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Earth&Environmental Sciences Courses (EESC) College of Arts and Sciences


Subject Area Course # Course Title Semester Credit Hours Expand
EESC 1110 Geology of National Parks Spring 3
Course Description

U.S. National Parks give us the perfect opportunity to explore and discuss fundamental geological concepts. How was the Grand Canyon carved out by a river? How are volcanoes in Hawaii different from those in Katmai National Park, and what do they tell us about plate tectonics? How did glaciers shape Acadia National Park? Which parks are most susceptible to earthquakes and why? While considering various National Parks, as well as some State Parks and/or parks in other countries, basic modern scientific methods in the earth sciences will be discussed and explored.


Instructor(s): Yvette D. Kuiper

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 1125 Exploring Earth History Spring 3
Course Description

"The earth is not finished, but is now being and will forever be remade." C.R. Van Hise (1898) The objective of this course is to describe the history of the earth and the development of life on Earth during the last 4.6 billion years, especially within North America. Major biological and physical events will be revealed by interpretation of the rock record. The use of animations and demonstrations will enhance your understanding of some major topics.


Instructor(s): Kenneth G. Galli

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: test

EESC 1126 Exploring Earth History Lab Spring 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Kenneth G. Galli

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 1132 Exploring the Earth Fall 4
Course Description

The Earth is a dynamic planet that our species is clearly changing. A great challenge of the twenty-first century is to maintain the Earth's ability to support its growing human population. This course discusses the origin and materials of the Earth and the processes by which it has evolved. It is a first course for Geological Sciences majors and also provides a background for departmental majors and minors. EESC1132 is appropriate as a natural science core course for students interested in the Earth Sciences. The laboratory consists of in-class exercises, analysis of rocks, and a weekend field trip.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Alan Kafka, Jeremy Shakin and Seth Kruckenberg

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 1133 Exploring the Earth: Lab Fall 0
Course Description

In laboratory, students learn to identify the rocks and minerals that make up the earth and develop their understanding of how volcanoes, streams, and glaciers shape the landscape. Field trips will be taken so that students may observe and interpret geological features of New England for themselves.


Instructor(s): Alan Kafka, Jeremy Shakun and Seth Kruckenberg

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 1134 Exploring the Earth II Spring 4
Course Description

This course is a continuation of EESC1132, offered in the Fall. This course is taught at the same basic level as EESC1132, and covers Earth Science topics that have not been covered in EESC1132. The two courses together provide a broad base in the Earth Sciences, which gives the right background for majors in the Department of Geology and Geophysics, and a good general knowledge of Earth Sciences for others taking the two courses. The laboratory (EESC1132) consists of in-class exercises, analysis of characteristics of rocks and a weekend geological field trip.


Instructor(s): Alan Kafka and Yvette D. Kuiper

Prerequisites: EESC1132-1133

Cross listed with:

Comments: Aimed towards Majors and Minors in the Department of Geology and Geophysics.

EESC 1135 Exploring the Earth II: Lab Spring 0
Course Description

The laboratory (EESC1135) consists of in-class exercises, analysis of characteristics of rocks and a weekend geological field trip.


Instructor(s): Yvette Kuiper

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 1140 Our Mobile Earth Summer 3
Course Description

This course will provide you with an introduction to the structure of Earth and the dynamic processes that continuously shape and remodel its surface. During class, we will discuss the formation and evolution of the oceans and continents within the framework of the modern theory of plate tectonics. The locations, causes and effects of earthquakes and volcanoes are presented. The dynamics within Earth which drive the tectonic plates are outlined.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jennifer Cole

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 1146 Origin and Evolution of Life on Earth Spring 4
Course Description

This course explores current theories about the origins of life, beginning with the original hypothesis of the Russian biochemist A.I. Oparin. Darwin's theory of evolution is emphasized, but many different components of the natural sciences touch upon this topic. The course lectures include the study of the oldest fossils, life in extreme habitats, cellular biology, prebiotic molecules, and the search for life on other planets.


Instructor(s): Paul K. Strother

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 1147 Origin and Evolution of Life on Earth Discussion Spring 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Paul K. Strother

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 1150 Astronomy Fall 3
Course Description

Astronomical observations and theories date back to the beginning of recorded history. The development of astronomy is closely tied to the growth of physics, mathematics, philosophy and theology. Emphasis is on large-scale concepts and on how we know what we know about the stars, our galaxy and the universe. The course covers these discoveries and ideas from the earliest days of astronomy to many of the recent, exciting advances.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Thomas Kuchar

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 1157 Oceanography Fall 4
Course Description

This course is an investigation of the world's ocean as an integrated system driven by geological, chemical, physical, and biological processes. Topics include origin and evolution of the ocean basins, nature of the sea bottom, characteristics of ocean water, causes and effects of ocean currents and circulation, marine ecology and biological productivity in the ocean. An understanding of the ocean's role in the health and evolution of the planet is stressed, with special emphasis on coastal areas. Two and a half hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory each week.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Gail Kineke

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 1158 Oceanography Lab Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Gail Kineke

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 1163 Environmental Issues and Resources Summer 3
Course Description

Learn about the major processes at work inside and on the surface of the earth. Acquire skills that will promote logical decision-making about evaluating and purchasing land and property. Each class is designed to examine the facts, historical background, and through homework exercises and virtual labs, provide experience in analyzing and solving real-world problems associated with environmental issues, resources and sustainability. Demonstrations, videos, readings and a campus field trip underscore important concepts and applications.


Instructor(s): Kenneth G. Galli

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 1167 Environmental Geosciences I: Resources and Pollution Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course covers the ways we interact with the Earth by using and too often abusing its resources. Topics discussed include human population growth and its role in resource sustainability, soils and food production, drinking water supplies, air and water pollution, waste disposal, and meeting our energy needs through use of petroleum, coal, nuclear power, and renewable resources. The focus will be on existing and emerging technologies that will determine whether our planet has a sustainable future in the coming decades that will shape your lives.


Instructor(s): Jennifer Cole

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 1168 Environmental Geosciences II: Earth Processes and Risks Spring 3
Course Description

This course will explore the dynamic processes operating on and within the earth and how those processes can impact humans. We will explore the nature of natural disasters, including river and coastal flooding, volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, landslides, severe storms, climate changes, and bombardment by rare extraterrestrial objects. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the current science used to predict the occurrences of these disasters, how accurate those predictions are, and the associated mitigation practices.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course may be taken independently of EESC1167.

EESC 1170 Rivers and the Environment Fall 3
Course Description

Scientific understanding of rivers is vital to address many of today's environmental challenges. Rivers transport and distribute water, sediment, nutrients, and contaminants throughout the landscape. They provide habitat and migration pathways for countless aquatic species. Rivers supply fresh water, power generation, and recreational opportunities to much of the world's human populations. We will learn about the geological, hydrological, and biological processes that are important to rivers and watersheds, and how knowledge of these processes aids our ability to manage, protect, and restore these systems.


Instructor(s): Noah Snyder

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 1172 Weather, Climate, and Environment Fall 4
Course Description

The earth's atmosphere is a dynamic system, causing weather changes daily, seasonal variations on an annual basis, and climate changes on time scales from centuries to millennia and even longer. This course examines the earth's weather system at all these time scales. The latest methods in local weather forecasting are explored from the point of view of computer models and internet websites. The effects of ocean temperatures, El Niño, the extent of the earth's ice caps, and volcanic eruptions on the long-term weather patterns are described, and man-made environmental effects are explored. A one hour laboratory/discussion is required.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 1173 Weather, Climate, and Environment Lab Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 1174 Climate Change and Society Spring 4
Course Description

Global climate change may be one of the biggest issues facing humanity in the twenty-first century. We investigate the scientific basis for global warming forecasts from what is well known to what is deeply uncertain based on theory, models, and the geologic record of earths climate history. We discuss the political, economic, and social dimensions surrounding the global warming debate, and explore the current and potential impacts of climate change on developed and developing societies. Connections to recent media will be emphasized to give students an up-to-date view on the state of our national conversation on climate change.


Instructor(s): Jeremy Shakun

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 1175 Climate Change and Society Lab Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Kris Karnauskas

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 1177 Cosmos Spring 3
Course Description

There are more than a dozen interplanetary probes from numerous countries that are currently collecting data from several planetary bodies in the Solar System. These exploration missions are expanding knowledge of our Solar System, which is mostly built on only about half a century of space exploration. We will discuss these space missions and their scientific goals and results, which are increasingly oriented to answer questions on planetary evolution and the possibility of extraterrestrial biospheres. Throughout this course, the fundamentals of how science works will be emphasized. If weather permits, there might also be outdoor lectures for star-gazing opportunities.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Open to all students.

EESC 1180 The Living Earth I Fall 4
Course Description

This core course provides a broad and modern presentation of the major topics and principles of Earth Science. The lectures will cover all the fundamental subjects of geology, with emphasis on earth materials such as minerals, rocks and internal and external Earth processes, with a brief overview of important aspects of Earth history. The labs will involve hands-on work studying minerals, igneous rocks, sedimentary rocks, metamorphic rocks, viscosity, weathering and running water, formation of ripples and sand dunes, plate tectonics, fossils, and earthquakes, in addition to a local field geology trip during lab time. Additional topics may be covered if time allows.


Instructor(s): Ken Galli

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 1181 The Living Earth I Lab Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Ken Galli

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 1182 The Living Earth II Spring 4
Course Description

This is the second semester of EESC1180. This course may be taken independently of EESC1180.


Instructor(s): Michael Barnett

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 1183 The Living Earth II Lab Spring 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Michael Barnett

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 1187 Geoscience and Public Policy Spring 3
Course Description

In this course, we will explore case studies that demonstrate the role of the earth sciences in addressing problems of public policy. For each case study, students will be introduced to the underlying scientific concepts relevant to the problem being addressed. After this scientific foundation is developed, we will discuss how it needs to be considered as part of the process of making policy decisions. The course will also introduce students to how scientists and public policy makers apply the concepts of probability and statistics in the decision making process.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Alan Kafka

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 1195 Introduction to Space Weather Spring 3
Course Description

Space weather is an emerging field of science that deals with the relationship between physical processes on the Sun and changes in the space environment surrounding Earth. Harsh space weather conditions threaten astronaut safety and can disrupt satellite operations, communications, navigation, electric power grids, and petroleum pipelines. Topics covered with include solar radiation, solar wind, flares, coronal mass ejections, magnetic storms, Earth's upper atmosphere, and the aurora. The goal of the course will be to develop skills for investigating and understanding the natural world in which we live, within the context of this new, exciting, and highly cross-disciplinary field.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 1501 Global Implications of Climate Change Fall 6
Course Description

Climate change is one of the defining issues of our time. Decisive and swift action to mitigate carbon emissions is needed in order to prevent catastrophic events and unhealthy environments for future generations. Societies worldwide will need to adapt to a new environmental reality. However, the causes, effects, and costs of climate change are not equally distributed, which raises questions about responsibility and justice. This course will encourage critical engagement with and personal reflection on these important issues, covering the science behind climate change, the use of different energy sources and their impact on carbon emissions, and the different roles of governments, businesses, religious communities, and individuals for enacting (and preventing) ambitious solutions to climate change.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Brian Gareau and Tara Gareau

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SOCY1501

Comments: Core Renewal Course:Complex Problems
Must also register for one of the Global Implications of Climate Change lab sections.

EESC 1504 Core Renewal Leadership Seminar Fall 3
Course Description


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 1702 Living on the Water: Coasts, Development, and Sea Level Change from Venice to Boston Fall 3
Course Description

Why do humans build cities on the water? How do humans impact the coast in intentional and inadvertent ways? The cities of Venice and Boston provide case studies for probing these enduring questions. We will explore the fundamental earth processes that define characteristics of coastlines around the world and the forces that bring about change. The human impacts of coastal development will be examined using a historical (last 1500 years) and a more modern (last 400 years) perspective. We will consider current projects and proposals to accommodate sea level and make predictions about future change.


Instructor(s): Gail Kineke

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal Course: Enduring Questions

EESC 2201 Environmental Systems: The Human Footprint Fall/Spring 2
Course Description

Humans have become an increasingly significant force on Earth system, including the atmosphere, biosphere, and hydrosphere. This course explores the influence of humans on natural systems and how environmental solutions and consequences link to social, political, economic, health, and justice issues. Specifically, we will discuss topics related to population growth, energy, agriculture, urbanization, and environmental justice. This course is part of the Environmental Systems introductory sequence (EESC2201-EESC2208) for Environmental Geoscience majors.


Instructor(s): Corinne Wong

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 2202 Environmental Systems: Ecosystems Fall 2
Course Description

This course provides an introduction to the science of ecology, the interaction of organisms and their physical environment. Concepts include food webs, trophic dynamics, and ecosystem services. This course is part of the Environmental Systems introductory sequence (EESC2201-EESC2209) for Environmental Geoscience majors.


Instructor(s): Gabrielle David

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 2203 Environmental Systems: Water Resources Spring 2
Course Description

Life on Earth depends on the presence of liquid water. For humans, fresh water is a vital resource. This course explores the science of hydrology including: the water cycle, surface and ground water flow, water use by humans, and threats to water supply. This course is part of the Environmental Systems introductory sequence (EESC2201-EESC2209) for Environmental Geoscience majors.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Gabrielle David

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 2204 Environmental Systems: The Critical Zone Spring 2
Course Description

The Earth's Critical Zone is the "heterogeneous, near surface environment in which complex interactions involving rock, soil, water, air, and living organisms regulate the natural habitat and determine the availability of life-sustaining resources." This course focuses the geochemical processes that influence water quality in the near surface. This course is part of the Environmental Systems introductory sequence (EESC2201-EESC2209) for Environmental Geoscience Majors.


Instructor(s): Rudolph Hon

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 2205 Environmental Systems: Climate Change Fall 2
Course Description

The climate system is a complex machine for moving energy around the planet that depends on myriad interactions between air, water, ice, rocks, and life on various time and space scales—and it affects nearly every aspect of the environment we live in. Throughout Earth’s 4.5 billion year history, climate has experienced periods both warmer and colder than today, as evidenced by records of environmental change preserved in natural archives. Today, human activity is the largest driver of change in the global climate system. This course provides an introduction to how Earth's climate works, the history of past climate changes, current trends and projected future conditions—all focused on parsing out what is well known to what is deeply uncertain. We will close with a brief survey of the political, economic, and sociological dimensions of climate change to understand how the science fits into a larger framework.


Instructor(s): Jeremy Shakun

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 2206 Environmental Systems: Oceans Spring 2
Course Description

The oceans cover 70% of the earth's surface and are home to much of its life. The oceans are critical to the earth's biogeochemical cycling of energy and mass. Ocean currents play a key role in climate through redistribution and exchange of heat with the atmosphere and storage of CO2. Coastal areas, the narrow interface between land and ocean, represent some of the most productive, populated, and vulnerable regions on earth. The course provides an introduction to the ocean's role in earth processes and explores topics and challenges facing a changing planet through case studies and critical and analytical thinking.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Gail Kineke

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 2207 Environmental Systems: Earthquakes Spring 2
Course Description

Earthquakes are among the most frightening and devastating of natural hazards, often resulting in catastrophic loss of life and property. Earthquakes are also among the most fascinating of natural phenomena. Although the basic global scale characteristics of earthquakes are well understood in the context of the theory of plate tectonics, considered in detail earthquakes are among the most complex and unpredictable of earth processes. This course is part of the Environmental Systems introductory sequence (EESC2201-EESC2208) for Environmental Geoscience majors.


Instructor(s): Alan Kafka

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 2208 Environmental Systems: Quantitative Methods Spring 2
Course Description

This course focuses on some mathematical topics that are commonly used in analyses of environmental systems. The primary emphasis in the course will be on statistical methods, especially understanding statistical sampling and the determination of the mean, standard deviation, and confidence intervals of a population. Some commonly used probability distributions including the normal and Poisson distributions will be discussed. Other topics such as line fitting, non-linear models, and feedback systems will be introduced. The course is part of the Environmental Systems introductory sequence (EESC2201-EESC2208) for Environmental Geoscience majors.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): John Ebel

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 2209 Environmental Systems: Ores and Resources Fall 2
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Ethan Baxter

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 2211 Environmental Systems: The Human Footprint Lab Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Corinne Wong

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 2212 Environmental Systems: Ecosystems Lab Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Gabrielle David

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 2213 Environmental Systems: Water Resources Lab Spring 0
Course Description

TBD


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Gabrielle David

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 2214 Environmental Systems: The Critical Zone Lab Spring 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Rudolph Hon

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 2215 Environmental Systems: Climate Change Lab Fall 0
Course Description

The laboratory section will focus on hands-on analysis of instrumental, paleoclimate, and model datasets to more deeply explore some of the central topics discussed in lecture.


Instructor(s): Jeremy Shakun

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 2216 Environmental Systems: Oceans Lab Spring 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Gail Kineke

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 2217 Environmental Systems: Earthquakes Lab Spring 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Alan Kafka

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 2218 Environmental Systems: Quantitative Methods Lab Spring 0
Course Description

TBD


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): John Ebel

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 2219 Environmental Systems: Ores and Resources Lab Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Ethan Baxter

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 2220 Earth Materials Spring 4
Course Description

Designed to acquaint majors and minors in the Department or in the Environmental Sciences minor with the basic materials present in the Earth and on the Earth's surface. The common rock-forming silicate minerals are discussed first. Then igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic processes are investigated to develop the classifications of these groups of rocks.


Instructor(s): Ethan Baxter

Prerequisites: EESC1132 or at least two from EESC2201-EESC2208

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 2221 Earth Materials Lab Spring 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Seth Kruckenberg

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 2230 Introduction to Geochemistry Fall 4
Course Description

Geochemistry applies the principles of chemistry to problems in the Earth Sciences. The theme of "how to build a habitable planet." Topics will include: (1) origin and distribution of elements and isotopes in different Earth materials, including the deep earth, crustal rocks and minerials, natural waters, and the atmosphere, (2) biogeochemical cycles, (3) pH and redox in natural environments, and (4) the carbonate system. We will discuss geochemical applications in geology, hydrology, oceanography, paleoclimatology, paleobiology, medical geology, and Earth System Science. The two-hour laboratory will include problem sets, introduction to instrumentation, and basic field and laboratory techniques.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Amy Frappier

Prerequisites: CHEM 1109-1110 or permission of the instructor and 1 course in earth sciences/in college or high school.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 2231 Introduction to Geochemistry Lab Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Amy Frappier

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 2250 Environmental Geology Fall 4
Course Description

The surficial environment and the geological processes of the earth will be examined in some detail. Man's influence on and alteration of these processes and environment will be emphasized. Specifically pollution as it affected the surface water, ground water, the ocean, and atmosphere will be studied. The problems of waste disposal as well as mineral and energy development will be analyzed. Some of the legal implications of man's actions and reactions to the problems and processes of the environment will be discussed. Two one-hour and fifteen minute lectures plus a two-hour laboratory per week.


Instructor(s): Rudolph Hon

Prerequisites: EESC1132

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 2251 Environmental Geology Lab Spring 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Rudolph Hon

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 2264 Stratigraphy and Sedimentation Fall 4
Course Description

Sedimentary rocks cover most of the surface of the earth and are valuable repositories for energy and information about the history of the earth. The goal of this course is to teach students how to "read" the history recorded in these rocks. This course will cover the basics of sedimentary rock description recognition and correlation over long distances in the field. We will also learn about the processes that produce sediment; transportation of sediment in streams, rivers, and bodies of standing water; and the formation of carbonate limestones. A 3-hour lab is required.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Jeremy Shakun

Prerequisites: EESC1132

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 2265 Stratigraphy and Sedimentation Lab Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Dept

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 2275 Integrat Sci Res,Service/Community&Soc/Environ Jus Fall/Summer 3
Course Description

This course is designed for environmental studies minors, secondary science teachers, or those who are interested in learning more about conducting scientific research. A key feature of this course will be the engagement in the design and development of research projects around air quality, hydroponics, and alternative energies. Embedded in each project will be the need to learn how to power and utilize alternative energy systems to maintain and sustain the equipment needed for each research project.


Instructor(s): Mike Barnett

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: EDUC7550

Comments:

EESC 2288 Geological Field Mapping Methods Spring 4
Course Description

The goals of this course are to learn basic geologic mapping skills. The weekly meetings will focus on reading and constructing geological maps and cross sections, interpretation of field data, basic structural data processing, and regional geology of the field area. The field component will be a two-week excursion after final exams, where skills learned throughout the term will be brought into practice in the field through mapping exercises and field trips.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Seth Kruckenberg

Prerequisites: EESC2220 and EESC2285 or permission of the instructor

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 2297 Environmental Hydrology Fall 3
Course Description

An introduction to hydrologic processes on and near the Earth's surface. Topics include all major components of the land phase of the hydrologic cycle—precipitation, infiltration, evapotranspiration, groundwater, and streamflow—emphasizing surface water and ground water as a single resource. Hydrologic processes will be discussed in the context of ecosystems, community infrastructure, and public health.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: EESC1132, EESC1170 or EESC2203

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 3310 Agroecology: The Science of Sustainable Agriculture Fall 4
Course Description

Conventional agriculture, while responsible for enormous increases in yield, has undermined the natural resources that support agricultural yield and ecosystem services. Yet there is a pressing need to maintain yield in the face of climate change. How can we meet the food needs of a growing human population without clearing more forests, polluting rivers and the atmosphere, overdrawing from aquifers, and threatening the existence of wild species? In this course we will learn how the principles of ecology can be applied to the design, management, and analysis of agroecosystems and agricultural landscapes with the goal of creating a sustainable food system.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Tara Pisani-Gareau

Prerequisites: BIOL2010 or EESC2201 and EESC2202 or by permission of the instructor

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 3312 River Restoration and Management Fall 3
Course Description

This course focuses on one of our most fundamental resources, rivers, and the science behind management and restoration. Rivers, floodplains, and wetlands transfer sediment, nutrients, and contaminants, while providing ecosystem services such as species habitat, clean water resources, hydroelectricity, transportation, and recreation. Subsequently, there are many stakeholders and goals for management and restoration projects. We will investigate qualitative, quantitative, and statistical methods used to understand the exciting complexity of river processes and applications of these methods to management plans. Furthermore, we will explore how restoration of river form is related to aquatic habitat restoration in the channel and surrounding wetlands.


Instructor(s): Gabrielle David

Prerequisites: EESC1132 or EESC1170 or EESC2203 or by permission of instructor

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 3318 Alternative Energy: Why Aren't We There Yet? Fall 3
Course Description

Oil, gas, and coal have historically provided the foundation of our domestic and global energy needs. It is becoming increasingly apparent that, to attain a sustainable society, we must shift away from these polluting, non-renewable fossil fuel resources. Alternative energy sources are non-polluting and renewable and are therefore logical replacements. Some are confused, however, as to why more progress hasn’t been made towards phasing out fossil fuels and transitioning to alternative energy. This course will delve into the benefits and cons of fossil fuels, as well as the stumbling blocks to implementing the following alternative energy technologies: hydropower, wave power, biomass, solar, geothermal, wind, hydrogen and nuclear energies.


Instructor(s): Jennifer Cole

Prerequisites: Environmental Systems: The Human Footprint (EESC2201).

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 3330 Paleobiology Spring 3
Course Description

Paleobiology is the study of evolution based on Paleontology, the fossil record of life through geologic time. The course begins with the origins of life and early evolution during the Precambrian Eon, when all major domains of life were established. The rise of plants and animals, beginning about 500 million years ago, is followed by the study of macroevolution and patterns of evolution through time. Lecture emphasizes paleobiology and environmental evolution; laboratory provides direct observation of fossils including basic morphology and phylogeny. The class may include an extended weekend field trip to Nova Scotia to visit several fossil localities.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Paul K. Strother

Prerequisites: EESC1132-1134, or BIOL2000-2020, or permission of the instructor

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 3331 Paleobiology Lab Spring 0
Course Description

TBD


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Paul K. Strother

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 3335 Topics in Geobiology Spring 3
Course Description

Geobiology is broadly concerned with the dynamic interface between biology and geology as deduced from Earth's 4-billion-year rock record. These long term interactions between the biosphere and the lithosphere that have resulted in irreversible changes in the Earth's surface environment. Course content begins with a review of Earth systems science and biogeochemical cycles along with the organisms that produce those cycles. Next, we examine the role played by the environment in biological evolution—biogeography, speciation, extinction, and species richness through geologic time. We end with the evolution of the atmosphere and oceans, including the study of global warming.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Paul K. Strother

Prerequisites: Two years of college work or permission of the instructor

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 3340 Costa Rica:Intro Tropical Science,Int'L Law&Dev Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 3370 Optical Mineralogy Fall 2
Course Description

This course is an introduction to polarizing light microscopy (PLM) and its application to mineral identifications in petrographic thin sections. Students will learn the basic concepts of polarized light microscopy with the objective to identify isotropic, uniaxial, and biaxial minerals in rocks using a polarized light microscope. This course is equivalent to the first part of GE 570.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Rudolph Hon

Prerequisites: EESC2220

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 3371 Optical Mineralogy Lab Fall 0
Course Description

Students will learn the practical skills of using petrographic polarizing microscope to identify minerals and describe thin sections.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Rudolph Hon

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 3372 Igneous Petrology Fall 2
Course Description

This course is devoted to an understanding of the petrology and petrography of igneous rocks. Lectures on the petrology of how igneous rocks form and the plate tectonic environments in which they do so will be integrated with the laboratory (EESC3373), where students use the petrographic microscope to identify the mineral phases and textures that make up these rocks. Phase diagrams will be used to help better understand the origin of igneous rock processes.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Eric Kelly

Prerequisites: EESC2220 and EESC3370/3371

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 3373 Igneous Petrology Lab Fall 0
Course Description

Students use the petrographic polarizing microscope to identify and describe igneous rocks.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 3374 Sedimentary Petrology Spring 2
Course Description

This course focuses on the recognition and identification of sedimentary rock types and the primary and secondary components that make up sedimentary rocks. The class will involve extensive analysis of sediment and sedimentary rock samples in hand specimen and thin section. The first part of this course will cover how siliciclastic rocks form, and the second part will cover carbonates and other biochemical rocks. Throughout the course, emphasis will be placed on understanding and using classification schemes and identifying different rock types in hand sample and thin section.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Eric Kelly

Prerequisites: EESC3370

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 3375 Sedimentary Petrology Lab Spring 0
Course Description

Students use the petrographic polarizing microscope to identify and describe igneous and metamorphic rocks.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Eric Kelly

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 3376 Metamorphic Petrology Spring 2
Course Description

This course is devoted to an understanding of the petrology and petrography of metamorphic rocks. Metamorphic rocks form from igneous, sedimentary and earlier metamorphic rocks most commonly by increased jpressure and temperature and are therefore a key to understanding tectonics. Lectures on the petrology of how metamorphic rocks form and the plate tectonic environments in which they do so will be integrated with the laboratory (EESC3377) where students use the petrographic microscope to identify the mineral phases and textures that make up these rocks. Phase diagrams will be used to help better understand the origin of metamorphic processes.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Eric Kelly

Prerequisites: EESC2220, EESC3370/3371, EESC3374/3375

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 3377 Metamorphic Petrology Lab Spring 0
Course Description

Students use the petrographic polarizing microscope to identify and describe metamorphic rocks.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 3378 Petrology Fall 4
Course Description

This course is focused on learning the techniques of polarizing light microscopy (PLM) and on petrology and petrography of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Lectures on the petrology of how these rocks form and how they relate to the plate tectonic environments will be integrated with the laboratory (EESC3379). Phase diagrams will be used to help better understand the origin of igneous rocks whereas metamorphic facies reactions will be applied to understanding of progressive and retrograde metamorphic processes.


Instructor(s): Rudolph Hon

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 3379 Petrology Lab Fall 0
Course Description

Students will learn the practical skills of using petrographic polarizing microscope to identify minerals and describe thin sections. Following the first part of learning the PLM basic skills the students will apply the petrographic microscope techniques to identify mineral phases and textures that make up both the igneous and metamorphic rock groups.


Instructor(s): Rudolph Hon

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 3380 Environmental Oceanography Spring 3
Course Description

In this course, fundamental physical, chemical, geological, and biological processes occurring in ocean environments are examined in the context of how they impact humans and how humans have impacted the ocean. Emphasis is placed on understanding the challenges involved with the development of environments and resources through actual case studies and problem solving. Topics include coastal oceanography and shore processes, water chemistry, biogeochemical cycles and circulation, and air/sea interactions as related to pollution and climate change.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Gail C. Kineke

Prerequisites: EESC1132

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 3385 Structural Geology Spring 4
Course Description

The goal of this course is the development of skills in the structural analysis of rock bodies as seen in outcrops, or small areas, to gain an understanding of the geometries, sequencing, and kinematics of deformational features. Structures such as folds, faults, foliations, lineations, and shear zones will be considered at various scales, as visible in the field, or in thin section. We will also discuss some inter- and intra- granular deformation mechanisms. The 3-hour laboratory consists of in-class problems and some field-based problems.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Seth Kruckenberg

Prerequisites: EESC1134

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 3386 Structural Geology Lab Spring 0
Course Description

TBD


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Seth Kruckenberg

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 3391 Introduction to Geophysics Fall 3
Course Description

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental principles of geophysics. Both theoretical and applied aspects of geophysics will be discussed. Topics include stress and strain, deformation of earth materials, the earth's gravitational field, the earth's magnetic field, seismic waves, earth structure, earthquakes, and tectonic processes.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Alan Kafka

Prerequisites: EESC1134; MATH1102-103; PHYS2211-2212, or permission of instructor

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 3398 Statistical Analysis of Scientific Data Fall 3
Course Description

The scientific process involves the collection of data for the testing and development of scientific models. This course covers the statistical methods commonly used to acquire, analyze, and interpret many different types of scientific data.


Instructor(s): Alan Kafka

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 4400 Geomorphology and Landscape Change Spring 4
Course Description

This course focuses on the physical processes that shape the landscape. Understanding the flow of water, sediment, nutrients, and contaminants throughout watersheds is vital to earth scientists and land managers. In this course, emphasis is placed on interactions of geomorphic processes with external factors such as land use, climate change, and tectonics. Topics include: sediment creation by chemical and physical weathering; hillslope hydrology and transport; mass-wasting processes; steam erosion, transport and deposition; and glacial landform development. The course includes several local field laboratories and a field trip in northern New England.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Noah P. Snyder

Prerequisites: EESC1132, EESC1170 or EESC2203; PHYS2200 (or equivalent) is recommended background

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 4401 Geomorphology and Landscape Change Lab Spring 0
Course Description

TBD


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Noah P. Snyder

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 4405 Fluid Flow and Sediment Transport Fall 3
Course Description

The interaction of fluid and sediment creates most sedimentary deposits and also shapes most of the earth's surface. The first part of this course will cover the basics of incompressible, Newtonian fluid flow. Emphasis will be placed on the conservation laws for mass and momentum and the hydrodynamics of boundary layer flow and turbulence. The second part will examine sediment entrainment, transport, and deposition. We will cover the nature of sediment movement, including bedload and suspended load, and the accompanying deformation of the bed. These principles will be used to predict the evolution of fluvial systems, bedforms, and sedimentary structures.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Doug Edmonds

Prerequisites: Calculus (MATH1100, MATH1102 or equivalent) and II (MATH1101, MATH1103, MATH1105 or equivalent)

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 4418 Hydrogeology Spring 3
Course Description

This is an introductory course in groundwater hydrogeology for advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students. The course covers the following topics: the hydrologic cycle; porosity; permeability and hydraulic conductivity of geologic materials; principles of groundwater flow; well hydraulics and aquifer testing; geologic control on groundwater flow; and an introduction to contaminant hydrogeology and field methods of site characterization.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Alfredo Urzua

Prerequisites: EESC1132

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 4420 Ecohydrology Fall 3
Course Description

This interdisciplinary course will explore the hydrologic mechanisms that underlie ecological patterns and processes by examining climate-soil-vegetation dynamics. Drawing extensively from the primary literature in lectures and discussions, we will cover ecohydrologic interactions at various scales in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, including drylands, grasslands, forests and woodlands, lake margins, streams and rivers, and wetlands, among others. Ecosystem management and anthropogenic perturbations to ecohydrologic dynamics also will be discussed.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Martha Carlson Mazur

Prerequisites: Hydrology (EESC1170, EESC2203, or EESC2297) and ecosystem science (EESC2202 or BIOL2010); or by permission of instructor.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 4424 Environmental Geophysics Fall 3
Course Description

This is a practical course in the methods of geophysical exploration. The emphasis is on the methods that are used in environmental site assessments and geotechnical engineering work. The principles and methods studied are also applicable to petroleum and mineral exploration. The methods covered include: resistivity, induced polarization, electromagnetics, magnetics, gravity, self potentials, ground penetrating radar and seismic refraction and reflection. In this course students will conduct geophysical investigations of selected field sites. Relevant lectures will be given on field methodology, instrumentation, theory, and interpretation. A one-hour discussion/laboratory is required.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Dept

Prerequisites: MATH1102-1103, PHYS2211-2122, or permission of instructor

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 4430 Environmental Isotope Geochemistry Spring 3
Course Description

This course will examine the application of isotope geochemistry to the investigation of the earth systems. Principles of radioactive decay and isotope fractionation will be developed and applied to topics such as element cycling at global and watershed scales, the origin and evolution of surface water, vadose water, and groundwater compositions, dating of the geologic record, and paleoenvironmental and paleoclimate reconstructions.


Instructor(s): Corinne Wong

Prerequisites: Two semesters of Chemistry (CHEM1109–1110 with labs CHEM1111–1112 or CHEM1117–1118 with labs CHEM1119–1120)

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 4440 Global Biogeochemical Cycles Spring 3
Course Description

The interplays between biology, geology and chemistry over geologic time make this planet unique. Biogeochemical cycles are pathways through which important nutrients are between the components of the earth system (i.e., biosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and atmosphere). This course will review the Earth's major biogeochemical cycles using different approaches, including isotopic tracers and mathematical models. The perturbation of natural cycles by anthropogenic activity will also be explored.


Instructor(s): Corinne Wong

Prerequisites: At least one college-level earth science course, or permission of instructor. Additional coursework in biology, chemistry, and/or the earth sciences is helpful.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 4455 Exploration Seismology Spring 4
Course Description

This course is an introduction to the basics of exploration seismology. Emphasis is placed on environmental and geotechnical applications as well as techniques used in petroleum and mineral exploration. The lectures cover the ideas and theories used in the acquisition, processing, and presentation of seismic refraction and reflection data.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): John E. Ebel

Prerequisites: MATH1102-1103, PHYS2211-2212

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 4456 Exploration Seismology Laboratory Spring 0
Course Description

TBD


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): John E. Ebel

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 4457 Watershed Science Fall 3
Course Description

This course develops concepts derived from the intersection of environmental issues related to water in the land environment and the scientific principles of water pathways and interactions above and below the ground surfaces in a watershed. In the first part we will introduce foundations of watershed water balance, followed by a discussion of chemical interactions between water and its surrounding earth material. We will conclude the course with topics focused on natural and anthropogenic factors that lead to a degradation of water quality and how to prevent such changes from occurring.


Instructor(s): Rudolph Hon

Prerequisites: EESC2220 or equivalent

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 4462 Paleoclimate I (Proxies) Fall 3
Course Description

The course explores how past climate information can be reconstructed from geologic deposits (e.g., ice cores, marine and lake sediments, glacier deposits, speleothems, tree rings). Topics will include the earth system processes governing physical, chemical, biological, and isotopic variability in such deposits, sampling and analytical methodologies for constructing paleoclimate records, techniques for dating and creating age models, and common approaches to interpreting past climate variability from climate archives. This course is intended to be paired with, but not a prerequisite for, Paleoclimate II (Past Climate Dynamics).


Instructor(s): Corinne Wong

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 4463 Paleoclimate Dynamics Spring 3
Course Description

Earth’s climate has exhibited rich variability on all space and time scales over its 4.5 billion year history, which provides valuable context for understanding modern climate change. Rather than taking a cursory look at this entire history, this course will more deeply explore such variability by focusing on the examination of three important and unresolved problems: the toggling between glacial and interglacial conditions over the past two million years, the remarkably abrupt climate changes seen throughout the last glacial period, and the relatively stability of climate over the past 10,000 years. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the forcings, feedbacks, and other processes responsible for producing these changes, as well as the mechanisms linking various regions and components of the climate system. Class time will be split into lectures, problem sets, and paper discussions.


Instructor(s): Jeremy Shakun

Prerequisites: EESC1174 or EESC2205, or permission of the instructor

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Comments:

EESC 4468 Thermodynamics of Earth Systems Spring 3
Course Description

This course covers fundamental principles of thermodynamics via application of Physical Chemistry to Earth systems. Examples are drawn from Petrology and other fields within Earth Science to explore the conditions of formation of minerals, magmas, solutions, and gases, and their responses to changes in those conditions. Topics in kinetics are addressed to examine non-equilibrium effects on some systems.


Instructor(s): Eric Kelly

Prerequisites: EESC2220 is required; CHEM1110 or a course in Petrology or Geochemistry is recommended.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 4480 Applications of GIS (Geographical Information Systems) Spring 4
Course Description

The course covers fundamental concepts and practical applications of GIS in the geosciences, environmental sciences, land use, and other related fields. Students will learn the basics and principles of spatial database management, database query, and preparation of printed maps. Formal presentations and practical assignments in the two-hour lab will use ArcView and ArcGIS software packages, with spatial data sets taken from across the disciplines including geosciences, environmental studies and land use/city planning, marketing, and other fields. Students will gain working experience of applying GIS to their studies and research and achieve practical skills for the marketplace.


Instructor(s): Rudolph Hon

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 4481 Applications of GIS Lab Spring 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Rudolph Hon

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 4484 Aqueous Geochemistry Fall 3
Course Description

Natural water systems consist of surface and subsurface water reservoirs that are in a constant process of chemical interaction with their surroundings. Understanding of the processes (i.e., dissolution and precipitation) of various chemical species will be presented from the standpoint of equilibrium and nonequilibrium thermodynamics of water-rock systems.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Rudolph Hon

Prerequisites: CHEM1109-1110, MATH1102-1103

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 4485 Advanced Structural Geology Fall 4
Course Description

Advanced Structural Geology (EESC4485-4486) builds on Introduction to Structural Geology (EESC2285-2286). Structures such as folds, faults, foliations, lineations, and shear zones will be considered in much more detail than in EESC2285. We will focus more on microstructures, complex geometries, and multiple generations of deformation.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Seth Kruckenberg

Prerequisites: EESC2285

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 4486 Advanced Structural Geology Lab Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Yvette Kuiper

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 4490 Remote Sensing and Image Interpretation Fall 3
Course Description

The course emphasizes methods of geological interpretation of remotely sensed image data. Students challenged with a series of images from which the group must, with guidance, draw relevant conclusions about the geology and geomorphology of the area represented. Projects are based on spatial data in paper or digital format including topographic or bathymetric maps, digital elevation models, aerial photographs, satellite images, subsurface images, scenes from the seafloor, and other planets. Methods of digital image processing and enhancement are discussed. Grades are based on projects that will consist of written reports, maps, processed digital images, and interpretive cross sections.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Noah P. Snyder

Prerequisites: EESC1132 (Exploring the Earth) and/or EESC2200 (Earth Materials)

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Comments:

EESC 5130 Isotopes in Earth Sciences Lab Spring 4
Course Description

The laboratory EESC5130 will include in-class problem sets, introduction to laboratory techniques and instrumentation, and subject projects.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Ethan Baxter

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 5140 Isotope Geochemistry and Geochronology Fall 3
Course Description

This course will introduce the various isotopic methods that are used in the Earth Sciences. Topics will include: (1) radiogenic isotopes in geochronology and petrogenesis, including U-Th-Pb, K-Ar, Rb-Sr ,and Sm-Nd, (2) light stable isotopes in geology, biogeochemistry, and paleothermometry, including C, H, O, N, and S, and (3) non-traditional stable isotopes in biogeochemistry, oceanography, and cosmochemistry including Fe, Mo, Cu, Ni, and Ca. We will emphasize the geochemical behavior, analytical methods, and specific applications of these isotope systems in geology.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Ethan Baxter

Prerequisites: One semester of Calculus, one semester of Chemistry, Earth Materials (EESC2220), or permission of instructor.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 5518 Estuarine Studies Spring 3
Course Description

This course is an exploration of the geological, chemical, physical, and biological processes occurring in estuaries. The course is geared toward junior-level science majors but is also appropriate for beginning graduate students. The course has a significant field component for individual projects that can be continued for thesis work (undergraduate or graduate). Class meetings through the semester are used for discussion or readings from the scientific literature, definition of research problems as a team, and introduction to data analysis and interpretation using results from field experiments and the numerical processing package MATLAB. Three hours per week plus extended field experiment.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Gail C. Kineke

Prerequisites: calculus and physics are recommended

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 5530 Marine Geology Fall 3
Course Description

Recent geological and geophysical information on the ocean basins is examined, concentrating on three areas: (1) structure of the earth, plate tectonics, and composition of the ocean basins; (2) geophysical processes responsible for the structure and evolution of the ocean basins; and (3) marine sedimentation, including sediment transport, pleistocene sedimentation, and global climate change. Sedimentological and geophysical investigation techniques are emphasized.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Dept.

Prerequisites: EESC1134; calculus and physics are recommended

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 5535 Coastal Processes Spring 3
Course Description

This course is a study of the physical and geological processes responsible for the formation and evolution of coastal environments. The course takes a morphodynamic approach by studying the coupled suite of hydrodynamic processes, seafloor morphologies, and sequences of change. Topics to be covered include: classification of coasts, sea level change, shallow water physical oceanography and sediment transport, and coastal environments (barrier islands and beaches, deltas, estuaries). Includes problem sets and field trip(s) to the coast.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Gail Kineke

Prerequisites: Calculus and physics are recommended.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 5543 Tectonics Fall 3
Course Description

Plate Tectonics, the idea that the surface of the Earth moves and reshapes itself through time, has revolutionized geology. While a great deal has been learned about the movements and evolution of the Earth's lithospheric plates through time, the full implications of this theory remain an area of active research and debate. Modern studies increasingly document important feedbacks between patterns of climate, deposition, metamorphism, magmatism, seismicity and deformation that can be understood in the context of the past and present motions of the Earth's plates. This course will focus on understanding the linkages between these dynamic processes through time.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Seth Kruckenberg

Prerequisites: Undergraduates wishing to take this course should have completed EESC1132 or EESC2200, and speak with the course instructor prior to registering.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 5549 Climate Change Debates Fall 3
Course Description

This advanced seminar seeks to provide an overview of the science of global change and a critical evaluation of the literature through a survey of current scientific debates. We will cover a wide range of issues from topics in radiative forcing, oceans, atmosphere, cryosphere, paleoclimate, biological feedbacks, and impacts. Students will be expected to read papers and lead discussions, write assessments of each climate debate, and prepare a final term paper evaluating the scientific consensus on climate change in the context of the debates we cover.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Jeremy Shakun

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 5570 Petrology Fall 3
Course Description

This course is the combination of EESC370 and EESC3372 for graduate students. The first part is an introduction to polarizing light microscopy and its application to mineral identifications in petrographic thin sections. The second part is devoted to an understanding of the petrology and petrography of igneous rocks. Lectures on the petrology of how igneous rocks form and their plate tectonic setting will be integrated with the laboratory, where students will use the petrographic microscope to identify minerals and textures that make up these rocks. Phase diagrams will be used to help understand the origin of igneous rocks.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Rudolph Hon

Prerequisites: EESC2220

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 5571 Petrology Lab Fall 0
Course Description

Students will first learn how to use the petrographic polarizing microscope as a basic tool in the Geosciences to identify and describe minerals in thin sections and then apply this knowledge to igneous rocks.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Rudolph Hon

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 5572 Geophysical Data Processing Spring 3
Course Description

This course covers the fundamental principles underlying methods that are commonly used to analyze digital signals. Methods of signal processing that are used in geophysical applications will be emphasized, but these same methods are also used in a wide variety of science and engineering applications. Topics include the following: signals and systems, linear time-invariant systems, Fourier analysis of continuous and discrete-time signals and systems, filtering, modulation, and sampling.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): John Ebel

Prerequisites: MATH1101 or 1102; PHYS2211-2212

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 5574 Petrology II Spring 3
Course Description

This course is the combination of EESC3374 and EESC3376 for graduate students. The first part focuses on the recognition and identification of sedimentary rocks and their primary and secondary components. Emphasis will be placed on understanding and using classification schemes and identifying different rock types in hand sample and thin section. The second part is devoted to an understanding of the petrology and petrography of metamorphic rocks. Lectures on how metamorphic rocks form will be integrated with the laboratory where students use a petrographic microscope to identify the mineral phases and textures of these rocks.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Eric Kelly

Prerequisites: EESC2220 and EESC5570, or equivalent

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 5575 Petrology II Lab Spring 0
Course Description

Students will use the petrographic polarizing microscope and other tools to identify and describe sedimentary and metamorphic rocks.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Eric Kelly

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 5578 Petrology (Grad) Fall 3
Course Description

This course is similar and concurrent with EESC3378 but reserved for graduate students. The emphasis will be on learning the techniques of polarizing light microscopy (PLM) and on petrology and petrography of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Lectures on the petrology of how these rocks form and how they relate to the plate tectonic environments will be integrated with the laboratory (EESC5579). Phase diagrams will be used to help better understand the origin of igneous rocks whereas metamorphic facies reactions will be applied to understanding of progressive and retrograde metamorphic processes. This course will include additional assignments.


Instructor(s): Rudolph Hon

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 5579 Petrology Lab (Grad) Fall 0
Course Description

This course is similar and concurrent with EESC3379 but reserved for graduate students. Students will learn the practical skills of using petrographic polarizing microscope to identify minerals and describe thin sections. Following the first part of learning the PLM basic skills the students will apply the petrographic microscope techniques to identify mineral phases and textures that make up both the igneous and metamorphic rock groups. Additional emphasis will be on interpretation of PLM observations.


Instructor(s): Rudolph Hon

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 5580 Environmental Seminar Spring 3
Course Description

We investigate environmental issues from scientific, historic, economic, and cultural perspectives and explore paths toward sustainable solutions. Outside experts occasionally attend and participate in specific seminars associated with their areas of concentration. As a senior seminar, the course will be driven by student interest and expertise. The goal is for each student to make use of the skills, knowledge, and background they bring to the conversation at this time in their academic career.


Instructor(s): Tara Pisani-Gareau

Prerequisites: Permission of the Director of Environmental Studies Program Director or the instructor

Cross listed with:

Comments: This seminar is required for and limited to seniors with an Environmental Studies Minor.

EESC 5582 Senior Environmental Geoscience Research Seminar I Fall 2
Course Description

In this two-semester course sequence, students will be introduced to the process of conducting original scientific research. This includes exploring fundamentals of a natural system from reading the scientific literature, defining a problem, designing and executing an experiment, analysis, data interpretation, and presentation of results in written and oral formats. Students will work individually or in groups within a broader research project. Topics and field areas will vary from year to year depending on existing projects and expertise of the instructor. The EESC5582-5583 sequence fulfills the senior research experience requirement for Environmental Geoscience majors.


Instructor(s): Gail Kineke

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 5583 Senior Research Seminar II Spring 3
Course Description

EESC5583 is the second semester of a two-course sequence that introduces students to the process of conducting original scientific research.


Instructor(s): Gail Kineke

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 5586 Advanced Environmental Oceanography Spring 3
Course Description

In this course, fundamental physical, chemical, geological, and biological processes occurring in ocean environments are examined in the context of how they impact humans and how humans have impacted the ocean. Emphasis is placed on understanding the challenges involved with the development of environments and resources through actual case studies and problem solving. Topics include coastal oceanography and shore processes, water chemistry, biogeochemical cycles and circulation, and air/sea interactions as related to pollution and climate change.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Gail Kineke

Prerequisites: EESC1132

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 5595 Senior Thesis Seminar Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Independent study in Geological Sciences or the Environmental Geosciences under the direction of a faculty member for undergraduate students. Normally runs for two semesters of the senior year. See university catalog or department website for information about department honors theses.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Permission of a faculty member.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 5596 Undergraduate Reading and Research in Environmental Geoscience Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

An independent study of some problem or area of knowledge in environmental geology under the direction of a faculty member. The possibility exists to work with actual problems in Massachusetts using data from state agencies. Also to be used for undergraduate students doing honors theses.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Permission of a faculty member.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 5597 Undergraduate Reading and Research in Geology Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

For undergraduates wishing to pursue independent study in the area of geology under the direction of a faculty member. Study can be in an area of knowledgeable interest or on a particular problem.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Permission of a faculty member.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 5598 Undergraduate Reading and Research in Geophysics Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

For undergraduates wishing to pursue independent study in the area of geophysics under the direction of a faculty member. Study can be in an area of knowledgeable interest or on a particular problem.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Permission of a faculty member

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 5599 Advanced Independent Research Fall/Spring 6
Course Description

Independent study in Geology, Geophysics, or the Environmental Geosciences under the direction of a faculty member for undergraduate students qualifying for the University's Scholar of the College Program.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Permission of a faculty member

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EESC 6660 Introduction to Seismology Fall 3
Course Description

This course covers the fundamentals of the science of seismology. Topics include seismic instruments, properties of vibrations and waves, seismic wave propagation, reflection and refraction, earthquake sources, and earthquake hazards.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): John Ebel

Prerequisites: MATH1103 (can be taken concurrently)

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Comments:

EESC 6684 Advanced Aqueous Geochemistry Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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EESC 6691 Earth Systems Seminar Fall 3
Course Description

An advanced seminar on topics in the Geosciences requiring integration of many subspecialities. Topics vary from year to year. Students will be expected to read and report on papers from the recent literature and prepare one or more talks similar to those presented at scientific meetings and a term paper integrating data from various areas of Geosciences. Required for all incoming graduate students.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Alan Kafka and Jeremy Shakun

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

EESC 6692 Earth Systems Seminar Fall 3
Course Description

An advanced seminar on topics in the Geosciences requiring integration of many subspecialities. Topics vary from year to year. Students will be expected to read and report on papers from the recent literature and prepare one or more talks similar to those presented at scientific meetings and a term paper integrating data from various areas of Geosciences. Required for all incoming graduate students.


Instructor(s): Ethan Baxter and John Ebel

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

EESC 6693 Earth Systems Seminar Fall 3
Course Description

This is a graduate level multidisciplinary course offered annually by the Department on a variety of topics related to research interests of the faculty. The Earth Systems Seminar is primarily intended for beginning graduate students, but upper level undergraduate students may enroll by permission of the instructors.


Schedule: TR

Instructor(s): Rudolph Hon

Prerequisites: Upper level undergraduates may enroll by permission of the instructors .

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EESC 6694 Earth Systems Seminar III Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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EESC 7798 Graduate Reading and Research in Geophysics Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

A graduate research study of a topic in geophysics under the supervision of a faculty member.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor

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EESC 7799 Graduate Reading and Research in Geology Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

A graduate research study of a topic in geology under the supervision of a faculty member.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor

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EESC 8801 Thesis Seminar Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Thesis research under the guidance of a faculty member.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

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EESC 8888 Interim Study Fall/Spring 0
Course Description

Required for master's candidates who have completed all their course requirements but have not taken comprehensive examinations. Also for master's students who have taken up to six credits of Thesis Seminar but have not yet finished writing their thesis.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

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