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Biology Courses (BIOL) College of Arts and Sciences


Subject Area Course # Course Title Semester Credit Hours Expand
BIOL 1010 General Biology Fall 3
Course Description

Designed for non-science majors who desire an introduction to cell and molecular biology, this course is also suggested for students who may be interested in the Biology major but lack sufficient preparation to enroll directly into BI200. Topics include the chemistry of life; biological membranes; cellular metabolism; cell structure; cell division; DNA replication/RNA transcription; protein synthesis; genetics/evolution. Lectures include discussions of the scientific method and current applications of biological investigations. Note: this course does not fulfill any requirement for the biology major, biochemistry major, or the pre-medical program.


Instructor(s): Anthony T. Annunziato and The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 1100 General Biology Fall 3
Course Description

Designed for non-science majors who desire an introduction to cell and molecular biology, this course is also suggested for students who may be interested in the Biology major but lack sufficient preparation to enroll directly into BIOL 2000. Topics include the chemistry of life; biological membranes; cellular metabolism; cell structure; cell division; DNA replication/RNA transcription; protein synthesis; genetics/evolution. Lectures include discussions of the scientific method and current applications of biological investigations. Note: this course does not fulfill any requirement for the biology major, biochemistry major, or the pre-medical program.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course does not fulfill any requirement for the biology major, biochemistry major, or the pre-medical program.

BIOL 1112 Biology Honors Research Thesis I Fall 3
Course Description

Seniors with advanced standing who have already completed at least one semester of undergraduate research can apply to participate in the Biology Honors Program. Students design and execute experiments as part of independent research projects conducted under the mentorship of a faculty member. Students write a senior honors thesis describing their project and its results.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: BI 461 or BI 462

Cross listed with:

Comments: By arrangement only.

BIOL 1163 Understanding Urban Ecosystems: Environmental Law, Policy, and Science Fall 3
Course Description

This course will explore the scientific and legal elements of the protection and restoration of urban environmental resources, with a focus on Massachusetts. Specifically, the course will cover the basic ecology, legal and social history, and legal and political frameworks for the following topics: urban habitat and wildlife, toxic pollution in cities, urban watersheds, urban air quality and public health, and the city as a biological habitat including human behavior and the urban setting. This course will be taught by environmental lawyers, Charles Lord and Aaron Toffler, with several lectures by Professor Eric Strauss, Boston College Environmental Studies Program Director.


Instructor(s): Charles Lord

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Does NOT satisfy the Natural Science Core Requirement

BIOL 1210 Teaching the Biosphere Fall 3
Course Description


Instructor(s): Laura Hake

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 1300 Anatomy & Physiology 1 Fall/Summer 3
Course Description

This course lays the foundation for the understanding of human anatomy and physiology. The first portion of the course covers cellular and molecular aspects of eukaryotic cell function: basic chemistry, macromolecules, cell structure, membrane transport, metabolism, gene expression, cell cycle control, and genetics. The course continues with the study of several organ systems. Beginning with the Integument, which is followed by the Skeletal and Muscular Systems, and ending this first semester with the Nervous System. The cellular and molecular basis for the functions of these systems is an integral element of this portion of the course.


Instructor(s): Carol Chaia Halpern

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Does not satisfy the Natural Sciences Core requirement. This course is restricted to School of Nursing students. Other students may be admitted only during the course drop/add period on a seat-available basis.

BIOL 1310 Anatomy & Physiology Lab 1 Fall/Summer 1
Course Description

Laboratory exercises intended to familiarize students with the various structures and principles discussed in BIOL 1300 through the use of anatomical models, physiological experiments, and limited dissection.


Instructor(s): Carol Chaia Halpern

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Lab fee required. This course is restricted to School of Nursing students. Other students may be admitted only during the course drop/add period on a seat-available basis.

BIOL 1320 Anatomy & Physiology 2 Spring/Summer 3
Course Description

This course is a continuation of BIOL 1300/1310, with a primary emphasis on the physiology of the major body systems. Systems studied in this course include the sensory, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. While the physiological functions under normal conditions are emphasized, relevant disease or dysfunctional conditions are also discussed.


Instructor(s): Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 1330 Anatomy & Physiology Lab 2 Spring/Summer 1
Course Description

A continuation of Anatomy & Physiology Lab 1.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 1410 Immune Defenses: Friend or Foe Spring 3
Course Description


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 1420 The Genetic Century Spring 3
Course Description

Genetics is transforming life in the twenty-first century, from health care to the foods we eat to our understanding of evolution and biodiversity. The course will provide students with a basic understanding of how information is encoded in genes and how that information is transmitted between generations and expressed during development and disease. Topics covered in the course include the genetic bases of disease and behavior, forensic uses of DNA, evolution, genetic engineering, genetically modified crops, and personalized medicine. This course is designed for students who are not majoring in biology or biochemistry.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Clare O'Connor

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 1440 Sustaining the Biosphere Spring 3
Course Description

Environmental problems and their solutions occur at the intersection of natural systems and the human systems that manipulate the natural world. The course will provide students with an integrated understanding of human systems that affect nature. Topics will include climate, air and water pollution, economics and urbanization, food and agriculture, population growth, biodiversity, waste management and health and toxicology. Sustainability, personal responsibility and a proactive approach to involvement in solutions to current environmental crises will be emphasized. This course is designed for students who are not majoring in biology or biochemistry.


Instructor(s): Laura Hake

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Students must also register for the Sustaining the Biosphere Discussion Section (BIOL 1501).

BIOL 1480 The Power of Plagues Spring 3
Course Description

An overview of infectious diseases, their effects on people and society, and the effectiveness and design of public health interventions in decreasing disease-associated morbidity and mortality. Concepts include the emergence and re-emergence of disease, drug resistance, and eradication and resource allocation, each highlighted through exploration of the biology of relevant pathogens. Diseases studied include malaria, HIV, tuberculosis, cholera, smallpox, SARS, and polio, among many others. Weaponization of infectious agents and the implications for security and health policy are also discussed. This course satisfies the Natural Science Core and is designed for non-biology majors.


Instructor(s): Kathleen Dunn

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 1490 Ecology of a Dynamic Planet Fall 3
Course Description


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 1503 Science and Technology in American Society Fall 6
Course Description

What roles do science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) play in advanced, knowledge-dependent societies? This course examines our institutional and cultural relationship to innovation: hopes and fears about STEM, views of science and religion, conceptions of democracy’s cultural requirements, the emergence of DIY and geek culture, and more. And it explores ethical questions around STEM, including debates over biotechnology, pharmaceuticals, climate change, and mass extinction. The course gives students the basic technical background to address these questions and an opportunity to imagine a technological application of their own for addressing the complex problems of the twenty-first century.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Andrew Jewett and Christopher Kenaley

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HIST1511

Comments: Core Renewal Course: Complex Problems. For freshmen only.

Students must also register for a lab section (HIST1512 or BIOL1502)

BIOL 1510 Brain Science: The New Frontier Fall 3
Course Description


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 1520 Biodiversity Connections: Biodiversity, Humans & Environment Spring 3
Course Description


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 1701 Epidemics&Disease:Biological&Social Causes,Consequences,&Responses Spring 3
Course Description

This course investigates the relationship between humans and microbes in the context of historical epidemics. We will cover well‐known epidemics, such as the Black Death during the Middle Ages and the devastating Influenza of 1918, and the role of antibiotics, vaccines, and antivirals in the treatment of key illnesses such as polio, tuberculosis, and AIDS. Students will learn basic concepts of biology including cell structure, genetics, physiology, and immunology. The course will conclude with identifying common behavioral themes as seen in the on‐going AIDS epidemic and in the more recent emerging Ebola epidemic in West Africa.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kathy Dunn

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal Course:Enduring Questions

BIOL 1702 Human Disease:Plagues, Pathogens and Chronic Disorders Spring 3
Course Description

Much of biological discovery has been centered around human disease and our quest for health and longevity. From the earliest observations regarding the human body, to the discovery of germs and the eventual technology guiding current treatments, human beings have sought to understand the physiological and cellular parameters associated with health. This course will examine human disease and epidemics through the lens of pathogens, genetic pre-disposition and environmental influence. Students will learn basic concepts of cell structure, genetics, and evolution in the context of infectious diseases such as Tuberculosis and AIDS or physiological disorders such as Alzheimer’s Disease or diabetes.


Instructor(s): Kathleen Dunn

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal Course:Enduring Questions
For Freshmen Only

BIOL 1703 Your Brain on Theatre: On Stage and Off Fall 3
Course Description

Actors are often challenged to portray individuals suffering from progressive neurological disorders—e.g., Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Diseases, Multiple Sclerosis, and syndromes associated with malnutrition and traumatic brain injuries. Beginning with the neuroscience of the “all right” brain, we will proceed to discuss neuroscience of the brain when awry, particularly in the context of how actors authentically convey the complexities of emotion and of neuro-disabilities. The enduring questions that we explore will pertain to defining the “true self”, establishing memory, and engendering responsiveness to “the other.”


Instructor(s): Daniel Kirschner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal Course: Enduring Questions. For freshmen only

BIOL 1704 Metamorphosis: Evolution and the Genetics of Change Spring 3
Course Description

Darwinian Evolution is a theory of change, and genetics is the field that attempts to explain how evolution works. This course abandons science textbooks in favor of first-person accounts by scientists (memoirs, letters, essays) to trace the origins and growth of evolutionary thought. Through reading, discussion and writing, students will gain a deeper understanding of basic genetics and how evolutionary theory can guide our thinking about human issues as diverse as race, eugenics, medicine, genetic engineering and IQ tests.


Instructor(s): Welkin E. Johnson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal Course: Enduring Questions

BIOL 1990 Gateway to the Life Sciences Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 2000 Molecules and Cells Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Foundational course required for Biology majors that introduces students to living systems at the molecular and cellular level of organization. Topics introduced in this course include basic cellular biochemistry, gene regulation, cellular organization and metabolism, and cell signaling and genetics.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: (or concurrent) CHEM 1109 or equivalent or permission of the department.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 2010 Ecology and Evolution Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Foundational course required for Biology majors with a focus on the ecology and resilience of living systems across all levels of spatial scales. Topics introduced in this course include evolution, population dynamics, behavioral ecology, ecosystems, co-evolution, and human ecology.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 2020 Organisms & Populations Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Foundational course required for Biology majors with a focus on the ecology and resilience of living systems across all levels of spatial scales. Topics introduced in this course include evolution, population dynamics, behavioral ecology, ecosystems, co-evolution and human ecology.


Instructor(s): Serena Moseman-Valtierra and The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies Natural Science Core Requirement.

BIOL 2040 Investigations in Molecular Cell Biology Lab Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

A 3-credit laboratory course designed to introduce students to the core techniques and experimental strategies of modern molecular cell biology within the context of an original research investigation. Students will learn to construct testable hypotheses, design experiments, and critically analyze experimental results. During the course of their investigations, students will gain proficiency in microbial cell culture, molecular cloning, genetic analysis, and molecular characterization. Students will also gain proficiency in scientific communication and the use of biological databases.


Instructor(s): Clare O'Connor and Douglas Warner

Prerequisites: BIOL 2000; CHEM 1111

Cross listed with:

Comments: Lab fee required.

BIOL 2050 BI 204 Lab Discussion Section Fall 1
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 2060 Gateway Biology Discussion II Fall 1
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 2070 Gateway Biology Discussion III Fall 1
Course Description


Instructor(s): Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 2100 Introductory Biology Laboratory I Summer 1
Course Description

The first semester of a two-semester introductory biology laboratory course designed for non-biology majors preparing for graduate programs in health professions. This course teaches basic laboratory skills, including microscopy, spectrophotometry, analytical electrophoresis and molecular cloning. Students are introduced to the principles of experimental design, data analysis and data interpretation. Inquiry-based activities include experiments in biochemistry, cell physiology and molecular biology.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course does not satisfy departmental requirements for biology majors.
Lab fee required.

BIOL 2110 Introductory Biology Laboratory II Summer 1
Course Description

The continuation of BIOL2100. Inquiry-based activities include experiments in organismic biology, ecology and field biology.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Lab fee required.

BIOL 2140 Capstone Science and Religion: Contemporary Issues Fall 3
Course Description

Is it possible for a contemporary scientist to be a believer in God and, in particular, a Christian believer? This course will explore the interaction between religion and science from early modern times (Galileo and Newton) to the present (Hawking, Peacocke, Teilhard de Chardin). The origin of the universe and the origin and evolution of life on earth will be explored. The influence of contemporary physics and biology on the believer's understanding of God's interaction with the world will be considered.


Instructor(s): Donald J. Plocke, S.J.

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Restricted to seniors and second semester juniors. Some knowledge of science, particularly familiarity with some basic concepts of physics, will be assumed.

BIOL 2200 Microbiology for Health Professionals Fall 3
Course Description

This course is a study of the basic physiological and biochemical activities of bacteria and viruses. Emphasis will be placed on virulence factors and the mechanism by which a variety of microorganisms and viruses establish an infection. The use of anti-viral drugs and antibiotics, the host immune response to microbial infection, and the effectiveness of various vaccination strategies will also be discussed.


Instructor(s): Kathleen Dunn

Prerequisites: BIOL1300-1320

Cross listed with:

Comments: Does not satisfy the Natural Sciences Core Requirement. Intended only for School of Nursing students.

BIOL 2201 Introductory Biology I Summer 3
Course Description

Foundational course required for Biology majors that introduces students to living systems at the molecular and cellular level of organization. Topics introduced in this course include basic cellular biochemistry, gene regulation, cellular organization and metabolism, and cell signaling and genetics.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course will be a two part series offered over the summer.

BIOL 2202 Introductory Biology II Summer 3
Course Description

Foundational course required for Biology majors with a focus on the ecology and resilience of living systems across all levels of spatial scales. Topics introduced in this course include evolution, population dynamics, behavioral ecology, ecosystems, co-evolution, and human ecology.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 2210 Microbiology for Health Professionals Laboratory Fall 1
Course Description

Exercises in this laboratory course deal with aseptic techniques, microbial cultivation and growth characteristics, staining and bacterial isolation techniques, differential biochemical tests, identification of unknown bacterial species, and testing effectiveness of antimicrobial agents.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: One two-hour laboratory period per week. Lab fee required.

BIOL 2240 Race, Disease and Disparities Fall 3
Course Description

This course will focus on issues of race and health in America and address the question “Is race a biological construct?” Underrepresented minorities face huge health disparities in America and we will also address the question “Is there a biological basis for differing health disparities in different diseases among different races?” The course will also cover the issues of health and training in the sciences for underrepresented minorities in the United States and current policy initiatives to address these disparities. Discussions will cover such issues as: the current health and science educational disparities in the sciences for minorities; current initiatives aimed at closing the disparity gaps as proposed by government agencies, non-profit organizations, scientific societies, and philanthropies; and why these issues are of general importance to science and society. The biologic, social and cultural dietary causes of diseases leading to health disparities will be considered.


Instructor(s): David Burgess

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 2300 Biostatistics Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course will introduce biology students to the basic statistical techniques that are used in conducting biological and medical research. The course is divided into four parts: (1) descriptive statistics (averages, variability); (2) probability and probability distributions (basic probability theory and the binomial, poison, and normal distributions); (3) statistical inference (parametric and non-parametric tests); and, (4) relationships between variables (simple and multiple regression). Students will become familiar with a standard statistical analysis software package and will critique actual research papers.


Instructor(s): Peter Clote (Fall) and Richard A. McGowan, S.J. (Spring)

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 2310 Biostatistics Honors Fall 3
Course Description

This course is similar in scope to BI230, except that it is a calculus-based course with perhaps more rigor than BI230. The course trains students to comprehend, critique, and communicate research findings from biomedical literature. Topics from statistics include elementary probability theory, standard distributions (binomial, geometric, normal, exponential, Poisson), random variable, expectation, variance, hypothesis testing, significance tests, confidence intervals, regression, correlation, and statistical learning theory.


Instructor(s): Peter Clote

Prerequisites: MT 100

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 3030 Introduction to Physiology Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course will offer a comprehensive exploration of fundamental life systems with a primary emphasis on human physiology. The chemical and physical processes common to all living organisms, including hemodynamics, respiration, circulation, acid/base regulation, synaptic transmission, kidney and muscle function will be discussed. Also included are related topics on development of the organism and functional aspects of the immune system in host defense strategies.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: BIOL 2000

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course is intended for Biology, Psychology, and Biochemistry majors and students in the pre-medical program seeking a broad overview of human physiology.

BIOL 3040 Cell Biology Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course is designed to provide students with a strong foundation in the molecular biology of the cell. Topics covered in the course include cellular biochemistry, regulation of gene expression, subcellular organization, regulation of the cell cycle, membrane trafficking, cell-substrate interactions, cytoskeleton, cancer, and cell signaling. It serves as excellent preparation for more advanced courses in cell biology, molecular biology, developmental biology, and genetics.


Instructor(s): David Burgess and Junona Moroianu

Prerequisites: BIOL 2000

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 3050 Genetics Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course focuses on genetics of microbial and eukaryotic organisms. Topics covered in the course include transmission genetics, chromosome structure, regulation of gene expression, population genetics, multifactorial inheritance and an introduction to genomics.


Instructor(s): Anthony D'Onofrio

Prerequisites: BI200 (Molecules & Cells)

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 3100 Molecular Cell Biology Laboratory Fall 1
Course Description

A laboratory course designed to introduce students to the core techniques and experimental strategies of modern cell biology and molecular biology. Students learn to construct hypotheses, design experiments, and critically analyze experimental results. Inquiry-based activities introduce students to the basics of sterile transfer, bacterial cell culture, molecular cloning, DNA amplification, protein overexpression and protein characterization.


Instructor(s): Michael Piatelli

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Lab meets once a week.
Lab fee required.

BIOL 3110 Genetics Laboratory Spring 1
Course Description

A laboratory course designed to introduce students to the principles and experimental strategies of genetic analysis. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is used as the model organism. Inquiry-based experiments are designed to teach students the principles of phenotypic analysis, genetic complementation, recombination mapping, and gene replacement.


Instructor(s): Dr. Michael Piatelli

Prerequisites: BI 310

Cross listed with:

Comments: Lab meets once a week.

BIOL 3120 Genetics Discussion Fall/Spring 0
Course Description

Discussion session to accompany BIOL3050 (Genetics). Discussion of lecture topics and problem-solving activities in small groups.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 3150 Introduction to Genomics Fall 3
Course Description

Biology of genomes: functions of genes and their products on a global scale using high throughput approaches, genome organization, transcriptomes and proteomes, genomics and diseases.


Instructor(s): Hugh Cam

Prerequisites: BIOL 2040 (can be concurrent)

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 3190 Genetics and Genomics Fall/Spring 4
Course Description

Classic and modern genetics: transmission genetics, genotype-phenotype relationships, genetic variation, genetic mapping, population genetics, genomic concepts, genomic aspects of genetic methods.


Instructor(s): Department and Timothy van Opijnen

Prerequisites: BIOL 2040 (or can be concurrent)

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 3210 Plant Biology Spring 3
Course Description

This course focuses on the critical importance of plants on Earth, and how their physiology (cell structure, photosynthetic ability, flowering, specialized structures allowing water and nutrient absorption and transport, defense strategies against predators, etc.) allows them to perform their diverse functions. Additional topics will include strategies that plants employ for adapting to environmental stresses such as pollutants and changing climate, as well as the development of transgenic strains of crop plants.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: BIOL2000

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 3316 Physiology Fall 3
Course Description

This is a study of the fundamental principles and physicochemical mechanisms underlying cellular and organismal function. Mammalian organ-systems are examined, with an emphasis on neurophysiology, cardiovascular function, respiratory function, renal function, and gastrointestinal function.


Instructor(s): Joseph Burdo

Prerequisites: BI200 (Molecules & Cells)

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course replaces BI554 and is not open to students who have taken either BI433 or BI554.

BIOL 3330 Biostatistics Fall 3
Course Description

This course trains students to comprehend, critique, and communicate research findings from biomedical literature. Topics from statistics include elementary probability theory, standard distributions (binomial, geometric, normal, exponential, Poisson), random variable, expectation, variance, hypothesis testing, significance tests, confidence intervals, regression, correlation, and statistical learning theory.


Instructor(s): Peter Clote

Prerequisites: MT101 (Calculus 2)

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 3390 Environmental Scholar I Fall 3
Course Description

A research and internship program with the Environmental Studies Program and the Urban Ecology Institute at Boston College. Year-long projects measure the impacts of human development on urban and suburban ecosystems. Scholars are divided into three teams focusing on field biology, environmental education, and environmental policy. Environmental Scholars participate in the program 10 hours per week and complete a final project each semester for review by the team's faculty mentor. The Scholars also participate in monthly Scholars Workshops and weekly team meetings.


Instructor(s): Eric Strauss

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Departmental permission required.
This course does not count as a bio-elective for biology majors.
By application only. Applications available in the Environmental Studies program office.

BIOL 3391 Environmental Scholars II Spring 3
Course Description

The continuation of BI 390


Instructor(s): Eric Strauss

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Departmental permission required.
This course does not count as a bio-elective for biology majors.

BIOL 4010 Environmental Biology Spring 3
Course Description

This course provides an interdisciplinary environmental science background with an emphasis on biology, covering topics that include: impacts of human populations on air, water, soil, and wildlife; mechanisms by which environmental contaminants can cause cancer, reproductive failure, and other outcomes; and key scientific findings influencing past, present and probable future environmental policies. Controversial issues such as climate change, alternative sources of energy, and methods of improving the global food supply will be discussed. Important historical writings as well as some of the most recent publications in the field will aid discussions of some of the most crucial unanswered problems.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: BIOL2000 and BIOL2010

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4040 Biotechnology Research Topics Fall 3
Course Description

Biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies have rich and diverse research programs that are used to develop novel therapeutics, diagnostics and technologies. We will use both scientific literature and other web-based materials, as well as the principles of cell biology, molecular biology and biochemistry, to explore and understand the applications of these research programs and technologies.


Instructor(s): Rebecca Dunn

Prerequisites: BIOL2040 and One of the following: BIOL3040, BIOL4140, BIOL4400

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4041 Genetics in Contemporary Society Fall 3
Course Description

In early 2001, scientists announced that a draft sequence of the human genome was available. Since that, advances in DNA sequencing technologies have produced sequences for thousands of species and made the sequencing of individual genomes affordable. In this seminar-style course, we will discuss how genetic information is affecting the practice of medicine, the foods we eat, our understanding of biodiversity and other topics. We will also discuss how this knowledge is being used in the genetic modification of plants and animals.


Instructor(s): Clare O'Connor

Prerequisites: BIOL 3150 or BIOL 3190

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4070 Ecology of Plants Spring 4
Course Description

An introduction to the study of plants and their ecology. Students develop the framework for plant identification and an understanding of ecological and evolutionary concepts at various scales. Angiosperms (flowering plants) will be emphasized with study of plant-plant and plant-animal interactions, plant reproduction, biomes, plant biogeography, and conservation. The BI 408 laboratory introduces students to inquiry-based observations and experiments in plant ecology. Students gain hands-on skills in plant identification, plant biology and plant ecology through field and laboratory/greenhouse exercises. In groups, students design/implement an ecological experiment that is conducted over the course of the semester in the greenhouse.


Instructor(s): Colleen Hitchcock

Prerequisites: BIOL2010

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4080 Ecology of Plants Lab Fall 0
Course Description

A laboratory course designed to introduce students to principles of plant biology. Inquiry-based experiments are designed to engage students in both the greenhouse and the field with a focus on the role of plants in ecological experiments.


Instructor(s): Colleen Hitchcock

Prerequisites: BIOL2010

Cross listed with:

Comments: Lab fee required.

BIOL 4090 Virology Fall 3
Course Description

This course will consider eukaryotic DNA and RNA viruses that are important in human disease. Basic principles of virus structure, host cell entry and the molecular biology of virus life cycles will be considered in the context of infectious disease. Viruses to be examined include Influenza, cancer-related viruses such as the Human Papilloma Virus, HIV, and emerging viruses such as Ebola and the hantaviruses. The host immune response to viral infection and the effectiveness of various vaccination strategies will also be discussed.


Instructor(s): Kathleen Dunn

Prerequisites: BIOL4140

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4140 Microbiology Spring 3
Course Description

This course provides a foundation in molecular cell biology for biology majors, focusing on bacteria, viruses, immunology and host/microbe relationships. Bacterial structure and function are addressed in terms of physiology, genetics and biochemistry. Gene expression, replication and transmission are examined in a variety of eukaryotic viruses. A review of the innate and adaptive phases of the immune response is presented with an emphasis on pathogen recognition, cellular communication and lymphocyte development. The course concludes with selected topics on pathogenesis, epidemiology, and microbial ecology.


Instructor(s): Kathleen Dunn

Prerequisites: BIOL 2000; BIOL 2040 is recommended or concurrently

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4150 Microbiology Lab Spring 1
Course Description

Exercises in this laboratory course deal with aseptic techniques, microbial cultivation and growth characteristics, staining and bacterial isolation techniques, differential biochemical tests, identification of unknown bacterial species, and testing effectiveness of antimicrobial agents.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4160 Nuclear Cell Biology Fall 3
Course Description

The function of the nucleus fundamentally defines cell behavior and has direct relevance to human genetic diseases and cancer. This course will explore the dynamic structures of the nucleus that carry out to the goals of cell specialization and reproduction. Topics will include the structures and functions of nuclear macromolecular complexes, spatial restriction of chromosomes and nuclear compartmentalization, and the emerging roles of the nuclear envelope, nuclear matrix, and nuclear actin on gene expression. Topics will be related to examples of human disease.


Instructor(s): Rebecca Dunn

Prerequisites: BIOL2000 and One of the following: BIOL 3040, BIOL 3190, BIOL 4140, BIOL 4400. A course in biochemistry is strongly recommended.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4170 Microbial Genetics Spring 3
Course Description

This course will focus on the use of genetic analysis to study microorganisms. Topics will include: maintenance, inheritance, and transfer of genetic material; mechanisms that introduce genetic diversity; regulation of gene expression, and how genomics impacts genetics. Examples will be drawn from prokaryotic, eukaryotic, and viral systems.


Instructor(s): Michelle Meyer

Prerequisites: BIOL 2040

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4200 Introduction to Bioinformatics Fall 3
Course Description

Bioinformatics is an emerging field at the intersection of biology, mathematics and computer science. It harnesses the power and speed of computers to analyze the molecules essential for life. This introductory course requires that students have a basic understanding of molecular biology, genetics, and the Internet, but does not require extensive background in mathematics or programming. Students will learn bioinformatic tools from the public domain, public databases, and simple programming tasks in PYTHON.


Instructor(s): Department

Prerequisites: A genetics course (BIOL 3150, BIOL 3190, BIOL 4170)

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4210 Plant Biology Lab Spring 2
Course Description

This laboratory introduces students to original research in plant biology. Students will learn ecological experimental design and the application of statistical analysis in plant research. Research will include the use of the scientific literature, online databases and the generation of publication quality data. Specific topics will focus on community interactions. Students will be expected to generate a poster presentation on their work and be able to discuss their research with peers. This course is recommended for students who are interested in pursuing advanced research.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This is a 2-credit laboratory course that is to serve as a companion to BI321 Plant Biology. Students participating in this lab need to either have taken BI321 in the past or are currently enrolled.

BIOL 4260 Human Anatomy Fall 4
Course Description

In this course, students will explore and compare the form and function of representative members of the five vertebrate classes. Evolutionary similarities and differences in form and function will be investigated, as will both the selective pressures, and non-selective constraints that have contributed to vertebrate structure. The course will conceptually integrate vertebrate anatomy with developmental biology, evolutionary biology, and ecology, and will provide skills valuable to careers in a range of biological disciplines, including molecular cell biology, medicine, evolutionary biology, and ecology.


Instructor(s): Lynn DiBenedetto

Prerequisites: BIOL 2000

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4270 Human Anatomy Lab Fall 0
Course Description

Laboratory to accompany BIOL 4260. This course provides hands-on experience with the form and function of major vertebrate groups, including cartilaginous fishes, bony fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. The focus will be on understanding evolutionary relationships and origins in different vertebrate groups. Exercises will include investigations of models, skeletons, and preserved organisms. One component of the class will involve a research project in which students compare and contrast the form and function of a specific anatomical trait of their choosing.


Instructor(s): Lynn DiBenedetto

Prerequisites: BIOL 2000

Cross listed with:

Comments: Lab fee required.

BIOL 4280 Modeling Physiology Using Physical Computing Spring 3
Course Description

In this interdisciplinary course, students will learn advanced concepts in physiology and how to use basic principles of electronics, engineering and Arduino microcontroller programming to build physical simulations of physiology.


Instructor(s): Joseph Burdo

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed BIOL3030 and Recommended: Previous or concurrent enrollment in PHYS2101 or PYS2201.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4290 Medical Biochemistry and Metabolism Spring 3
Course Description

Living organisms require constant input of energy and raw materials, acquired from their surroundings and harnessed by numerous metabolic pathways. An ever-increasing knowledge of the integration and regulation of these pathways has deepened our understanding of both health and disease. Using studies from recent research and articles in the popular press, and based on fundamental biochemistry, we will investigate various topics: the increase in obesity and diabetes, the metabolism of cholesterol, inborn errors of metabolism, the connection between how we eat and the global carbon cycle, the sense onsense of nutritional supplementation, and the evolution of metabolic pathways.


Instructor(s): Arlene Wyman

Prerequisites: BIOL4350 or CHEM4461

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4320 Developmental Biology Fall 3
Course Description

Developmental biology is in the midst of a far-reaching revolution that profoundly affects many related disciplines, including evolutionary biology, morphology, and genetics. The new tools and strategies of molecular biology have begun to link genetics and embryology and to reveal an incredible picture of how cells, tissues, and organisms differentiate and develop. This course describes both organismal and molecular approaches, which lead to a detailed understanding of (1) how it is that cells containing the same genetic complement can reproducibly develop into drastically different tissues and organs, and (2) the basis and role of pattern information in this process.


Instructor(s): Laura Hake

Prerequisites: BIOL2040 and Additional coursework in in molecular cell biology (such as BIOL 3040, BIOL 4140, BIOL 4400)

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4330 Human Physiology Spring 4
Course Description

This course will examine the normal functions of a living human organism including its physical and chemical processes. An integrative approach will be used to explore the physiological processes of the nervous, respiratory, cardiovascular, renal, gastrointestinal and endocrine systems and the relationships between them. In the computer based laboratory, which is a corequisite, students will investigate the functions of intact, living human organisms through real-time, hands-on data acquisition and analysis of the neuromuscular, cardiovascular and respiratory systems using clinical measurements including EMG, EEG, cardiac electrophysiology and spirometry.


Instructor(s): Debra Mullikin-Kilpatrick

Prerequisites: BIOL 3030 Intro to Physiology or BIOL3040 Cell Biology or permission of the instructor. Junior standing

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4340 Human Physiology Lab Spring 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Debra Mullikin-Kilpatrick

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4350 Biological Chemistry Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course is designed to introduce biology and biochemistry majors to the subject with an emphasis on understanding the biochemical principals that are crucial to biological function at the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels. The material includes: (1) the structure and chemistry of biomolecules, including amino acids, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids; (2) the key metabolic pathways and enzymology involved in the synthesis/degradation of carbohydrates; and (3) the cycling of energy through biological systems. Reference will be made to alterations in biochemical structures, processes, and pathways that relate to specific diseases.


Instructor(s): Daniel Kirschner (Fall) and Rebecca Dunn (Spring)

Prerequisites: BIOL2000 and CHEM2231

Cross listed with:

Comments: Students cannot get credit for BIOL4350 if they have already completed CHEM4461 (Biochemistry 1). This course, together with BIOL4400, satisfies the one year requirement of basic biochemistry for the biochemistry major.

BIOL 4351 Biochemistry Discussion Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

This Discussion Section accompanies BIOL 4350, Biological Chemistry.


Instructor(s): Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4360 Biochemistry Discussion Section Fall 1
Course Description

This Discussion Section accompanies BIOL 4350.


Instructor(s): Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4400 Molecular Biology Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course will explore the structure, function, synthesis and interaction of nucleic acids and proteins. The mechanisms involved in maintaining cellular genetic and epigenetic information, and in reading this "code" to generate specific patterns of gene expression, will be studied in detail. Topics include classic and newly-developed techniques for studying macromolecules; biotechnology; the functional organization of chromosomes; protein folding and modifications; DNA replication, repair and supercoiling; RNA synthesis and processing; translation and the levels of gene regulation. Literature from the foundational investigations that led to our understanding of these processes and the current research in these areas will be presented.


Instructor(s): Danielle Taghian and Anthony Annunziato

Prerequisites: BIOL 2000

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course, together with BIOL 4350, satisfies the one year requirement of basic biochemistry for the biochemistry major.

BIOL 4402 Marine Ecology Spring 3
Course Description

The Earth is an ocean-dominated planet. Thus, a balanced understanding of biology on Earth requires fundamental knowledge of marine organisms. We will explore the adaptations and interactions of marine organisms in a range of ocean ecosystems. Perceptions of the ocean as the "last frontier" on the planet will be contrasted with evidence of pervasive human influences. We will also study the basic tools and interdisciplinary approaches to scientific exploration of the ocean, as these will be essential for managing marine biodiversity, sustaining fisheries and coastal resources, and the interpreting the role of the ocean in climate change.


Instructor(s): Serena Moseman-Valtierra

Prerequisites: BI201 (or BI202)

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4420 Current Topics in Ecology Fall 3
Course Description

Students in Ecology will investigate interrelationships among organisms and between organisms and their physical environments. Students will become familiar with looking at ecological processes on a hierarchy of interconnected levels, including those of the molecule, individual, population, community, and ecosystem. The class will discuss classic experiments in ecology, as well as unresolved ecological questions of special current relevance. There will be an emphasis on developing a conceptual understanding of ecological relationships, on exploring the analytical tools with which ecological hypotheses are generated and tested, and on appreciating the dynamic nature of populations and ecosystems.


Instructor(s): Robert Wolff

Prerequisites: BIOL 2010

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies the advanced experience requirement for the Biology major.

BIOL 4422 Plant Biology Spring 3
Course Description

This course focuses on the critical importance of plants on Earth and how their physiology (cell structure, photosynthetic ability, flowering, specialized structures allowing water and nutrient absorption and transport, defense strategies against predators, etc.) allows them to perform their diverse functions. Additional topics will include strategies that plants employ for adapting to environmental stresses, such as pollutants and changing climate, as well as the development of transgenic strains of crop plants.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: BI 200 (Molecules & Cells)

Cross listed with:

Comments: Not offered in 2011-12

BIOL 4423 Human Genetics Fall 3
Course Description

Recent advances in human genetics have provided scientists with some of the data they need to understand how genetic differences manifest themselves in human development and disease. This course will discuss the techniques scientists use to sequence and analyze DNA, how the genetic composition of individuals differs, and how those differences lead to our diversity, and sometimes, to disease. The ethical implications of genetic advances such as prenatal genetic testing, preimplantation genetic diagnosis, and consumer genomics will also be discussed.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: BI200 (Molecules & Cells) and one of the following: BI-305 (Genetics) or BI-315 (Functional Genomics)

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4424 Computational Foundations of Bioinformatics Spring 3
Course Description

Biology is increasingly a field dominated by high-throughput methods, yielding large data sets which require data analysis using both public domain/commercial software as well as new algorithms to be implemented in a programming language. Bioinformatics is an interdisciplinary area concerned with the application of mathematics, statistics and programming to solve mainstream problems in biology. In this course, we will learn basic bioinformatics computer skills: UNIX, python and perl programming parsing biological databases.


Instructor(s): Peter Clote

Prerequisites: Calculus 100, 101

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course is not open to students who have taken MC 140 and MC 141, or equivalent.
This course will normally count as an upper division bio-elective. With departmental approval, it can instead count as a math substitute. It cannot count for both.

BIOL 4436 Environmental Genomics: Lab Projects Fall 3
Course Description

In this hands on laboratory, each student will learn the technical skills necessary to undertake research projects on the health and genetic diversity of animal species in New England and various global ecosystems. Techniques learned to accomplish projects will include extraction of DNA and RNA, polymerase chain reaction for analysis of biodiversity and disease prevalence and quantitative real time PCR for analysis of gene expression.


Instructor(s): Laura Hake

Prerequisites: BI201 (or 202), BI204 (or BI310-311) and ONE of the following (BI305, BI315, BI440)

Cross listed with:

Comments: Lab fee required.

BIOL 4437 Developmental Neuroscience and Behavior Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the interaction among genetic and environmental influences on the development of the nervous system and behavior. A multi-level analysis is emphasized, ranging from cellular control of gene expression during development to complex behavioral phenomena.


Instructor(s): Marilee Ogren

Prerequisites: PS285 (or BI481) and ONE of the following (BI304, BI414, BI440)

Cross listed with: PSYC3387

Comments:

BIOL 4441 Ecology Laboratory Fall 1
Course Description

A laboratory course designed to introduce students to the core techniques and experimental strategies of ecology. Through field and greenhouse experiments students are introduced to the basics of field observation, species identifications, competition experiments, population studies and predator-prey interactions. Students learn to construct hypotheses, design experiments, and critically analyze experimental results. Weekly lab meets in the field, lab and/or greenhouse.


Instructor(s): Prof. Hitchcock

Prerequisites: BI 200 and BI 202

Cross listed with:

Comments: Lab meets once per week. Lab fee required.

BIOL 4443 Coastal Field Ecology Fall 3
Course Description

This course discusses the ontogeny and natural history of barrier beach systems in New England. Course topics include abiotic factors such as tides and climate, floral and faunal biodiversity and ecology, as well as the conservation of rare ecosystems.


Instructor(s): Peter Auger

Prerequisites: BI 200-202 (Introductory Biology 1 and 2) or permission of instructor

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4450 Behavioral Ecology Spring 3
Course Description

This course will examine the adaptive significance of behavior in an ecological context. Lectures and readings from the primary literature will review basic concepts and theory as well as model-based and experimental approaches to exploring questions in the field. Topics covered includes social behavior, reproductive behavior, life history strategies, optimal foraging, territoriality, co-evolution, and communication.


Instructor(s): Jeff Dacosta

Prerequisites: BIOL2010 and BIOL3150 or BIOL3190

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4458 Evolutionary Applications Spring 3
Course Description

Students will explore major ideas in modern evolutionary biology, including natural selection, mutation and genetic variation, population genetics, architectural constraints on structure, speciation and adaptive radiation, the history of life, and the evolution of sociality. The emphasis will be on learning conceptual tools that can be applied to specific questions and on an integrative understanding of the complexity of evolutionary change. For example, students will combine thinking from population genetics and developmental biology with ideas from phylogenetics and ecology. Important practical implications of evolution, such as the evolution of infectious diseases and the evolution of agricultural pests, will be explored.


Instructor(s): Serena Moseman-Valtierra

Prerequisites: BI200 and BI202 (Molecules & Cells and Organisms & Populations)

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4478 Senior Thesis Research Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4510 Cancer Biology Spring 3
Course Description

The onset of cancer occurs through a multi-step process that is accompanied by the deregulation of fundamental cellular processes, including cell cycle control, apoptosis and angiogenesis. This course will provide an overview of the molecular and cellular changes associated with these processes and with the initiation, progression and metastasis of tumors. Topics covered will include tumorigenesis, tumor viruses, oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, genomic instability and the current treatments for cancer. The class will draw on textbook and primary literature readings to enrich the current view of this complex disease.


Instructor(s): Danielle Taghian

Prerequisites: BIOL 2040 and additional coursework in molecular cell biology (such as BIOL 3040, BIOL 4140, or BIOL 4400)

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4520 Molecular & Cell Physiology of Exercise Fall 3
Course Description

The principal aim of this course is to explore the molecular and physiological changes that occur in humans through various forms of aerobic and anaerobic exercise. The role of nutrition as an energy source will be discussed in detail, with particular emphasis on cellular metabolism. Energy transfer in the body and during rest and physical activity will be explored. A detailed study of the physiology of pulmonary, cardiovascular,nervous, muscular and endocrine systems will underscore the interrelationships of these systems during exercise. The practical application of diet and exercise as it pertains to weight maintenance and disease control will render a practical application to the course. Current research in the field will be presented weekly through student presentations.


Instructor(s): Danielle Taghian

Prerequisites: BIOL 2000 and additional course work in molecular or cell biology. BIOL3030 and BIOL4350 recommended.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4550 Cell Physiology & Exercise Fall 3
Course Description

This course is an advanced physiology course that takes a systems approach to the physiological changes that occur with exercise. There will be an emphasis on the myocardial, circulatory, muscular, ventilatory, and respiratory adaptations associated with physical training, and the unique characteristics of elite athletes. The course will also include a study of the biochemical adaptations that occur during acute exercise or as a result of prolonged exercise training, with emphasis on the biochemical regulators of intermediary metabolism.


Instructor(s): Kristin Stanford

Prerequisites: BI 200; previous coursework in physiology is essential (BI316, BI303 , BI554 or part of an introductory course). Biochemistry is strongly recommended.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4560 Insect Ecology Spring 3
Course Description

Advanced course in ecology of the world's most diverse group of organisms. The course focuses on the diverse ecological interactions amongst insects and other organisms, including herbivory, predation, parasitism, and pollination. Lectures also cover insect behavior, population dynamics, current theories in insect ecology, and applications of insect ecology to society, including agriculture.


Instructor(s): Tara Pisani Gareau

Prerequisites: BI200 and BI201 (or BI202)

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4570 Principles of Immunology Fall 3
Course Description

An introductory survey of the immune system, this course will examine the development and deployment of immunity from a molecular and cellular perspective. Topics will include innate versus adaptive immunity, B and T cell activation, antibodies and antigens, and immunological memory. Modern experimental techniques and the immune system's roles in infectious disease, cancer and autoimmune disease will also be discussed.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: BIOL 2040 and additional coursework in molecular cell biology (such as BIOL 3040, BIOL 4140, BIOL 4400)

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4590 Introduction to Neuroscience Fall 3
Course Description

An introduction to basic neuroanatomy and cellular neurobiology as well as a more detailed description of the electrophysiological properties of neural cells and the specialized communication that takes place between them. We will discuss how memories arise and are stored in the healthy brain and what goes wrong in some pathological conditions like Multiple Sclerosis and Parkinson's Disease.


Instructor(s): Joseph Burdo

Prerequisites: BIOL 3040

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4800 Biochemistry Laboratory Fall 3
Course Description

This is an advanced-project laboratory for students interested in hands-on training in modern biochemical techniques under close faculty supervision in a new, dedicated laboratory designed for this purpose. In addition to formal lab training and discussion sections, students will have access to the lab outside class hours to work on projects intended to produce publication-quality data. Ideal for students interested in solid grounding for and exposure to academic research in biochemistry.


Instructor(s): Clare O'Connor

Prerequisites: BI 435 (Biological Chemistry), CH 561 or equivalent

Cross listed with:

Comments: Lab fee required.

BIOL 4801 Research in Molecular Cell Biology Fall 3
Course Description

This course builds on the research results obtained by students in BIOL2040. Students in this course will design original experiments that explore the functional conservation of enzymes involved in methionine synthesis among yeast species. Students will also be involved in the preparation of a manuscript for publication in a scientific journal. In addition to their experimental work, students will gain proficiency in the analysis of primary scientific literature and scientific writing. This course is recommended for students who wish to pursue scientific research in graduate school or a career setting.


Instructor(s): Clare O'Connor

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed BIOL2040

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4802 Research in Evolutionary Genomics Spring 3
Course Description

This course will provide hands-on training in the collection and analysis of genome-scale data from non-model organisms. Students will learn good laboratory practices while preparing samples for next-generation DNA sequencing, which will be run in the department’s core sequencing facility. Students will also learn basic Linux/Unix computational skills and several bioinformatics tools that will be applied in managing and analyzing the massive amounts of data generated by this sequencing technology. Through data analyses and reviews of the primary literature, students will gain exposure to modern methods in phylogenetics and population genetics. This course is recommended for students interested in advanced topics in genomics,bioinformatics, and evolution. BIOL3150 and BIOL4200 recommended.


Instructor(s): Jeffry DaCosta

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed BIOL2040 and Must have successfully completed BIOL2010

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4810 Research in Molecular Microbiology Lab Fall 3
Course Description

An advanced project laboratory course for hands-on training in the experimental techniques of molecular microbiology under faculty supervision. The course will focus on the extraction of genetic material and cloning of genes from a variety of different organisms in order to analyze functional homology of the methionine pathway. Methods taught include: DNA extraction, DNA sequencing, polymerase chain reaction, and the use databases for research and analysis.


Instructor(s): Douglas Warner

Prerequisites: BIOL2040

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies the advanced experience requirement for the Biology Major.

BIOL 4820 Research in Cell Biology Lab Fall 3
Course Description

This course introduces students to original research in cell biology. Students learn how to use the scientific literature and online databases to design and conduct experiments on an original research question involving the cellular responses of model organisms. Students will work in research teams on projects that are intended generate publication-quality data. Projects will involve cell culture, the generation of transgenic cell lines, light and fluorescence microscopy, analysis of cellular macromolecules and physiological characterization. This course is recommended for students who are interested in pursuing graduate studies or careers in biomedical research.


Instructor(s): Kellee Siegfried-Harris

Prerequisites: BIOL2040 and Additional coursework in molecular cell biology such as BIOL 3040, BIOL 4140, or BIOL 4400.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Lab fee required.

BIOL 4830 Research in Molecular Biology Lab Fall 3
Course Description

An advanced project laboratory course for hands-on training in the experimental techniques of molecular biology under faculty supervision. In addition to formal lab training and discussions, students will have access to the lab outside class hours to work on projects intended to produce publication quality data. The research project will focus on environmentally-mediated gene expression in the organism Pseudomonas fluorescens. Methods taught include: DNA cloning techniques, DNA sequencing, polymerase chain reaction, and the use national databases for research and analysis. It is ideal for students who desire a solid introduction to hypothesis-driven research in molecular biology through practical training.


Instructor(s): Noreen Lyell

Prerequisites: BIOL2040

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies the advanced experience requirement for the Biology major. Lab Fee required.

BIOL 4840 Research in Biochemistry Lab Spring/Fall 3
Course Description

This course introduces students to experimental techniques used in modern biochemistry within the context of original investigations. Students will learn methods involved in the separation and characterization of biological macromolecules, including electrophoresis, protein over-expression, HPLC and mass spectroscopy. Students will work in teams on projects that they have designed in consultation with the instructors, with the goal of generating data that will be used in a research publication. Ideal for students interested in gaining practical experience in biochemical research.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: BIOL 2040 and BIOL 4350 or CHEM 4461 or equivalent.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies the advanced experience requirement for the Biology major. Lab fee required.

BIOL 4850 Research in Neuroscience Lab Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

An introduction to how neuroscience research is conducted, you will learn how to isolate neurons from the chick embryo forebrain, culture them in a sterile environment and use cells in a toxicity test as a model of human neurodegeneration. You will research protection against that toxicity by a natural compound of your own choosing. You will choose that compound after searching the primary literature to develop a hypothesis as to how that compound will protect the neurons against toxic conditions. Basic statistical methods will be used to determine if any neuroprotection by your compound is significant or not.


Instructor(s): Joseph Burdo

Prerequisites: BIOL 2040 and BIOL 3040.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies the advanced experience requirement for the Biology major. Lab fee required.

BIOL 4860 Methods in Community Ecology Lab Fall 3
Course Description

This laboratory introduces students to original research in community ecology. Students will learn ecological experimental design and the application of statistical analysis in community ecology. Specific topics will focus on multi-trophic interactions. Research will include the use of the scientific literature, online databases and the generation of publication quality data. Students will be expected to generate a poster presentation on their work and be able to discuss their research with peers. This course is recommended for students who are interested in pursuing advanced research.


Instructor(s): Colleen Hitchcock

Prerequisites: BIOL 2010, BIOL 2040 and a statistics course (can be concurrent)

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies the advanced experience requirement for the Biology major. Lab Fee Required.

BIOL 4870 Research in Molecular Genetics Lab Spring 3
Course Description

The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is an important model organism for the study of intracellular processes such as cell cycle control, transcription, DNA replication, chromosome maintenance, and signal transduction. This laboratory will involve original molecular genetic research using S. pombe that involves concepts related to forward genetics and gene manipulation. This course is recommended for students interested in pursuing graduate studies or careers in biomedical research.


Instructor(s): Charles Hoffman

Prerequisites: BIOL 2040 and a genetics course (BIOL 3150, BIOL 3190, or BIOL 4170) or instructor permission.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies the advanced experience requirement for the Biology major. Lab fee required.

BIOL 4890 Investigations in Cellular Re-Programming Fall 3
Course Description

Induced pluripotent stem cells, IPSCs, are cells that can be generated from adult cells such as skin fibroblasts. Once generated, iPSC’s can be directed to differentiate into any cell and offer exciting models for disease research. This laboratory course will teach students the techniques used to reprogram adult murine fibroblasts into pluripotent stem cells and their subsequent differentiation into cardiac and neuronal lineages. Resulting cell lines will be characterized using molecular and cell biology techniques and students will work to create novel cellular disease models to progress particular disease research.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed BIOL2040

Cross listed with:

Comments: This will be an advanced lab course for Biology and Biochemistry students. The course will be graded.

BIOL 4901 Tutorial in Biology Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course is a directed study that includes assigned readings and discussions of various areas of the biological sciences.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4911 Undergraduate Research I Fall 3
Course Description

Undergraduate students of advanced standing may participate in research projects in the laboratory of a faculty member. With department approval, students completing two semesters of undergraduate research can substitute one biology elective.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Permission of the department

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4912 Undergraduate Research II Spring 3
Course Description

Undergraduate students of advanced standing may participate in research projects in the laboratory of a faculty member. With department approval, students completing two semesters of undergraduate research can substitute one biology elective.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Permission of the department

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4914 Undergraduate Research Investigations II Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4916 Research in Biochemistry II Spring 3
Course Description

Continuation of BI 463. With permission, BI463-464 can be used to fulfill the laboratory requirement for biochemistry majors.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: BI463 or permission of the Department.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4917 Advanced Undergraduate Research I Fall 3
Course Description

Designed for students who have completed one or two semesters of undergraduate research under course numbers BIOL4911 and BIOL4912 and who desire to continue independent research projects under the guidance of department faculty.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: BIOL4911 and/or BIOL4912 and permission of the instructor

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4918 Advanced Undergraduate Research II Spring 3
Course Description

Designed for students who have completed two or three semesters of undergraduate research under course numbers BIOL4911, BIOL4912 and BIOL4917 and who desire to continue independent research projects under the guidance of department faculty.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Permission of the Department.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4921 Advanced Independent Research Fall/Spring 6
Course Description

See the College of Arts and Sciences section of this Catalog for a description of the Scholar of the College program. This course can count as a maximum of one upper-division elective if no other elective credit has been claimed for other research courses.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Permission of Department.

BIOL 4922 Advanced Independent Biochemistry Research Fall/Spring 6
Course Description

See the College of Arts and Sciences section of this Catalog for a description of the Scholar of the College program. This course can count as a maximum of one upper-division elective if no other elective credit has been claimed for other research courses.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Permission of Department.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4925 Advanced Undergraduate Research Investigations II Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4926 Advanced Undergraduate Research IV Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4928 Advanced Undergraduate Research Investigations I Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4941 Biology Senior Thesis Seminar I Fall 1
Course Description

Biology majors writing a senior thesis meet weekly for a seminar discussing research results and articles from the primary scientific literature.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4942 Biology Honors Seminar II Spring 1
Course Description

Students participating in the Biology Honors Program meet weekly for a seminar discussing research results and articles from the primary scientific literature.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4951 Senior Thesis Research I Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course is designed for seniors who will have completed at least two semesters of undergraduate research by graduation. Students prepare a written thesis describing their experimental results, while still participating in laboratory research under the guidance of a faculty mentor.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Two or more semesters of undergraduate research and permission of the instructor

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4952 Senior Thesis Research II Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 4953 Biology Honors Research Thesis II Spring 3
Course Description

Students continue independent research projects begun in BIOL1112 and write a thesis describing the project and its results.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: BIOL1112

Cross listed with:

Comments: By arrangement only.

BIOL 4954 Undergraduate Research Investigations Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Designed for students who are participating in research projects under the joint mentorship of a Boston College Biology Department faculty member and a scientific mentor at an off-campus laboratory.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 5020 Literature of Neurochemistry Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar course will address current topics in the neurochemistry of the mammalian brain. The topics will include energy metabolism, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, and brain cancer. The brain is uniquely dependent on glucose for energy, but can transition to ketone bodies when glucose becomes limiting as would occur during prolonged fasting. The transition from glucose to ketone bodies for brain energy produces remarkable neurochemical transitions, which ultimately lead to improved brain health. This course will examine primary research papers. Students will gain an understanding of how therapeutic fasting and caloric restriction changes brain energy metabolism to manage incurable neurological diseases.


Instructor(s): Prof. Thomas Seyfried

Prerequisites: BIOL3040; BIOL4350 or equivalent

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 5030 Current Topics in Cancer Research Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This seminar will review evidence showing that impaired cellular energy metabolism is the defining characteristic of nearly all cancers regardless of cellular or tissue origin. In contrast to normal cells, which derive most of their usable energy from oxidative phosphorylation, nearly all cancer cells become dependent on non-oxidative substrate level phosphorylations to meet energy demands. Evidence will be discussed supporting a general hypothesis that all hallmarks of cancer including genomic instability and metastasis can be linked to impaired mitochondrial function. A view of cancer as a metabolic disease will impact approaches to cancer management and prevention.


Instructor(s): Thomas Seyfried

Prerequisites: BI204 and additional coursework in molecular cell biology (such as BI304, BI414 or BI440) or biochemistry (BI435 or CH561) or instructor permission.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 5060 Recombinant DNA Technology Spring 3
Course Description

This course will describe the theory and practice of recombinant DNA technology and its application within molecular biology research. Topics will include the cloning of genes from various organisms, plasmid construction, transcriptional and translational gene fusions, nucleic acid probes, site-directed mutagenesis, polymerase chain reaction, and transgenic animals. The goal of the course is to make the research-oriented student aware of the wealth of experimental approaches available through this technology.


Instructor(s): Charles S. Hoffman

Prerequisites: BIOL 2040 and additional coursework in molecular cell biology (such as BIOL 3040, BIOL 4140 or BIOL 4400) or genetics (BIOL 3150, BIOL 3190, or BIOL 4170) or instructor permission.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 5070 Current Research in Evolutionary Development Fall 2
Course Description

How are developmental processes modified to effect changes in animal form and function? What are the developmental and molecular constraints on evolutionary processes? Where does evolutionary novelty originate? How can an understanding of evolutionary development profoundly inform biomedical questions? This course will introduce students to the concepts, methods and tools currently used in the emerging field of Evolutionary Development (“Evo Devo”). Through in-depth reading of primary literature, presentation and discussion, the course will introduce some of the work being done in this interdisciplinary field of research.


Instructor(s): Sarah McMenamin

Prerequisites: BIOL2000 and BIOL2010; Additional course work in molecular cell biology or genetics; BIOL4320 is recommended.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 5071 Microbial Community Ecology Spring 2
Course Description


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: BIOL 2010 and 2014; BIOL 414 and a statistics course recommended.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 5080 Algorithms in Computational Biology Spring 3
Course Description

A good understanding of important algorithms in the field of computational molecular biology is vital to bioinformatics researchers, especially those who intend to work at the cutting edge of research. In this course, we will cover basic computational biology (genomics, structural biology, systems biology). Topics may include: pairwise, multiple and wraparound alignment (tandem repeats), genomic rearrangements, Monte Carlo, genetic algorithms, hidden Markov models, phyogenetic trees, RNA and protein secondary structure, machine learning (neural networks, support vector machines), gene finders, clustering, microarray data, transcription factor binding site detection, etc.


Instructor(s): Peter Clote

Prerequisites: MATH 1100 and 1101, Programming proficiency in some language (C/C++, java, python, perl or other imperative language). BIOL4200 is recommended

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 5090 Cellular Differentiation Fall 3
Course Description

This is an advanced course in cell and organ differentiation. The developmental processes by which unspecialized cells, tissues and structures achieve a more specialized adult form and function will be examined with a major emphasis on the human vertebrate. The factors and environmental signals as well as modifications in gene expression both of which strongly influence the process of differentiation will be examined. Relevant scientific articles from the current literature will be utilized in this course.


Instructor(s): Debra Mullikin-Kilpatrick

Prerequisites: BIOL 2040 and additional course work in cell and molecular biology. A course in biochemistry is strongly recommended.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies the advanced experience requirement for the Biology major.

BIOL 5120 Biostatistical Analysis Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 5130 Environmental Disruptors of Development Fall 3
Course Description

More than 100,000 chemicals are manufactured and may end up as environmental pollutants. Some have toxic effects at high concentrations and protection plans are already in place. However, embryonic, fetal or neonatal exposure to low "safe" levels of numerous pollutants can (1) induce subtle changes in developmental programs regulated by steroid hormones; (2) increase the reproductive, immune, metabolic or cognitive disorders and (3) increase the risk of adult-onset disorders (breast cancer, prostrate cancer, diabetes, reduced fertility). This course will examine experiments regarding Environmental Endocrine Disruptors and consider how this work is important in the development of regulatory policy.


Instructor(s): Laura Hake

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies the advanced experience requirement for the Biology major.

BIOL 5140 Eukaryotic Gene Expression Fall 2
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 5150 Vaccine Development and Public Health Fall 3
Course Description

Despite more than 3 decades of research, the development of an efficacious HIV/AIDS vaccine remains elusive. Nonetheless, the quality of knowledge generated by HIV researchers is impressive. It is no surprise that potent Ebola virus and Zika virus vaccine candidates have been developed in a short time span. This class will discuss the difficulties and successes encountered with vaccine development (AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, small-pox, measles, poliomyelitis, tetanus, Ebola and Zika). At a time when questions have been raised about the link between childhood vaccination regimens and autism, we will discuss the ethics, economics, problems and benefits of modern day vaccination.


Instructor(s): Ismael Fofana

Prerequisites: BIOL2000 and additional course work in molecular cell biology or biochemistry. BIOL4570 Principles of Immunology is recommended.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 5160 Inflammation in Health and Disease Fall 3
Course Description

Inflammation is the body’s normal immune response to a variety of injuries. The principal aim of this course is to explore the relationship between the inflammatory response and a host of diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular, autoimmune, musculoskeletal and digestive. The biology and physiology of inflammation, triggers of the immune response and the role of acute and chronic inflammation in the development of disease will be discussed using primary literature.


Instructor(s): Danielle Taghian and Tom Chiles

Prerequisites: BIOL 2040 and additional course work in molecular cell biology; BIOL 4350 and BIOL 4570 are recommended.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 5170 Human Parasitology Fall 3
Course Description

This course is an introduction into the biology and biochemistry of parasites, organisms that live at the expense of other organisms. Parasitology covers a wide range of organisms ranging from protozoa like malaria to roundworms, tapeworms, fleas and ticks. Parasites have an important impact on human health, and global public health efforts toward control will be highlighted. The course will study the adaptations of parasites to their ecological niches in their infected hosts and the pathology resulting from parasitic infections.


Instructor(s): Marc Jan Gubbels

Prerequisites: BIOL 2040 and additional course work in molecular cell biology (such as BIOL 3040, 4140, or 4400)

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies the advanced experience requirement for the Biology major.

BIOL 5230 Immunity and Infectious Disease Spring 3
Course Description

This course will focus on immune cells, the immune system's response to viral and bacterial infection and the pathogenesis resulting from these responses. Topics will include questions of self and non-self in immune responses, the role of mucosal immunity and gut flora in immune responses and pathogenesis, AIDS pathogenesis, vaccines, and cutting edge technological approaches to immune therapy. Reading materials will consist of a basic immunology text, classical primary papers, and research reports.


Instructor(s): Kenneth Williams

Prerequisites: BIOL 4570 or BIOL 4140 or instructor permission.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies the advanced experience requirement for the Biology major.

BIOL 5240 Computational Foundations of Bioinformatics Spring 3
Course Description

Biology is a field increasingly dominated by high-throughput methods, yielding large data sets which require data analysis using both public domain/commercial software as well as new algorithms to be implemented in a programming language. Bioinformatics is an interdisciplinary area concerned with the application of mathematics, statistics, and programming to solve mainstream problems in biology. In this course, we will learn basic bioinformatics computer skills: UNIX, python and perl programming, and parsing biological databases.


Instructor(s): Peter Clote

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course is not open to students who have taken CS 100 and CS 101 or equivalent.

BIOL 5270 Neurobiology of Disease Fall 3
Course Description

This course will delve into the effects of neurological and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Multiple Sclerosis, on human behavior and CNS physiology and anatomy. The course will draw on current primary and review literature for background readings as well as Web conferencing to connect personally with the authors who have performed and published the cutting edge research. This will allow the students a deeper understanding of the particular disease, as well as the process of scientific research and current laboratory techniques available to study the molecular and cellular underpinnings of these diseases.


Instructor(s): Joseph Burdo

Prerequisites: BIOL4810

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 5280 Biotechnology Research Topics Fall 3
Course Description

Biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies have rich and diverse research programs that are used to develop novel therapeutics, diagnostics and technologies. We will use both scientific literature and other web-based materials, as well as the principles of cell biology, molecular biology and biochemistry, to explore and understand the applications of these research programs and technologies.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: BIOL 2040 and additional course work in molecular cell biology (such as BIOL 3040, 04140, or 4400)

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 5290 Biomolecules: Molecular Driving Forces Spring 3
Course Description

This is a course on statistical thermodynamics and its applications in biology and chemistry. Following the excellent book, Molecular Driving Forces, of Dill and Bromberg, the course includes a self-contained treatment of mathematics beyond single variable calculus and elementary probability theory. What is the free energy of an ensemble of RNA molecules? Why is protein folding cooperative? What is the critical point in a phase transition? How does Langmuir adsorption explain the saturation effect one sees in gene expression microarrays? These are the types of questions that will be addressed in this course.


Instructor(s): Peter Clote

Prerequisites: MATH1101. Previous course work in biology and/or chemistry is recommended.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 5320 Nanoscale Integrated Science Spring 1
Course Description

This course will offer an introduction to state-of-the-art integrated science research at Boston College. It will include topics such as biosensor development, drug delivery and materials for energy harvesting, all stemming from fundamental studies in materials properties, molecular structures and chemical reactions. Through a series of seminars, the course will cover basic concepts of nanomaterial preparation and characterization and provide a brief survey of nano- and microfabrication technologies, molecular engineering, biophotonics, biomimetics, nanobiosensors, nano-optics and photovoltaics. The course is directed towards graduate and senior undergraduate students in physics, biology and chemistry.


Instructor(s): Prof. Dong Cai

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: CHEM5501 PHYS4585

Comments:

BIOL 5330 Virus Infections & Cellular Transport Fall 3
Course Description

This advanced biology course is focused on the intracellular traffic of macromolecules to different organelles inside the cell, the transport signals, the receptors and pathways. In addition, during the course we will analyze how different major human viruses (including HIV, human papillomaviruses, adenoviruses, hepatitis B virus, herpes simplex virus, vesicular stomatitis virus) exploit the intracellular transport pathways of host cells during their viral infections and the transformation processes leading to different types of cancer. Students will be exposed to both lectures and analysis and discussion of recent research papers.


Instructor(s): Junona Moroianu

Prerequisites: BIOL3040 or BIOL4140 or Permission of the instructor

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies the advanced experience requirement for the Biology major.

BIOL 5340 Nano- and Micro- Systems for Biomedical Applications Spring 3
Course Description

This course covers the state-of-the-art biomedical and diagnostic systems utilizing nano- and micro- technologies. The course will cover fundamental aspects of the biomolecules (proteins, antibodies, DNA, siRNA, and peptides), nanosturctures and nanoarchitectures, microfluidic apparatus, etc. The course will also emphasize basic molecular properties, material preparation, characterization, and device fabrications. The introduction of integrated systems will be conveyed by case discussions related to biodetection, drug delivery, nanotherapeutics, and biointerfaces. Students will have an overview of "hot spots" of nanotechnology in biomedical applications and understand the general strategy to design devices and experiments to address issues in the biomedicine areas.


Instructor(s): Dong Cai

Prerequisites: BIOL3040 or BIOL4140; BIOL4550 is recommended

Cross listed with:

Comments: The course is directed towards graduate and senior undergraduate students satisfying the requisites.

BIOL 5350 Structural Biochemistry of Neurological Diseases Spring 3
Course Description

The goal of structural biology is to relate molecular form to biological function. Characterizing biological processes in terms of the molecular structures and interactions of their constituents is accomplished using methods including: x-ray crystallography, and fiber and membrane diffraction; NMR spectroscopy; light and electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy; computation; and modern molecular biology. This course will focus on the nerve myelin sheath. The objective is to thoroughly introduce the student in myelinology. Topics include: (1) Myelin Function, Formation, Biochemistry, Structure; (2) Diseases Involving Myelin; (3) CNS Myelin: PLP-Related Disorders; and (4) PNS Myelin: P0 and PMP22-Related Disorders.


Instructor(s): Daniel Kirschner

Prerequisites: BIOL4350 or CHEM4461

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 5360 Viruses, Genes & Evolution Spring 3
Course Description

By definition, viruses are absolutely dependent on host infection for their existence. As a consequence, most viruses are exquisitely well-adapted to their respective hosts. Hosts, in turn, have evolved numerous countermeasures to prevent viral infection. This course will focus on the molecular interplay between viruses and their hosts, and how this genetic arms-race plays out over vastly different timescales (within an infected individual, within and between host populations, and ultimately, across millions of years of virus-host co-evolution).


Instructor(s): Welkin Johnson

Prerequisites: BIOL 2040, a genetics course (BIOL 3150, BIOL 3190, BIOL 4170) and a course in molecular or cell biology (such as BIOL 3040, BIOL 4400, or BIOL 4140) or instructor permission.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies the advanced experience requirement for the Biology major.

BIOL 5370 Literature for Neurological Diseases Spring 3
Course Description

Focusing on neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, Guillain-Barre syndrome, and leukodystrophies, we will use sources from the primary and review literature to explore fundamental scientific research in these diseases, and creative non-fiction and memoirs to understand the personal, ethical, sociological, and scientific/medical issues pertaining to these diseases.


Instructor(s): Daniel Kirschner

Prerequisites: BIOL 4350 or CHEM 4465.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies the advanced experience requirement for the Biology major.

BIOL 5380 Topics in Biomechanics Fall 3
Course Description

This course will explore the physical principles underlying biological processes and mechanisms including movement, feeding, architecture, and transport. Drawing on physics and mechanical engineering, the course will explore how organisms swim, fly, walk, and consume resources, how they respond to moving fluids, and the relationship between their size and design of mechanical systems. Underlying all these topics will be investigations of how biological materials (e.g., wood, muscle, bone, skin, etc.) influence the mechanical behavior of complex life forms. The course will prepare students for more in-depth explorations of other related disciplines including ergonomics, orthopedics, kinesiology, and sports medicine.


Instructor(s): Christopher Kenaley

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed BIOL3030 and Familiarity with basic Newtonian physics and mechanics is recommended.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 5400 Immunology Spring 3
Course Description

This course focuses on the regulation of immune responses at the molecular level. Topics include: regulation of B and T cell development, functions of B and T lymphocytes in the development of immune responses, generation of antibody and T cell receptor diversity, and antigen processing via MHC I and MHC II pathways. The course emphasizes modern experimental approaches, including the generation of transgenic mice, CRE-mediated conditional deletion, adoptive transfer strategies, and multiparameter FACS. Research literature is used extensively to cover current trends and advances in lymphocyte tolerance, T-regulatory cell function, Th1/Th2 cells, immune therapy, TLRs, and innate immune responses.


Instructor(s): Kenneth Williams

Prerequisites: BI200 and ONE of the following (BI304, BI305, BI315, BI414, BI440)

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 5420 Cancer As A Metabolic Disease Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar will review evidence showing that impaired cellular energy metabolism is the defining characteristic of nearly all cancers regardless of cellular or tissue origin. In contrast to normal cells, which derive most of their usable energy from oxidative phosphorylation, nearly all cancer cells become dependent on non-oxidative substrate level phosphorylations to meet energy demands. Evidence will be discussed supporting a general hypothesis that all hallmarks of cancer including genomic instability and metastasis can be linked to impaired mitochondrial function. A view of cancer as a metabolic disease will impact approaches to cancer management and prevention.


Instructor(s): Thomas Seyfried

Prerequisites: BIOL 2040 and additional coursework in molecular cell biology (such as BIOL 3040, 4140 or 4400) or biochemistry (BIOL 4350 or CHEM 4461) or instructor permission.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies the advanced experience requirement for the Biology major.

BIOL 5430 Genomics & Personalized Medicine Spring 3
Course Description

Personalized medicine is based on the idea that each person's unique genome sequence can be used to predict risk of acquiring specific diseases, allowing for more informed choices about health. The students will be exposed to the scientific concepts and technologies empowering personalized medicine. Through lecture, research paper reading and discussion the students will understand how human genomic information has impacted current topics in biomedical research. Students will write a research paper focused on how genomic information has advanced understanding of a human disease and how translation of genomic information will impact treatment or disease detection in the future.


Instructor(s): Timothy Connolly and Thomas Chiles

Prerequisites: BIOL 2040 and a genetics or genomics course. Additional coursework in biochemistry and molecular biology is strongly recommended.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies the advanced experience requirement for the Biology major.

BIOL 5440 Synthetic Biology Fall 2
Course Description

This course strives to answer the following questions: how are concepts from engineering applied to biological systems, what tools are available for engineering biological systems, how has synthetic biology advanced over the last 15 years, what useful advances has synthetic biology produced, and what are the ethical concerns raised by synthetic biology. This course primarily involves reading, analysis, and discussion of primary literature.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 5450 Advanced Lab in Cell Imaging Fall/Spring 2
Course Description

This course will survey the various visualization techniques and instruments used by scientists and biomedical researchers: light microscopy, confocal, electron microscopy, super-resolution, and image processing. Students will discuss the experimental use of these techniques and instruments as described in the primary literature. The laboratory component will focus on becoming familiar with the instrumentation that we have available at Boston College. The course will culminate in individual projects of the students choosing utilizing equipment that we have in the laboratory.


Instructor(s): Bret Judson

Prerequisites: BIOL 2040 and additional coursework in cell and/or molecular biology.

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course satisfies the advanced experience requirement for biology majors.

BIOL 5460 Topics in Microbial Pathogenesis Fall 2
Course Description

In this course we will discuss primary research literature on various aspects of pathogenesis i.e., the microbial an/or immunological mechanism by which pathogens (prions, viruses, (myco)bacteria, protozoa, worms) cause disease. Each student will select a primary paper from a high impact journal together with a supportive review and present the background information to the class. The primary paper will be discussed at the following class period, with all students having defined responsibilities for discussion of the figures and data.


Instructor(s): Marc-Jan Gubbels

Prerequisites: BIOL 2040 and additional course work in immunology, microbes, molecular/cell biology, undergraduate research, or other demonstrable experience in reading primary research literature.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies the advanced experience requirement for the Biology major.

BIOL 5510 Cell Biology of the Nervous System Spring 3
Course Description

This course will focus primarily on central nervous system (CNS) glial cells. These cells make up approximately 90% of the human brain, but are less well studied than neurons. The course will be split into three parts. Part I covers neuroglial cell morphology and physiology. Part II covers functions of glial cells, including myelin, immune functions, the blood brain barrier, and influence of glial cells on neurons. Part III focuses on disease and neuroglial cells, including mechanisms of glial cell injury and recovery of neural function. Autoimmune and infectious diseases, glial cell derived tumors, strokes, and Alzheimer's disease are covered.


Instructor(s): Kenneth Williams

Prerequisites: ONE of the following: BIOL 3040, 4140, 4400

Cross listed with:

Comments: Not Offered in 2011-12

BIOL 5540 Physiology Spring 3
Course Description

This course will examine the normal functions of a living human organism including its physical and chemical processes. An integrative approach will be used to explore the physiological processes of the nervous, respiratory, cardiovascular, renal, gastrointestinal and endocrine systems and the relationships between the systems. Starting in Spring 2010, the Physiology Lab (BI-555) is a co-requisite for the lecture.


Instructor(s): Prof. Mullikin-Kilpatrick (Spring)

Prerequisites: BI 200-202 (Intro Biology 1 and 2)

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 5550 Laboratory in Physiology Spring 1
Course Description

The mechanisms that underlie homeostasis in the healthy human are varied and complex. In this computer-based physiology laboratory, we will emphasize the processes that regulate important properties of living systems as we explore the intricacies of some of the major organ systems in the human body. We will investigate the functions of the intact, living organism through real-time, hands-on data acquisition and analysis of the cardiovascular, respiratory and neuromuscular systems. Several labs will focus on sensory and motor systems because of their clinical relevance. Students will learn about different clinical measurements, including electromyography, spirometry, and cardiac electrophysiology.


Instructor(s): Prof. Mullikin-Kilpatrick

Prerequisites: BI 200 (Intro Biology 1)

Cross listed with:

Comments: Starting in Spring 2010, the Physiology Lab (BI-555) is a corequisite for the Physiology Lecture (BI-554).

BIOL 5560 Developmental Biology Spring 3
Course Description

Developmental biology is in the midst of a far-reaching revolution that profoundly affects many related disciplines including evolutionary biology, morphology, and genetics. The new tools and strategies of molecular biology have begun to link genetics and embryology and to reveal an incredible picture of how cells, tissues, and organisms differentiate and develop. This course describes both organismal and molecular approaches which lead to a detailed understanding of (1) how it is that cells containing the same genetic complement can reproducibly develop into drastically different tissues and organs, and (2) the basis and role of pattern information in this process.


Instructor(s): Danielle Taghian

Prerequisites: BI 304-305 (Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics) or permission of the instructor

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 5585 Genomics Laboratory Spring 3
Course Description

This laboratory is a hands-on introduction to the foundations of functional genomics. The course incorporates both lecture format and laboratory time. The goal of the course is to familiarize students with concepts in reverse and forward genetics such as mutation detection, targeted mutagenesis, mutant library generation, mapping and sequence analysis.


Instructor(s): Stephen Wicks

Prerequisites: BI 304-305, BI 310-BI 311

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 5610 Molecular Evolution Spring 3
Course Description

The amount of available genomic sequence data has increased exponentially in the last decade, revolutionizing our ability to study evolution at the DNA level. This course will provide an introduction to the molecular evolution of genes and genomes as well as related topics in population genetics. Topics will include genetic variation within and between species, methods for reconstructing the evolutionary history of sequences, and molecular signatures of natural selection. These will be explored through both computational and mathematical methods.


Instructor(s): Jeffrey Chuang

Prerequisites: BIOL4200 and Calculus 1 or permission of instructor

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 5630 DNA Viruses & Cancer Spring 3
Course Description

It is estimated that 15-20% of human cancers worldwide have viral etiology. There are several DNA viruses, including Human Papillomaviruses, Adenoviruses, Epstein-Barr virus, Herpes virus type 8, Hepatitis B and C viruses and Merkel cell polyomavirus that are associated with different types of cancer. This course is focused on these DNA tumor viruses, their replication cycles and the cellular transformation pathways leading to different cancers (including cervical cancer, Burkitt's lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease, a subset of T-cell lymphoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, Kaposi's sarcoma and Merkel cell carcinoma), and therapeutic strategies. Students will be exposed to both lectures and presentations of research papers.


Instructor(s): Junona Moroianu

Prerequisites: BIOL2040 and BIOL3040 or BIOL4140 or BIOL4400 or permission of the instructor.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 5678 Advanced Undergraduate Research III Fall 3
Course Description

Designed for students who have completed at least semesters of undergraduate research under course numbers BI 461-466 and who desire to continue independent research projects under the guidance of department faculty.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: BI 465 and/or BI 466 and permission of the instructor

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 5700 Biology of the Nucleus Fall 3
Course Description

This course provides an in-depth treatment of the molecular biology of DNA and RNA, with particular emphasis on the control and organization of the genetic material of eukaryotic organisms. Topics include chromatin structure and function, histone modifications, DNA replication, gene activation and silencing, DNA methylation, and RNA interference. Emphasis is on experimental design, and analysis of the primary literature.


Instructor(s): Anthony T. Annunziato

Prerequisites: One of the following: BIOL 4350, 4400, CHEM 4461/4462, or instructor permission

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies the advanced experience requirement for the Biology major.

BIOL 6110 Advanced Genetics Fall 2
Course Description

This course is designed for graduate students who have successfully completed an undergraduate genetics course. Topics cover the fundamental principles of genetics and the methods and technology of genetic research applied to the study of a variety of model systems.


Instructor(s): Hugh Cam

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 6120 Graduate Biochemistry Fall/Spring 2
Course Description

This course, which is designed for graduate students who have successfully completed an undergraduate biochemistry course, will cover the biochemistry of biologically significant macromolecules and macromolecular assemblies. Topics will include the elements of protein structure and folding, principles of protein purification and analysis, enzymology, nucleic acid biochemistry, and the structure and function of biological membranes. The first half of the course will review selected topics in biochemistry, with the objective of bringing all students to a certain level of competency in the field. The second half of the course will focus on original papers from the biochemical literature.


Instructor(s): Daniel Kirschner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 6140 Graduate Molecular Biology Spring 2
Course Description

This course concentrates on gene expression, chromatin dynamics, and cell-cycle control in eukaryotic cells. Topics include transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms, DNA replication and methylation, RNA interference, microarray analysis, and the generation and use of transgenic organisms. The course is designed for graduate students who have successfully completed undergraduate biochemistry and molecular cell biology courses.


Instructor(s): Anthony Annunziato

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 6150 Advanced Cell Biology Spring 2
Course Description

This course is designed for graduate students who have successfully completed an undergraduate course in cell biology. Topics include the principles of cellular organization and function, regulation of the cell cycle and cancer, and interactions between cells and cellular signaling pathways.


Instructor(s): Junona Moroianu

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 6160 Graduate Bioinformatics Fall 2
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Gabor Marth

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 6170 Advanced Cell Biology Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 6180 Scientific Proposal Writing Fall 2
Course Description

The purpose of the course is to develop students skills in research proposal writing, presentation, and critical evaluation. To meet these goals graduate students will be guided in the preparation and defense of an original research proposal in a field of their choice with no direct connection to their thesis topic.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 6190 Independent Study in Genetics Spring 3
Course Description

Independent study course in Genetics.


Instructor(s): Michelle Meyer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 6350 Graduate Biochemistry Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 7101 Readings and Research Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Intended for M.S. students who are acquiring a knowledge of the literature and experimental methods associated with their research projects under the guidance of a faculty research advisor. Participation in research group meetings, journal clubs, data clubs, etc., may be required. A maximum of six credits may be earned from this course.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 8010 Thesis Seminar Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

A research problem of an original nature will be addressed. This course is designed for M.S. candidates under the direction of a faculty member. A maximum of six credits may be earned from this course.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 8020 Topics in Pathogenesis Fall 2
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 8030 Malaria Biology and Control Fall 3
Course Description

Malaria eradication has returned to the international public health agenda. We will explore the genetics and cell biology of malaria parasites, mosquito vectors and human hosts, to achieve a better understanding of malaria biology; the successes and failures of the previous eradication effort; and prospects for eradication in our lifetimes.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Marc Muskavitch

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 8040 Synthetic Biology Spring 3
Course Description

This course will examine current topics in synthetic biology, including design and construction of novel biological systems and components ranging from chemical biology and the design of novel macromolecules to metabolic engineering and synthetic life. The practical applications of synthetic biology, challenges ahead for the field, and the ethics and risks associated with engineering life will also be discussed.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Michelle Meyer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 8050 Departmental Seminar Fall 1
Course Description

This is a series of research seminars conducted by leading scientists, both from within the department and from other institutions, that are presented on a regular (usually weekly) basis.


Instructor(s): Marc Muskavitch

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 8060 Departmental Seminar Spring 1
Course Description

This is a series of research seminars conducted by leading scientists, both from within the department and from other institutions, that are presented on a regular (usually weekly) basis.


Instructor(s): William H. Petri

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 8070 Viruses and Evolution Theory Fall 2
Course Description

Viruses are adept at exploring sequence space and exploiting a wide variety of adaptive strategies, resulting in an extensive assortment of genome architectures. For these reasons, viruses have long served as important model systems for understanding and testing evolutionary theory. In addition, many important aspects of viruses – such as adaptation to host cells, virulence, pathogenesis, transmission within and between populations, and their impact on organismal ecology and evolution – are best understood within the framework of population genetics and evolutionary theory. In this course, we will draw on the primary virological literature to explore important concepts in evolutionary biology, such as: viruses and the origins of life; quasispecies theory; robustness, cryptic variation, and the balance between stability and evolvability; and the relationship between genome architecture and information content.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jamie Henzy and Welkin Johnson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 8290 Chromosome Dynamics Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Anne Stellwagen

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 8350 Seminar in Structural Biochemistry Fall 3
Course Description

Myelin is a ubiquitous and essential specialized tissue in the nervous systems of higher vertebrates. This seminar introduces the student to myelinology. Topics include: Myelin Function, Formation, Biochemistry, Structure; Diseases Involving Myelin; CNS Myelin: PLP-Related Disorders; and PNS Myelin: P0 and PMP22-Related Disorders. Source material includes textbooks, reviews, and original literature. Class is DISCUSSION-based. Students are expected to be fully prepared based on their critical reading of the assigned material. Discussion centered on original literature will focus not only on the scientific questions and findings of each paper but also on the techniques used to address the questions.


Instructor(s): Daniel Kirschner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 8360 Current Methods in Microbial Research Spring 2
Course Description


Instructor(s): Michelle Meyer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 8370 Current Topics in Molecular and Developmental Biology Spring 2
Course Description


Instructor(s): Sarah McMenamin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 8380 Molecular Basis of Nuclear Reprogramming Fall 3
Course Description

A graduate seminar course on current issues in the field of mammalian nuclear reprogramming. Particular focus will be devoted to recent research involving factors responsible for the acquisition of the stem-like pluripotent states. Papers will be read as a group and discussed in class. Grades will be based on discussion participation and paper presentation.


Instructor(s): Hugh Cam

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 8390 Host-Microbe Interactions: Mucosal Immunity and Pathogenesis Spring 3
Course Description

This seminar series will focus on the molecular mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis with an emphasis on the host-pathogen interactions. Of particular interest will be the interactions that lead to conversion of commensals to pathogens. Students should expect to enhance their skills to evaluate the literature critically for accuracy, precision, novelty, and relevance. Students will also have ample opportunities to hone their presentation skills.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): David Newburg and David Kling

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 8450 RNA:Algorithms for Structure,Function,Gene Finding Fall 2
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 8470 Cytoskeleton and Disease Spring 3
Course Description

We will discuss classic and recent research regarding the relationship between cytoskeletal function and disease. We will focus on the mechanical, organizational, and signaling functions of the cytoskeleton and how the aberrant regulation of these properties contribute to diseases that affect different tissues.


Instructor(s): Folker and Eric

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 8480 Nuclear Import and Export Pathways During Viral Infections Spring 3
Course Description

This graduate Seminar will analyze how different major human viruses exploit the nuclear import and export pathways of host cells during their viral life cycles leading to human infectious diseases. Also, deficiencies in traffic into and out of the nucleus in some cancers will be analyzed. Research papers describing recent studies will be presented and discussed.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Junona Moroianu

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 8800 Responsible Conduct of Research/Professional Development Spring 2
Course Description

Readings, presentations, and discussion centered around issues in the responsible conduct of research and professional development, for graduate students in the life sciences. Topics to be covered include data collection and manangement; authorship and priority; preparation, review, and publication of peer-reviewed manuscripts; sharing of research material; grant writing, review, and funding; collegial relationships; human subjects; animals in research; learning styles and undergraduate teaching; mentoring; and career progression.


Instructor(s): Marc Muskavitch

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: For graduate students in the life sciences.

BIOL 8810 Departmental Discussion Group Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 8820 Research Discussion Group Fall 0
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 8880 Interim Study Fall/Spring 0
Course Description

Required for Master's candidates who have completed all course requirements but have not taken comprehensive examinations. Also for Master's students (only) who have taken up to six credits of Thesis Seminar, but have not yet finished writing their thesis.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 9901 Doctoral Comprehensive Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

Required for Doctoral students who have completed all course requirements, but are preparing for comprehensive examinations.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

BIOL 9911 Doctoral Continuation Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

All students who have been admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree are required to register and to pay the fee for doctoral continuation during each semester of their candidacy. Doctoral Continuation requires a commitment of at least 20 hours per week working on the dissertation.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: