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Teacher Education and Currriculum and Instruction Courses (EDUC) Lynch School of Education


Subject Area Course # Course Title Semester Credit Hours Expand
EDUC 1044 Working with Special Needs Students Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Introduces pre-service teachers to a variety of issues surrounding special education, including its historical development, concepts of disability, the terminology commonly used in the field, and recent trends and practices. Examines legislation pertaining to special education, particularly the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Assists future educators to understand the process of designing and implementing an Individualized Educational Program (IEP).


Instructor(s): David Scanlon and Richard Jackson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 1100 First Year Experience, Reflection, and Action Fall 2
Course Description

First Year Experience, Reflection, and Action is a seminar designed to help first year students negotiate the rigors and dilemmas of college life and become more critical citizens. Readings, discussions, and panel presentations will address moral-cognitive decision-making, vocational discernment in the context of Ignatian Pedagogy, local, state, and national trends in Applied Psychology and Human Development and Teacher Education and expose students to LSOE and university faculty and student research. Participants will read and critique current research about college student issues and learn to self-reflect critically in order to make more informed choices and decisions.


Instructor(s): Audrey Friedman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 1111 Freshmen Era/Group Section Fall 0
Course Description

Students break up into small groups to further discuss the main topics they have read about and heard during the large group lectures. Group facilitators and Peer Advisors lead discussions and all students must participate and submit assignments and research. The goals of the experience are the same ad EDUC1100.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 1112 Professional Development Seminar for Freshmen II Spring 1
Course Description

Designed as a continuation of orientation; mandatory for all freshmen. Both faculty advisors and peer advisors address specific topics relative to college requirements, available programs, and career possibilities, as well as college life and social issues. Both group and individual sessions are scheduled.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Continued from Fall

EDUC 1128 Computer Applications for Educators Spring 3
Course Description

The technology which is often available in contemporary classrooms affords opportunities for reaching more students in relevant ways. This course covers fundamental knowledge and skills needed by teachers who wish to use that technology and affords students opportunities to develop their expertise in mainstream and emerging educational technologies. This course includes presentations on hardware (e.g., computers, scanners, digital cameras, video cameras) and software (e.g., interactive, web, productivity) and discussion of how these integrate into classroom instruction. Substantial hands-on project time is provided.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Alec Peck

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This is not a course in computer programming. (EDUC1128 is for undergraduate students only).

EDUC 1150 Critical Reading and Writing: Beyond the Gist Summer 3
Course Description

This course is designed for a) incoming first year students that need critical reading/writing strategies to understand/write about difficult texts required in literature, philosophy, and other reading/writing-intensive Core courses; and b) rising sophomores that experienced difficulty passing reading/writing intensive courses. Instruction will address literal, interpretive, and applied reading comprehension strategies, identifying critical themes; questioning the text; visualizing and physicalizing text; responding to informational texts and texts in different genres; developing, supporting, and writing arguments; understanding the specific, functional, and conceptual meanings of vocabulary; reading visuals; test-taking strategies; citing references. All reading materials will be drawn from actual texts used in Core courses. The critical reading and writing skills of prospective students will be assessed prior to admission into the course.


Instructor(s): Audrey Friedman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Entry by permission of the Instructor Only

EDUC 2039 Learning and Curriculum in the Elementary School Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Introduces students to the profession of education and roles of teachers. Provides understanding of contexts in which education is delivered in multicultural settings and opportunity to gain knowledge and experience about interpersonal, observational, and organization skills that underlie teaching. Faculty and students work together throughout course to examine students' commitment to and readiness for career as a teacher. Introduces essentials of curriculum, teaching, and managing classrooms at elementary (K-6) level and links them to major learning theories for children. Views curriculum, instruction, management, and learning theory from perspectives of current school reform movement and social/cultural changes affecting elementary classrooms and schools.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Students must be registered for EDUC2151 and arrange their schedules to be on-site in a school Tuesday or Thursday.

EDUC 2101 Teaching Language Arts Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Focuses on the teaching and learning of language arts in the elementary grades. Students will be exposed to theoretical approaches to both oral and written language development in addition to a wide variety of teaching methods. Students will have the opportunity to apply their learning through practical lesson development, and encouraged to reflect on their experiences via the theoretical perspectives highlighted in the course. Student diversity and its implications for teaching language arts will be an integral theme. Students will draw on their experiences in their prepractica to apply and reflect on learning as they mediate theory and practice.


Instructor(s): Curt Dudley-Marling

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 2104 Teaching Reading Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course is designed to offer preservice teachers theoretical and practical knowledge and experience into teaching literacy to elementary age students. Emphasis will be placed on the social, political, and cultural context of reading instruction. Students will gain understanding of major theoretical perspectives on literacy development and the myriad strategies for teaching reading in a variety of contexts. Students will also be expected to spend time in a context where they can gain experiences in providing reading instruction in a relevant and productive way.


Instructor(s): Curt Dudley-Marling and Lisa Patel Stevens

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 2105 Teaching the Social Sciences and the Arts Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Provides prospective elementary teachers with opportunities to develop social studies and arts curricula for elementary age students and consider a variety of instructional approaches appropriate for this age group. Students will learn how to develop the skills of an historian and select and integrate knowledge appropriate for diverse learners. Curricular topics include evaluating context-appropriate materials, developing critical thinking, using and critiquing primary sources in the classroom, and developing varied learning activities through the use of multiple media.


Instructor(s): Patrick McQuillan

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 2108 Teaching Mathematics and Technology Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course presents methods and materials useful in teaching mathematics to elementary school children. It analyzes mathematics content and pedagogy from both conceptual and practical perspectives. Emphasis is placed on the interconnections among theory, procedures, and applications that form the framework on which specific mathematics lessons are constructed. It examines the elementary mathematics curriculum through technology resources, addressing the different ways in which technology can be used. Activities include laboratory experiences with concrete models and technology as well as inquiry into the role of the teacher in the school community in the epoch of teaching for social justice.


Instructor(s): Lillie R. Albert

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 2109 Teaching About the Natural World Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course is designed to increase confidence, enthusiasm and knowledge for teaching elementary science. Science can be an essential part of an elementary classroom not only to achieve key science learning goals, but also as a means to engage and motivate students as well as support literacy and mathematics learning. An overarching focus of the course is on the idea that science is a "practice" that includes specific ways of reasoning, communicating and acting. The course is also designed in partnership with the afterschool program at Gardner Pilot Academy in BPS. For eight weeks during the course, undergraduates will work with elementary students to teach them science and to reflect on how to design more effective science lessons.


Instructor(s): G. Michael Barnett

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 2131 Undergraduate Inquiry Seminar: I Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

The purpose of this seminar is to introduce and develop classroom-based inquiry skills in teacher candidates. Teachers develop a self-awareness about their personal beliefs and biases about teaching, learning, and pupils; explore, understand, and learn to navigate the various aspects of school culture; and learn to use their classroom as a research site by posing critical questions about pupil learning, consulting related research, gathering and analyzing data about their pupils and classrooms, attempting interventions, evaluating results, and documenting pupil learning.


Instructor(s): Fran Loftus and Melita Malley

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Graded as Pass/Fail.

EDUC 2151 Pre-Practicum I Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

A one-day-a-week practicum for Lynch School sophomores and juniors majoring in elementary and secondary education. Placements are made in selected schools in the Greater Boston area. Apply to the Office of Practicum Experiences & Teacher Induction during the semester preceding the placement by May 1 for fall placements and December 1 for spring placements.


Instructor(s): Fran Loftus and Melita Malley

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: For Lynch School undergraduate students only. Graded as Pass/Fail.

EDUC 2208 Educational Strategies: Children with Special Needs Spring 3
Course Description

This course provides instruction to pre-service teachers interested in learning more about instruction, curriculum, and teaching for children with special needs, with a framework highlighting important educational issues pertinent to their professional development and the realities of teaching. The course emphasizes the complexities of teaching children with individual learning profiles in inclusive settings. Students will examine educational readings and instructional practices through the lenses of curriculum, author voice, and academic tension. Class participants will develop a comprehensive understanding of the historical, legal, and political developments influencing current general and special education practices.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 2211 Secondary Curriculum and Instruction Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Provides an introduction to secondary teaching practices as well as an overview of the history and structure of secondary schools. Topics include curriculum theory and development, interdisciplinary teaching, teaching students with diverse learning abilities, application of educational research, assessment, national standards, and alternative models for secondary schools. Focuses on the role of the teacher in secondary education reform. Taught on-site and in conjunction with secondary education teacher candidates' first prepracticum experience, this course offers a unique opportunity for a cohort experience in which preservice teachers work closely with each other, high school faculty, the instructor, and urban students.


Instructor(s): Audrey Friedman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Department permission required.

EDUC 2290 Number Theory for Teachers Spring 3
Course Description

This course is intended to focus on the wealth of topics that relate specifically to the natural numbers. These will be treated as motivational problems to be used in an activity-oriented approach to mathematics in grades K-9. The course will demonstrate effective ways to use the calculator and computer in mathematics education. Topics include prime number facts and conjectures, magic squares, Pascal's triangle, Fibonacci numbers, modular arithmetic, and mathematical art.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: MATH1190-1191

Cross listed with: MATH2290

Comments:

EDUC 2291 Geometry for Teachers Spring 3
Course Description

This course is intended to fill a basic need of all teachers of grades K-9. Geometry now occupies a significant role in the elementary mathematics curriculum. The course will treat content, but ideas for presenting geometry as an activity-based program will also be stressed. Topics to be covered include the geoboard and other key manipulatives, elements of motion and Euclidean geometry, and suggestions for using Logo as a tool to enhance teaching geometry.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: MATH1190-1191

Cross listed with: MATH2291

Comments:

EDUC 3132 Undergraduate Inquiry Seminar: II Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

The purpose of this seminar is to introduce and develop classroom-based inquiry skills in teacher candidates. Teachers develop a self-awareness about their personal beliefs and biases about teaching, learning, and pupils; explore, understand, and learn to navigate the various aspects of school culture; and learn to use their classroom as a research site by posing critical questions about pupil learning, consulting related research, gathering and analyzing data about their pupils and classrooms, attempting interventions, evaluating results, and documenting pupil learning.


Instructor(s): Fran Loftus and Melita Malley

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Graded as Pass/Fail.

EDUC 3133 Undergraduate Inquiry Seminar: III Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

The purpose of this seminar is to introduce and develop classroom-based inquiry skills in teacher candidates. Teachers develop a self-awareness about their personal beliefs and biases about teaching, learning, and pupils; explore, understand, and learn to navigate the various aspects of school culture; and learn to use their classroom as a research site by posing critical questions about pupil learning, consulting related research, gathering and analyzing data about their pupils and classrooms, attempting interventions, evaluating results, and documenting pupil learning.


Instructor(s): Fran Loftus and Melita Malley

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Graded as Pass/Fail.

EDUC 3134 Undergraduate International Inquiry Seminar IV Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

The purpose of this seminar is to introduce and develop classroom-based inquiry skills in teacher candidates. Teachers develop a self-awareness about their personal beliefs and biases about teaching, learning, and pupils; explore, understand, and learn to navigate the various aspects of school culture; and learn to use their classroom as a research site by posing critical questions about pupil learning, consulting related research, gathering and analyzing data about their pupils and classrooms, attempting interventions, evaluating results, and documenting pupil learning.


Instructor(s): Fran Loftus and Melita Malley

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Department Permission required. Graded as Pass/Fail. Restricted to students completing a pre-practicum abroad.

EDUC 3152 Pre-Practicum II Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

A one-day-a-week practicum for Lynch School sophomores and juniors majoring in elementary and secondary education. Placements are made in selected schools in the Greater Boston area. Apply to the Office of Practicum Experiences & Teacher Induction during the semester preceding the placement by April 15 for fall placements and December 1 for spring placements.


Instructor(s): Fran Loftus and Melita Malley

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: For Lynch School undergraduate students only. Graded as Pass/Fail.

EDUC 3153 Pre-Practicum III Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

A one-day-a-week practicum for Lynch School sophomores and juniors majoring in elementary and secondary education. Placements are made in selected schools in the Greater Boston area. Apply to the Office of Practicum Experiences & Teacher Induction during the semester preceding the placement by April 15 for fall placements and December 1 for spring placements.


Instructor(s): Fran Loftus and Melita Malley

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: For Lynch School undergraduate students only. Graded as Pass/Fail.

EDUC 3154 International Pre-Practicum for LSOE Students Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

A one-day-a-week practicum for Lynch School juniors who study abroad for one semester majoring in early childhood, elementary, and secondary education. Placements are made in selected school and teaching-related sites. Apply to the Office of Practicum Experiences & Teacher Induction during the semester preceding the placement by May 1 for fall placements and December 1 for spring placements.


Instructor(s): Fran Loftus and Melita Malley

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Department permission required. For Lynch School undergraduate students only. Graded as Pass/Fail.

EDUC 3203 Philosophy of Education Spring 3
Course Description

This course is organized in such a way as to enable us address and discuss the dialectics of freedom hidden under the process of education. The class investigates a number of conflicting positions about freedom in education and explores philosophical resources to help us to understand the nature of these issues more fully. A list of movies which students are recommended to watch before class will help them to find out and discuss the hottest philosophical topics pertaining to freedom in educational frameworks.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL3203

Comments:

EDUC 3308 Bilingualism in Schools and Communities Fall 3
Course Description

The goal of this course is to prepare students to participate in increasingly multilingual and multicultural environments in order to better serve bilingual students, families, and communities. Building on theory, research, and practice from the fields of bilingualism, second language acquisition, and education, students will learn about the process of language and literacy development in children and adolescents who are exposed to more than one language, and the social and cultural contexts in which this development occurs. Through the use of case studies and school profiles, students will deepen their understanding of issues in bilingualism and bilingual education.


Instructor(s): Mariela Paez

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Successful completion of the courses EDUC 3308 and EDUC 3346 entitles students to receive a certificate indicating that you have completed categories 1, 2, and 4 to be considered qualified to teach ELLs as noted in the Massachusetts Commissioner of Education's Memorandum of June 15, 2004.

EDUC 3323 Reading and Special Needs Instruction for Secondary and Middle School Students Spring 3
Course Description

Develops knowledge of the reading process and how to "teach reading the content areas." Students will develop curriculum and instruction that integrates reading instruction in the content areas, addressing diverse learners. Involves understanding relationship among assessment, evaluation, and curriculum; learning what and how to teach based on student assessments; developing and providing scaffolded instruction that addresses reading comprehension and critical thinking; and integrating reading, writing, speaking, listening, and thinking into content curriculum. Also addresses how to help students comprehend non-printed text.


Instructor(s): Audrey Friedman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 3386 Introduction to Sign Language and Deafness Spring 3
Course Description

A course in the techniques of manual communication with an exploration of the use of body language and natural postures, fingerspelling, and American Sign Language. Theoretical foundations of total communication will be investigated. Issues related to deafness are also presented.


Instructor(s): Edward Mulligan

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 4135 Undergraduate Inquiry Seminar 4 Fall 9
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 4155 Pre-practicum IV Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 4231 Senior Inquiry Seminar Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This capstone inquiry seminar requires teacher candidates to continue to develop an inquiry stance in their practice through the systematic analysis of teaching and learning in their classroom experiences. Grounded in a theory of teacher education for social justice that encourages practitioners to challenge educational inequities by inquiring into practice, this course advances teacher candidates’ skills in planning, delivering, assessing and analyzing instruction that promotes pupil learning and enhances their life-chances.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 4250 Practicum for Lynch School Students Fall/Spring 12
Course Description

Semester-long practicum experience (300+ clock hours), five full days per week, for Lynch School seniors majoring in education. Placements are made in selected schools in the Greater Boston area. Apply to the Office of Practicum Experiences and Teacher Induction during the semester preceding the placement by March 15 for fall placements and by October 15 for spring placements.


Instructor(s): Fran Loftus and Melita Malley

Prerequisites: A 2.5 grade point average and successful completion of all required pre-practicum field assignments and courses

Cross listed with:

Comments: For Lynch School undergraduate students only

EDUC 4255 Seminar: International/Out-of-State Program Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

For students who have completed a semester of student teaching abroad or in certain U.S. locations. Students lead seminars on the culture of overseas, Native American reservation, and other sites with students selected to participate in the International/Out-of-State program for the following year.


Instructor(s): Fran Loftus and Melita Malley

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Department permission required

EDUC 4269 Extended Practicum Spring 3
Course Description

This is an extended practicum for students who have already completed their full time student teaching. This placement provides additional field experience and opportunities for them to further hone their abilities to mediate theory and practice. The course is by arrangement only with the Practicum Director.


Instructor(s): Fran Loftus and Melita Malley

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: For students who have advance approval to continue practica. Apply to the Office of Practicum Experiences and Teacher Induction.

EDUC 4360 Inclusive Education Field Observation Fall/Spring 0
Course Description

Open to undergraduate majors in the Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences, the Inclusive Education Minor is offered in the LSOE. The minor is designed to (1) introduce Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences students to the world of disabilities and special education with an emphasis on special education practice, and (2) enhance the ability of future professionals to meet the needs of increasingly diverse school populations. Classes address the nature and implications of disabilities and effective practices in special education. The minor consists of six-courses and a zero-credit field observation. Appropriate for those considering a career or further studies in education.


Instructor(s): David Scanlon

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 4402 For God & Country: Thinking about Religion & Citizenship Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores the religious and ethical dimensions of citizenship, with particular attention to the points at which religious and political allegiances conflict or appear to conflict. With an eye toward the contemporary American context, we will draw upon diverse political philosophies, faith traditions, historical periods and geographic regions for insight. We will consider the nature of this conflict between God and country, attempts to resolve it in theory and practice, and contemporary issues that exemplify it. Among the many questions we will ask: Are patriotism and faith compatible? What is the difference between a good person and a good citizen? (Can we be one but not the other?) What are the limits of religious tolerance in a diverse society? How can we educate the next generation to sustain the values and institutions we hold dear?


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Erik Owens

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: THEO7486

Comments:

EDUC 4464 Psychological Perspectives on Schooling Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

In many countries, including the United States, children’s attendance at school, or the documentation of a plan for learning outside of a school, is compulsory until late adolescence. As former or current students of schools, most people have opinions about what makes for good teaching and good learning and they use these opinions when making decisions about schooling for their children. Rather than encourage the acceptance of the educational status quo, or promote using one’s personal anecdotes as the best evidence for making decisions about schooling, this course aims to use evidence from psychology concerning development and learning to examine the practices in some philosophically-driven approaches to schooling. Students will use this information to design schools in which the pedagogical approach, social milieu, and understandings of children’s development are evidence-based and support articulated values and goals.


Instructor(s): Jill Hogan and Mahsa Ershadi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PSYC4464 APSY4464

Comments:

EDUC 4901 Readings and Research Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Provides a student the opportunity to do guided readings under the supervision of a professor. Research project must be approved one month before the beginning of the course by the instructor, department chair, and associate dean.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: APSY4901

Comments:

EDUC 4911 Independent Study/Internship Experience Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Provides a student independent research opportunities under the guidance of an instructor. Research project must be approved one month before the beginning of the course by the instructor, department chair, and associate dean.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: APSY4199

Comments:

EDUC 4921 Independent Study: Fifth Year Program Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course is open to students in the Fifth Year Program only.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 4961 Honors Thesis I Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Students who have the approval of the Dean to write an honors thesis will use this course as the credit vehicle for writing the thesis.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Open only to students who are candidates for Latin honors.

EDUC 4962 Honors Thesis II Fall 3
Course Description

Students who have the approval of the dean to write an honors thesis will use this course as the credit vehicle for writing the thesis.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Open only to students who are candidates for Latin honors.

EDUC 6300 Secondary/Middle School Science Methods Fall 3
Course Description

Provides an active, instructional environment for science learning that enables each student to construct knowledge (skill, affective, and cognitive) that, in turn, allows them to be prepared to construct instructional environments meeting the needs of tomorrow's secondary and middle school students. Activities reflect on current research: reform movements of AAAS, NRC, NSTA, inclusive practices, interactions with experienced teachers, firsthand experience with instructional technology, and review and development of curriculum and related instructional materials.


Instructor(s): G. Michael Barnett

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 6301 Secondary and Middle School History Methods Fall 3
Course Description

Demonstrates methods for organizing instruction, using original sources, developing critical thinking, facilitating inquiry learning, integrating social studies, and evaluation. Students will design lessons and units, drawing on material from the Massachusetts state history standards and other sources.


Instructor(s): Patrick McQuillan

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 6302 Secondary and Middle School English Methods Fall 3
Course Description

Develops knowledge, skills, and dispositions essential for competent understanding, development, and delivery of effective English Language Arts instruction in a diverse classroom. Addresses educational and literary theory, pedagogy, assessment, evaluation, content, curriculum, media literacy, and sensitivity to and respect for adolescents who come from a variety of cultures, abilities, interests, and needs. Provides knowledge of local, state, and national standards and strategies to help students reach those standards. Encourages risk-taking, experimentation, flexibility, application of theory, and innovation. Good teaching demands open-mindedness, critical reading, writing, and thinking, honest reflection, high expectations, ongoing revision, and commitment to social justice.


Instructor(s): Audrey Friedman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 6303 Foreign Language Pedagogy Fall 3
Course Description

For anyone considering the possibility of teaching a foreign language. Introduces students to techniques of second language teaching at any level. Students learn how to evaluate language proficiency, organize a communication course, review language-teaching materials, and incorporate audiovisual and electronic media in the classroom.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: RLRL5597 LING4330

Comments: Fulfills Massachusetts licensure requirement methods in foreign language education

EDUC 6304 Secondary and Middle School Mathematics Methods Fall 3
Course Description

Provides prospective teachers with a repertoire of pedagogical methods, approaches, and strategies for teaching mathematics to middle school and high school students. Considers the teaching of mathematics and the use of technology from both the theoretical and practical perspectives. Includes topics regarding performance-based assessment and culturally relevant practices for teaching mathematics in academically diverse classrooms.


Instructor(s): Lillie Albert

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 6305 Secondary Math and Science Methods Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 6307 Teachers and Educational Reform Spring 3
Course Description

Issues of school reform are constantly in the media—high-stakes testing, charter schools, the Common Core. At the heart of these reforms are teachers and the work they do with students in their classrooms. In this course, students look in-depth at the nature of teaching and learning in schools and classrooms. In particular, the course attends to issues and practices linked to current efforts at educational reform, approaching these matters through active inquiry and experiential enactment of such practices. Focused reflection is also a central component of this class.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Graduate students by permission only

EDUC 6316 Developmentally Appropriate Curriculum in Early Childhood Education Spring 3
Course Description

This course focuses on the development and implementation of curriculum in early education. The Massachusetts Guidelines for Preschool Learning Experiences and the national standards for developmentally appropriate practices will be utilized throughout the semester. This course will highlight each of the curriculum domains (language/literacy, mathematics, science and technology, social studies, health, and the arts) while demonstrating how to build an integrated curriculum in an early childhood classroom. The importance and value of play in the early years will be emphasized, and strategies will be shared to help teacher candidates document student learning.


Instructor(s): Mariela Paez

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 6323 The Linguistic Structure of English Spring 3
Course Description

An analysis of the major features of contemporary English with some reference to earlier versions of the language, including sound system, grammar, structure and meanings of words, and properties of discourse.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Claire Foley, M.J. Connolly and Margaret Thomas

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: LING3323 ENGL2121

Comments:

EDUC 6346 Teaching Bilingual Students Fall/Spring/Summer 3
Course Description

Deals with the practical aspects of the instruction of teaching English Language Learners in Sheltered English Immersion, and mainstream classrooms. Reviews and applies literacy and content area instructional approaches. Includes such other topics as history and legislation related to English Language Learners and bilingual education, and the influences of language and culture on students, instruction, curriculum, and assessment. There are two sections of this course: one for elementary and early childhood education majors and one for secondary education majors.


Instructor(s): Anne Homza and Patrick Proctor

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Summer course: Section .01 for Elementary Education majors; Section .02 for Secondary Ed majors

EDUC 6347 Teaching Bilingual Students in Secondary Education Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 6363 Survey of Children's Literature Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores the influences, appeal, and impact of children's literature. Students will be expected to develop and apply criteria to evaluate the value of using children's literature in different contexts. Critical questions will be explored in relation to children's literature.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 6367 Restructuring the Classroom with Technology Fall 3
Course Description

This course centers on the use of advanced technologies to explore different ways to design instructional materials. The focus of the course will be the development of broad-based and intensive projects that require familiarity with various system and software applications to the degree where unique end products will be generated. Students will design curriculum materials that fully integrate appropriate software and technology tools. Students will develop a curriculum website and use hypermedia authoring systems, graphic packages, and instructionally relevant software programs to create classroom-specific projects.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: EDUC1128, EDUC6628 or Equivalent knowledge of instructional software

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 6373 Classroom Management Spring 3
Course Description

Focuses on observation and description of learning behaviors, with emphasis on examining the relationship of teacher behavior and student motivation. Prepares teachers to analyze behavior in the context of a regular classroom setting that serves moderate special needs students and to select, organize, plan, and promote developmentally appropriate behavior management strategies that support positive learning. Also considers theoretical models of discipline and classroom management strategies, and requires students to propose and develop a rationale for selection of specific techniques for specific classroom behaviors.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: ED201 is now EDUC6373.

EDUC 6374 Management of the Behavior of Students with Special Needs Fall/Summer 3
Course Description

Focuses discussion, reading and research on the diagnosis and functional analysis of social behaviors, places substantial emphasis on the practical application of applied behavior analysis techniques. Also discusses alternative management strategies for use in classrooms.


Instructor(s): Alec Peck

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 6384 Teaching Strategies for Students with Low Incidence Multiple Disabilities Spring 3
Course Description

This course is designed to assist the special educator in acquiring and developing both the background knowledge and practical skills involved in teaching individuals who have severe or multiple disabilities. The areas of systematic instruction, communication, gross motor, fine motor, community and school functioning, collaboration, functional and age-appropriate programming are emphasized. The role of the educator as developer of curriculum, instructor, and in the transdisciplinary team are included. The students should be prepared to participate in a one-day-per-week field placement.


Instructor(s): Susan Bruce

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Pre-practicum required (25 hours)

EDUC 6389 Assessment of Students with Low Incidence and Multiple Disabilities Fall 3
Course Description

This course addresses formal and informal assessment of students with intensive needs. Students will become familiar with assessments driven by both the developmental and functional paradigms. All assessment activities will be founded on the principle that appropriate assessment goes beyond the student to include consideration of the student's multiple contexts. This course also addresses the IEP, the legal mandates behind the process, and the collaborative role of the teacher, as part of the educational team, during the assessment and report writing processes.


Instructor(s): Susan Bruce

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Pre-practicum required (25 hours).

EDUC 6398 Working with Families and Human Service Agencies Fall 3
Course Description

Explores the dynamics of families of children with special needs and the service environment that lies outside the school. After exploring the impact a child with special needs may have on a family, including the stages of acceptance and the roles that parents may take, focuses on some of the services available in the community to assist the family. A major activity associated with this course is locating these services in a local community.


Instructor(s): Alec Peck

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Pre-practicum required (25 hours)

EDUC 6492 Linguistically Responsive Teaching: Deepening Your Sheltered English Instruction Skills Summer 1
Course Description

This 15-hour one credit online module is designed for licensed elementary classroom teachers in Massachusetts schools who have already obtained their SEI Endorsement (either through the state's RETELL course or other avenues). This summer two-week online course provides the support and coaching teachers need to develop their skills as linguistically responsive educators.


Instructor(s): Anne Homza

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 6493 Language Acquisition Module Fall 1
Course Description

See course description for EDUC6593.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 6495 Human Development and Disabilities Fall/Summer 3
Course Description

This course addresses the reciprocal relationship between human development and disability. Prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal causes of disability will be presented. Students will learn about theoretical perspectives, research, and current disagreements related to causes, identification, and treatment of disabilities. Prevention and intervention strategies will be presented for each disability. The application of assistive technology will be covered across disabilities.


Instructor(s): Susan Bruce

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 6496 Foundations of Autism Spectrum Disorder Summer 3
Course Description

This course covers the major theoretical explanations for ASD symptomology, including contributions from education, psychology, neuroscience and related fields. Major debates surrounding identification, treatment, and outcomes of students with ASD, including recent commentaries from the ASD self-advocacy community, will be discussed.


Instructor(s): Kristen Bottema-Beutel

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 6497 Intervention for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder Summer 3
Course Description

In this course students will learn strategies and purported mechanisms behind current intervention models designed for students with ASD. Student will be able to evaluate research evidence and claims of effectiveness of each intervention, and will design and implement appropriate interventions for student with ASD.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 6498 Field Experience for Autism Spectrum Disorder Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

Candidates in the autism specialization are required to complete 10 hours of observation and interaction in a setting that serves students with ASD, under the supervision of a master teacher. Students will complete a checklist of activities, signed by the master teacher, ensuring that this 10-hour requirement has been met. It is recommended that students complete the field experience either simultaneously with EDUC6497 or after this course has been completed. Some specialization candidates will have already worked in settings with students with ASD. These candidates may count this prior experience toward the 10-hour requirement by having the master teacher with whom they worked sign the checklist


Instructor(s): Kristen Bottema-Beutel

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: It is recommended that students complete the field experience either simultaneously with EDUC6497 or after this course has been completed

EDUC 6540 Ed Implications/Sensory, Motor & Health Impairments Spring 3
Course Description

This course addresses the impact of physical disabilities on learning. Emphasis is placed on the educational needs of children with cerebral palsy, visual impairment, or hearing loss in combination with intellectual disability. Basic anatomy of the eye and ear are covered along with the common causes of vision and hearing loss. This course prepares teachers to perform functional vision and hearing evaluations and to translate those findings into appropriate classroom accommodations and adaptations. Many children with disabilities have unmet sensory integration needs that influence their behavior and subsequent readiness to learn.


Instructor(s): Thomas Miller

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 6588 Teaching and Learning Strategies for Moderate Special Needs Spring 3
Course Description

This course is intended to help prospective and experienced special education teachers and other educators a repertoire of skills for teaching students with mild/moderate (high incidence) educational disabilities. Participants will accomplish this goal by making connections among their knowledge of disabilities, special education policy and practices, assessments, education theory, and teaching methods. Students will learn how to develop, implement, and monitor individualized education programs, implement research-based effective intervention practices, and collaborate with others to meet the needs of special education students in inclusive and other educational settings. Successful students will have familiarity and competency with a variety of special education procedures and teaching approaches and specific practices. Appropriate for both elementary and secondary level education. Class sessions will routinely include time to practice skills being learned. Prerequisites EDUC7579


Instructor(s): David Scanlon

Prerequisites: EDUC7579

Cross listed with:

Comments: Not open to non-degree students. EDUC6589 is intended for general educators and EDUC6588 is required for special educators

EDUC 6589 Teaching and Learning Strategies for Inclusive Secondary Educators Spring 3
Course Description

Designed primarily for elementary and secondary education teacher candidates and practicing educators, this course helps them develop an initial repertoire of skills for teaching students with educational disabilities. The primary emphasis of this course is on the education of students with mild/moderate disabilities in inclusive classrooms. Participants will learn to develop comprehensive instructional plans fully inclusive of students with educational disabilities, utilized an IEP to guide instruction, develop accommodations and modifications appropriate to students and the curriculum, design individual, small, and large group instructions, and evaluate various service delivery options for educating students with special needs.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 6592 Foundations of Language and Literacy Development Spring 3
Course Description

Provides students with a comprehensive overview of major theories and research in language and literacy including theories of instruction. Emphasis is placed on major reports on literacy instruction as well as critiques of those reports. Topics covered include: language acquisition, the role of language in literacy learning, emergent literacy, the role of phonics in early literacy learning, reading fluency, reading comprehension and critical literacy, discourse theory, multi-modal literacy, and adolescent literacy.


Instructor(s): Curt Dudley-Marling

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 6593 Introduction to Speech and Language Disorders Fall 3
Course Description

On the basis of the development of normal children, this course will explore dysfunctions of speech and language that interfere with normal communication and learning processes. The evaluation of language performance and the remediation of language deficits will also be stressed.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 6595 Assessment and Instruction for Students with Reading Difficulty Fall/Summer 3
Course Description

Examines the methods and materials related to formal and informal assessment, analysis, and interpretation of the results of assessment and instructional techniques for students with a range of reading difficulties (K-12). Focus is on the needs of students from varied populations.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: EDUC7542 or equivalent

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 6628 Computer Applications for Educators Spring 3
Course Description

Explores the role of emerging technologies in the context of schools. Course is theoretically grounded in the Project-Based Learning literature. Assignments are hands-on, with emphasis placed on producing tangible artifacts that will serve a practical need. Specifically, students will develop PowerPoint presentations to evaluate educational software and web-based curricular materials. Also, each student will develop a website featuring his or her teaching portfolio. Course appropriate for all computer skill levels.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Alec Peck

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This is not a course in computer programming. Alternates every other Spring with EDUC1128. (EDUC6628 is for graduate students only).

EDUC 6635 Education of Christians: Past, Present, and Future Spring 3
Course Description

The history of the church's educational ministry serves to enlighten its present pastoral praxis. Students in this course read original and classical documents as a treasury of wisdom for religious education and pastoral ministry. The course will closely parallel the history of theology, of the church, and of Western education.


Instructor(s): Hosffman Ospino

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: TMRE7076

Comments:

EDUC 6674 Teaching Mathematical Problem Solving in Grades 4-12 Spring 3
Course Description

Examines complex issues, trends, and research regarding alternative approaches for teaching mathematical problem solving. Topics include the nature of mathematical inquiry; models for collaborative grouping; methods and materials for cultivating problem solving, reasoning, and communication processes; methods of assessing mathematical problem solving; and the impact of Vygotskian Psychology on the teaching and learning of mathematical problem solving.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Lillie R. Albert

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 6675 Consultation and Collaboration in Special Education Spring 3
Course Description

Designed for educators who enter into supportive or consultative relationships with each other, with other professionals, and with parents. Presents conceptual and pragmatic guidelines for functioning effectively with colleagues and other adults. Also covers advocacy strategies and environmental accessibility issues.


Instructor(s): Alec Peck

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 6686 Augmentative Communication for Individuals with Disabilities Spring 3
Course Description

This course focuses upon the communication problems of persons who are developmentally disabled, physically challenged, hearing impaired, and deaf-blind. Students learn strategies for enhancing communication and learn how to develop and implement a variety of augmentative communication systems.


Instructor(s): Susan Bruce

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 7101 Readings and Research In Curriculum and Instruction Fall/Spring/Summer 3
Course Description

Under the direction of a faculty member who serves as Project Director, a student develops and completes a significant study.


Instructor(s): Alec Peck

Prerequisites: Faculty member approval

Cross listed with:

Comments: By arrangement

EDUC 7250 Mathematics and Technology: Teaching, Learning, and Curriculum in the Elementary School Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course presents methods and materials useful in teaching mathematics to early childhood and elementary school children and the different ways in which technology can be used in the elementary school classroom. The course will consider the teaching of mathematics and the use of technology from both theoretical and practical perspectives.


Instructor(s): Rebecca Mitchell

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 7401 Supervision in Action Spring 3
Course Description

This course is designed as an introduction to research-based clinical supervision models in teacher education. Hands-on application-in action includes observational strategies, collaborative assessment logs, and summative reports as resources for ongoing data collection. Course participants acquire and then apply the Massachusetts Department of Education Pre-service Performance Assessment rubric for coaching and evaluating student teachers, integrating the BC Teacher Education themes that emphasize teaching for equity and social justice. This course is restricted to cooperating teachers in BC Partnership Schools who are supervising a BC student teacher in a full-time practica and to new BC Clinical Faculty.


Instructor(s): Amy Ryan

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 7410 Special Topics; Queering in the Classroom Summer 3
Course Description

This course will review and critique current theory, research, and practice related to sexual orientation in psychology and education. There will be a focus on lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender issues during earlier developmental periods. Four broad areas include: (1) Terminology and models related to sexual orientation identities, gender expression, and prejudice; (2) the intersection of sexual orientation with other social identities; (3) experiences of LGBT individuals across contexts and implications for therapy and educational interventions broadly considered; and (4) relevant policy issues. The course will provide a framework on which to base empirically-supported practices with LGBT clients and students.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: APSY7410

Comments:

EDUC 7420 Graduate Full Practicum/Initial License Fall/Spring 6
Course Description

A semester-long practicum, five full days per week, for graduate students in the following licensure programs: Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary. Placements are made in selected schools in the greater Boston area, and designated international settings. Apply to the Office of Practicum Experiences and Teacher Induction during the semester preceding the placement: by March 15 for fall placements and by October 15 for spring placements.


Instructor(s): Fran Loftus and Melita Malley

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 7421 Theories of Instruction Spring 3
Course Description

This provides an in-depth review of modern instructional models classified into selected families with regard to perception of knowledge, the learner, curriculum, instruction, and evaluation. Each student will be asked to survey models in his/her own field(s) and to select, describe, and defend a personal theory in light of today's educational settings based upon personal experiences, reflection on current research, and contemporary issues central to the education of all learners.


Instructor(s): Lillie Albert

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 7429 Graduate Pre-Practicum Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

This is a pre-practicum experience for students in graduate programs leading to certification. Placements are made in selected schools in the greater Boston area. Apply to the Office of Practicum Experiences & Teacher Induction during the semester preceding the placement by April 15 for fall placements and December 1 for spring placements. Students who are accepted into a program after the deadlines are requested to submit the application upon notification.


Instructor(s): Fran Loftus and Melita Malley

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Graded as Pass/Fail.

EDUC 7431 Graduate Inquiry Seminar: One Fall 1
Course Description

The course will coincide with the pre-practicum experience. It is designed to introduce teacher candidates to inquiry as stance and the skills necessary to conduct classroom-based research that leads to pupil achievement and teaching for social justice. The course is designed to help teacher candidates mediate the relationships of theory and practice, pose questions for inquiry, learn through reflection and discussion, learn from their students and colleagues, construct critical perspectives about teaching, learning, and schooling, and to improve teaching and learning. The second part of this sequence is 432 which is taken in conjunction with full-time student teaching (EDUC7420).


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 7432 Graduate Inquiry Seminar:Two Fall/Spring 2
Course Description

The primary goal of this capstone seminar is to initiate teacher candidates into the practice of teacher research or collaborative inquiry for action. Collaborative Inquiry for Action is an ongoing, collaborative process of systematic and self-critical inquiry by educators about their own schools and classrooms in order to increase teachers' knowledge, improve students' learning, and contribute to social justice. This final project will be presented at a roundtable presentation at the end of the semester and also satisfies the M.Ed., MAT, MST Comprehensive Examination in Education.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Donovan Urban Scholars must enroll in EDUC432.08.

EDUC 7435 Social Contexts of Education Fall/Spring/Summer 3
Course Description

Examines the role of situational, school, community, peer, and family factors on the education of children. Participants in the course will strive to understand the effects of their own social context on their education, to develop strategies to help students understand their context, and to understand and contribute to what schools can do to improve teaching and learning and school culture for all students regardless of internal and external variables.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 7436 Curriculum Theories and Practice Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Asks teachers to analyze the philosophical underpinnings of educational practices. Also asks teachers to examine their own philosophies of education and to construct meaning and practice from the interplay between their beliefs and alternative theories. Designed for individuals advanced in their professional development.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 7438 Instruction of Students with Special Needs and Diverse Learners Fall/Spring/Summer 3
Course Description

This course focuses on the education of students with disabilities and other learners from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. The goal of the course is to promote access to the general curriculum for all students through participation in standards-based reform. Universal Design for Learning (UDL) provides the theoretical framework for this course. Through an examination of historical milestones, landmark legislation, systems for classification, approaches to intervention, and the daily life experiences of diverse learners, students acquire knowledge about diversity and the resources, services, and supports available for creating a more just society through education.


Instructor(s): Richard Jackson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 7447 Literacy and Assessment in the Secondary School Fall/Summer 3
Course Description

This course is an advanced study of literacy processes and strategies for use with students, including multiple subjects and content areas, and those literacies used outside of school contexts. Participants will investigate and regard literacy as social practice, situated in particular contexts and accessible to particular participations.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 7461 Human Rights Interdisciplinary Seminar Fall/Summer/Spring 3
Course Description

Students wishing to apply for the seminar should submit a brief statement explaining their interest (no longer than 250 words) to humanrights@bc.edu with the subject-line "Human Rights Interdisciplinary Seminar." Please include your Eagle ID and academic discipline in the application. The application deadline is Thursday, November 5, 2016. In the spring of 2017, the seminar's focus will be on the ethical, politico-legal, and psychosocial issues confronting those whose human rights are affected by torture, drones, sexual violence, forced movement, deportation and migration. The differential effects of rights violations due to power based on "gender," "race," ethnicity and economic resources will be critically examined. We will also explore refugee movement and migration and the contours of asylum and other forms of protection, especially in the context of humanitarian crisis, war, and grave forms of economic injustice.


Instructor(s): Brinton Lykes and Daniel Kanstroom

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: APSY7461

Comments:

EDUC 7472 Theory and Pedagogy in the Language Arts Classroom Fall 3
Course Description

Collaboratively developed and taught course that explores major theories of literary criticism and investigates how classroom teachers can develop curriculum and instruction that apply these forms to analysis and discussion of text in the classroom. Students will read, discuss, and analyze six major works and examine ways of teaching and viewing texts through several critical theory lenses. Pedagogy also emphasizes culturally relevant strategies for helping mainstream, special needs, and linguistically different learners access understanding about theory and content. Additional readings address theories of literary criticism and theories of curriculum and instruction.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL7717

Comments: Satisfies literary requirement in English and advanced content requirement in Teacher Education.

EDUC 7473 Teaching Writing Summer 3
Course Description

In this course, developing and sustaining a writing curriculum for teachers in K-12 will be practiced and discussed, including a variety of pedagogical approaches to developing a sustained and enjoyable classroom writing culture. The primary emphasis will be on learning through doing--students will write in a variety of genres themselves (poetry, short fiction, memoir, reader response essay) with group discussion on process and implementation in their individual classrooms and based on their own students' needs. Grade is based on a portfolio of finished writing and a strategic plan for implementing writing protocols and ideas in the classroom.


Instructor(s): Susan Roberts

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 7492 Deaf/Blind Seminar Summer 3
Course Description

Presents histories of deaf, blind, and deaf/blind services. Discusses various etiologies of deaf-blindness along with their implications for intervention with persons with deaf-blindness. Provides overview of legislation and litigation relating to special services for individuals with deaf-blindness. Students complete a project relating to services for persons with multiple disabilities. Several guest speakers representing various agencies and organizations serving individuals with deaf-blindness present this course.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 7520 Mathematics and Technology: Teaching, Learning, and Curriculum in the Elementary School Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course presents methods and materials useful in teaching mathematics to early childhood and elementary school children and the different ways in which technology can be used in the elementary school classroom. The course will consider the teaching of mathematics and the use of technology from both theoretical and practical perspectives.


Instructor(s): Rebecca Mitchell

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 7529 Social Studies and the Arts: Teaching, Learning and Curriculum in the Elementary School Fall/Summer 3
Course Description

This course is designed to help students examine historical interpretation with critical analysis through history and the arts. It explores different areas of content and instructional methods directly related to Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks in social studies, literature, and the arts.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 7542 Teaching Reading Fall/Summer 3
Course Description

Offers teacher candidates skills for teaching reading to school age children. Students will gain understanding of reading through a historical, political, theoretical and practical lens. They will understand the delivery of instruction by learning a balanced approach to teaching reading. They will gain familiarity of how children learn to read by partaking in observations, assessments and instruction with a school age child. Students will learn a variety of ways to meet the needs of linguistically and culturally diverse learners. They will recognize reading difficulties and learn ways to differentiate instruction for such readers.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 7543 Teaching Language Arts Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Examines the development of written and spoken language and methods of instruction for oral and written language from the preschool years through early adolescence. Students learn strategies for identifying children's areas of strength and weakness and to plan instruction. Addresses the needs of children from non-English speaking homes. Expects students to spend at least 16 hours distributed across at least eight sessions in a classroom or other setting where they can work with one or more children.


Instructor(s): Maria Estela Brisk

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 7546 Teaching About the Natural World Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Provides an introduction to the various philosophies, practices, materials, and content that are currently being used to teach science to elementary and middle school children. Exposes prospective teachers to the skills and processes endorsed by the National Science Education Standards, the National Health Standards, and the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System.


Instructor(s): G. Michael Barnett

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 7550 Integrat Sci Res,Service/Community&Soc/Environ Jus Fall/Summer 3
Course Description

This course is designed for environmental studies minors, secondary science teachers, or those who are interested in learning more about conducting scientific research. A key feature of this course will be the engagement in the design and development of research projects around air quality, hydroponics, and alternative energies. Embedded in each project will be the need to learn how to power and utilize alternative energy systems to maintain and sustain the equipment needed for each research project.


Instructor(s): Mike Barnett

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: EESC2275

Comments:

EDUC 7579 Educational Assessment of Learning Problems Fall 3
Course Description

This course focuses on formal and informal approaches to the nondiscriminatory assessment of students with a wide range of cognitive and academic difficulties. The focus is on identifying students with mild/moderate disabilities. It is designed to prepare specialists for the process of documenting special needs, identifying current levels of performance, addressing critical issues, and designing approaches to monitoring progress.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Open to students in the Teacher of Students with Moderate Special Needs Program, Counseling Psychology, and Reading Specialist Programs. Not open to Special Students.

EDUC 7610 Clinical Experience Fall/Spring 6
Course Description

A semester-long, full-time clinical experience for advanced level students working in schools in a professional role. Covers the following graduate licensure programs: Reading, Moderate Special Needs, and Intense Special Needs. Placements are selectively chosen from schools in the Greater Boston area and designated international settings. Apply to the Office of Practicum Experiences and Teacher Induction during the semester preceding the placement by March 15 for fall placements and by October 15 for spring placements.


Instructor(s): Melita Malley and Fran Loftus

Prerequisites: Approval by the Practicum Office, good academic standing, and successful completion of all undergraduate practicum regular education teacher certification requirements

Cross listed with:

Comments: Candidates who intend to complete the specialist practicum in their own classroom or in a paid internship must meet with the Director as soon as possible to ensure that the responsibilities of the position are aligned with the license the candidate is seeking.

EDUC 7611 Learning&Development:Spec Needs of Early Learners Fall 3
Course Description

This course will focus on the development and learning of children from birth through age eight. The course will emphasize an in-depth understanding of children's developmental stages and developmentally appropriate practices with a particular focus on research. Topics highlighted in the course include: history and background of early childhood education, observation and assessment, models and programs in early childhood, language development, children with special needs, diversity and the role of culture and family involvement in early childhood. In this course, students will increase their understanding of young children in the context of their learning environment . Students will learn about different observation techniques and the application of different theoretical perspectives to teaching learning in early childhood settings.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 7621 Bilingualism, Second Language, and Literacy Development Fall/Spring/Summer 3
Course Description

Explores first and second language and literacy development of children raised bilingually as well as students acquiring a second language during pre-school, elementary, or secondary school years. Also addresses theories of first and second language acquisition, literacy development in the second language, and factors affecting second language and literacy learning. Participants will assess the development of one aspect of language or language skill of a bilingual individual and draw implications for instruction, parent involvement, and policy.


Instructor(s): Mariela Paez, Maria Estela Brisk and Patrick Proctor

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 7665 Develop Disabilities:Eval,Assessment,Families&Sys Fall 3
Course Description

This course focuses on issues facing professionals who work with people with developmental disabilities, their families, and the system whereby services are offered. It is designed for graduate and post-graduate students interested in learning about interdisciplinary evaluation and teams, in understanding disabilities from the person's and family's perspective, and in acquiring knowledge about the services available in the community. This course will be held at Children's Hospital.


Instructor(s): David Helm

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 7666 Developmental Disabilities: Evaluation, Assessment, Family and Systems Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course focuses on issues facing professionals who work with people with developmental disabilities, their families, and the system whereby services are offered. It is designed for graduate and post-graduate students interested in learning about interdisciplinary evaluation and teams, in understanding disabilities from the person's and family's perspective, and in acquiring knowledge about the services available in the community. This course will be held at Children's Hospital.


Instructor(s): David Helm

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 7678 Advanced Classroom Research: Experienced Teacher as Researcher Spring 3
Course Description

This course is appropriate for experienced teachers and others working in educational settings, graduate students with school-based experience, and current or prospective teacher educators. The course focuses on the possibilities and consequences of taking an "inquiry stance" as a framework for posing, investigating and addressing problems of practice. The course explores what it means to be a practitioner researcher in educational institutions, including schools, colleges and universities, museums and adult learning programs. The course will pay particular attention to the conceptual and experiential frameworks that practitioners bring to site-based educational inquiry.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 7698 Leadership Colloq on Universal Design for Learning Summer 3
Course Description

This advanced graduate level seminar examines the current body of work generated by the UDL framework. Included are selected readings, guest presentations, facilitated conversations, online reflections, and other activity-based collaborations among participants and guests. Final products will include the development of proposals offering promising applications of UDL theory to research and practice in order to improve education for ALL learners.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Richard Jackson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Syllabus available on request (jacksonr@bc.edu).

EDUC 7700 Adult Believers in a Postmodern Context Summer 3
Course Description

What are the dynamics that make adults ready and able to live effectively as people of faith in our contemporary postmodern context? What does it mean to be a believer in such a context and how are adults supported in the maturity of faith? Theology, psychology, and education theory all have a contribution to make in addressing these questions. Focused consideration is given to contemporary theories in adult development and adult learning. Attention is given to the implications of this for the parish/congregation, but broader applications are also considered.


Instructor(s): Jane Regan

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: TMRE7073

Comments: This 3-credit summer course will be offered June 27-July 14, 2016. It will meet Monday-Thursday, 8:30 a.m.-11:45 a.m. Class will not meet on Monday, July 4.

EDUC 7726 Clinical Experience in Reading Fall 6
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 7727 Family and Community Engagement Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 7734 Spiritual Sources of Catholic Education and Catechesis Fall 3
Course Description

Catholic education and catechesis are rooted in particular appropriations of the Christian faith articulated as schools of spirituality. From these appropriations emerge commitments to specific charisms and pedagogical practices. It is imperative that Catholic educational efforts continue to affirm the spiritual legacies that have sustained schools, missions, and parochial programs throughout history. In this course we read some foundational texts of major schools of spirituality and explore how they have inspired life-giving philosophies of Catholic education. The guiding principle throughout the course is that a good philosophy of Catholic education and catechesis is always sustained by a deep spirituality.


Instructor(s): Hosffman Ospino

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: TMRE7053 THEO7734

Comments: The course is open to Catholic school teachers and administrators, religious educators, and anyone interested in learning more about the spiritual roots of Catholic education.

EDUC 7744 Philanthropy in Biography and Society Spring 3
Course Description

An interdisciplinary course designed for graduate students from across the university seeking to understand the personal meaning and financial trends of philanthropy, especially among wealth holders; and for those who may become donors, fundraisers, or nonprofit executives. Philanthropy is one component of moral biography by which individuals freely allocate resources to achieve their discerned vocational purposes. Topics include: the history of philanthropy; its philosophical, spiritual, and sociological underpinnings; its patterns and trends in the U.S. and globally; its motivations; how research methodology affects findings; the daily personal assistance we provide to others; and how to conduct biographical conversations with donors.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Paul Schervish

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 7773 College Teaching and Learning Spring 3
Course Description

This course begins with an overview of the scholarship on the pedagogical foundations of higher education in order to explore research on pedagogy in colleges and universities. We examine how college learning is assessed and how post-secondary teaching is evaluated. We consider how the markers and politics of identity inform teaching and learning in American higher education. Classroom climate issues and studies, learning and the assumption of whiteness, the objectives of college teaching and learning and their critiques, and evaluation and assessment practices are explored. Students develop and implement a teaching philosophy via the development of a college teaching portfolio.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Anna Martinez Aleman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 7901 Urban Catholic Teacher Corps Fall/Spring 0
Course Description

See Urban Catholic Teacher Corps' website (http://www.bc.edu/content/bc/schools/lsoe/cce/uctc.html) for details or contact the program office at 617-552-0602.


Instructor(s): Charles Cownie

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Open only to teachers participating in the Urban Catholic Teacher Corps program

EDUC 8100 Master's/Caes Comprehensive Exam Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 8101 Interim Study:Master's/Caes Students Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

EDUC 8528 Understanding Learning Disabilities and Education Summer 3
Course Description

General and special educators are responsible for serving students with learning disabilities, only some of whom have an identified disability. Course topics include: theories and knowledge of what learning disabilities are, characteristics of students with LD across the life span, and major approaches to service delivery and instruction. This course is appropriate for educators working at the elementary level and higher.


Instructor(s): David Scanlon

Prerequisites: EDUC1044 or EDUC7438 or Waiver for equivalent experience

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EDUC 8807 The Academic Profession Fall 3
Course Description

The academic profession is examined from a sociological, cultural, and international perspective, looking at academic work, patterns of academic careers, teaching and research, and related issues. Generally, students in the seminar will engage in a collaborative research project focusing on an aspect of the academic profession.


Instructor(s): Philip Altbach

Prerequisites: None

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EDUC 8912 Participatory Action Research: Gender, Race, Power Fall 3
Course Description

This course introduces students to theoretical and practical issues in the design and implementation of field-based participatory action research, including a review of theories and practices that have contributed to community-based knowledge construction and social change. Ethnographic, narrative, and oral history methodologies are additional resources for understanding and representing the individual and collective stories co-constructed through the research process. Students participate in a series of community-based collaborative workshops and/or have ongoing collaborative work in a site. We reflect collaboratively and contextually on multiple and complex constructions of gender, race, and social class in community-based research.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: APSY8912

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EDUC 9101 Readings and Research for Doctoral Students Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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EDUC 9709 Research on Teaching Fall 3
Course Description

Introduce Ph.D. students to conceptual and empirical scholarship about teaching and teacher education as well as to contrasting paradigms and methodological approaches upon which this literature is based. Helps students become aware of major substantive areas in the field of research on teaching/teacher education, develop critical perspectives and questions on contrasting paradigms, and raise questions about implications of this research for curriculum and instruction, policy and practice, and teacher education/professional development. Considers issues related to epistemology, methodology, and ethics.


Instructor(s): Marilyn Cochran-Smith

Prerequisites: None

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EDUC 9711 Historical and Political Contexts of Curriculum Spring 3
Course Description

Introduces Ph.D. students in Curriculum & Instruction to the major curriculum movements in American educational history by examining the history and implementation of curriculum development on the macro and micro levels of schooling. Focuses on key campaigns and controversies in curriculum theory and practice, using primary source materials to place them within the academic, political, economic, and social contexts that have marked their conceptualization, and change inside and outside of schools.


Instructor(s): Dennis Shirley

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Permission of instructor required for all students, except for Ph.D. students in Curriculum & Instruction.

EDUC 9729 Controversies in Curriculum and Instruction Spring 3
Course Description

Explores contemporary curriculum controversies in American education as well as the ways these are shaped by differing conceptions of teaching, learning, and the purposes of schooling and by the larger social, historical, political, and cultural contexts in which schooling occurs. The course assumes a broad and encompassing definition of curriculum and the aspects of instruction, assessment, and teacher preparation that have major implications for curriculum. Although the focus of the course is on curricular controversies in K-12 education, controversies related to the curriculum of early childhood education, adult learning, and higher education are also relevant.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

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EDUC 9737 Contemporary Issues in Curriculum & Instruction Fall/Summer/Spring 3
Course Description

The design of learning environments (e.g. curriculum, technology tools, professional development) and individuals’ experiences within those environments significantly impact both teacher and student learning. The learning sciences is an interdisciplinary field of research that draws from a variety of domains such as cognitive science, educational psychology, sociology and education to design effective learning and teaching environments. The goals of the learning sciences are to 1)understand the physical, cognitive and social aspects of learning environments and 2)use these understandings to design more effective learning environments. In this course, we will examine different learning environments. For example, we will examine curriculum to evaluate the scaffolds to support student learning, analyze digital learning environments for professional development to support teacher learning and critique video of classroom discourse to examine student interactions and community development.


Instructor(s): Kristen Bottema-Beutel

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SOCY7737

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EDUC 9755 Theories of Leadership Spring 3
Course Description

Explores various epistemologies of practice and theoretical models of leadership through cases taken from a wide variety of educational settings, paying particular attention to the interplay between a personal ethic and issues of race, gender, and social class. Highlights models and processes of institutional restructuring and interprofessional collaboration. Recommended for doctoral students.


Instructor(s): Andrew Hargreaves

Prerequisites: None

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EDUC 9803 History of Education Fall 3
Course Description

This course provides an overview of major themes in the history of American education. Topics include the roles of Puritanism and slavery in shaping educational systems in the colonial North and South; the role of the American Revolution in promoting democratic and republican values; the rise of common schools as part of a broad wave of antebellum social reforms, including abolitionism and feminism; the Civil War, Reconstruction, and Jim Crow eras as distinctive moments in the expansion and contraction of educational opportunities for African-Americans; and the growth and expansion of high schools, colleges, and universities in the twentieth century.


Instructor(s): Dennis Shirley

Prerequisites: None

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EDUC 9819 Educational Change Fall 3
Course Description

This course focuses on the study of change theories and approaches, their application in educational reform, and their impact on teaching and learning. Students examine the history of educational change and consider the forces for and against change in schools and other educational organizations. Each student is expected to conduct a research study of an educational change initiative.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

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EDUC 9851 Qualitative Research Methods Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Introduces the foundations and techniques of carrying out qualitative research. Topics include philosophical underpinnings, planning for a qualitative research project, negotiating entry, ethics of conducting research, data collection and analysis, and writing/presenting qualitative research. Requires a research project involving participant observation and/or interviewing.


Instructor(s): Robert Starratt

Prerequisites: None

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EDUC 9864 Advanced Qualitative Research Fall 3
Course Description

Building upon the foundation concepts of qualitative research and initial exploration of an introductory course in qualitative methodologies, this course explores the theoretical, methodological, and analytic implications of conducting qualitative research from differing theoretical perspectives. Key readings include texts on social theory, qualitative methodologies, and exemplar qualitative research from various social scientific fields. Students will distinguish between methodology and methods, analyze data, and produce either a report for a specified audience or a research manuscript for possible submission to an educational research journal.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

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EDUC 9901 Doctoral Comprehensives Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


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Prerequisites: None

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EDUC 9902 C&I Doctoral Comprehensive Exam: Publishable Paper Fall/Spring/Summer 1
Course Description

The C&I doctoral program comprehensive exam will now take the form of a publishable paper.


Instructor(s): Elizabeth Sparks

Prerequisites: None

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EDUC 9903 Udl Leadership Fall/Spring 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Richard Jackson

Prerequisites: None

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EDUC 9911 Doctoral Continuation Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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EDUC 9951 Dissertation Seminar in Curriculum & Instruction Spring 3
Course Description

This is a student-centered seminar that is aimed at assisting doctoral students in identifying, shaping, and defining a research topic. Students will be expected to develop an Intent to Propose a Thesis, and to work toward the development of a full-scale draft of a Thesis proposal. Prior to the completion of the seminar, students will be expected to have established a Dissertation Committee.


Instructor(s): Curt Dudley-Marling

Prerequisites: None

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EDUC 9988 Dissertation Direction Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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