

ENGL 4624 Reading Visual Culture Fall 3
Course Description

This course is an introduction to some aspects of the emerging field of Visual Culture. Among the areas we may explore are painting, photography, installation and performance art, texts incorporating word and image, public art, advertising, architecture. We will study how images are used both to impose and to subvert dominant constructions of race, class, gender and sexuality. We will be exploring these issues across a range of disciplines: In philosophy, history, literature, aesthetics, psychoanalysis, anthropology, sociology.


Instructor(s): Robin Lydenberg

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4625 Seminar: Toni Morrison Spring 3
Course Description

Through Toni Morrison's oeuvre, readers can explore a variety of North American cultural and historical preoccupations, particularly as interpreted through an African American purview. In this course we will explore thematic and artistic concerns that arise in Morrison's fiction and nonfiction and thus gain insight into the culture of the United States. The following themes shape this course: dominant cultural mores and their impact (The Bluest Eye); legacies of slavery (Beloved); culture as a sustaining force (Song of Solomon); women's responses to patriarchy (Sula); homogenizing impulses in dominant culture (Tar Baby); creation and use of culture (Jazz).


Instructor(s): Rhonda Frederick

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: AADS4625

Comments:

ENGL 4626 American Studies Senior Seminar: Studies in American Culture Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

In this seminar, which also draws on elements of a writing workshop and a course in methodology, we examine selected subjects in American culture: music, landscape, sport, work, childhood, crime, and more. Seeking to develop effective ways to balance storytelling and interpretation, character and argument, we draw on a variety of models for approaching the problem of writing analytically about culture. Authors on the syllabus may include Tom Wolfe, Anne Fadiman, William Finnegan, Jennifer Price, Henry Louis Gates Jr., David Simon, and Edward Burns.


Instructor(s): Carlo Rotella and Lynne Feeley

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Admission by permission of instructor

ENGL 4627 Capstone: Ways of Knowing Spring 3
Course Description

This course considers the workings of memory and the transmutation of memory into narratives that express values and explore identity on the personal, national, and cultural level; in literary and historical texts, films, and photographs; in and public memorials. We reflect on and create memory texts of various kinds; explore the influence of personal, social, and historical experiences on the construction of memory; observe the languages available for the expression of memory; and seek, through writing and discussion, to discern ways in which the process of remembering can unfold toward the future.


Instructor(s): Carol Hurd Green

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: UNCP5513

Comments: You can take a Capstone class only as a senior or second-semester junior.
Capstone classes may not be taken Pass/Fail.
You may take only one Capstone class before graduation.

ENGL 4628 Capstone: Five Heroic Americans Spring 3
Course Description

This course will examine the writings of two American women and three American men whose intellectual and spiritual gifts have enriched our heritage. We will read: Thoreau’s journals; poems by Emily Dickinson and Robert Frost; essays by Emerson; and selections from Mary Rowlandson’s account of her capture by the Quabog Indians. Students will discuss their observations in light of the Capstone program: relationships; work; civic responsibility; and spirituality.


Instructor(s): Fr. Robert Farrell, S.J.

Prerequisites: Seniors only.

Cross listed with: UNCP5567

Comments: Capstone classes may NOT be taken Pass/Fail. You may take only ONE Capstone class before graduation.

ENGL 4629 Advanced Topic Seminar: Romantic Writing Spring 3
Course Description

Although many have regarded the British Romantic era as an age of poetry, the writers of the time produced original works in a number of different genres and devised new forms of writing as well. In this course we will read poems of many kinds as well as poetic drama, criticism, satire, short fiction, essays, polemical writing, memoirs, journals and letters. Writers studied will include Blake, Wollstonecraft, Equiano, Barbauld, Robinson, the Wordsworths, Baillie, Coleridge, De Quincey, Byron, the Shelleys, Hemans, Keats, and Landon. We will also read critical essays each week and build towards a final research paper.


Instructor(s): Alan Richardson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4630 Capstone: Passages Fall 3
Course Description

In our passages through this enigmatic world we reflect on the vision of St. Theresa of Avila, "All things pass; only God remains." Life embraces us in paradox. Through novel, poetry, short story and essay the many writers considered in this Capstone, including Ann Tyler, Willa Cather, Judith Guest, Marcus Aurelius, Emily Dickinson and Robert Frost, will share their insights with us and help us to appreciate the Capstone ideals of wholesome relationships, generous citizenship, spiritual development and joy in work.


Instructor(s): Robert Farrell, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: UNAS5538

Comments:

ENGL 4631 Capstone: Mindfulness & Storytelling Spring 3
Course Description

This course will invite students to reflect on their humanity by exploring storytelling and naming through various methods. Via reading short stories and essays, we will engage how others name the world in an effort to change it. By interviewing an elder, we will learn awareness and skills of listening to inform our own views of life. And via a focus on mindfulness— nonjudgmental awareness of the present moment while observing one’s thoughts, emotions, and reactions—we will engage our own internal storytelling to reflect on ways our inner rhetoric can help us or hold us back.


Instructor(s): Paula Mathieu

Prerequisites: Seniors only

Cross listed with: UNCP5568

Comments: Capstone classes may NOT be taken Pass/Fail. You may take only ONE Capstone class before graduation.

ENGL 4632 Advanced Topics Seminar: Friendship, Love & Social Taboo Spring 3
Course Description

This course will explore why taboo-defying relationships—in particular, interracial friendships and romances, interfaith marriages, adultery, incest, and same-sex love—have been central to American literature and cultural history. Beginning with classic nineteenth-century works by writers such as James Fenimore Cooper, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Walt Whitman, and Mark Twain, the course will move on to a study of twentieth-century writers such as Israel Zangwill, W. E. B. Du Bois, Nella Larsen, William Faulkner, James Baldwin, and Alice Walker and of cultural texts such as West Side Story and Lone Star. Readings will include literary criticism, theory, and historical documents.


Instructor(s): Lori Harrison-Kahan

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4637 Capstone: Vision Quest: A Multicultural Approach Fall 3
Course Description

You can take a Capstone class only as a senior or second-semester junior. Capstone classes may not be taken Pass/Fail. You may take only one Capstone class before graduation.
This course will use the Vision Quest, a Native American ritual for finding oneself, as a metaphor for students’ four years at Boston College. Relating their own lives to the lives of the characters in the books, who have all gone on some variation of a quest, students will explore the ways their education and experiences at college have influenced their ideas of community, work, spirituality and relationships, and have prepared them to face the great mystery of life ahead. The main texts include The Grass Dancer, The Life of Pi, Their Eyes Were Watching God, The Bonesetter's Daughter, and The House on Mango Street. Films include Thunderheart and The Whale Rider. Personal reflection papers and class participation are a main component of this course.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Dorothy Miller

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: UNCP5544

Comments: You can take a Capstone class only as a senior or second-semester junior. Capstone classes may not be taken Pass/Fail. You may take only one Capstone class before graduation.

ENGL 4645 American Nature Writing Spring 3
Course Description

In this course we will read literature from the perspective of the fact that when we read a book we are holding a dead tree. Many of the authors we will encounter, however, are themselves aware of this perspective and use it in their work to raise questions about the relation between humanity, or culture, and nature. Our texts will represent a variety of genres (poetry, essay, fiction), and our authors will include Emerson and Thoreau, as well as such recent writers as Edward Abbey, Annie Dillard, Wendell Berry, and Gary Snyder (among others).


Instructor(s): Robert Kern

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4661 American Studies Honors Thesis Spring 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4670 Capstone: Into the Woods Fall 3
Course Description

All readers, young and old, share the wonder in fairy tales. This serves a deeper purpose: to experiment and learn our boundaries and responsibilities. There are dangers in woods, but Red Riding Hood learns a lot, frees herself, and embarks upon life. The symbolic journey into the woods allows seniors to leaves the "woods of BC" with optimism and commitment. How will you negotiate transitions into society with the wisdom from your journey here?


Instructor(s): Bonnie Rudner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: UNCP5541

Comments: You can take a Capstone class only as a senior or second-semester junior.
Capstone classes may not be taken Pass/Fail.
You may take only one Capstone class before graduation.

ENGL 4671 Magazine Production and Publishing Fall 3
Course Description

This course will explore magazine publishing from both a critical standpoint and a practical one. We’ll conduct a comprehensive study of the medium and learn basic industry skills; these will include fundamentals of writing and editing, entry-level design concepts and principles of new media. ENGL4671 is taught in conjunction with Post Road Magazine (postroadmag.com), so special emphasis will be placed on literary journals. Students will work as interns at Post Road for the duration of the course, thereby gaining real-world publishing experience and putting their new skills to the test.


Instructor(s): Christopher Boucher

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4696 Dante's "Divine Comedy" in Translation Fall 3
Course Description

An introduction to and critical reading of the "Divine Comedy" (in English translation), one of the world's greatest epic poems, produced by "the chief imagination of Christendom" (Yeats). Dante's journey through Hell, Purgatory, and Paradise will be analyzed at its multiple levels of interpretation: literal and allegorical, theological, philosophical, political, and literary. Compendium of an entire epoch of European civilization, the "Comedy" will also be interrogated for its responses to the fundamental questions of human existence: God, the Cosmos, the Self, Good and Evil, Right and Wrong, Suffering, and Happiness.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Laurie Shepard

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: THEO5559 PHIL5508 ITAL5526

Comments: Conducted in English. Elective for Italian major or minor.

ENGL 4899 Hacking the Humanities: Programming and Analysis for Literary and Historical Studies Fall 3
Course Description

This course will introduce humanities students to a variety of digital research methods. Students will learn the basics of Python programming for literary and historical studies, encounter a number of tools widely used by digital humanists (such as MALLET, Gephi, and GIS programs), and engage with theoretical works that underpin the field. While we will encounter open questions and the epistemological justification for digital research, this class is primarily a methods one. After completing this course, students will be able build or apply digital tools in their own research. Designed for graduate students/upper-level undergraduates. No programming or command-line experience required.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4902 Advanced Topic Seminar: Contemporary Novels of the World Spring 3
Course Description

Focus on contemporary novels by authors from various places across the globe. We will explore the ideas, narrative structures, and styles of writers such as Mahfouz (Egypt), Kundera (former Czechoslovakia), Sebald (Germany), Pamuk (Turkey), Hosseini (Afghanistan), Tahar Ben Jelloun (Morocco), and Coetzee (South Africa). Through close reading, we will examine the aesthetic dimension of each novel, comparing the books as we proceed. We will also be attuned to their political, social, and historical dimensions. With as much sensitivity as possible, we will address questions of cultural difference. Relevant post-colonial and psychoanalytic theory will also be included.


Instructor(s): Frances Restuccia

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4904 Advanced Topic Seminar: Emily Dickinson Fall 3
Course Description

The old idea that Emily Dickinson's originality and poetic genius arose from her separation from the world around her is far too simple. It encourages us to think of Dickinson condescendingly, as a natural wonder rather than an educated and self-conscious artist; moreover, this idea causes us to miss some of Dickinson's most interesting meanings. She was, in fact, thoroughly versed in the science and politics of her day, acquainted with a good number of contemporary writers, and aware of many more, fascinated (though often with satirical intent) by the whims of fashion.


Instructor(s): John Anderson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1900 requirement.
Fulfills the Women Writers requirement for LSOE.

ENGL 4905 Advanced Topic Seminar: Making Sex in Early Modern England Spring 3
Course Description

The early modern period witnessed a literary explosion; it was also a time when definitions of masculinity and femininity were especially fluid. Authors like Christopher Marlowe, Shakespeare, and Margaret Cavendish were writing their poetry and plays while medical writers, religious leaders, politicians, and everyday folk were actively debating what "made" someone a man or a woman and how this should guide one's actions. We will be reading a variety of these literary and non-literary texts so that we can investigate how these often contradictory theories of sex and gender difference informed the period's complex representations of bodies and their behaviors.


Instructor(s): Caroline Bicks

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4906 Advanced Topic Seminar: Futures Past: Time and History in Modernism Spring 3
Course Description

In this class, we will examine how modernist novelists, poets, filmmakers, and philosophers struggled to master or to escape the past, how these struggles resulted in modernism's creative representations of time and history, and how these representations continue to influence our contemporary understanding of artistic innovation and political transformation. Texts to be discussed will most likely include works by Charles Baudelaire, Walter Benjamin, Henri Bergson, Sergei Eisenstein, T. S. Eliot, Wyndham Lewis, Karl Marx, Friedrich Nietzsche, and Virginia Woolf.


Instructor(s): Robert Lehman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4907 Advanced Topic Seminar: Irish Gothic Fall 3
Course Description

Ghosts and vampires, lunatics and criminals, human corruption and supernatural punishment: these things have fascinated generations of Irish writers and readers. This advanced seminar will investigate why Ireland produced such a rich tradition of Gothic literature, beginning in the early nineteenth century and continuing right up to the present. We will also explore various critical and theoretical approaches to the genre: political, historical, psychological, sexual, and religious. Writers to be studied include Maria Edgeworth, Sheridan LeFanu, Charles Maturin, Bram Stoker, Oscar Wilde, Elizabeth Bowen, and Patrick McCabe.


Instructor(s): Marjorie Howes

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4908 Advanced Creative Nonfiction: Writing the Body in Illness and Health Spring 3
Course Description

This workshop will explore ideas of "health" and "illness," reading nonfiction by Skloot, Groopman, Gawande, Farmer, Fadiman, and others while honing our own writing on these topics. What constitutes "health," and why (especially in women's magazines) is it paired with "beauty"? How is `disease’ defined and can nonfiction challenge extant medical perceptions? Weekly writing assignments in a range of genres (op eds, memoir essays, profiles, and essays on health-related topics) and detailed workshop critiques will help participants to develop a portfolio on topics related to these issues and to polish one longer piece with an eye toward publication.


Instructor(s): Amy Boesky

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4909 Advanced Seminar: Sensibility, Sentiment, and Sensation in the 19th Century Spring 3
Course Description

What is feeling too much, or too little? Can the mind be separated from the body? Is the brain a purely material explanation for our thoughts? Are emotions gendered? These questions animated nineteenth-century thinkers and writers, and remain puzzling today. This course will move roughly chronologically through three nineteenth-century British accounts of the relationship between thoughts and feelings: sensibility, sentiment, and sensation. Our texts will include three central novels (Austen's Sense and Sensibility, Dickens's A Christmas Carol, and Collins's The Woman in White), a range of poems and reviews, and medical, psychological, and philosophical treatises.


Instructor(s): Maia McAleavey

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Interested students should contact the instructor for permission to enroll.

ENGL 4910 Advanced Seminar: Medieval English Mystics Fall 3
Course Description

Writings about mystical experience are among the most vivid, emotional, and controversial medieval literature. Mystics' inner lives distinguished them sharply from their fellow Christians, and their external behavior often threatened the religious and secular institutions of their day. Mysticism also provided a mode in which women could express intense devotion, a kind of selfhood, and often erotic longing. We will read English mystical writing from the eleventh to fourteenth centuries, including Richard Rolle, Walter Hilton, The Cloud of Unknowing, Julian of Norwich, and Margery Kempe. All texts will be read in Middle English, but no previous knowledge is required.


Instructor(s): Robert Stanton

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Prerequisite: One pre-1700 course in English.

ENGL 4911 Advanced Topic Seminar: The Crises of the 19th Century: Society, Gender and Belief Fall 3
Course Description

Nineteenth-Century Britain went through a series of rapid changes in religious belief, gender roles, sexuality, national self-definition, and social organization. Writers experienced these changes as "crises" in faith and values. This course traces the debates and personal experiences of these changes in the poetry and prose of the period—by writers including Thomas Carlyle, Matthew Arnold, John Ruskin, John Henry Cardinal Newman, Charles Kingsley, Harriet Martineau, Margaret Oliphant, Annie Besant, Thomas Hardy, Walter Pater, Oscar Wilde, and Edmund Gosse.


Instructor(s): James Najarian

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4912 Advanced Topic Seminar: Whiteness and the Narratives of Race Fall 3
Course Description

Do races exist? Is "White" a color like "Black" or "Asian" or "Hispanic"? What is whiteness and why is it the norm against which "people of color" are identified? What is the relation between race and nationality, or race and language group? Given its competing definitions, how should we understand the term "racism"? This seminar will discuss legal, political and cultural theories about race and racism in relation to narratives from around the world. Our goal is to understand how color, nationality and identity become political by probing the underlying logic of social inequality.


Instructor(s): Kalpana Seshadri

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4913 Advanced Topic Seminar: Disability Studies Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar will consider constructions of “norms” and otherness in literature and culture. Readings will include theoretical texts by Foucault, Lennard Davis, Elizabeth Grosz, Tom Shakespeare, Simi Linton, Rosemarie Garland-Thomson, and Tobin Siebers, among others. Literature from several periods and perspectives (including Philoctetes, Richard III, and The Elephant Man) will supplement our exploration of the dynamic (and problematic) representations of able-bodiedness as well as disability. Responsibilities will include contributions to a shared class blog, short critical exercises, attendance at occasional films, and a final substantive critical paper.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Amy Boesky

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: TAMI course: Fulfills the Theory requirement.

ENGL 4914 Advanced Topic Seminar: Aesthetic (Re)Turns Spring 3
Course Description

In this interdisciplinary course, we will examine the dawn of modern aesthetics, its transformation into a "philosophy of art," its apparent destruction at the hands of Marxist and Post-Structuralist critics, and its contemporary rebirth. Topics to be addressed will include: the move from subjective claims about taste to objective claims about beauty; the relationship between aesthetic experience and political activity; and the so-called "end of art." This course should be of interest to students of literature, music, visual art, and philosophy.


Instructor(s): Robert Lehman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4915 Advanced Fiction Writing Workshop Spring 3
Course Description

This course is open to sophomores, juniors and seniors (not freshmen), who will be selected on the basis of manuscript submission. Students should submit up to 8 double-spaced pages of writing (your submission may be part of a larger piece; if so, indicate this on the manuscript), along with a paragraph explaining your interest in the course and a list of other college level writing workshops you have taken, with instructors and grades. Ideally, the writing sample will be fiction, but if your strongest writing is in creative non-fiction or poetry or drama, that is also acceptable, though prose is encouraged. Include your e-mail address. Materials should be submitted via email to Christopher Boucher by no later than November 1 at 5 pm. Students will be notified by e-mail by November 9, 2017 as to whether or not they have been admitted to the course.


Instructor(s): Christopher Boucher

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor required

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4916 Advanced Seminar: Hawthorne and Melville Fall 3
Course Description

Hawthorne and Melville, two great writers of the American Renaissance, were also friends and mutual inspirations. This course engages not only their important works, each in light of the other's influences, but also their correspondence, their relation to contemporary movements (e. g. Transcendentalism) and events (e. g. the Mexican War), biographical materials, and the literary-critical tradition each has generated. Where possible we will use Norton Critical editions or other "cultural" editions of the works, and we will explore resources on-line as well. This course is a seminar, with oral presentations, shorter writings, and a research paper of approximately 20 pages.


Instructor(s): James Wallace

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Interested students should contact the instructor for permission to enroll.
Students must have taken EN141 or a comparable course to enroll.

ENGL 4917 Advanced Poetry Workshop Spring 3
Course Description

This is a workshop for those who already have some experience writing poetry, and who wish to work intensively on matters of craft and revision. Students will produce roughly two poems a week, responding to each other’s drafts in workshop discussion. Though the bulk of class discussion will be about student writing, some class time will be devoted to a discussion of useful models and what they can teach us about strategy and craft. Short in-class exercises will be given weekly as prompts to begin the writing process. In ongoing consultation with the instructor about which poets might interest them most, students will devise their own reading list of contemporary poets and keep a response journal. In at least two half-hour conferences over the semester, each student will be given individual feedback on a packet of revisions. The final project will be a chapbook of at least twelve revised poems produced over the semester, culled from around 25 drafts produced in and out of class.


Instructor(s): Suzanne Matson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: No application process or prerequisite is required, but previous workshop experience is advised.

ENGL 4918 Advanced Topic Seminar: Literary Boston Spring 3
Course Description

Walk the streets of Old Boston in this course that explores familiar and forgotten chapters of literary history. Spend a night at the Federal Street Theatre during the 1790s. Search early Boston magazines for forgotten treasures. Meet the poet buried on Boston Common. Find out why Edgar Allan Poe called members of the Boston literati “Frog-Pondians.” And watch the American Renaissance flower. Authors studied will include Judith Sargent Murray, Lydia Maria Child, Charles Sprague, David Walker, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Poe—Bostonians all! Visits to literary sites and explorations of archival materials will help transport us back in time. In connection with their term essays, students will do research for an exhibition on literary Boston that will run at the Burns Library in the autumn of 2015.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Paul Lewis

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1900 requirement

ENGL 4919 Advanced Topic Seminar: Forgotten Chapters in Boston's Literary History Fall 3
Course Description

This experimental course is linked to an exhibition with the same name that will run in the spring and summer of 2012 at the Boston Public Library, the Massachusetts Historical Society and Boston College. Each of the "forgotten chapters" will deal with a writer, editor, genre, or event in the rich literary history of Boston between 1790 and 1860. Students will help design the exhibition by researching topics and finding objects (books, periodicals, manuscripts, images) that will help convey ideas to viewers. Open to English majors, American Studies minors, and others motivated by irresistible enthusiasm.


Instructor(s): Paul Lewis

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Permission of the instructor required.

ENGL 4920 Advanced Topic Seminar: Violent Relations in the Middle Ages Spring 3
Course Description

Does violence destroy human relationships, or does it help to create them? In this course, we'll investigate both socially constructive and destructive aspects of violence in the Middle Ages, as represented in imaginative writings ranging from cannibalistic Crusader epics to comic tales of domestic mayhem, from Arthurian romance to meditations on Christ's Passion. In exploring the social value of violence as well as its harm, we'll better understand why violence was central to medieval society and what viable alternatives literature proposed—issues still relevant to the critique of violence today. Medieval readings accompanied by modern theorizations of violence.


Instructor(s): Julie Orlemanski

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4921 Advanced Independent Research Fall/Spring 6
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Frances Restuccia

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4922 Advanced Topic Seminar: 20th Century Women Poets Fall 3
Course Description

How do women poets situate their voices with respect to poetic tradition and all it implies? We’ll begin to answer this by contextualizing H. D., Marianne Moore, and Elizabeth Bishop within modernist frameworks, then consider how they served as influences, models, or foils for a middle generation of female poets (Sylvia Plath, Anne Sexton, and Adrienne Rich) who broke new ground in terms of claiming a self-authorizing voice and gendered subjectivity. Finally, we’ll examine a wide range of contemporary women poets who perform a freedom from gendered constraints that their poetic foremothers Anne Bradstreet and Emily Dickinson could have only dreamed of.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Suzanne Matson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4923 Advanced Topic Seminar: Topics in Theory Spring 3
Course Description

In this course we will wander into the high altitudes of contemporary theory, exploring some key concepts that have been particularly influential on literary studies in recent decades. We will explore such topics as "Hybridity and the Other," "The Uncanny," "The Construction of the Subject: From Narcissism to Gender, Race and Class," and "Problems in Representation: Visual and Textual." These issues will be approached from multiple perspectives including, but not limited to, deconstruction, gender theory, queer theory, psychoanalysis, and cultural studies. Readings will likely include texts by Derrida, Lacan, Freud, Kristeva, Barthes, Mercer, Bal, hooks and others.


Instructor(s): Robin Lydenberg

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4924 Advanced Topic Seminar: American Modernism Fall 3
Course Description

This course will explore the narrative and poetic strategies that writers between the first and second world wars employ to represent issues including family, space, objects, trauma, war, commodity culture, gender, race and class. As we explore the role of literature in picking up the pieces of American life after the First World War, we will focus on the way in which modern poets and novelists come to view the relationship between language and lived experience. The class will focus on a range of writers including Faulkner, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Hurston, Larsen, Stein, Eliot, Williams, Stevens and West.


Instructor(s): Laura Tanner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Admission by permission of instructor.

ENGL 4925 Advanced Topic Seminar: Literary Approaches to the Past Spring 3
Course Description

This course is a study of literary narratives set in the distant past. Students will become familiar with a variety of genres of writing over 500 years of literary history. Questions to be addressed include: How and why do authors imagine the past? Is anachronism always an error? Is the past knowable, and is the literature of the past a good way to get to know it? We consider why an array of writers, including Thomas Malory, William Shakespeare, and Mark Twain, chose to tell tales of long ago.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Eric Weiskott

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1900 requirement.

ENGL 4931 Advanced Topic Seminar: Proust Spring 3
Course Description

A semester-long course on Proust’s A la recherche du temps perdu. The primary text will be the Moncrieff-Kilmartin translation, but students who can read French will be encouraged to read it in the original. During the semester, we will make our way through Proust’s monumental, but sometimes deceptively accessible, novel.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kevin Ohi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4933 Advanced Topic Seminar: Psychoanalysis and Literature as Dreams, Phobias and the Uncanny Fall 3
Course Description

In this course we will explore the intersection of psychoanalysis and literature by studying both psychoanalytic approaches to narrative fiction and the use of narrative techniques in theoretical and clinical psychoanalytic material. Our primary readings will include texts by Freud and Lacan as well as several literary works they discuss in detail. Secondary criticism responding to their work will bring us into contact with a wider range of psychoanalytic and other theoretical approaches as we explore a range of issues in dream interpretation, case studies, literary interpretation, and art criticism.


Instructor(s): Robin Lydenberg

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4934 Advanced Topic Seminar: Digital Dubliners and the Literary Future Fall 3
Course Description

Bring your critical, creative, writing, and visual expertise to bear on the future of Digital Humanities while developing skills for tomorrow. This is a unique opportunity to construct, edit, and e-publish, for iPad, a critical edition of Joyce's Dubliners incorporating sound, images, video, and text. The data you'll research, and your own critical essays and annotations will be published and sold on iBooks. With the methodological and conceptual issues encountered, we'll interrogate the future of e-publishing, the book, and of the literary imagination. Edited and authored by you, the book will be called The Dubliner's Guide for Students by Students.


Instructor(s): Joseph Nugent

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4935 Writing and Composition Pedagogy for Secondary School Teachers Spring 3
Course Description

Students will attend and observe a section of First-Year Writing Seminar (FWS) to understand different methods and approaches for teaching writing. The students will then meet once a week to discuss how and if some of these approaches might be adapted for use in a high- school or middle-school course. Finally, students will develop 3-4 writing assignments or activities that could be used in a high- school or middle school setting. The course is open to juniors, seniors and graduate students. For more information about the course and the FWS schedule, please email Trese Ainsworth at ainswor@bc.edu.


Instructor(s): Treseanne Ainsworth

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course is designed to give future secondary school teachers a stronger background in the practice of teaching writing.

ENGL 4938 Advanced Topic Seminar: The Whitman Tradition Fall 3
Course Description

Our effort here will be to define and trace the development of a distinctive tradition in American poetry grounded in the formal strategies and philosophical assumptions of Whitman's Leaves of Grass, characterized by free verse, long lines, a radically democratic, anti-hierarchical ethos, and the call of the open road. To what extent, we will ask, do poets whose work looks very different from Whitman's still find a place in this tradition. Writers to be considered (other than Whitman himself) will most likely include Emerson, Dickinson, Stevens, Williams, Ginsberg, Snyder, and others.


Instructor(s): Robert Kern

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4941 Advanced Topics Seminar: Readings in Cultural Theory Spring 3
Course Description

This seminar is designed to meet the needs of students who are interested in graduate or professional school and who are seeking for that purpose an overview of the many concepts and practices of contemporary cultural and literary theory. Surveying various developments of the field during the last three decades, we'll survey Marxist, psychoanalytic, feminist, new historical, structuralist, and post-structuralist approaches to culture. Though our primary focus will be theoretical essays and books, students will also have the opportunity to apply the theories to literary and cultural texts. Theorists include: Marx, Benjamin, Althusser, Freud, Lacan, Lévi-Strauss, Barthes, Derrida, and Foucault.


Instructor(s): Elizabeth K. Wallace

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Interested students should contact the instructor for permission to enroll.

ENGL 4950 ATS: Literature of Slavery: Abolition Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar will examine the antislavery movement’s powerful impact on American literature and culture. Many nineteenth-century African American slave narratives, newspapers, and novels emerged out of and contributed to the struggle against slavery. Abolitionism also inspired bestselling novels such as Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Alongside nineteenth-century abolitionist texts, we’ll consider their lasting influence on contemporary writers, including Toni Morrison and James McBride, and in films such as 12 Years a Slave and Django Unchained. Since Boston was an important center of antislavery activism and literature, we will take advantage of libraries, museums, and other local resources throughout the semester.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Adam Lewis

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1900 requirement

ENGL 4952 Advanced Seminar: Bodies & Borders Spring 3
Course Description

How do literary narratives of the last century use bodies, objects, and space to map cultural and representational borders? How do these borders shape our understanding of concepts of identity, family, creativity, memory and home? This course will focus on the question of materiality, using literary depictions of material "things" to explore topics including gender, sexuality, trauma, technology, domesticity, ghosts, and grief. We will pair literary texts from modern and contemporary writers including Virginia Woolf, William Faulkner, Toni Morrison, Marilynne Robinson, and Don DeLillo with theoretical and philosophical studies of the body, objects, and space.


Instructor(s): Laura Tanner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Interested students should contact the instructor for permission to enroll.
Students must have completed their pre-1700 requirement.

ENGL 4954 Junior Honors Seminar Spring 3
Course Description

"Why study Irish childhood now?" Representations of the child dominate recent Irish culture, from Oscar winning movies, to Pulitzer winning memoirs, and Booker winning novels. The seminar evaluates this cultural turn. It examines how understandings of the Irish child change over time. It investigates the relationship between children and nation. It asks how nostalgia and memory frame childhood. It considers education, play, adoption, child abuse, and institutionalization. Texts include Joyce's Dubliners, novels by Kate O'Brien, Roddy Doyle, Colm Toibin and Anne Enright, memoirs by John McGahern and Hugo Hamilton, films and documentaries including The Butcher Boy and States of Fear.


Instructor(s): James Smith

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Permission of the instructor required.

ENGL 4955 ATS: Ireland: The Colonial Context Spring 3
Course Description

According to Seamus Deane, “Ireland is the only Western European country that has had both an early and a late colonial experience.” This seminar examines literary and cultural representations of the Norman invasion, the Elizabethan and Jacobean plantations, the emergence of an Anglo-Irish identity, the cultural nationalist response to imperialism, and the emergence of a post-national society. The seminar’s main objective, therefore, is to evaluate how Irish culture manifests, responds to and/or resists the colonial encounter. Particular attention is paid to the issues of language, literary tradition and literary authority, and to representations of place, gender, and identity.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): James Smith

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4956 ATS: Animal Worlds in the Middle Ages Fall 3
Course Description

This course explores the troubled boundaries between human and non-human subjects and objects in the Middle Ages. Animals provided rich symbolism for human virtues, vices, and activities, often at the cost of any subjectivity or voice, but categories distinguishing humans from animals frequently blurred or broke down, creating both crises of human identity and anomalous animal voices; we will be on the lookout for “animals” who talk or bite back. We will read a variety of medieval genres alongside works in the emerging field of Critical Animal Studies to explore the ways in which humans and animals create one another.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robert Stanton

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1700 requirement

ENGL 4967 Advanced Seminar: Irish Contemporary Writing Fall 3
Course Description

Cultual introversion characterized Ireland during World War II and after; but by the early 1960's Time magazine could report "new spirit in the oul sod." Writers had always sought radical forms to express underlying realities. Now society itself seemed intent on secularization, urbanization and an expanded role for women. However, the eruption of old conflicts in the North reminded people that not everyone was ready for change. These developments led to major works of literature. New voices were raised from within the gay and Irish-language communities; and a period of rapid globalization saw the 'worlding' of Irish writing.


Instructor(s): Declan Kiberd

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 4972 American Studies Senior Seminar: America and its Futures Fall 3
Course Description

Drawing on literary and non-literary texts, this seminar focuses on contemporary attempts to imagine the near future. We will cover issues such as the environment, energy, technological innovation, demographic change, and globalization. The seminar explores how these topics take on a different and renew urgency when we turn our gaze forward in time. We will take a special interest in the year 2050, as this is a year that is distant enough that a lot of significant changes to the ways we live ourlives will occur but close enough that it is well within our likely lifespans.


Instructor(s): Min Song

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 5001 ATS: Reading Like a Victorian Fall 3
Course Description

In this course, we will read “like Victorians” by reading four Victorian novels in their original serial installments: Wilkie Collins’s thriller The Woman in White, Anthony Trollope’s delightful Framley Parsonage, Charles Dickens’s classic Our Mutual Friend, and Charlotte Yonge’s moralistic The Clever Woman of the Family. Each was published monthly or weekly between 1859 and 1865. As we experiment with serial and simultaneous reading, we will consider these texts as they were first produced and consumed, analyzing their accompanying illustrations, articles, and advertisements. Along the way, we will imagine the experience of reading in a world new to mass literacy.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Maia McAleavey

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1900 requirement

ENGL 5002 ATS: Virtual Joyce Spring 3
Course Description

One astonishing book, one unforgettable experience, one seminar a week. Intermittently baffling, always fascinating, frequently hilarious, Joyce presents a challenge that no serious devotee of literature (not just English majors) should refuse. Along our intimate journey through the greatest novel of the Modernist movement, we’ll employ a few modern digital tools to help ask great humanistic questions. Eagerness, curiosity, and a sense of humor are the only prerequisites. The demand that I make of my reader, Joyce wrote, is that he should devote his whole life to reading my works. Don’t wait. Start now.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Joseph Nugent

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 5004 ATS: Enslaved Africans Fall 3
Course Description

This class will consider canonical 18th-century novels, plays, and visual and musical texts to explore how they have been revisited and revised in the 20th and 21st centuries. What themes seem most alive and relevant from the eighteenth-century novels and works? How have more recent authors responded to earlier themes and adapted them to serve a more modern context? What happens not only to well-known characters, but also to form, genre, and narrative technique when modern writers take up the earlier stories? What does it mean to read a literary work in its historical context? Out of its context? How do actual readers, embodied and embedded in a particular historical moment, relate to characters and their stories from long ago? How do we process and make sense of the very idea of the literary period? Texts include: Oroonoko; Robinson Crusoe, Foe, Castaway, The Martian; The Harlot’s Progress, Slammerkin; The Rake’s Progress; The Beggar’s, Three Penny Opera; and Mansfield Park.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Elizabeth Wallace

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1900 requirement

ENGL 5510 Contemporary American Women Writers Fall 3
Course Description

Focusing on literature written by American women from 1980 to the present, this course will explore issues of space, family dynamics, immigration, power, race, violence, grief, and embodiment, as well as gender. We will ask questions such as: How do these writers define space, and use literature to claim a space of their own? What is the relationship between gender and race or ethnicity, in a given text and in contemporary American culture? How do women writers represent the intangible dynamics of emotional connection and loss? How does fiction represent changing experiences of embodiment, including pregnancy, obesity, illness, and aging?


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Laura Tanner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 5513 American Studies Senior Seminar Spring 3
Course Description

Where in the world is American Studies? That is the central question we will take up in this seminar, and we will attempt to answer it by exploring different accounts of Americans traveling and living abroad as sailors, exiles, soldiers, expatriates, and tourists. Through a selection of readings and films, we will consider the ways in which American identities and cultures from the nineteenth to the mid-twentieth centuries take shape and transform through different global encounters.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Adam Lewis

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 5517 Capstone: Love and Indoctrination: A Foundation for the Rest of Your Life Spring 3
Course Description

In our world of political spin and fake news, the surveillance state and social media, the pressure to separate what’s real and valuable from what’s fake and mere propaganda (another way of saying “lies”) is paramount, and critical for figuring out how to live, practically, spiritually, intellectually and psychologically.

In George Orwell’s 1984, the affair of Winston Smith and Julia threatens the entire structure of Big Brother. Why? What is it about love that threatens large systems based on indoctrination? In this course we will explore and develop working definitions of both love and indoctrination in order to differentiate them.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Thomas Kaplan-Maxfield

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: UNCP5517

Comments: Capstone classes may NOT be taken Pass/Fail. You may take only ONE Capstone class before graduation.

ENGL 5524 A Poetry Practicum Spring 3
Course Description

This hands-on course explores a variety of enduring forms and genres, from blank verse to ballads to popular song and blues. In addition to studying model poems from different historic periods, weekly writing exercises will give us a practical feel for each form. The aim here is not to produce finished poems, as in workshop, but to increase our enjoyment of poetry and song by acquiring some first-hand knowledge of poetic craft. There will be a paper, midterm, and final. No previous creative writing experience is necessary (though poets are welcome), but students should have taken “Studies in Poetry.”


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Andrew Sofer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 5534 Advanced Creative Nonfiction: Writing About Family Spring 3
Course Description

Patricia Hampl's definition of memoir as "the intersection of narration and reflection" will serve as the stylistic foundation for this course on writing about family history. We will explore different practical approaches and structural techniques as we also consider moral and philosophical questions. When is it permissible to invent facts in a memoir or history? Can we ever hope to render real people fairly? How can we avoid judging past events by present standards? Our reading list will include such authors as Virginia Woolf, James Baldwin's, Maxine Hong Kingston, Vladimir Nabokov, and Mary Karr.


Instructor(s): Suzanne Berne

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 5539 Advanced Topic Seminar: History, Memory & Culture in American Literature Fall 3
Course Description

This course focuses on nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first century fiction, memoir, and experimental nonfiction, examining what writers and critics have had to say about the psychological and narrative dimensions of memory in American literature. Texts considered include Willa Cather's My Antonia (a novel made to look like a memoir); Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway's modernist fiction; Fae Mae Ng's Bone (a book narrated in reverse time); war memoirs by Stephen Crane, Dexter Filkins, or Michael Herr; and Walter Benjamin's, Tillie Olsen's or John Edgar Wideman's blending of ethnic autobiography and experimental fiction.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Christopher Wilson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 5541 Advanced Nonfiction Workshop: The Spiritual Autobiography Fall 3
Course Description

The spiritual autobiography is a literary genre whose roots go back to the writings of such thinkers as St. Augustine. Contemporary writers have evolved and developed it to include more than just the religious conversion experiences described earlier, considering grace and presence as mediated through nature, friendship, and travel. In this course, students will develop their own essays about spirituality by reading samples from the genre, but principally through workshopping of each other's texts. We'll attempt to define spirituality in a modern context as students craft essays that confront these complex questions of being.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Sue Roberts

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 5544 Advanced Creative Nonfiction: Writing About Family Fall 3
Course Description

Every family history holds a web of connections to general history, and understanding one's relationship to the past requires looking into some of those connections. In this course we will explore intersections between personal and general history through a variety of writing assignments and readings. Writing about a family heirloom, for instance, will examine how much history can be contained in an object; writing about a family photograph will consider context and time period as well as the people represented. Assigned readings will include essays by James Baldwin, Virginia Woolf, Alice Walker, and Alfred Kazin.


Instructor(s): Suzanne Berne

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 5575 Adv CNF: Writing Across Cultures Fall 3
Course Description

Students will use creative non-fiction as a tool for cross-cultural inquiry by writing three substantial essays that explore the complexities of writing in a global context. Projects may include 1) The traveler’s experience–trying to decipher the unknown, writing as a traveling "I" and "eye" 2) A literary profile of an immigrant's cross-cultural experience 3) The writer as journalist-observer of a cross-cultural "pocket" in the Boston area. Texts will be drawn from memoir, anthropology and literary journalism. Students will do interviewing and reporting, as well as produce a steady stream of writing and revision about subjects they are excited to explore. This course may be of particular interest to students with international backgrounds, Global Studies/International Studies majors/minors, and/or study abroad experience. Haitian-American author Edwidge Danticat will visit our class.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Elizabeth Graver

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Interested students should have taken a previous Boston College writing workshop (beyond FWS) or have equivalent writing experience.

ENGL 5603 Seminar in College Teaching: Women's Studies Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

See course description in the History Department.


Instructor(s): Emily McWilliams

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HIST4456

Comments: Fulfills the Women Writers requirement for EN/LSOE majors.

ENGL 6001 Male, Female, Other in Early Modern England Fall 3
Course Description

Attempts by individuals and groups to create and police gender difference tell us more about the times in which they lived, the political and social views that moved them, than the “truth” of what makes someone male or female, masculine or feminine. In this seminar, we’ll be mining the spaces in between the more conventional views of gendered bodies and behaviors that prevailed in 16th- and 17th- century England—analyzing how the “Others” who did not fit neatly into dominant categories were represented in medical, dramatic, and other popular texts.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Caroline Bicks

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1700 requirement for undergrads. Undergraduates wishing to enroll must contact the professor for permission.

ENGL 6002 Experimental Writing for Scholars Fall 3
Course Description

Scholarly work doesn't always have to lead to the usual scholarly papers, articles, and books. The range of forms of writing available to us to present our research and the knowledge available in our fields extends well beyond these standard options. In this graduate-undergraduate course, we analyze and try out for ourselves a variety of alternatives presented to us by journalism, the essay, and other traditions: profile, op-ed, explainer piece, personal essay, review essay, in memoriam, anecdote, memoir, humor, and more. Our objective is to expand our repertoire of ways to write about what we learn and to expand the audience we reach. This is primarily a writing workshop, rather than a research-intensive course. In addition to writing and workshopping every week, we will read published examples of each of the genres we study and have class visits from experts who offer their own perspective on the rich variety of forms available to the scholarly writer.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Carlo Rotella

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 6003 American Modernisms Spring 3
Course Description

This seminar will explore strategies employed by American writers between the first and second world wars to construct the modern subject in a world threatened by literal and metaphorical violence. We will focus on issues including trauma, sexuality, domestic space, technology, popular culture, race, bodies and objects. Along the way we will explore: 13 ways of looking at a blackbird; how to build a coffin in 13 steps; how Chanel No. 5 relates to Wallace Stevens’s poems; the “dream dump” of Hollywood culture; the dark landscapes of modernism (gangsters, waste lands and whorehouses); racial homelessness and exile; the trauma of modern warfare (or, how to get blown up while eating cheese); pregnancy, childbirth and abortion; dirt and desire.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Laura Tanner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 6004 Environmental Humanities Spring 3
Course Description

There has been growing scholarly interest within the humanities in thinking in a sustained and systematic way about the environment. This interest emerges from an active engagement with the present, when ecological concerns increasingly demand urgent attention, and with movements within the humanities itself for new accounts about our ability to know the physical world. This course charts the development of this interest and considers how it intersects with concerns that have been long-standing preoccupations for the humanities. Race in particular will remain an important feature of our discussions. Readings will include scholarly writings alongside important nonfictional and fictional works.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Min Song

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 6005 Knowing the Other in Early Modern England Fall 3
Course Description

In sixteenth and early seventeenth century England, people confronted new ideas, new areas of the world, and new peoples that changed their understanding of knowledge itself: what it was, where it came from, how to determine its truth value. In this course we will read primary sources that reveal how humanist education, the Protestant reformation, new science, expanded trade, and the “discovery” and colonization of the new world transformed what counted as knowledge. We will also read literary works from the period that were shaped by these issues, ranging from Thomas More’s Utopia, selections from Spenser’s Faerie Queene, plays by Marlowe, Shakespeare, and Jonson, and poems by Donne and other writers.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Mary Crane

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1700 requirement

ENGL 6600 Honors Thesis Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Amy Boesky

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 6613 Adavanced Topic Seminar: Gender and Sexuality in Victorian Literature Spring 3
Course Description

This seminar explores the constructions and the highly charged cultural significance of gender and sexuality in the literature of Victorian Britain. Readings include a selection of fiction, poetry, and prose writing by authors such as Alfred, Lord Tennyson; Emily Brontë; Elizabeth Barrett Browning; Mary Elizabeth Braddon; Dante Gabriel Rossetti; Christina Rossetti; Robert Louis Stevenson; and Thomas Hardy. Theoretical, historical, and critical readings will inform our study of Victorian gender and sexuality.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Aeron Hunt

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 6647 Irish Gothic Fall 3
Course Description

Vampires, demons, madness, imprisonment, and murder: this course investigates why, during the turbulent 19th century, Irish writers turned again and again to the macabre themes and unconventional narrative modes of the Gothic. Writers to be studied include Maria Edgeworth, Joseph Sheridan LeFanu, Charles Maturin, Bram Stoker, and Oscar Wilde.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Marjorie Howes

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies the pre-1900 requirement.

ENGL 6648 American Studies Senior Seminar: American Cultural Memory Fall 3
Course Description

In this seminar we will consider how mass media and popular culture shape how we remember (and forget) histories of labor, migration, and war, as well as local and global social movements. We will begin with some key readings on the history and practice of American Studies. From there, we’ll move through a series of case studies examining print, visual, and other cultural representations of American politics and life from the mid-nineteenth-century to the present. We will explore a rich variety of material, including museums and memorials, visual and material culture, and fiction and nonfiction, among others.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Adam Lewis

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 6675 The Art and Craft of Literary Translation: A Seminar Spring 3
Course Description

Literary translation as an art. Discussion of the history and theory of literary translation in the West and in Russia, but mainly practice in translating poetry or artistic prose from Germanic, Romance, Slavic, or Classical Languages, into English.
Conducted entirely in English as a workshop.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Maxim D. Shrayer

Prerequisites: Knowledge of a Classical, Germanic, Romance or Slavic language beyond the intermediate level

Cross listed with: RLRL8899 LING4327 SLAV4061

Comments: Permission of instructor required for undergraduates and for languages beyond those in the course description.

ENGL 6699 Seminar: Old English Spring 3
Course Description

Anglo-Saxons ruled England for 600 years, and their language is both familiar and strange. The core of English (stone, water, bone) comes from Old English, but English has changed in 900 years. Grammar is learned quickly. Then a world of literature opens up: violent poetry, mournful elegy, spiritual meditations, fanciful romance. We read Genesis, Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Bede's Ecclesiastical History, mesmerizing homilies, Boethius' Consolation of Philosophy, and unforgettable poetry: the moody elegies The Wanderer, The Wife's Lament, and The Husband's Message, the Christian psychedelia of Dream of the Rood, the cryptic remnant Wulf and Eadwacer, and the feminist Biblical narrative Judith.


Instructor(s): Robert Stanton

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1700 requirement. This course is open to both undergraduate and graduate students.

ENGL 7002 Gaslight to Noir: Writing Crime and Corruption Spring 3
Course Description

This course centers on American discourses of crime and corruption, starting with the mid-nineteenth century and extending through the early 1940s. Along with contemporary literary and cultural criticism on crime and corruption, course readings will include classic American fiction (for instance, novels by the likes of W.D. Howells, Henry Adams, Julian Hawthorne, Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burton, Mark Twain or F. Scott Fitzgerald); texts by historians (e.g. on prisons, railroads organized crime, and street crime); some social and political theory (on muckraking, corruption, on crime and policing); some journalism; and some noir fiction (e.g. by writers such as Jim Thompson, James M. Cain, Raymond Chandler). One short (4-5) essay evaluating a critical article; an ungraded in-class PowerPoint presentation; and a 10-12 page conference paper due at the end of the semester.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Christopher Wilson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7003 Game of Thrones: Medieval English Political Poetry Spring 3
Course Description

Before House Stark and House Lannister came the House of York and the House of Lancaster. The fourteenth, fifteenth, and sixteenth centuries in England witnessed a series of social and political upheavals, from the Black Death to the Wars of the Roses and the Reformation. English political poetry responds to and intervenes in these events. Political writing influenced the decisions of kings, shaped public perception of national politics, and landed people in prison (or worse). This course makes a survey of the genre, 1350-1650, with special focus on William Langland's Piers Plowman. We will read canonical authors such as Chaucer and Langland alongside little-known texts from print and manuscript archives. Topics will include periodization, multilingualism, the relationship between literature and politics, and the histories of poetic forms. No prior knowledge of Middle English required.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Eric Weiskott

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7004 Literary and Cultural Theory Spring 3
Course Description

This course introduces students to the concepts and practices of contemporary cultural and literary theory. Surveying various developments of the field during the last four decades, we will study: Marxist, psychoanalytic, feminist, new historical, structuralist, poststucturalist, and postcolonial approaches to literature and culture. Though our primary focus will be theoretical essays and books, students will also have the opportunity to apply the theories to literary and cultural texts. Possible theorists include: Marx, Althusser, Freud, Lacan, Lévi-Strauss, Derrida, Foucault, Chakrabarty, and Taussig. The course requires a series of short essays.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Elizabeth Wallace

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the Theory Requirement

ENGL 7005 The Skull and the Mirror: Theatre, Philosophy, Language Fall 3
Course Description

This course explores how theatre translates philosophical questions and predicaments into the language of the stage. Rather than tracing a chronological history, we will look at several key intersections drawn mainly from Shakespeare and modern/contemporary theatre. Our pairings (or triads) may include Plato-as-philosopher and Plato-as-dramatist; Nietzsche and Ibsen; Shakespeare and Ordinary Language Philosophy; Edward Albee and Speech-Act Theory; Beckett, Adorno, and Rancière; Neil LaBute and aesthetic theory; Tom Stoppard and epistemology; Michael Frayn and quantum uncertainty; Caryl Churchill and ethics. This class does not presume any previous background in either western philosophy or drama. All are welcome.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Andrew Sofer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7006 Global Economy, Ecology, and the Contemporary Novel Fall 3
Course Description

In our current global situation the economy and the market dominate the political sphere and direct the intimacies of social life, while fundamentally transforming the planetary environment. We shall approach this situation by a) tracing its genealogy in the industrial revolution through 19th century literature; b) engaging with economic theorists to grasp the contours of economic logics; and c) studying the impact of the global economy on the environment through world literature. The aim of this course is to draw a wide arc that will connect the economy to the environment and to the proliferation of civil conflict and inequality.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kalpana Seshadri

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7007 The Abbey Theatre Spring 3
Course Description

Dublin’s Abbey Theatre has, since the days of Yeats, been the premier showcase for new plays in Irish. Using a wide range of plays, this course will look at the history and development of the Abbey from its origins at the turn of the twentieth century to the present, with particular emphasis on the some of the controversies that have accompanied its productions, and on the theatre’s continuing relevance in the cultural life of Ireland.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Philip O'Leary

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7008 Postwar Hollywood: Film Analysis Spring 3
Course Description

This seminar focuses on Hollywood cinema of the 1940s-1960s. The first part of the course offers an introduction to the formal analysis of film, in which students develop the skills of close reading cinematic texts. The second part focuses on cultural historical readings of individual films (The Manchurian Candidate), directors (Orson Welles), genres (melodrama), and styles (film noir).


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Tina Klein

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7009 Contemporary Theorists Fall 3
Course Description

This course is an in-depth introduction to key figures and movements in Contemporary Theory, with an emphasis on live theorists working today. We will read essays (mainly from The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism) and books by theorists such as Freud, Lacan, Kristeva, and Žižek (psychoanalysis); Derrida (deconstruction); Foucault (cultural theory); Benjamin (Marxist theory); Deleuze; Said (post-colonial theory); Butler (feminism) and Mulvey (feminist film theory); along with Badiou, Nancy, Ranciere, and Agamben. You do not need to have studied Theory prior to taking this course.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Frances Restuccia

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the Theory Requirement

ENGL 7010 American Literature, Print Culture & Material Texts Spring 3
Course Description

In this seminar we will examine 18th- and 19th-century American literature with the interdisciplinary the theories and methods of print culture studies. We will explore changing notions of authorship and literary property; the relationship of format and genre; and different institutions and practices of reading. Our seminar readings will include novels, periodicals, broadsides, and other material texts from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. In addition, we will consider some recent scholarship on African American and Native American print culture, literary nationalism and the transatlantic literary marketplace, and the history of the book in America.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Adam Lewis

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7011 Race and Cultural Theory Spring 3
Course Description


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Cynthia Young

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7012 Reading in Victorian Culture Fall 3
Course Description

Victorian literature was created for newly literate masses amid an explosion of print. In this course, we will read poetry as it first appeared in magazines, consider the emergence of detective fiction, and practice reading aloud. We will read major Victorian novels serially and “sideways,” by examining articles, advertisements, and illustrations alongside the original published parts of our texts (including Wilkie Collins’s The Woman in White, Anthony Trollope’s Framley Parsonage, Charles Dickens’s Our Mutual Friend, and Charlotte Yonge’s The Clever Woman of the Family). Critical and theoretical frameworks will include reader response and reception theory, literary sociology, and book history.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Maia McAleavey

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7015 Everyday Fictions Fall 3
Course Description

This graduate seminar will focus on the representation of ordinary, everyday life in modern and contemporary fiction by writers including Ernest Hemingway, Virginia Woolf, Nella Larsen, Marilynne Robinson, Don DeLillo, Richard Ford, Jhumpa Lahiri and others. In shifting the lens of analysis from the tragic, the unexpected and the dramatic to the lived experience of the everyday, we will raise questions about the nature of literary representation, the construction of narrative, and the potential of literature to capture the rhythms of ordinary life.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Laura Tanner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7700 English Language Training for Graduate Level Students: Focus on Speech Fall 0
Course Description

Designed for students whose first language is not English, this course will emphasize the oral/aural language skills required for success in graduate work. It will provide students the opportunity to hone their speaking and listening skills through group discussions, presentations, and targeted practice in pronunciation, stress, and intonation through the reading of poetry and tongue twisters. The course may be particularly beneficial to those with teaching responsibilities at BC. Non-credit and offered free of charge by GSAS to its students during the fall semester. Students who enroll in the course are expected to attend all classes throughout the semester.


Instructor(s): Lynne Anderson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Department permission is required.

ENGL 7701 English Language Training for Graduate Level Students: Focus on Writing Spring 0
Course Description

Designed for those whose first language is not English, this course offers students practice writing in a range of academic modes including reflection, summary, analysis, and critique. Early in the semester, students will explore the composition process from brainstorming to drafting to revision to editing. Grammar is taught in the context of student writing. Several classes will be devoted to e-mail, reference letter, and proposal writing. Non-credit, offered free of charge by GSAS to its students during the spring. Department permission required. Students who enroll in the course are expected to attend all classes and complete short writing assignments weekly.


Instructor(s): Lynne Anderson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Department permission is required.

ENGL 7702 The 9/11 Novel Summer 3
Course Description

In a little more than a decade, a significant body of novels have directly addressed the 9/11 attacks and the repercussions that have followed. An even larger body of novelists have written about this subject indirectly. This course will survey these novels, reading critical works alongside them, to consider what they can tell us both about how national traumas are remembered and how singular events can have lasting consequences. We will also consider why an event like Hurricane Katrina has not generated such an outpouring of literary expression, and what might have happened if it did.


Instructor(s): Min Song

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7703 Melville and His Era Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines Melville's major fiction and poetry in the context of 19th-century social, political, and literary developments: "Young America," maritime reform, urban poverty, and popular fiction, as well as the colonial politics of American expansion and the Civil War. The basic approach in this class is informed by New Historicism, and criticism by a variety of cultural historians will be important. Corollary readings will include Poe's Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym, Maria Cummins' The Lamplighter, and Civil War poetry by Whitman and others. Work includes occasional reports and a research paper.


Instructor(s): James Wallace

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7704 Human Rights and the 20th Century Novel Fall 3
Course Description

Human Rights and the 20th-Century Novel This course presents a survey of the novel in English, from a variety of national contexts throughout the twentieth century, specifically with an eye to how novel-form mediates readers' perceptions of the concept of modern human rights. We will also spend some time on human rights in critical theory and in history.


Instructor(s): Lisa Fluet

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7705 Early Modern Poetry Fall 3
Course Description

An exploration of poetry from the Tudor and Stuart eras, according some attention to theories of genre and of editorial practice that respond to differences among poems by Shakespeare and Jonson, Donne and Milton. Concentration on developments in erotic and in religious lyrics, the emergence of satire, and the transition from manuscript culture to print publication. Other poets likely to be featured include Sidney, Spenser, the Countess of Pembroke, Herbert, and Marvell.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Dayton Haskin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7706 Medieval English Romance Fall 3
Course Description

This course reads romances as nostalgic expressions of desire: for readable national pasts, authorizing foundation myths, satisfying fantasies of gender relations. Complex questions of audience (such as the relation between "popular romance," a perceived lower/middle class, and high-status aristocratic and French texts) and cultural relations (Saxon and Celtic traditions jostled with French literary models as English re-emerged after suppression under the Normans) will help us characterize the social and political force of the genre(s). We will examine questions of gender construction, class irritation, desire for origins, and the limits of the romance genre, deploying mythography, postcolonial criticism, and orality theory.


Instructor(s): Robert Stanton

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7707 W.C. Williams and Wallace Stevens Fall 3
Course Description

Two American poets, two Modernists, who between them shaped the course of American and world poetry over the past century. From the 1910s through the 1950s, we will watch as these two interact and develop the possibilities of the Imagination, one coming to identify with the clamoring world around him, the other with the multivalent possibilities of the world within, and then back again as language dictated. Among texts by Williams we will examine Kora in Hell, Spring & All, In the American Grain, An Early Martyr and Other Poems, Adam & Eve & The City, The Desert Music, Journey to Love, and Pictures from Brueghel, and his epic, Paterson (1946—1958). Among texts by Stevens we will examine Harmonium, Ideas of Order, The Man with the Blue Guitar, Parts of a World, Transport to Summer, The Auroras of Autumn and his late poems.


Instructor(s): Paul Mariani

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7708 Crises of the 19th Century: Society, Gender and Belief Spring 3
Course Description

This course reads Victorian literature in the context of larger historical and cultural movements (often perceived as "crises") in the nineteenth century. The readings start in the 1830s, tracing Britain's political, military and Imperial ascent; they end at the very close of the nineteenth century, often seen as the apex of British economic and military power. The writers we read include Alfred Tennyson, Mary Mitford, Harriet Martineau, Henry Mayhew, Queen Victoria, Matthew Arnold, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Christina Rossetti, George Meredith, George Eliot, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, John Ruskin, Walter Pater, Lord Alfred Douglas, Edmund Gosse, and Virginia Woolf.


Instructor(s): James Najarian

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7709 Visual Culture Spring 3
Course Description

This course will introduce students to basic concepts in the field of visual culture studies. We will explore potential and limitations of a semiotic approach to reading images drawn from popular culture and high art (with help of Roland Barthes, John Berger, Mieke Bal, WJT Mitchell and others). Readings will engage with the history of seeing as it is continually transformed by technology, ideology, and various cultural institutions of knowledge and control (through Benjamin, Crary, Krauss and others). Theoretical readings will take us through methodologies and disciplines including psychoanalysis, political theory, aesthetics, deconstruction, gender studies, philosophy, and (yes, even) literature.


Instructor(s): Robin Lydenberg

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the Theory requirement

ENGL 7711 Reading and Teaching Poetry Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7712 Modern, In Theory Fall 3
Course Description

This course addresses modernism's attempts to theorize itself and its position in a wider modernity, as well as more recent attempts to characterize modernism and its afterlives. Texts will include works of literature, film, painting, and philosophy. Authors will most likely include Marx, Baudelaire, Nietzsche, Weber, Woolf, Hulme, Pound, Eliot, Greenberg, Jameson, Badiou, T. McCarthy, Malick, and Von Trier.


Instructor(s): Robert Lehman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the Theory requirement

ENGL 7713 Seminar: Talking Things in the 18th Century Spring 3
Course Description

This course reads eighteenth-century texts through the lens of "thing theory," a theoretical approach addressing how inanimate objects help to form and transform human beings. We begin with theoretical works defining the key theoretical moves of "thing theory." We will then read classic works, including Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, Pope's The Rape of the Lock, and Swift's Gulliver's Travels, alongside relevant thing theory. We also explore how human beings were treated as objects under chattel slavery. This class offers expertise in the practice of "thing theory" and knowledge of eighteenth-century texts from a number of genres.


Instructor(s): Elizabeth Wallace

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7714 Writing the Self in Early Modern England Fall 3
Course Description

A graduate seminar exploring modes of self-representation in early modern England, from portraits and personal ornaments to experimental literary forms (diaries, eye-witness accounts, martyrologies, early "lives," histories and chronicles, "defenses"). We will consider the lives (and representations) of sixteenth and seventeenth-century martyrs, royals, poets, statesmen, scientists and bigamists, among others. How is selfhood performed, re-enacted, and reformed in the period? How do early modern anxieties about the contingent nature of selfhood help to shape nascent forms of autobiography and biography? Works by More, Foxe, Hoby, Clifford, Walton, Cavendish, Pepys, and Carleton, among others.


Instructor(s): Amy Boesky

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7715 Animal Worlds in the Middle Ages Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores troubled boundaries between human and non-human subjects and objects in the literature, culture, and art of the Middle Ages. While human beings defined the nature and role of animals, those terms, as well as the institutions that mediated them, constituted what being human meant. We will read philosophy, history, theology, saints’ lives, fables, lyrics, epics, sagas, romances, laws, visions, and mystical/devotional texts alongside works in the emerging field of critical animal studies to begin to answer key questions about economic roles, cultural constructions, and the formation of ethical structures in the service of sharing lives and worlds.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robert Stanton

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7716 Shakespeare and Donne Spring 3
Course Description

This course proposes to make a comparative study, with its principal attention falling upon erotic poetry and the vexed questions raised in relation to reading it by the existence of biographical narratives about these writers. We will also attend to the history of how biography has been used in various attempts to manage interpretation of their writings. The principal readings are likely to be Shakespeare's sonnets and Venus and Adonis; Donne's Elegies, Songs and Sonnets, and Verse Letters; and Antony and Cleopatra and Measure for Measure.


Instructor(s): Dayton Haskin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7717 Theory and Pedagogy in the Language Arts Classroom Fall 3
Course Description

Collaboratively developed and taught course that explores major theories of literary criticism and investigates how classroom teachers can develop curriculum and instruction that apply these forms to analysis and discussion of text in the classroom. Students will read, discuss, and analyze six major works and examine ways of teaching and viewing texts through several critical theory lenses. Pedagogy also emphasizes culturally relevant strategies for helping mainstream, special needs, and linguistically different learners access understanding about theory and content. Additional readings address theories of literary criticism and theories of curriculum and instruction.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: EDUC7472

Comments: Satisfies literary requirement in English and advanced content requirement in Teacher Education.

ENGL 7718 Race and Visual Culture Summer 3
Course Description

How do historically inherited and contemporary ideas about race color our vision? Where and how does race figure in and figure film, t.v., photography, and art installations? This seminar looks at how race and visual culture have intersected over the last 100 years. Beginning with theories that consider the meaning(s) of visual culture and race, the course uses the critical vocabulary we will develop to examine three themes; slavery and its aftermaths; urban subjects; and race in a "post-race" world. Some topics we will consider include Birth of at Nation, The Wire and the art of Kara Walker.


Instructor(s): Cynthia Young

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7720 Mess, Mourning, and Decomposition in British Victorian Literature Summer 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): James Krasner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: June-July Session

ENGL 7721 Milton Fall 3
Course Description

The principal focus will be John Milton's major poetry, above all Comus and Lycidas, Paradise Lost, and Samson Agonistes. Substantive attention to Milton as a reader, to his invention of the idea of having a career as a writer, and to the ways in which his writing has been framed for (and by) students. Participants will be given training in archival research and asked to develop a research project that probes some aspect of how Milton has been lodged in cultural history.


Instructor(s): Dayton Haskin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7722 Irish Literary Revival Spring 3
Course Description

This course will introduce students to one of the most important literary and cultural movements of the 20th century—the Irish Literary Revival. We will study the poetry, prose, and drama of the Revival in their broader contexts, including works by W. B. Yeats, J. M. Synge, Augusta Gregory, and Douglas Hyde. We will also engage the Revival critics, such as James Joyce and G. B. Shaw. In addition, students will learn how to work with the special collections related to the Revival in the Irish archives of the Burns Library.


Instructor(s): Marjorie Howes

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7723 18th Century New Materialisms Fall 3
Course Description

According to Diane Coole and Samantha Frost, by definition New Materialisms return us to some “fundamental questions about the nature of matter and the place of embodied humans within a material world.” And so this course introduces students to key concepts in an emerging field while exploring the relevance of those concepts for an eighteenth- century context. Possible eighteenth-century authors may include Cavendish, Defoe, Pope, Swift, Goldsmith, Sterne, and Cowper. We may also read theoretical work by the following authors, among others: Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer, Jane Bennett, Rosi Braidotti, Karen Barad, Stacy Alamo, Bruno La Tour, and Timothy Morton. The written work will consist of two short essays, and then longer, conference-length paper.


Instructor(s): Elizabeth Wallace

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7724 Sociability and the Social in Victorian Culture Spring 3
Course Description

This course investigates how the literature and culture of Victorian Britain imagined different modes of sociability, and new models of subjectivity and connection, during a period of rapid social transformation. Topics may include the emergence of market society, the place of affect, and social discourses such as family and friendship.We will read a selection of Victorian social novels, along with poetry and nonfiction prose. Students will write short response papers and one longer paper.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Aeron Hunt

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7725 1916 and After Spring 3
Course Description

1916 remains a resonant year in Irish cultural history. Much of the twentieth century the Easter Rising and the Battle of the Somme were considered to represent the antagonism between nationalism and empire, rebellion and service, liberty and oppression. These oppositions were tested continuously in literature and art. Our interest will be to examine how historical event relates to cultural practice. Taking 1916 as a major moment of cultural and political transition globally, this course traces the experimental landscape of revolution and its aftermath in modernism through the work of Beckett, Elizabeth Bowen, James Joyce, Jack and William Butler Yeats.


Instructor(s): Nicholas Allen

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7727 Modern Major Irish Drama Spring 3
Course Description

This course will offer an in-depth study of the work of the three most important contemporary Irish playwrights: Brian Friel, Tom Murphy, and Conor McPherson. There will be discussion of the Irish and international context of their work, and of the plays as works to be performed as well as as literary texts.


Instructor(s): Philip O'Leary

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7728 Studies in the Eighteenth-Century Novel Spring 3
Course Description

This course investigates what British novelists were up to in the century when prose fiction emerged as a recognizable genre with its own traditions and conventions. We explore such issues as the novelty of the form and its ties to previous forms of discourse; tensions in the novel between historical/social realism and imaginative artifice; interactions of moral, aesthetic and cultural values and norms; relations between psychology and narrative strategy. Close scrutiny of major works by such authors as Behn, Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Johnson, Radcliffe, and Austen.


Instructor(s): Robert Chibka

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7729 Woolf and Stevens Fall 3
Course Description

A course focusing on the aesthetics of impersonality in Woolf and Stevens, it will, in the perhaps unexpected encounter it stages, also question the categories through which we organize our understanding of literature, especially nation, genre, and period. What is visible in Stevens' poetry if it is read in the context of British modernism, and in the context of modernism's equivocal relation to the Victorian novel and aestheticism? What might be perceived in Woolf's novelistic innovations if they read in the context of a poetic tradition--and in her novels if read as if they were poems?


Instructor(s): Kevin Ohi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7730 Novels of the World Spring 3
Course Description

This course will focus on contemporary novels by authors from various places in the world as well as on the question of how to teach such novels. We will explore the ideas as well as narrative structures and styles (the aesthetics) of writers such as Sebald (Germany), Coetzee (South Africa), Pamuk (Turkey), Hosseini (Afghanistan), Mahfouz (Egypt), and Kundera (former Czechoslovakia). We will address political, social, and historical dimensions and contexts. Although it will be difficult to generalize from a few novels, we will engage issues of cultural difference. We also may consider some relevant post-colonial and/or psychoanalytic theory.


Instructor(s): Frances Restuccia

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7731 The Idea of Literature: From Work to Text Fall 3
Course Description

This course is dedicated to literary theory. Rather than surveying the main trends represented in most theory anthologies, however, we will focus specifically on theoretical works that pose and attempt to answer the ontological question: What is literature? Surveying the diverse ways in which this question has been posed and answered, we will read works situated at the intersections of literary criticism, literary theory, and philosophical aesthetics. Authors may include Friedrich Schlegel, Novalis, Jean Paulhan, Maurice Blanchot, Paul de Man, Jacques Derrida, Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe, Jean-Luc Nancy, and Jacques Ranciere.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robert Lehman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the Theory requirement

ENGL 7732 Contemporary Irish Fiction Fall 3
Course Description

Concentrating of contemporary Irish fiction, this seminar examines the confluence of stories representing Irish society since the mid-1980s. We will discuss significant cultural shifts and attempt answers to ongoing cultural questions. These include issues of national identity in an era of globalization, the relationship between tradition and innovation in Celtic Tiger Ireland, and the challenges and contradictions posed by the Northern Ireland Peace Process, as well as issues of gender, sexuality, and ethnicity in the new Ireland. Novelists include Roddy Doyle, Colm Tibn, Patrick McCabe, Emma Donoghue, Mary Morrissy, Anne Enright, Eoin McNamee, Eilis N Dhuibhne, and Deirdre Madden.


Instructor(s): James Smith

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7733 American Fiction to 1870 Summer 3
Course Description

The course engages the origin and development of the American short story and novel, from local beginnings in sentimental fiction to its first maturity in the American Renaissance. Novels by Brown, Cooper, Hawthorne, and Fanny Fern; stories by Irving, Poe, Melville, Bierce, and Harte. The contributions of such subgenres as the epistolary novel, bildungsroman, the historical novel, Gothic romance, and "woman's fiction" will be considered. Students are invited to incorporate pedagogical approaches and lesson plans into their coursework. The aim is to understand the work American fiction has done in the development of American political and cultural life


Instructor(s): James Wallace

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7734 African American Writers of the 20th and 21st Centuries Fall 3
Course Description

This course introduces graduate students to the field of African American literature, an increasingly important sub-field within contemporary English departments. Focusing on several genres (sci-fi, neo-slave narratives, memoir, short stories), we will read Toni Morrison, James Baldwin, Octavia Butler, Percival Everett, Michael Thomas, and Junot Diaz, among others. In addition to exploring themes such as post-Emancipation notions of freedom, life under Jim Crow, and the influence of oral and vernacular culture on black literature, we will also consider how fiction has responded to recent Caribbean and African migration, the exploding rate of black incarceration, and the "War on Terror."


Instructor(s): Cynthia Young

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7735 The London Vortex, 1908-1922 Fall 3
Course Description

Ezra Pound arrived in London in August 1908 determined to absorb the entire tradition of European poetry and to use it to generate something wholly new. In October 1922, T. S. Eliot published in the first issue of The Criterion his masterpiece, The Waste Land, a poem that Pound called “the justification of the ‘movement,’ of our modern experiment….” In this class we will focus on the literature, criticism, and visual art produced as part of the “modern experiment” in which Pound saw himself and Eliot participating between 1908 and 1922. Writers and painters to be studied may include H. D., Eliot, Epstein, Fry, Ford, Gaudier-Brzeska, Hulme, Lewis, Marsden, Pound, Woolf, and others.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robert Lehman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7736 New Historicism Spring 3
Course Description

This course engages both the theory and the practice of New Historicism, from its origins in anthropology and Continental philosophy to recent work in cultural studies, emphasizing Althusser and Jameson, Michel Foucault, Stephen Greenblatt and Louis Montrose, and the ways other critical schools have reacted to or against New Historicism. Finally, we will consider how New Historicism has influenced the rise of Cultural Studies as a critical practice. Students will develop their own New Historical projects, and the work of the course will include oral reports and a research paper.


Instructor(s): James Wallace

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7738 Agamben and His Universe Fall 3
Course Description

This course will focus on Giorgio Agamben along with philosophers, artists, and theorists with whom his work intersects: St. Paul, Simone Weil, Aristotle, Titian, Scholem, Arendt, Benjamin, Heidegger, Bataille, Foucault, Deleuze, Derrida, Debord. It will engage topics such as the relation of political theory to ethics; Agamben's relation to psychoanalysis; messianism; the "human" and the relation of the human to animality; pornography; time and cinematic time; the profane vs. the sacred; the society of the spectacle; sovereignty, the state of exception, and biopolitics. Agamben's elegant writing animates all sorts of historical, cultural, political, philosophical, ethical, aesthetic, and theological arenas.


Instructor(s): Frances Restuccia

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the Theory requirement

ENGL 7739 Major Irish Writers Spring 3
Course Description

A survey of major literary figures of twentieth-century Ireland, including Yeats, Synge, Joyce, O'Casey, O Criomhthain, O Cadhain, Heaney, and Ni Dhomhnaill. Irish-language works will be read in translation.


Instructor(s): Philip O'Leary

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7741 Bodies/Borders Spring 3
Course Description

How does twentieth-century American literature use the human body to map cultural and representational borders? In two sections on modern and contemporary American fiction, this course will focus on representations of the body to explore the cultural construction and dissolution of borders between subjectivity and embodiment, life and death, health and illness, whiteness and "color," individual and national identities. Course topics will include grief, ghosts, wounds, objects, trauma, violence, space, sexuality and technology. Texts may include fiction by Stein, Larsen, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, West, Morrison, Robinson, DeLillo, and Alexie.


Instructor(s): Laura Tanner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7742 Chaucer: Verse History Fall 3
Course Description

A practical and theoretical introduction to issues in medieval and modern poetics, focalized through Chaucer’s verse forms. Emphasis on metrical form, the momentum of metrical traditions, the translation of prosody between languages, and the circulation of cultural stereotypes about meter. We ask how poetic traditions develop, why they endure or disappear, and how the practice and theory of meter changes over time. Units on the alliterative tradition, Chaucer’s tetrameter, Chaucer’s pentameter, and fifteenth-, sixteenth-, and nineteenth-century English pentameters.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Eric Weiskott

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7743 Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama Fall 3
Course Description

Why was theater so popular in early modern England, yet also considered dangerous? This course covers a variety of comedies and tragedies written in England during the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, including works by Kyd, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Jonson, Middleton, and Webster. We will consider aspects of genre and staging, as well as the sexual, political and social implications of drama in the period. In addition, we will read critical essays that place these plays in historical context. Work will include a class presentation; informal web postings; a short paper; and a final long essay.


Instructor(s): Andrew Sofer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7746 The City in American Literature and Culture Spring 3
Course Description

We will consider how American literature and culture has responded to the formal and conceptual challenges posed by cities. Taking an American Studies approach to our subject, our inquiry will include not only novels (e.g. Sister Carrie, Native Speaker) and other literary forms but also film (e.g., Chinatown, Blade Runner), music, landscape, and more. We'll also read scholars like Betsy Klimasmith, Thomas Heise, and Catherine Jurca, who offer interdisciplinary models for relating the interpretation of texts to the social, economic, and political facts of city life.


Instructor(s): Carlo Rotella

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7747 Sex, Gender, and the Body in Early Modern England Fall 3
Course Description

This graduate seminar explores the fluid conceptions of sex, gender, and the body that were circulating in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century texts—everything from the medical to the pornographic, from poetry to pamphlets. Topics and texts include: early modern anatomy (excerpts from Crooke, Culpeper and Sharp among others); the transvestite stage (John Lyly, Gallathea); the “virgin” body (Queen Elizabeth’s writings and Middleton and Rowley, The Changeling); the relationship between passion, mind, and body (the poems of Philip Sidney, Shakespeare, and Mary Wroth); same-sex desire (Marlowe, Edward II; Margaret Cavendish, The Convent of Pleasure); and the pornographic body (Nashe, Choise of Valentines).


Instructor(s): Caroline Bicks

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7748 Early American Fiction and Nonfiction Fall 3
Course Description

This course reads early American fiction by such writers as Rowson (Charlotte Temple and Lucy Temple), Murray (The Story of Margaretta), Foster (The Coquette), Brown (Ormond), Sedgwick (A New-England Tale), Poe (Ligeia), Hawthorne ("Rappaccini's Daughter"), Melville (Benito Cereno), Douglass (The Heroic Slave) and Stowe (Uncle Tom's Cabin) in relation to contemporaneous nonfiction. Such conjunctions lead to an awareness not only of the expanding canon of antebellum fiction but also of the cultural contexts within which it evolved. Topics we will follow across generic boundaries include gender roles, poverty, and slavery.


Instructor(s): Paul Lewis

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7749 Poetics Spring 3
Course Description

This course traces the development of poetics from the mid-twentieth century to recent attempts at revival. We'll read Aristotle's Poetics as a "pre-text," followed by key essays in Russian and Prague school poetics, responses by the Bakhtin group, and examples of the transition from Slavic to French structuralist poetics. We then review the poststructuralist critique of structuralist poetics before considering the return of poetics in cognitive poetics and the New Formalism. Although the readings could be described as "theory," most of them are concerned with questions of literary methodology, often illustrating their claims in relation to specific poetic texts.


Instructor(s): Alan Richardson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7750 Early Women Writers Fall 3
Course Description

An exploration of the wide range of writing by British women in the 16th and 17th centuries, from the testimony of Reformation martyr Anne Askew in the Tudor era to the romances and plays by Aphra Behn in the Restoration. We will read works by (and in some cases, about) Queen Elizabeth, Amelia Lanyer, Elizabeth Cary, Anne Clifford, Katherine Phillips, Margaret Cavendish, and Aphra Behn, along with critical essays. One short paper; one seminar paper, and a brief presentation will be required.


Instructor(s): Amy Boesky

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7751 Race & Cultural Theory Spring 3
Course Description


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Cynthia Young

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7752 Contemporary Literary and Cultural Theory Fall 3
Course Description

This course introduces students to the concepts and practices of contemporary cultural and literary theory. Surveying various developments of the field during the last two decades, we will study: Marxist, psychoanalytic, feminist, new historical, structuralist, poststucturalist, and postcolonial approaches to literature and culture. Though our primary focus will be theoretical essays and books, students will also have the opportunity to apply the theories to literary and cultural texts. Possible theorists include: Marx, Althusser, Freud, Lacan, Lévi-Strauss, Derrida, Foucault, Chakrabarty, and Taussig. The course requires a series of short essays.


Instructor(s): Elizabeth Wallace

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the Theory requirement

ENGL 7753 Reading Jacques Derrida Spring 3
Course Description

This course will examine some of the fundamental ways that the work of Jacques Derrida has contributed to altering the context in which the humanities can be understood and studied within the modern university. It will take examples from Derrida’s repeated interventions in such disciplines as literature, philosophy, theology, and history. By situating Derrida’s work at the margins where accepted demarcations between the disciplines begin to blur, the course will suggest new possibilities for conducting interdisciplinary work in the future.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kevin Newmark

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: FREN7750 PHIL7753

Comments: Open to undergraduates with permission of instructor

ENGL 7754 The Making of Renaissance Lit Spring 3
Course Description

When colleges in the U.S. began to offer courses called “English,” the term “Renaissance” came gradually to be applied to early modern literature. On the basis of research that we’ll conduct principally in the Archives of Harvard and M.I.T., this course will attend to texts--by Marlowe, Shakespeare, Milton and others—that were made to illustrate the prestige of “the Renaissance.” Students will receive training in doing archival research in order to foster projects that probe continuities and differences between early attempts to turn literature in English into a school subject and our current critical practices.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Dayton Haskin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7755 Derrida and Agamben Spring 3
Course Description

This course focuses on the shared concerns and differences between two important thinkers on themes that center on the question of the political. By close reading carefully selected texts we will see how each author analyzes the structure of sovereignty, the force of law, the state and finally community. The readings will invariably open other issues such as globalization, human rights, war and terror. Students interested in this course but who have not done any previous work on either author should get in touch with me by email.


Instructor(s): Kalpana Seshadri

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7758 George Eliot Fall 3
Course Description

The intellectual range and psychological depth of Marian Evans, the writer known as George Eliot, was unequalled in the Victorian novel. This course will give us an opportunity to study her development, from the early stories of provincial life to the cosmopolitan vision of her final novel. Reading her major novels along with her essays, letters and contemporary critical texts, we will attempt to define certain patterns of cultural conflict and experience that she explored in changing fictional forms throughout her career. We will consider the ways that biographical material may offer insights into cultural history.


Instructor(s): Rosemarie Bodenheimer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7759 Pulp, Popular, Proletarian Fall 3
Course Description

This is a course on the underground worlds of American writing that often remain out of view in the academy. We will focus on three different forms of nineteenth and twentieth century American prose: working class narrative (for instance, proletarian fiction or memoir from the 1930s) "pulp" or sensational literatures (dime novels, or nonfiction exposés of poverty, prisons, or crime); and popular romance genres (adventure, mystery, "true confessions"). Readings will include not only samples of these genres, but attempts by well-known American writers to adapt them to elite practices and experimental styles.


Instructor(s): Christopher Wilson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7761 Black Cultural Studies Fall 3
Course Description

This course looks at how theories about race and popular culture intersect with critiques of state violence, empire and postcoloniality. Focusing on texts written after World War II, this course considers how race theory is informed by Third World decolonization, immigration from the periphery to the center, the Cold War and the Non-Aligned Movement, as well as the rise of the U.S. during the "American Century." Special attention will be paid to pop culture forms music, fashion, film and the subcultures and social movements out of which they emerge.


Instructor(s): Cynthia Young

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7762 Fourth Genre: Contemporary American Literary Nonfiction Spring 3
Course Description

The "fourth genre" refers to works of nonfiction that contain literary features more commonly associated with fiction, poetry, and drama. We will examine a few pioneers of the form, including Woolf, Thoreau, and Freud, but our study will focus primarily on subgenres of contemporary American creative nonfiction, including immersion journalism; autobiography; graphic memoir; and literary and lyric essay. Readings will include work by creative nonfiction by writers such as Wolfe, Didion, Talese, Dillard, Kincaid, Bechdel, and Slater. Writing assignments will include both academic and creative essays.


Instructor(s): Lad Tobin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7763 Modern British Fiction Fall 3
Course Description

This course will consist primarily of novels by authors such as James, Ford, Conrad, Joyce, Greene, Lawrence, Forster, Woolf, and possibly Barnes. We will also examine critical essays on specific novels as well as writing on modernism in general, including James's "The Art of Fiction" and Woolf's "Modern Fiction." We will read classic works such as Joseph Frank's "Spatial Form in Modern Literature," Ortega y Gasset's "The Dehumanization of Art," and Lukcs' "The Ideology of Modernism." Themes such as interiority, subjectivity, epistemology, ambiguity, form and content, empire, and distinct ways of rendering the flood of human experience will be featured.


Instructor(s): Frances Restuccia

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7764 Twentieth-Century Irish Fiction Fall 3
Course Description

In this graduate seminar, we will read a selection of Irish novels so as to identify, discuss and better understand complex cultural phenomena that become manifest in the aftermath of the colonial experience. The underlying premise suggests that Irish novelists participate in debates concerning national identity and, in the process, anticipate the evolution of a postnational society. Paying particular attention to issues of language, gender, place and literary authority, and to representations of religion, history, and identity, the seminar seeks to establish the inevitable heterogeneity related to the post-colonial condition.


Instructor(s): James Smith

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7765 What Is Performance? Fall 3
Course Description

Performance is everywhere in critical discourse today. But what is it? This course, which satisfies the M.A. theory requirement, introduces the dynamic field of performance studies, which fuses theater studies, anthropology, ethnography, and theory. We will test the utility of the field’s primary concepts, including performativity, for the analysis of specific cultural performances, ranging from scripted plays to glam rock to gender to performance art (including one local event chosen by the class). Work will include analyzing a theatrical or cultural performance of your own choosing.


Instructor(s): Andrew Sofer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course fulfills the MA theory requirement

ENGL 7766 Feminist Theory Fall 3
Course Description

This class surveys major movements in twentieth and twenty-first century Anglo-American and French feminist literary theory. Though our main focus will be theories of textual analysis, some of our interdisciplinary readings will draw from other subjects, such as history, anthropology, and biology. The class covers foundational feminist texts; key readings in British and American literary feminism; "criture feminine," feminist psychoanalytic and narratological approaches to texts and films; postcolonial feminism; and gender theory. Written work includes two short papers and one longer essay, with the goal of producing a paper suitable for presentation at a professional conference.


Instructor(s): Elizabeth Wallace

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course fulfills the MA theory requirement

ENGL 7769 Dickens Fall 3
Course Description

Charles Dickens, the first great master of the popular literary marketplace, wrote prolifically in many genres, usually within the same work. This course will focus on some major novels, read alongside journalistic pieces and contemporary criticism. We will attempt to build up a picture of Dickens' characteristic psycho-social scenarios, his range of styles, and the variations he played on recurrent themes throughout his career. Novels will probably include Oliver Twist, David Copperfield, Dombey and Son, Bleak House, and Our Mutual Friend; we will sample a range of critical approaches.


Instructor(s): Rosemarie Bodenheimer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7771 The Victorian Novel Spring 3
Course Description

Provides graduate students with an advanced introduction to the scholarly and critical study of the Victorian novel (1837-1901). It is appropriate both for students who have had some undergraduate course work in the field and those who are relatively new to Victorian Studies. We will read a number of the major novels of the period, probably including novels by Charlotte Brontë, W. M. Thackeray, Charles Dickens, George Eliot, and Thomas Hardy. We will also explore the historical context of the Victorian era and develop a critical framework for theorizing these texts and, more broadly, the novel as a genre.


Instructor(s): Maia McAleavey

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7772 16th Century British Writers Spring 3
Course Description

In this course we will discuss a selection of the most important works written in England during the 16th century with special reference to their literary and cultural contexts. Works will include More’s Utopia, poems by Wyatt, Sidney, and Shakespeare, poems and speeches by Queen Elizabeth I, plays by Marlowe and Shakespeare, book I of Spenser’s Faerie Queene, as well as relevant critical articles. Requirements will include a short paper, and a longer (18-20-page) paper.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Mary Crane

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7775 Seminar: Nabokov Fall 3
Course Description

The bilingual and bicultural achievement of Vladimir Nabokov. A polemical examination of Nabokov's writings, with particular attention to connections among his aesthetics, ethics, and metaphysics and to issues of gender, sexuality, authorship, and exile.
Readings include selected Russian and English novels and short stories, as well as poetic, autobiographic, and discursive works.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Maxim D. Shrayer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SLAV5163

Comments: All readings are in English.
Instructor's permission required for undergraduates

ENGL 7776 Walter Pater and Oscar Wilde Spring 3
Course Description

Two of the best-known aestheticist writers, Pater and Wilde made style an inextricable part of their philosophical, literary, and critical projects. Focusing primarily on the detailed examination of their texts, this course will seek to come to terms with some effects of these writers' often contrasting styles. We will read both famous and lesser-known texts, asking, among other things: how do they imagine literary tradition and cultural transmission? What is their relation to late-Victorian aesthetic, moral, and philosophical discourses? What is the relation of queer desire to their innovations in style and form?


Instructor(s): Kevin Ohi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7779 Contemporary American Poetry Fall 3
Course Description

The contemporary moment in American poetry is lively, diverse, and resists easy definition. Strong individual voices stake out widely differing poetic projects, and part of our work will be to consider the poets with an eye toward their literary ancestors as well as their lines of contemporary kinship. We'll take up established voices like Simic, Glck, Olds, Levine, Merwin, and Rich, as well as some relative newcomers. Though we'll focus on the poetry itself, we'll also read some commentators like Holden, Chiasson, Altieri, and—importantly—the poets themselves.


Instructor(s): Suzanne Matson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7780 Readings in Theory Spring 3
Course Description

This course is organized as an introduction to the reading of literary theory for graduate students in various disciplines. Its aim is to develop an awareness of and sensitivity to the specific means and consequences of interpreting literary and extra-literary language today. The course allows students to acquire a basic familiarity with some of the most formative linguistic, philosophical, and anthropological antecedents underpinning any attempt to understand and account for the special status reserved for rhetorical language in literature or beyond it. Readings from Saussure, Lvi-Strauss, Jakobson, Barthes, Lacan, Ricoeur, Geertz, Austin, Derrida, and de Man, among others.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kevin Newmark

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL7780 FREN7780

Comments: Conducted in English
Open to undergraduates with permission of instructor only
Fulfills a Ph.D. requirement in Romance Languages and Literatures

ENGL 7781 Virginia Woolf Fall 3
Course Description

In addition to the major novels—Jacob's Room, Mrs. Dalloway, To the Lighthouse, The Waves, and Between the Acts—and famous essays and autobiographical writings (A Room of One's Own, Three Guineas, and Moments of Being—we will look at some of Woolf's (relatively) neglected work: her short fiction and essays, and perhaps some of the lesser-read novels (The Voyage Out, Night and Day, The Years). Focusing on detailed readings of Woolf's writing, we will also attempt to view her writing in various other contexts: Anglo-American modernism, for instance, or the history of the novel and the essay.


Instructor(s): Kevin Ohi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7782 Issues and Methods in American Studies Spring 3
Course Description

This course offers an introduction to the field of American Studies, which focuses on the interdisciplinary study of American culture. We will read a range of recent scholarship, exploring diverse approaches, methods, and issues of interest. In the process, we will assemble a tool kit of critical skills for making interpretive arguments about works of culture in their historical moments. The cultural forms we analyze may include popular fiction, film, music, religion, and others.


Instructor(s): Christina Klein

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7784 Studies in Early Modern Poetry Fall 3
Course Description

This course promotes broad and deep familiarity with poems by Shakespeare, Donne, Herbert, and Marvell. It will afford some attention to the transition from manuscript circulation to print and from print to digital publication: the access that we have to Shakespeare’s sonnets uniquely through print; some implications of Donne’s eschewing print for his poems and yet preparing his sermons to be printed; the making of Herbert’s manuscript into a book by the Little Gidding community; the erratic history of disseminating Marvell’s lyrics. The phase of the course given to Donne will explore emerging digital resources that are creating unprecedented opportunities for readers and for scholars.


Instructor(s): Dayton Haskin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7785 Stuart Literature and Culture Fall 3
Course Description

This course explores the early 17th century in Britain through canonical and non-canonical materials. Our central focus will be the changing representation of the body in competing discourses of this period—medical, juridical, political, and aesthetic. Topics may include the gendered body; appetite and its regulation; virginity; deviance; the reproductive body; colonial bodies and foreign "tongues"; anatomical practices; melancholy; prayer, penance, and political martyrdom. Readings will include works by Donne, Shakespeare, Herbert, Harvey, Milton, and Charles I. One presentation and two papers required.


Instructor(s): Amy Boesky

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7786 T.S. Eliot & Walter Benjamin Spring 3
Course Description

In this class, we will focus on two giants of European modernism: T. S. Eliot (1888-1965) and Walter Benjamin (1892-1940), who, during the early decades of the twentieth century, struggled to construct the (literary and political) future out of the ruins of the past. Topics of discussion will likely include the politics of (difficult) art; the role of technology in modern life; and the possibility of historical representation.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robert Lehman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the Theory requirement

ENGL 7787 Ireland: The Colonial Context Fall 3
Course Description

As Seamus Deane asserts, "Ireland is the only Western European country that has had both an early and a late colonial experience." This course spans the major cultural and historical moments and surveys the associated literary production connecting these experiences: from the Elizabethan plantations to post-independent Ireland's decolonization. The main objective is to evaluate how Irish culture manifests and/or resists the colonial encounter. Particular attention is paid to the issues of language and authority, and to representations of place, gender, and identity. Students engage with a wide variety of writers and cultural critics.


Instructor(s): James Smith

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7788 Irish Heroic Literature in Modern Adaptation Fall 3
Course Description

Beginning with a study of the ethos of Irish heroic literature in its historic and cultural context, this course will then examine the uses, ideological, aesthetic, and personal, to which that material has been put by Irish writers of the past two centuries. Particular attention will be paid to shifting concepts of "authenticity" and the degree to which various creative artists have retained, reinterpreted, or reinvented what they perceived to be the essence of their originals.


Instructor(s): Philip O'Leary

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7789 Eighteenth-Century British Comedies, Dramatic and Narrative Fall 3
Course Description

Taking as its texts a variety of dramatic comedies and comic novels written from the Restoration through the eighteenth century, this course will explore questions about how generic constraints, expectations, and innovations shaped representations of social life and consider ways in which framing a "world" as comic could display, challenge, and/or occlude social, cultural, and/or literary complacencies and/or anxieties. Along with short readings in history of the novel and the theater and theory of comedy, we will discuss plays and novels by such authors as Wycherley, Etherege, Behn, Congreve, Gay, Steele, Fielding, Sterne, Goldsmith, Burney, and Sheridan.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Robert Chibka

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7790 Fashioning the Nation in the Late Eighteenth Century Spring 3
Course Description

What currently characterizes the interdisciplinary field of eighteenth-century studies? We'll answer this question through an examination of six key concepts: gender, consumerism, nationality, writers and readers, and theatricality. As ideas that saw significant revision over the course of the long eighteenth century (1688-1820), these concepts can be charted in literary, cultural, and visual texts. Readings include poetry (by Pope, Swift, and Goldsmith), prose (by Addison and Steele, Dr. Johnson, and others), plays (by Cibber, Lillo, Gay, and Cowley) and two novels (Evelina and Tom Jones.)


Instructor(s): Elizabeth Kowaleski Wallace

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7791 Exploring Avant-Gardes Fall 3
Course Description

This interdisciplinary course will track avant-garde practice in a selection of textual and visual works produced in the twentieth century. We will focus on two moments: the early decades of the historical avant-gardes (Futurism, Dada, Surrealism), and the resurgence of avant-garde transgressions in the aesthetics and politics of postmodernism. We will survey the debates between various theorists of the avant-garde (Burger, Poggioli, Benjamin, Adorno, Jameson), and study some exemplary manifestoes by avant-garde artists and writers (Marinetti, Tzara, Breton, Cixous, Haraway). Additional readings will include texts by and about Duchamp, Breton, Ernst, Carrington, Bellmer, Hoch, Stein, Wittig, Burroughs and others.


Instructor(s): Robin Lydenberg

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7793 American Fiction and the Family Summer 3
Course Description

This class will explore the representation of family dynamics and everyday life in American fiction of the last century. We will consider how the construction of individual and familial identity is shaped by the contexts of grief, violence, consumerism, poverty, disaster, race, class, aging, and domestic space. Texts may include Faulkner’s As I Lay Dying, Robinson’s Housekeeping, DeLillo’s White Noise, Krauss’s The History of Love, and McCann’s Thirteen Ways of Looking, as well as short fiction by Hemingway, Baldwin, Lahiri, Carver, Alexie and others.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Laura Tanner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ENGL 7799 Nature,Culture,Wrtg:Derrida's of Grammatology/Cont Fall 3
Course Description

Contemporary critical analyses of concepts such as gender, sexuality, and imperialism, often profess skepticism towards traditional norms and certainties and denounce "essentialism," "universalism," self and other, us and them polarities, to espouse a commitment to social change. This course aims to make precise the bases and implications of these gestures through a close reading of Derrida's Of Grammatology, the inaugural text of disciplinary revision. We shall also read related texts (Saussure, Rousseau, Levi Strauss, etc) in addition to classic deconstructive works in gender and race theory by critics such as Paul De Man, Barbara Johnson, Gayatri Spivak, and others.


Instructor(s): Kalpana Seshadri

Prerequisites: None

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ENGL 8001 The Global 18th Century Spring 3
Course Description

Eighteenth-century British literature has a reputation for being obsessively nationalistic, defining a British Self against all foreign Others, but the eighteenth century was also a time of contact and exchange among all corners of the globe. In this class, we will examine how British writers engaged questions of globalism and transnationalism during an era when the cultural understand of both “Britain” and “the world” were changing. The secondary material for this class will come from a variety of critical perspectives, including postcolonial and global theory, ecocriticsm, geocritcism, and posthumanism/new materialism. We will discuss the different theoretical and political stakes these approaches bring to how we conceptualize the global.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Rebekah Mitsein

Prerequisites: None

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ENGL 8009 Reading in Victorian Culture Fall 3
Course Description


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Maia McAleavey

Prerequisites: None

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ENGL 8800 Irish Gothic Spring 3
Course Description

Ghosts and vampires, lunatics and criminals, human corruption and supernatural punishment: these things have fascinated generations of Irish writers and readers. This seminar will investigate why Ireland produced such a rich tradition of Gothic literature, beginning in the early nineteenth century and continuing right up to the present. We will also explore various critical and theoretical approaches to the genre: political, historical, psychological, sexual, and religious. Writers to be studied include Maria Edgeworth, Sheridan LeFanu, Charles Maturin, Bram Stoker, Oscar Wilde, Elizabeth Bowen, and Patrick McCabe.


Instructor(s): Marjorie Howes

Prerequisites: None

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ENGL 8801 Thesis Seminar Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

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ENGL 8802 Joyce's Ulysses Spring 3
Course Description

This course will be dedicated to an extended exploration of James Joyce's Ulysses, a novel that has often been called the most important literary work of the twentieth century. Most of our time will be devoted to an intensive reading of the novel itself, but we will also read selected critical and historical materials. No prior knowledge of Joyce's works is required, just a willingness to tackle the challenges offered by his most influential masterpiece.


Instructor(s): Marjorie Howes

Prerequisites: None

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ENGL 8803 America and Its Futures Spring 3
Course Description

Drawing on literary and non-literary texts, this seminar focuses on contemporary attempts to imagine the near future. We will cover issues such as the environment, energy, technological innovation, demographic change, and globalization. The seminar explores how these topics take on a different and renew urgency when we turn our gaze forward in time. We will take a special interest in the year 2050, as this is a year that is distant enough that a lot of significant changes to the ways we live ourlives will occur but close enough that it is well within our likely lifespans.


Instructor(s): Min Song

Prerequisites: None

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ENGL 8804 Beckett on Stage and Screen Fall 3
Course Description

This course introduces the twentieth century's most influential dramatist, together with the dynamic field of Beckett Studies. Considering Beckett's work as director-choreographer as well as playwright, we will place Beckett in his theatrical as well as biographical, geographical, and historical contexts. Texts include Waiting for Godot, Endgame, Happy Days, Krapp's Last Tape, Not I, and several "shorts" for television. Work will include a class presentation, a short project, and a final long essay. Students will have the option to pursue original archival research in the Burns library. No previous familiarity with Beckett's prose or drama is required.


Instructor(s): Andrew Sofer

Prerequisites: None

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ENGL 8805 Beckett Fall 3
Course Description

This course introduces a major Irish (post)modernist writer, arguably the most important playwright of the twentieth century. Reading a range of Beckett’s fiction and drama, and with the help of various critical essays, we will place Beckett in his biographical, geographical, theatrical, and historical contexts. Texts will include Waiting for Godot, Endgame, short fictions early and late, and several plays for television. Work will include a class presentation, a short project, and a final long essay for which original archival research in Burns Library is an option. No previous familiarity with Beckett is required.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Andrew Sofer

Prerequisites: None

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ENGL 8806 American Literatures of Slavery & Abolition Spring 3
Course Description

In this seminar we will examine nineteenth-century American literature by focusing on the theme of slavery and abolition. We will consider this theme’s influence on several important literary genres, including slave narratives, sentimental novels, gothic short stories, as well as popular print forms such as pamphlets and newspapers. Authors covered include Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Edgar Allan Poe, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Herman Melville, and Mark Twain. Alongside scholarship that situates our readings within different literary and historical contexts, we’ll also read and discuss pedagogical material to consider strategies for teaching American literature of slavery and abolition.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Adam Lewis

Prerequisites: None

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ENGL 8807 Globalization and Culture Fall 1
Course Description

This class investigates the cultural dynamics of globalization. We will explore how works of culture imagine the issues raised by globalization, and how they are products and agents of globalization. We will begin by defining globalization and considering its different historical periods. Did it begin in the fifteenth century, the nineteenth century, 1945, or the 1970s? From there we will explore a variety of theoretical approaches to globalization drawn from the fields of English, anthropology, cultural studies, and film studies. We will explore each of these theoretical models through specific works of culture, including movies, novels, short stories, travel narratives.


Instructor(s): Christina Klein

Prerequisites: None

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ENGL 8808 Queer Literary Traditions Fall 3
Course Description

For many writers, philosophers, and theorists, to confront the question of literary and cultural tradition is to engage a paradoxical object, one that is "inherited" through repeated scenes of its failed or thwarted transmission. This course will examine the queer allure of such scenes, suggesting, among many other things, the possibility of understanding thwarted transmission as synonymous with the literary tradition as such and, hence, of bringing into view the queerness of that tradition. Writers might include some of the following: Plato, Sappho, Shakespeare, Wilde, Pater, James, Swinburne, Hopkins, Melville, Faulkner, Nabokov, Agamben, de Man, Barthes, Foucault, Deleuze, and Carson.


Instructor(s): Kevin Ohi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the Theory requirement

ENGL 8810 Hopkins - Berryman Fall 3
Course Description

This graduate seminar will examine the lives and works of two radical innovators: the English poet, Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844—1889) and the American poet, John Berryman (1914—1972). The first half of the course will focus on the poems of Hopkins’s Jesuit years, while the second half will focus on Berryman’s poems from Homage to Mistress Bradstreet through the Dream Songs and after. Paul Mariani is the author of Dream Song: The Life of John Berryman (1990) and Gerard Manley Hopkins: A Life (2008).


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Paul Mariani

Prerequisites: None

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ENGL 8811 Queer Time Fall 3
Course Description

Queer experience is marked by a distinctive relation to time: (nominally) non-reproductive and (in most cases) experiencing forms of desire unknown to their parents, queer people are deprived of (but also liberated from) the presumed transparency of legacy and inheritance, just as the disregard shown queer lives and histories deprives and liberates them from a complacent relation to history; to come out marks a life with a fundamental temporal discontinuity unknown to straight lives. Examining relevant recent writing in queer theory, we will also examine other considerations of time by, among others: Plato, Augustine, Bergson, Freud, Benjamin, Foucault, and Deleuze.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kevin Ohi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the Theory requirement

ENGL 8812 New England Literary Culture Fall 3
Course Description

Explores the development of a regional literary culture, beginning with the Puritan migrations of the 1620s and '30s and ending with the diminishing of New England's influence after the Civil War. Puritan backgrounds and the mythology of the "Pilgrim fathers"; Puritan origins of "the American self" and the Jeremiad tradition; Native Americans and the development of captivity narrative; witchcraft; family and politics; the cult of domesticity and the sentimental novel; the American Renaissance; slavery, abolition, and women's rights. Readings include William Bradford, Anne Bradstreet, Mary Rowlandson, John and Abigail Adams, Fanny Fern, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Margaret Fuller, and Harriet Beecher Stowe.


Instructor(s): James Wallace

Prerequisites: None

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ENGL 8813 Joyce, Ulysses, Empire and Nationalism Fall 3
Course Description

“What?” says Alf. “Love,” says Bloom. “I mean the opposite of hatred.” Love of country? Amor Matris? Hatred of injustice? Some transcendent romantic love? In the company of James Joyce, we’ll tease out such questions, flying by the nets of language, religion, and—in this centenary year of Ireland’s bolt for independence—nationality. Joyce’s troubled community imagining itself into nationhood presents a lens for us to explore Modernism, World Wars, the emasculated subaltern, and the metrocolonial dilemma. Concentrating on Ulysses, we’ll question the contradictions in Joyce’s lonely life of creation, and in his passionate works of near infinite depth.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Joseph Nugent

Prerequisites: None

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ENGL 8814 Heaney and Friel: Writing Ireland, Writing the World Fall 3
Course Description

From playwright Brian Friel's early “success” (Philadelphia, Here I Come!) and Seamus Heaney's signature poems (“Digging,” “Mid-term Break”), through masterpieces, Faith Healer, Translations and the “bog poems,” to the blossom of their genius, Dancing at Lughnasa and Human Chain, we'll examine how these artists negotiated the “Troubles” of their native Northern Ireland (Friel's Freedom of the City, Heaney's elegies and allegories), how their plays and poems converse, and how their authors emerged to command places on the world's stage as consciences of Ireland and beyond.


Instructor(s): Peter Fallon

Prerequisites: None

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ENGL 8815 Julia Kristeva Fall 3
Course Description

Focusing on major works of Julia Kristeva, professor emeritus at the University of Paris Diderot-Paris7, psychoanalyst, novelist, and one of the world’s leading psychoanalytic theorists, this course will engage topics such as the semiotic, abjection, femininity, melancholia, love, belief, and intimate revolt. We will read several theoretical texts—e.g., Powers of Horror, Black Sun, Strangers to Ourselves, Proust and the Sense of Time, New Maladies of the Soul, Female Genius, Intimate Revolt, Hatred and Forgiveness, and The Severed Head; at least a couple of novels, including Kristeva’s recent Teresa, My Love (a fascinating combination of theory and fiction); and criticism.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Frances Restuccia

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the Theory requirement

ENGL 8816 Eliot, James & Woolf Spring 3
Course Description

Focusing on three of its greatest creators, this course will formulate different ways of thinking about the novel in English. Inevitably, we will be led to large questions—about the representation of reality and of human consciousness, about the novel’s embeddedness in socio-political reality, about perspective and vision and the limits of human knowledge, for example. But our primary focus will be close readings, and we will need to develop ways of talking, concretely, about what novels do and about how they are put together. Readings will include works by Charles Dickens, George Eliot, and Henry James.


Instructor(s): Kevin Ohi

Prerequisites: None

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ENGL 8817 Contemporary Anglophone Novels from Africa and South Asia Summer 3
Course Description

In this course we will read major contemporary novels from Africa (Nigeria, Somalia, Southern Africa) and South Asia (India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka) that engage directly with the experience of British Imperialism and contemporary globalization. Our concerns will be with the economic consequences of globalized political power and the ways in which creative writers and intellectuals in the developing world represent issues such as food security, environmental degradation, rapid industrialization and the onslaught of consumer values.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kalpana Seshadri

Prerequisites: None

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ENGL 8818 Yeats: Work, Thoughts, Contexts Spring 3
Course Description

This course will explore Yeats’s major works, with a special emphasis on his poetry. We will examine issues of form and poetics; we will also engage with his work’s social, political, and historical contexts and concerns. We will engage with a wide range of contemporary scholarship on Yeats, as well as Yeats’s own formulations and theorizations of his work.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Marjorie Howes

Prerequisites: None

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ENGL 8819 British Romanticism and Imperial Culture Spring 3
Course Description

Topics include antislavery poetry, early slave narratives, anti- and pro-slavery polemics; literary Orientalism and other forms of exoticism; anti-imperialist poetry and polemics; Ireland and Scotland as sites for colonial appropriation (including literary appropriation) and emergent nationalist cultures. Attention will be given to literary constructions of the Americas in this era and to the beginnings of Creole literary traditions. Texts may include poems by Chatterton, Rushton, More, Yearsley, Blake, Barbauld, Williams, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, and Byron; novels by Austen (Mansfield Park), Morgan (Wild Irish Girl), Scott ( Waverley ), Edgeworth (Castle Rackrent); and slave narratives by Equiano and Prince.


Instructor(s): Alan Richardson

Prerequisites: None

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ENGL 8820 Modern American Poetry and Poetics Fall 3
Course Description

An analysis of the rise of Modern American Poetry in the crucial decades between Frost's North of Boston and Pound's free verse experiments to the publication of The Bridge and the Great Depression. We'll also examine The Waste Land, the early Cantos, the radical experimentation of the New York and Chicago schools, the Great War and modern memory, Dadaism, Surrealism, Symbolism, Gertrude Stein, Picasso, and Braque, as well as the legacies of Whitman and Dickinson, Hopkins and Hardy, Yeats, Williams, Stevens, Marianne Moore, H.D., and the Harlem Renaissance.


Instructor(s): Paul Mariani

Prerequisites: None

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ENGL 8821 Violence in Medieval Literature Spring 3
Course Description

Does violence destroy human relationships, or does it help to create them? In this course, we'll investigate both socially constructive and destructive aspects of violence in the Middle Ages, as represented in imaginative writings ranging from cannibalistic Crusader epics to comic tales of domestic mayhem, from Arthurian romance to meditations on Christ's Passion. In exploring the social value of violence as well as its harm, we'll better understand why violence was central to medieval society and what viable alternatives literature proposed — issues still relevant to the critique of violence today. Medieval readings accompanied by modern theorizations of violence.


Instructor(s): Julie Orlemanski

Prerequisites: None

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ENGL 8822 Novel Theory and the Novel Fall 3
Course Description

Working primarily from Michael McKeon's anthology, Theory of the Novel: A Historical Approach, we will read major works of novel theory, focusing on genre and narrative theory, the rise of the novel in history, and the institutionalization of the study of the novel. Theoretical authors will include: Armstrong, Auerbach, Bakhtin, Barthes, Benjamin, Booth, Brooks, Frye, Ortega y Gasset, Girard, Jameson, Lukcs, Moretti, Todorov, Watt, and others. We will also read three British novels that will serve as our primary examples, probably Robinson Crusoe, Emma, and David Copperfield.


Instructor(s): Maia McAleavey

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course satisfies the theory requirement of the MA program.

ENGL 8825 Composition Theory and the Teaching of Writing Spring 3
Course Description

This course is designed to prepare graduate students to teach first-year college writing courses; to introduce students to central issues, problems and theories in composition studies; and to examine ways in which contemporary critical theories (including feminism, psychoanalysis, cultural studies, and critical pedagogy) have influenced the teaching and study of composition. Requirements will include a theoretically-informed analysis of a student essay; a piece of creative nonfiction and an accompanying description of the process used to produce it; an annotated syllabus for a first-year college course; and a week of student teaching in a First Year Writing classroom.


Instructor(s): Paula Mathieu

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Department Permission required

ENGL 8830 Wallace Stevens and High Modernism Fall