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Classics Courses (CLAS) College of Arts and Sciences


Subject Area Course # Course Title Semester Credit Hours Expand
CLAS 1010 Elementary Latin I Fall 3
Course Description

This course will introduce the fundamentals of Latin grammar and vocabulary. The aim is to prepare students to read simple Latin prose.


Instructor(s): Mark Thatcher and Maria Kakavas

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

CLAS 1011 Elementary Latin II Spring 3
Course Description

This course is a continuation of CLAS1010, which was offered in the fall semester.


Instructor(s): Maria Kakavas and Kendra Eshleman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

CLAS 1020 Elementary Ancient Greek I Fall 3
Course Description

This course will introduce the fundamentals of ancient Greek grammar and vocabulary. The aim is to prepare students to read something like Plato's Apology after a year of study.


Instructor(s): Gail Hoffman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

CLAS 1021 Elementary Ancient Greek II Spring 3
Course Description

This course is a continuation of CLAS1020, which is offered in the fall semester.


Instructor(s): Gail Hoffman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

CLAS 1052 Intermediate Ancient Greek I Fall 3
Course Description

This course is a review of the essentials of Classical Attic grammar and a reading of selections from Greek literature, often Xenophon's Anabasis, Plato's Apology and/or Crito, or a play such as Euripides's Medea.


Instructor(s): Christopher Polt

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL3052

Comments:

CLAS 1053 Intermediate Ancient Greek II Spring 3
Course Description

This course is designed to develop students proficiency in reading Greek literature in the original language through intensive readings from two Greek travel narratives: Book 9 of Homers Odyssey (including the story of the Cyclops) and selections from Xenophon's Anabasis. We will read the Greek assignments slowly and carefully while reviewing grammar, combined with discussion of the social and cultural contexts of these works.


Instructor(s): Hanne Eisenfeld

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL3053

Comments:

CLAS 1056 Intermediate Latin I Fall 3
Course Description

This course gives a thorough review of the essential grammatical forms presented in Elementary Latin along with a close reading of an introductory selection of Roman prose and poetry.


Instructor(s): Maria Kakavas and Elizabeth Sutherland

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

CLAS 1057 Intermediate Latin II Spring 3
Course Description

This course is a continuation of CLAS1056, which is offered in the fall semester.


Instructor(s): Maria Kakavas and Elizabeth Sutherland

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

CLAS 1058 Advanced Intermediate Latin Fall 3
Course Description

This course is intended for students who have completed the equivalent of BC’s intermediate-level Latin sequence but who need further preparation before joining the advanced Latin courses. We will read a selection of Latin prose and poetry with a focus not only on literary analysis but also on strengthening language ability. Readings vary.


Instructor(s): Elizabeth Sutherland

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

CLAS 1060 Elementary Modern Greek I Fall 3
Course Description

This course is an introduction to the study of Demotic Greek. It will introduce the fundamentals of grammar and will focus on reading ability, oral comprehension, and oral expression. Class instruction is supplemented by required laboratory work.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Maria Kakavas

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

CLAS 1061 Elementary Modern Greek II Spring 3
Course Description

This course is a continuation of CLAS1060, which is offered in the fall semester.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Maria Kakavas

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

CLAS 1063 Intensive Reading in Latin Summer 3
Course Description

The goal of this course is to build solid reading skills in the Latin language by providing an intensive and comprehensive introduction to the basics of Latin grammar and syntax. The course meets for twelve weeks and is divided into two sessions. The first session will begin to guide students through the fundamentals of the language using Wheelock's Latin. The second session will complete Wheelock's Latin and proceed to readings in the original from Caesar, Cicero, Catullus, and others.


Instructor(s): Maria Kakavas

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

CLAS 1070 Intermediate Modern Greek I Fall 3
Course Description

This second-year course in Modern Greek will provide a review of the grammar and introduce the students to the reading of selected literary excerpts from prose and poetry.


Instructor(s): Maria Kakavas

Prerequisites: CLAS1060-1061 or equivalent

Cross listed with:

Comments:

CLAS 1071 Intermediate Modern Greek II Spring 3
Course Description

This second-year course is a continuation of CLAS1070 offered in the fall semester.


Instructor(s): Maria Kakavas

Prerequisites: CLAS1060-CLAS1061 or equivalent

Cross listed with:

Comments:

CLAS 1110 Story/Decep Narr/Anc Rome Spring 3
Course Description

How do we make others believe us when we stretch the truth? Ancient Roman literature serves in this course to introduce classic tools of storytelling and deception that we still encounter today. We will study how ancient authors manipulate our perception of the stories they tell and see how these techniques recur in modern examples. Topics include the courtroom strategy of Cicero, political propaganda in epic poetry, Aesopic fables, forged eye-witness reports of the Trojan War, ghost stories, and the account of a man transformed into a donkey. We end with several modern short stories. Readings are in English.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Brigette Libby

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

CLAS 1166 Modern Greek Drama in English Spring 3
Course Description

The Greeks' love of theater did not end with the classical age. The course presents a survey of highlights of Modern Greek drama centering mainly on the twentieth century, with plays such as Tragedy-Comedy (N. Kazantzakis), The Courtyard of Miracles (I. Kambanellis), The City (L. Anagnostaki), The Wedding Band (D. Kehaides), and The Match (G. Maniotes). The discontinuity from the ancient Greek theater may be discussed, and a reading performance may be planned. The course is offered entirely in English, but provision may be made for reading the plays in Greek.


Instructor(s): Dia Philippides

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: THTR3389

Comments:

CLAS 1186 Greek Civilization Fall 3
Course Description

An introduction through lectures, readings, visuals, discussion, and written exercises to the many-sided contribution of the Ancient Greeks to the literature, art, and thought of what has come to be known as Western Civilization. Topics will include a historical overview (3000 - 323 BC), heroic epic (Iliad and Odyssey), drama (tragedy and comedy), mythology, historiography, political theory and practice (especially Athenian Democracy), philosophy, sculpture, and architecture.


Instructor(s): Gail Hoffman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

CLAS 1190 Ancient Tyranny Spring 3
Course Description

This course on tyranny in ancient Greece and Rome explores both mythological and historical figures as well as the concept of absolute power itself, and how it is dealt with in historical, literary, and philosophical texts. In addition to studying names, dates, locations of particular tyrannies, we will also explore the sociological and economic reasons behind the emergence of these tyrants, as well as the nature of our sources, in an attempt to learn something about the nature of power itself that reaches beyond the boundaries of the ancient world.


Instructor(s): Meredith Monaghan

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

CLAS 1701 Death in Ancient Greece: Achilles to Alexander the Great Fall 3
Course Description

In ancient Greece, death played a starring role in epic poetry and on the tragic and comic stage, funerary monuments lined the roadways, and dead heroes and family members alike were believed to intervene in the affairs of the living. Beginning with the "funeral mask of Agamemnon" and ending with royal Macedonian tombs, this course examines how ancient Greek responses to death addressed the universal problem of mortality while simultaneously using death as a lens for thinking about contemporary problems. We will consider throughout how the ancient materials resonate differently -- or not -- for us today.


Instructor(s): Hanne Eisenfeld

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal Course: Enduring Questions

CLAS 2205 Greek History Fall 3
Course Description

A study of the history of Greece from the Bronze Age in the second millennium BCE to the preeminence of Alexander of Macedon in the 4th century. The course will focus on such broad topics as the development of Greek social and political institutions, notions of justice, freedom, and Greek identity, relations among Greek city-states and with foreign nations, imperialism, the golden age of Greek literature, and the rise of Macedonian monarchy. Emphasis will be on the study of the ancient sources: literary, historiographic, archaeological, and epigraphic.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Mark Thatcher

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HIST2201

Comments:

CLAS 2206 Roman History Fall 3
Course Description

A study of the social, political and cultural history of ancient Rome from its foundation by Romulus to the rise of Constantine and late antiquity. The course will focus on the development of Roman social and political institutions, the Roman conquest of the Mediterranean, the evolution of Roman identity, and the rise and spread of Christianity. Emphasis will be on the study of the ancient sources: literary, historiographic, archaeological and epigraphic.


Instructor(s): Kendra Eshelman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HIST2205

Comments:

CLAS 2207 Greeks and Barbarians Spring 3
Course Description

In "Greeks and Barbarians," we'll use a combination of written sources, archaeological evidence, and even visual art to investigate the fascinating history of relationships and conflicts between Greeks, Persians, Egyptians, Carthaginians, and more. We'll read a variety of literature in English, such as the histories of Herodotus and Xenophon, the tragedies of Aeschylus and Euripides, and more, to help us figure out what Greeks really thought about barbarians - and about themselves.


Instructor(s): Mark Thatcher

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HIST2202

Comments:

CLAS 2208 Art and Myth in Ancient Greece Spring 3
Course Description

An introduction to the visual representation of the Greek gods and godesses and to the artistic depiction of the primary cycles of Greek legends (e.g., the Trojan War and heroes such as Herakles, Perseus, and Theseus). This course focuses on how specific visual attributes serve to identify mythological characters and how the development of narrative in Greek art helped to relate their stories. Inquiring into the use of mythological imagery to decorate temples, cult statues, and vases used primarily for the symposium (male drinking parties), we will consider the functions of mythological imagery within Greek society.


Instructor(s): Gail Hoffman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ARTH2206

Comments:

CLAS 2210 Roman Spectacles Fall 3
Course Description

Rome overflowed with spectacle: theatrical shows and gladiatorial combats, chariot races and military parades, animal hunts and funeral processions, ritual sacrifices and Christian martyrdoms. In this course we will explore what public spectacles looked like in Rome and why they were ubiquitous sights in the ancient world, paying special attention to: who produced public spectacles and what benefits they derived from them, tangible or otherwise; how spectators responded to and participated in such events; and how spectacular displays reinforced and/or challenged social norms and traditional values, both individually and for society at large. Students will have hands-on opportunities to reconstruct and perform select spectacles in order to reflect on the ancient and modern experience of spectacular public display.


Instructor(s): Christopher Polt

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HIST2207

Comments:

CLAS 2216 Art and Archaeology of Homer and Troy Fall 3
Course Description

Homer's Iliad describes a "Trojan War." Until Schliemann's excavations of a fortified site in Turkey suggested a real Troy and further work in Greece revealed a brilliant Bronze Age civilization, most thought Homer's story pure fiction. This class investigates archaeological sites such as Troy and Mycenae, Bronze Age shipwrecks, a Late Bronze Age "Pompeii," and the artistic evidence for objects and practices described by Homer in order to separate historical truth from elements either invented by the poet or adopted from his own time and reinvented by Hollywood.


Instructor(s): Gail L. Hoffman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ARTH2216

Comments:

CLAS 2217 Heroic Poetry: Homer, Virgil, and Beyond Fall 3
Course Description

This course has three basic aims: to explore the process of reading literary texts closely, to explore the tradition of heroic or "epic" narrative, and to consider the value of literature in our lives both individually and socially. What is it good for? Readings include selections from the poems of Homer and Virgil, as well as from Milton's Paradise Lost and Pope's mock-heroic Rape of the Lock. We will also read selections from Plato's hostile criticism of literature and from authors who introduce unheroic, even anti-heroic values into an epic.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Charles Ahern

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

CLAS 2220 The Platonic Dialogue Spring 3
Course Description

This course will examine Plato's dialogues as a philosophical art form. We will study the dialogues' position within the history of Greek literature, the different types of dialogues in the Platonic corpus, and their reception in Rome and beyond. Considerable time will be spent reading a wide range of individual dialogues in translation. Some topics to be covered include: the function of dialectic in the education of the philosopher, Plato's use of non-philosophical forms such as poetry and myth in his dialogues, and the limitations of writing as a means of conveying knowledge.


Instructor(s): Daniel Harris- McCoy

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL2221

Comments:

CLAS 2223 The Art Museum: History, Philosophy and Practice Fall 3
Course Description

A study of the emergence of museums of art, tracing their development from private and ecclesiastical collections of the classical period and middle ages to their present form as public institutions. This course will focus on the exhibition, Roman in the Provinces: Art on the Periphery of Empire which is being organized for the Yale University Art Gallery and the McMullen Museum, Boston College. It will open at Yale in August 2014 and come to the McMullen in February 2015. Course includes field trips to museums.


Instructor(s): Gail Hoffman and Nancy Netzer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

CLAS 2226 The Age of Augustus Fall 3
Course Description

Augustus, the first emperor of Rome, restored stability to the Roman world after its civil wars, established a new political order which became the Roman Empire, rebuilt the city of Rome to match its role as the capital of a world empire, and oversaw remarkable creativity in the visual and literary arts, including the works of Horace, Vergil, Livy, Propertius, and Ovid. This course will examine the political events and cultural life of this vital time with particular attention to Augustus' own central role in the creation of what we call the Age of Augustus.


Instructor(s): Michael Mordine

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

CLAS 2228 Ancient Athletics Spring 3
Course Description

This course surveys ancient sport culture and sporting events from the Greek Olympic games to the Roman gladiatorial contests. while comparing ancient and modern athletic conventions and values. Many types of evidence will be employed, including readings and translation, artistic and archaeological remains, and student participation in reconstructing ancient events. Topics to be investigated include training and competing, the rules of the games, winning and celebrating, prizes and social status, sportsmanship, professionalism versus amateurism, women in ancient athletics, the relationship between sport and religious ritual, and athletics in ancient myth.


Instructor(s): Michael Mordine

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

CLAS 2230 Classical Mythology Fall 3
Course Description

This course explores the mythology of ancient Greece, Rome, and the Near East within its cultural, political, historical, and religious contexts. You will meet (or renew your acquaintance with) mythical figures like Zeus, Gilgamesh, Medusa, and Helen as they appear in multiple literary genres and other artistic media. In order to analyze and interrogate these myths we will use ancient and modern frameworks for thinking about what mythology is and what it does. What can a myth tell us about the civilization that created, adopted, or adapted it? What do our uses of Classical mythology - and our creations of our own myths - tell us about ourselves?


Instructor(s): Hanne Eisenfeld

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL2220

Comments:

CLAS 2236 Roman Law and Family Spring 3
Course Description

We will look at the makeup and dynamics of the Roman household through legal sources, which allow investigation of Roman legal arguments and approaches to issues such as marriage, dowry, divorce, disciplining children, adultery, procreation, adoption, and women's rights, and the role of the pater familias. We will also observe similarities and differences between Roman family law and modern American family law. By the end of the course you will have gained a better understanding not only of the Roman family but also of how societies -- including our own -- use law to order and regulate family relationships.


Instructor(s): Kendra Eshleman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HIST2206

Comments:

CLAS 2240 Dangerous Women in Classical Myth Spring 3
Course Description

Demeter sticks a baby in the fire, Amazons cut off one breast and live far away from men, Clytemnestra kills her husband in his bath. In this course we will investigate how Greeks and Romans used stories about female figures - goddesses, monsters, and humans - as a way of talking about a range of conflicts, tensions, and fears. While we focus on the ancient world, we will also look at how these figures are used in later periods and think about which stories we tell about women - and why.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): DEPT

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL2204

Comments:

CLAS 2242 Roman Religion Fall 3
Course Description

The Romans lived in a world full of gods; religion affected every part of Roman life, from politics to warfare to entertainment. Christianity took shape within this world, and Roman religion, especially the mystery cults, has often been regarded as a model for the early church. Yet the Roman concept of ‘religion’ has very little in common with modern, Judeo-Christian-influenced notions. In this class we will explore the theory and practice of religion in the ancient Roman world, as reflected in ancient literary texts, as well as in epigraphic and archaeological evidence. Themes include the nature of Roman worship, from state cult to magic and mysteries, the interplay between religion and politics, and the development of Christianity in its pagan context.


Instructor(s): Kendra Eshleman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HIST4211 THEO2241

Comments:

CLAS 2244 Women in the Greek Cultural Spectrum Spring 3
Course Description

The course will explore the status of women as seen by such authors as Homer, Hesiod, Semonides, Sappho and Plato as well as some playwrights and contemporary Greek writers. A wide range of topics will be discussed from the above selected readings. There will be a focus on roles and relationships between gods and goddesses, husbands and wives, mothers (parents) and children as part of the societal structure.


Instructor(s): Maria Kakavas

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

CLAS 2250 Multiculturalism in the Roman Empire Spring 3
Course Description

From its beginnings as a small city-state in central Italy, Rome built a vast multicultural empire stretching across the entire Mediterranean and much of Europe. We will travel through this empire, visiting such different peoples and provinces as the Germans and the Jews, Britain and Greece. How did those people remain loyal to their origins while also becoming Roman? How did the different cultures included within the empire transform who “the Romans” were and what it meant to be Roman? How did the emperors – those larger-than-life figures like Augustus and Nero – use the diversity of the empire to craft their public images as conquerors or as...Greek actors? We’ll use a combination of written sources, archaeological evidence, and even visual art to investigate these questions and to explore the ever-expanding melting pot of the Roman world.


Instructor(s): Mark Thatcher

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HIST2837

Comments:

CLAS 2254 The Culture of Athenian Democracy Spring 3
Course Description

A political and cultural history of Athens during the creation and height of its democracy (circa 480-400 B.C.E.). The course will consider the Persian Wars and their effect on political and constitutional developments in Athens, the workings of the Athenian Democracy under Pericles, and the eventual collapse following the Peloponnesian War. Readings in translation include Thucydides, Plutarch, Aristotle, Xenophon, Plato, and the Greek playwrights (Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes). Emphasis will be on integrating historical, literary, and archaeological evidence to provide as complete a picture as possible of this dynamic period of ancient history.


Instructor(s): Gail Hoffman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HIST4202

Comments:

CLAS 2260 Drama and Society in Ancient Greece Fall 3
Course Description

Greek drama offered the people of one ancient society, Athens, a medium for debating the great issues of their time: how can society best be governed? How should citizens behave in times of war? How can women take an active role in a man’s world? What is the role in society of rational, intellectual discourse? Or the role of religion? Can literature help guide us through these questions? Greek writers rarely provide clear answers, but their plays invite us to join the debate. By critically reading a selection of Greek dramas – both tragedies and comedies – in their social context, we will confront a series of issues that are still debated today and discuss how one society approached them.


Instructor(s): Mark Thatcher

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL2111

Comments:

CLAS 2262 The City of Rome Spring 3
Course Description

What was a normal day like for ancient Romans? What did they see, hear, and do while going about their lives? How did those things change as Rome shifted from a Republic to an Empire and as their city became caput mundi ("Head of the World")? In this course we will reconstruct the lived experiences of Romans by examining Rome's urban spaces through art, architecture, artifacts, and texts. Along the way, we will explore: public buildings, mundane and monumental; recreation (baths, theaters, arenas); civic infrastructure (aqueducts, sewers, roads); economy and commerce (shopping, harbors, slavery); gender and sexuality (domestic spaces, brothels); religion (temples, sacrifices, funerals); and other topics as appropriate.


Instructor(s): Christopher Polt

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ARTH2262

Comments:

CLAS 2268 The Christian East: Orientale Lumen Spring 3
Course Description

The spirituality and traditions of Eastern Christianity across places and times. The worlds of Eastern Orthodoxy, Oriental Orthodoxy, and the Catholic Eastern Churches in their doctrine and practice. Liturgy and ritual; iconography and architecture; music, chant and hymnography; languages, social order, and ethnicity; history and the present. With emphasis on Byzantine Greek, Syrian, and Slavonic usages and the Armenian church, but not neglecting the Nestorian churches and Coptic and Ethiopian Christianity.


Instructor(s): M.J. Connolly

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

CLAS 2270 Gender and Sexuality in Ancient Rome Spring 3
Course Description

In this course, we will examine Roman views on gender and sexuality during a period covering approximately 200 BCE to 200 CE. We will use literature, epigraphy, and material culture to reconstruct what the ideals of behavior were for Roman men and women, what constituted deviation from these ideals, and how real Romans may actually behaved.


Instructor(s): Elizabeth Sutherland

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

CLAS 2275 Greece Viewed Through Her Films Fall 3
Course Description

This course views Greece through the medium of films made chiefly by internationally-renowned Greek filmmakers. The films are studied as reflections of the Greek landscape and climate, history and politics, literature and culture. The course offers multiple angles on Greece (Never on Sunday, Zorba the Greek) and comparison with films of other countries—the reel leads from mythical antiquity (Iphigeneia) to the vibrant contemporary nation, in its international context on the Southeastern rim of Europe (Ulysses' Gaze, Touch of Spice). All the major films viewed are in English or have English subtitles.


Instructor(s): Dia M.L. Philippides

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

CLAS 2280 Beast Literature Spring 3
Course Description

From Mother Goose’s fairy tales to lolcats, we imagine animals often speaking as we do. But what are we saying when we use animals to talk with and about one another? And what does literature featuring articulate animals say about our attitudes towards humans, animals, and the lines we draw between them? This course explores “beast literature” in its various forms (fable, comedy, the novel, epic, debate poetry, etc), examining its incarnations through ancient Greece and Rome, Medieval Europe, and the modern world.


Instructor(s): POLT

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL2202

Comments:

CLAS 2286 The History and Structure of Latin Fall 3
Course Description

An introduction to the phonological, morphological, and syntactic structures and history of Latin from the earliest inscriptions through the classical and medieval periods up to neo-Latin.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): M.J. Connolly

Prerequisites: Prior study of Latin.

Cross listed with: LING3205

Comments:

CLAS 2290 Dying, Death and Afterward in Ancient Greece Spring 3
Course Description

The ancient Greeks wrote poems and stories about glorious - and inglorious - deaths, believed in afterlives that could involve privilege or punishment (or neither), and passed laws about burials and mourning. This course will examine cultural responses to death in the Greek world through the lenses of material objects (e.g. tomb decorations and grave goods), literary and artistic representations, and ritual activity. We will consider how practices and beliefs changed over time in response to shifting societal and individual needs, and, in addition, how this helps us to understand the place death fills in our own communities.


Instructor(s): Hanne Eisenfeld

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

CLAS 2295 Ancient Comedy Fall 3
Course Description

This course explores comedy from ancient Greece and Rome. Reading plays by Aristophanes, Plautus, and Terence, we will examine what the ancients considered "comic," how comedy was performed, and what comedy contributed to contemporary society. Along the way we will consider how comedy promotes, questions, and lampoons ancient values and ideas about warfare, slavery, gender and sexuality, etc. All readings will be in English and there will be substantial performance opportunities.


Instructor(s): Polt

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL2295

Comments:

CLAS 2384 Church Latin Fall 3
Course Description

A rapid yet thorough coverage of the grammar of Ecclesiastical Latin, with associated readings in liturgical, scriptural, devotional, doctrinal and procedural texts of the Roman Catholic Church. A look at underlying linguistic structures of Latin, ironing out seeming irregularities and aiding in vocabulary building. 
 For students with little or no background in Latin. Non-novices may also enroll for grammar review and for extensive text reading practice, with the expectation that they will also meet higher demands and serve to tutor beginners.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): M. J. Connolly

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: THEO2384 LING2384

Comments:

CLAS 3301 Greek Tragedy Spring 3
Course Description

To be determined


Instructor(s): Hanne Eisenfeld

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

CLAS 3302 Greek Rhetoric Fall 3
Course Description

The class will explore the theory and practice of classical Greek rhetoric. From Homer onward, persuasive speech occupied a central place in Greek political and cultural life, and Greeks were the first western theorists of how and why verbal persuasion works. We will read works by early Greek orators Gorgias, Antiphon, and Lysias in Greek, along with ancient discussions of rhetorical composition and critiques of rhetoric in English. We will focus on the construction and contexts of Greek oratory and on the social-historical issues illuminated by the speeches themselves.


Instructor(s): Kendra Eshleman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

CLAS 3307 Aeschylus: Agamemnon Spring 3
Course Description

Aeschylus's tragedy Agamemnon will be read in its original form. Topics for discussion will include: the nature of families, fate, the gods, sacrifice, the function of the chorus, language, and style. Secondary scholarship will be consulted.


Instructor(s): Dia M.L. Philippides

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

CLAS 3312 Roman Love Elegy Fall 3
Course Description

We will trace the rise and fall of Roman Love Elegy, a literary genre with lasting impact on our modern idea of poetry. We'll find the origins of elegy in the poems of Catullus before seeing the genre truly emerge in the poetic books of Propertius and Tibullus. As we read, we will discuss the characteristics, themes, and techniques of this new poetic tradition and ask why elegy grew into a dominant poetic genre at Rome when it did. We'll end with Ovid's ingenious poetry, which shows elegy at its pinnacle but also destroys the genre for centuries to come.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

CLAS 3315 Homer: The Odyssey Fall 3
Course Description

Homer's Iliad is not only one of the world's great war poems, it is also the story of the quintessential epic hero, Achilles. We will read, in Greek, a selection of books (including 1,9, 16, 22, 24) that trace Achilles' trajectory through rage, grief, and empathy. We will discuss the questions raised by Achilles' relationships with his superiors, friends, family, and enemies: To whom is loyalty owed and are there limits to those obligations? What is the price of kleos and should one pay? Does war abrogate the laws that govern human conduct? We will also discuss some of the fundamental debates of Homeric scholarship including the history and composition of the texts, the effects of language and meter, and the place of epic in Greek literature.


Instructor(s): Hanne Eisenfeld

Prerequisites: Two years of Greek or the equivalent. Consult professor before registering.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

CLAS 3320 Roman Civil War Literature Spring 3
Course Description

As soon as the Romans conquered an empire, they began tearing it apart, fighting a series of civil wars that ushered in a new imperial system. How did the Romans understand the experience of brother fighting brother? How did generals like Caesar and Augustus justify fighting their fellow Romans for their own gain? How did Roman poets use myth to explain the Romans’ special curse of civil war? This course explores the theme of civil war in Roman literature, by reading in Latin selections from a series of texts – including Caesar’s Civil War, Cicero’s letters, Augustus’ Res Gestae, Horace’s Odes, and Vergil’s Aeneid – in the historical and cultural context of Rome in the 1st century BC.


Instructor(s): Mark Thatcher

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

CLAS 3325 Lucretius Fall 3
Course Description

The Roman poet Lucretius is one of the key figures in the history of Western philosophy, expounding in his work De Rerum Natura (“On the Nature of Things”) upon the primary tenets of Epicurean thought. In this course we will read selections from De Rerum Natura in Latin, aiming to acquire a greater knowledge of Latin grammar and vocabulary and to improve facility in reading Latin poetry. We will use Lucretius’ poem as a focal point to explore ancient Epicureanism, its views on human ethics and the workings of the physical world, its place within ancient philosophy more broadly, and its continuing relevance for modern thought.


Instructor(s): Christopher Polt

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL3325

Comments:

CLAS 3327 Archaic Greek Poetry Spring 3
Course Description

This course is a survey of Greek poetry of the Archaic period, roughly from the late eighth to the early fifth century, between Homer and the advent of drama. Selections from Hesiod, the Homeric Hymns, the lyric canon, and elegiac and iambic verse will be read.


Instructor(s): Michael Mordine

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

CLAS 3328 Cicero and Friends Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Reading in Latin of Cicero's speech Pro Roscio Amerino, in which he defends his client against a charge of having murdered his father. Context of several types will be supplied by readings in English: selections from the Digest of Roman law, from other ancient murder trials, from critical studies of Ciceronian oratory and of Roman criminal law, and from opening and closing statements in Anglo-American murder trials. Of particular interest will be differences between ancient and modern juries and the importance of narrative in shaping a jury's attitude towards a case.


Instructor(s): Charles F. Ahern

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

CLAS 3329 Ovid's Metamorphoses Fall 3
Course Description

This course is reading (in Latin) and discussion (in English) of selected stories from Ovid's long poem about bodily transformations in the world of ancient myth, taking into consideration the poem in both its literary and its historical contexts. What to make of a narrative of instability amidst the increasing rigidity of the late Augustan principate?


Instructor(s): Charles F. Ahern, Jr.

Prerequisites: None

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CLAS 3331 Sophocles and Aristophanes Spring 3
Course Description

A close reading of two plays--a tragedy and a comedy (most likely Antigone and Frogs)--in the original Greek, with attention to the content and form of Greek tragedy and comedy, as well as the characteristics of the particular authors and texts. Participants will write their own studies. This course is designed chiefly for undergraduate majors and graduate students in Classical Studies, yet students from other fields are welcome to participate.


Instructor(s): Dia Philippides

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

CLAS 3332 Sanskrit Spring 3
Course Description

The grammar of the classical language of India, supplemented through reading selections from the classical literature and an introductory study of comparative Indo-Iranian linguistics.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): M.J. Connolly

Prerequisites: Familiarity with an inflected language highly recommended.

Cross listed with: LING3204

Comments:

CLAS 3333 Apuleius Spring 3
Course Description

Apuleius' Metamorphoses (aka the Golden Ass) is the only ancient Latin novel to survive complete, an exploration of the dark underbelly of Roman imperial society, sex, violence, slavery, witchcraft, banditry, and unholy curiosity. In this course, we will read in Latin all of book 3, and large sections of the novella that occupies the center of the work, the Cupid and Psyche. In addition, we will read the entire novel in English.


Instructor(s): Kendra Eshleman

Prerequisites: None

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CLAS 3335 Ovid Fall 3
Course Description

Readings in Latin from Ovids Ars Amatoria his handbook for young Roman men trying to catch girls and his Fasti, a religious calendar richly illustrated with mythological stories. We will develop Latin reading skills and review grammar as necessary. Along the way, we will discuss the literary heritage of Ovids poems and investigate their social, political and cultural contexts in the Age of Augustus.


Instructor(s): Mark Thatcher

Prerequisites: None

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CLAS 3336 Horace: The Odes Fall 3
Course Description

Close reading of selected Satires of Horace and Juvenal, with particular attention to the development of satire as a genre.


Instructor(s): Elizabeth Sutherland

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Open to undergraduate and graduate students; graduate students can expect extra readings in background texts and in modern scholarship.

CLAS 3337 Lucan's Civil Wars Spring 3
Course Description

Lucan's epic, De Bello Civili, looks back in history to narrate the civil wars that ended the Roman Republic and put Julius Caesar in power. At the same time, the poem is clearly a reflection of the poet's own cultural context under the Emperor Nero. We will read much of Lucan's epic in Latin and the rest in English, and we will consider a sampling of recent scholarship. Discussions will focus on Lucan's style and narrative structure as well as his portrayal of civil war, his relationship to Nero, and his status as an epic poet writing after Vergil.


Instructor(s): Brigitte Libby

Prerequisites: None

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CLAS 3338 Cicero and Sallust: Catiline Fall 3
Course Description

The failed conspiracy of Catiline occupies a pivotal point in the dissolution of the Roman republic. Falling between the civil wars of Sulla (88-81 BCE) and Caesar (49-46 BCE), Catiline’s uprising (63 BCE) is part of the long aftermath of the former and representative of (and contributing to) the social and political breakdown that led to the latter. It is also one of the best attested episodes from the late Republic, the subject of four Ciceronian speeches (and mentioned in many of his other works) and a monograph by the historian Sallust. In this advanced Latin class, we will read Sallust’s Bellum Catilinae and Cicero’s First Catilinarian in Latin, and the rest of Cicero’s Catilinarian orations in English. Topics will include the place of this episode in the political history of the late Republic, its representation by Cicero and Sallust, and the broader historiographic issues it raises. Graduate students will read in addition select letters of Cicero.


Instructor(s): Kendra Eshleman

Prerequisites: None

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CLAS 3339 Roman Epistolography Fall 3
Course Description

This course explores the Latin epistolary tradition through the study of various letters written by Cicero, Seneca, Pliny and others, both in Latin and in translation. These letters provide unique windows into the life and times of some of the greatest figures of Roman history and literature. Through our investigation pf their letters we will examine the changing historical, political, social, and cultural milieus of multiple generations of Romans from the end of the Republic in the first century BCE to the consolidation of the imperial system in the second century CE.


Instructor(s): Michael Mordine

Prerequisites: None

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CLAS 3342 Livy Fall 3
Course Description

In the last two decades, the study of the Augustan historian Livy has undergone a renaissance. Once scorned as a dull compiler and apologist for the Augustan regime, Livy is now recognized not only as a masterful stylist but also as a subtle and challenging thinker. In this class, we will focus on his history of early Rome, reading portions of books 1 and 5 in Latin, and other selections from the first pentad in English. Major themes will include women, religion, and political power in the Ab Urbe Condita, the relationship between Livy’s work and the Augustan principate, Livy’s methods as a historian, and the larger, related problems of the character of ancient historiography and our knowledge of early Roman history generally.


Instructor(s): Kendra Eshleman

Prerequisites: None

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CLAS 3345 Sophocles Fall 3
Course Description

Sophocles’ tragedy Antigone will be read in the original Greek. Sophocles uses this mythical heroine to ask questions of lasting importance. How can society best be governed? What is the proper relationship between the state and the individual, between men and women, or between humans and the divine? We will join the debates raised in modern scholarship by considering these questions against the social and cultural background of Athens in the 5th century BC, as well as Sophocles’ place in the Greek literary tradition.


Instructor(s): Mark Thatcher

Prerequisites: None

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CLAS 3348 Latin Epigram: Catullus and Martial Spring 3
Course Description

We will read selected epigrams of Catullus and Martial. In contrast to epic, these poems are often short, funny and deal with the joys and sorrows of everyday life. Emphasis will be given to the place of epigram in the pantheon of Roman literature, the construction of individual poems, their arrangement in a collection, and the insight they provide into ancient life.


Instructor(s): Daniel Harris McCoy

Prerequisites: None

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CLAS 3350 Catullus Fall 3
Course Description

The Roman poet Gaius Valerius Catullus offers a rare and tantalizing glimpse at the private lives of Roman elites at the end of the Republic. In this course we will examine his work and what it can show us about ancient Roman relationships — social and erotic — as well its place within the broader literary tradition. Readings will be in Latin.


Instructor(s): Christopher Polt

Prerequisites: None

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CLAS 3356 Tacitus Fall 3
Course Description

A reading of the Nero books of Tacitus' Annals, accompanied by an investigation of Roman historiography and the history and culture of the Age of Nero, including the evolution of the Julio-Claudian principate, the flourishing of art, literature, and philosophy under Nero, and the complex interaction between art and imperial power.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kendra Eshleman

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

CLAS 3358 Petronius Fall 3
Course Description

This course will explore the dark and tawdry underbelly of Imperial Rome through the eyes of Petronius, author of the Satyricon. In addition to closely reading the Satyricon's Latin prose, we will examine its place in the canon of Greek and Roman literature and what it can tell us about Roman social history.


Instructor(s): Daniel Harris McCoy

Prerequisites: None

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CLAS 3370 Roman Comedy Spring 3
Course Description

The Roman playwright Plautus inspired many of the greatest writers of Western comedy, including Shakespeare, Molière, and Wilde. This term we will read in Latin his Amphitruo, the only surviving ancient ‘mythological burlesque,’ aiming to acquire a greater knowledge of Latin grammar and vocabulary and to improve facility in reading Latin poetry. We will examine the genre more broadly by reading additional Roman comedies in English. We will also explore the cultural, material, and performance context of Roman theater.


Instructor(s): Christopher Polt

Prerequisites: None

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CLAS 3373 Euripides, Hecuba Fall 3
Course Description

A close reading of Euripides' play Hecuba in the original Greek. The play will be studied from several viewpoints, including language, style, characters, and themes, viewing the text in its context and in comparison with other contemporary literary works. The related scholarship will be reviewed. Participants will write their own studies on the play. This course is designed chiefly for undergraduate majors and graduate students in Classical Studies, yet students from other fields are welcome to participate.


Instructor(s): Dia Philippides

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

CLAS 3375 Vergil Spring 3
Course Description

Vergil's Aeneid, the premier work of Roman poetry, recounts the struggles of refugees from the Trojan War as they wander in search of a new home and in the process lay the foundations of Rome. We will read large selections of the epic in Latin and the whole in English, considering how Romans viewed themselves in their broader Mediterranean context, what archetypical values Vergil embodies in his characters, and how the poem speaks to the anxieties and interests of Vergil's contemporaries at the beginning of the Empire.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Christopher Polt

Prerequisites: None

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CLAS 3376 Studies in Words Spring 3
Course Description


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: LING3376

Comments:

CLAS 3382 Herodotus I Spring 3
Course Description

Readings (in Greek) from the Histories of Herodotus, the first Greek historian. We will develop Greek reading skills and review grammar as necessary. Along the way, we will meet larger-than-life characters like Croesus, king of Lydia; Solon, the wise Athenian; and Themistocles, the wily trickster. We will explore some major themes of the work: the great deeds of both Greeks and non-Greeks, including the rise to power of both Persia and Athens; the clashing but also overlapping cultures of the Greek world; and the achievements of Greek wisdom and culture. Finally, we will place Herodotus in the cultural context of Archaic Greece and fifth-century Athens, reading the entire Histories and other texts in English, and discuss the place in the Greek literary tradition of this “most Homeric of historians.”


Instructor(s): Mark Thatcher

Prerequisites: None

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CLAS 3385 Letters of Cicero and Pliny Fall 3
Course Description

This advanced Latin course will examine the wide variety of goals, subjects, styles and addressees identifiable in the epistolary genre. Translation, close readings, and analysis of a selection of letters by Ciceero and Pliny will be supplemented with brief forays into poetic epistles, including Ovid's Heroides and Horace's epistles, and Seneca's philosophical letters.


Instructor(s): Meredith Monaghan

Prerequisites: None

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CLAS 3386 Studies in Words Spring 3
Course Description

The ways of words in the life of language as seen through the linguistic techniques of morphology, lexicography, semantics, pragmatics, and etymology. Aspects examined include: word formation, word origins, nests of words, winged words, words at play, words and material culture, writing systems, the semantic representations of words, bytes and words, the creative word, the Word made flesh, awkward words, dirty words, dialect vocabulary, salty words, fighting words, words at prayer, new words, and the Great Eskimo vocabulary hoax.


Instructor(s): Michael J. Connolly

Prerequisites: None

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CLAS 3387 Thucydides Spring 3
Course Description

If Herodotus is the Father of History, Thucydides is the father of the modern study of history. In this class, we will read generous selections from his history in Greek, and the entire work in English. Much of our attention will be given to untangling Thucydides’ difficult Greek, but we will also spend as much time as possible exploring issues central to the work: the nature of power; the interplay of justice and expediency; the place of morality in international relations; the character of Greek warfare; Thucydides’ views of religion, democracy, and finance; and historiography itself — how to write it, and how to read it.


Instructor(s): Kendra Eshleman

Prerequisites: Two years of ancient Greek

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CLAS 3390 Reading and Research I Fall 3
Course Description


Instructor(s): Maria Kakavas

Prerequisites: None

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CLAS 3391 Reading and Research II Spring 3
Course Description


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

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CLAS 3393 Senior Thesis Fall 3
Course Description


Instructor(s): Kendra Eshleman

Prerequisites: None

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CLAS 3394 Senior Thesis Spring 3
Course Description


Instructor(s): Kendra Eshleman

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

CLAS 3399 Advanced Independent Research Spring 6
Course Description


Instructor(s): Charles Ahern

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

CLAS 7790 Readings and Research I Fall 3
Course Description


Instructor(s): Gail Hoffman and Kendra Eshleman

Prerequisites: None

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CLAS 7791 Readings and Research II Spring 3
Course Description


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

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CLAS 8888 Interim Study Fall/Spring 0
Course Description


Instructor(s): Gail Hoffman

Prerequisites: None

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