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Art History Courses (ARTH) College of Arts and Sciences


Subject Area Course # Course Title Semester Credit Hours Expand
ARTH 1101 Art: Prehistoric to Middle Ages Fall 3
Course Description

A fundamental course for understanding the visual arts in the Western World: painting, sculpture and architecture. Major monuments in the history of art will be discussed in historical and cultural context beginning with Paleolithic cave art through the art of the medieval period. This course will examine some of the ancient material from an archaeological perspective, but its main emphasis will be on style and meaning in art. Assignments will include museum visits and the study of significant works of art in Greater Boston.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Pamela Berger and Kenneth Craig

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 1102 Art: Renaissance to Modern Times Spring 3
Course Description

This is the fundamental course for understanding the visual arts: painting, sculpture and architecture. The major monuments in the history of art will be discussed in their historical and cultural context beginning with the Renaissance in Europe down to the art of our own time. The emphasis will be on style and meaning in art. The class meets for two slide lectures per week. Assignments will include museum visits and study of significant works of art in Greater Boston.


Instructor(s): Claude Cernuschi and Stephanie Leone

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 1103 Art History Workshop I Fall 3
Course Description

The primary objective of this two-semester course is to expose the student to a series of problems in order that he or she may understand more fully the formal and technical aspects of works of art studied in the general survey of art history (ARTH1101-ARTH1102). Critiques and discussions also try to develop greater aesthetic sensitivity.


Instructor(s): Aileen Callahan

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Required for art history majors.

ARTH 1104 Art History Workshop II Spring 3
Course Description

The primary objective of this two-semester course is to expose the student to a series of problems in order that he or she may understand more fully the formal and technical aspects of works of art studied in the general survey of art history (ARTH1101-ARTH1102). Critiques and discussions also try to develop greater aesthetic sensitivity.


Instructor(s): Aileen Callahan

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Required for art history majors

ARTH 1107 History of Architecture Fall 3
Course Description

The evolution from pre-history to contemporary times of select examples of Western architecture is considered against the background of history, religion, societies, politics, psychology, and technology.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Katherine Nahum

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 1108 Great Art Capitals of Europe Spring 3
Course Description

This course is for artists, art lovers, and travelers. It deals with selected works of painting, sculpture and architecture from the fifth-century golden age of Athens through the post-impressionism of nineteenth century Paris. The course will treat particular monuments in-depth, emphasizing their artistic styles, as well as the ideological and social contexts in which they were created. While looking at the art of the past, we will also consider how it has been interpreted by historians.


Instructor(s): Pamela Berger

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Students who have taken ARTH1101-ARTH1102 cannot take this class.

ARTH 1109 Clues to Seeing Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Everyone looks, not everyone sees. This course aims to develop students' ability to see the visual clues and cues that artists use in their works to communicate meaning. First students learn to see and read artists' visual vocabulary. Then students use skills to uncover underlying meaning in works of art from various times and places to reveal understandings about the contexts in which artworks were created. In addition to developing skills to analyze any artwork and insights into a few cultural moments, students take away a heightened ability to see and understand all aspects of visual experience.


Instructor(s): Judith Bookbinder

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 1130 Intersection of Science and Painting Spring 3
Course Description

In this course, material is drawn from physics, chemistry, and mineralogy to give the non-science student a scientific understanding of light, color, and colorants used in painting, as well as an introduction to the methods of scientific analysis that can be brought to bear on conservation and restoration of paintings, on investigating hypotheses in art history, and on establishing authenticity of artwork.


Instructor(s): David McFadden

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: CHEM1102

Comments:

ARTH 1174 Islamic Civilization Fall 3
Course Description

This course introduces students to the rich culture produced in the regions where Islam was the prominent religion during the past 1400 years, from its rise in seventh-century Arabia to its position as the world's fastest-growing religion in the twenty-first century. It will cover the tenets of the faith and popular practice as reflected in the diverse and varied cultural expressions of Muslim peoples in the worlds of Islam, from China to Morocco.


Instructor(s): Sheila Blair and Jonathan Bloom

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HIST2101 THEO1174

Comments:

ARTH 1175 Asian Art Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 1701 Living on the Water: Venetian Art, Architecture, and the Environment Fall 3
Course Description

Why do humans build cities on the water? How does the environment affect the creation and development of cities? How do humans shape cities in intentional and inadvertent ways? The long and illustrious history of Venice provides a case study for probing these enduring questions. Students use methods of art and architectural history to examine how Venetians constructed the city in space and over time, how its coastal position influenced art and architecture, how Venetians expressed individual and collective identity through the built and natural environment, and what issues threaten the city today.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Stephanie Leone

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Core Renewal Course: Enduring Questions

ARTH 2206 Art and Myth in Ancient Greece Spring 3
Course Description

An introduction to the visual representation of the Greek gods and godesses and to the artistic depiction of the primary cycles of Greek legends (e.g., the Trojan War and heroes such as Herakles, Perseus, and Theseus). This course focuses on how specific visual attributes serve to identify mythological characters and how the development of narrative in Greek art helped to relate their stories. Inquiring into the use of mythological imagery to decorate temples, cult statues, and vases used primarily for the symposium (male drinking parties), we will consider the functions of mythological imagery within Greek society.


Instructor(s): Gail Hoffman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: CLAS2208

Comments:

ARTH 2207 Ruins of Ancient America: Temples and Tombs Fall 3
Course Description

The Aztec, Maya, and Inca peoples, and their precursors in Mexico, Central America, and Peru, flourished prior to sixteenth century Spanish conquest. Ancient Meso-American cultures shared an emphasis on a cosmic calendar, kinship, warfare, blood sacrifice, and an elaborate ritual ball game. We will explore these, and the new theories on the classic Maya collapse and practice of human sacrifice. The Andes, with the vast Inca empire, and newly discovered tombs and enigmatic ceramics of the Moche in Peru, reveal an emphasis on nature worship and animal and supernatural images.


Instructor(s): Diana K. McDonald

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 2208 Way Before Columbus:Treasures of the Lands/Andes Spring 3
Course Description

This course focuses on the most significant masterpieces of the Ancient Americas, including the colossal Olmec heads, the sarcophagus cover from the tomb of the Maya ruler Pakal, and goldwork from the royal tombs of Sipan, Peru. The art will be closely examined in the context of the archaeology, religious beliefs, rituals, and technology of the ancient cultures. How do practices of human sacrifice, blood-drawing, burial, weaving, & pottery-making reflect the culture? Learn about the mysteries of the Aztec Calendar Stone, the Temple of the Feathered Serpent at Teotihuacan, and the unusual sculptured pots of the Moche of Peru.


Instructor(s): Diana McDonnald

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 2213 Introduction to Islamic Art and Architecture Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines the development of Islamic art and architecture through a variety of different approaches. In class, we will examine a dozen masterpieces of Islamic art and architecture and their settings. The examples are drawn from many media, arranged chronologically and spread geographically throughout the Islamic lands.


Instructor(s): Sheila Blair

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 2216 Art and Archaeology of Homer and Troy Fall 3
Course Description

Homer's Iliad describes a "Trojan War." Until Schliemann's excavations of a fortified site in Turkey suggested a real Troy and further work in Greece revealed a brilliant Bronze Age civilization, most thought Homer's story pure fiction. This class investigates archaeological sites such as Troy and Mycenae, Bronze Age shipwrecks, a Late Bronze Age "Pompeii," and the artistic evidence for objects and practices described by Homer in order to separate historical truth from elements either invented by the poet or adopted from his own time and reinvented by Hollywood.


Instructor(s): Gail L. Hoffman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: CLAS2216

Comments:

ARTH 2217 African Art Spring 3
Course Description

The traditional arts of sub-Saharan Africa are charged with an emotional intensity and clarity of form that the art of few other cultures can match.This survey will present African sculpture as the visible expression of a complex transcendental world of African philosophy and religion. Architecture and textiles will also be discussed in the context of the course.


Instructor(s): Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 2221 Mysteries and Visions: Early Medieval Art Fall 3
Course Description

This course will illuminate the art of the so-called Dark Ages, from about 200 A.D. to around the year 1000 A.D. We will begin with the art of the waning classical world where, in addition to the burgeoning imagery of early Christianity, one finds the magico-religious art of the mystery cults of Cybele, Mithras, and Isis. We will look at the art of Byzantium, as well as that of Celtic-Early Christian Ireland, and go on to a study of the Carolingian renaissance. The last part of the course will be devoted to the apocalyptic millennial art of tenth century Spain.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Pamela Berger

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 2222 Imagination and Imagery: Later Medieval Art Spring 3
Course Description

This course will look at the symbolism and the multiplicity of meanings in works of art from the Romanesque and Gothic world. We will study the various artistic styles of architecture, sculpture, and painting of the period, all the while treating the art in its intellectual and social context. We will pay particular attention to the new ways medieval men and women envisioned space and time, as well as God and nature.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Pamela Berger

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 2224 Art&Patronage in Renaissance&Baroque Rome Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 2225 Italian Art&Architecture:From Giotto/ Michelangelo Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 2226 Islamic Spain/Al-Andalus:Word,Monument&Image Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HIST4125 ICSP2260

Comments:

ARTH 2228 Survey of Asian Art Fall 3
Course Description


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 2231 Early Renaissance Art in Italy Fall 3
Course Description

Why was art made in the Renaissance? What did it mean to its original audience? This course studies connections between art, society and culture in Italy in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, a period of fertile artistic innovation. We will explore the prominent artistic centers of Florence, Siena, Rome, and Venice; powerful patrons like the Medici family; and renowned artists, such as Giotto, Brunelleschi, Donatello and Botticelli.


Instructor(s): Stephanie Leone

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 2232 Northern Renaissance Art Spring 3
Course Description

Painting in the Netherlands and in Germany in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Emphasis will be on the style and the meaning of the great works of the masters of Northern Renaissance art such as Jan van Eyck, Hieronymus Bosch, Pieter Bruegel, and Albrecht Durer. We will discuss how the Renaissance in Northern Europe is different from the Italian Renaissance and what influences it absorbed from the Italians. We will consider the importance of printed pictures in this era when books and broadsheets assumed such a crucial role.


Instructor(s): Kenneth Craig

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 2238 Renaissance Art and Architecture in Florence Summer 3
Course Description

This course studies painting, sculpture, and architecture in Florence during the Renaissance, c. 1300-1600. Studying the art of this period in its original location, we seek to understand the relationship between the art of Florence and the city's history, society and culture as it changed over three centuries. We investigate why art was made and what message it conveyed. Topics of discussion include religious versus civic imagery, the role of the artist, private and institutional patronage, humanism, the rise of domestic art, and urbanism.


Instructor(s): Stephanie Leone

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Must apply through OIP
Department Permission required

ARTH 2241 Chinese Art and Architecture, 1911 to present Fall 3
Course Description

After the fall of the Qing dynasty in 1911 Chinese artists were confronted with the great challenge of expressing radically new concepts of modernity, national identity, and selfhood in visual terms. By the mid twentieth century their attention had shifted to the problem of how best to represent the ideologies of the Communist party. Today, contemporary artists and architects respond to new social issues, such as political censorship, environmental destruction, and urban displacement. By covering a wide range of topics—including advertisements of the modern Shanghai woman, Socialist realist sculpture, Mao-era propaganda posters, and the politically-charged works of Ai Weiwei—this course introduces students to this extremely dynamic period in Chinese art history.


Instructor(s): Aurelia Campbell

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 2242 Scientific Examination of Works of Art I Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 2244 Chinese Visual Culture Fall 3
Course Description

This course surveys the visual and material culture of China from Neolithic to present times. Our subject matters include ritual bronzes, tomb artifacts, Buddhist sculpture, landscape paintings, garden architecture, imperial portraiture, Communist-era woodblock prints, and contemporary art. Particular attention will be paid to understanding objects within their original social and cultural contexts. Students will be trained in various art historical methodologies and will deepen their knowledge about one aspect of Chinese art history though an in-depth research project.


Instructor(s): Aurelia Campbell

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 2245 Japanese Visual Culture Spring 3
Course Description

This course surveys the visual and material cultures of Japan from Neolithic to present times. Our subject matters include ancient pottery, Buddhist temples, tea culture, Edo woodblock prints, and contemporary art. Particular attention will be paid to understanding objects within their original social and cultural contexts. Students will be trained in various art historical methodologies and will deepen their knowledge about one aspect of Japanese art history through an in-depth research project.


Instructor(s): Aurelia Campbell

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 2246 Architecture of East Asia Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores a diverse range of architecture in China, Japan, and Korea from ancient to contemporary times. We will investigate the major architectural types in East Asia—including cities, temples, palaces, gardens, and houses—as well as individual monuments, such as Japan’s Himeji Castle and the “Bird’s Nest” Olympic stadium in Beijing. In addition to examining the architectural histories of these sites, we will discuss thematic uses related to design, space, landscape, ritual, memory, and modernity. Students will also develop a deepened understanding of one aspect of East Asian architectural history through an in-depth research project on a well-conceived topic.


Instructor(s): Aurellia Campbell

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 2250 Introduction to African Art Spring/Fall 3
Course Description

Survey that takes a critical look at centuries of arts from Africa in their cultural and political contexts


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 2251 Modern Architecture Spring 3
Course Description

This course charts the development of modern architecture from lateeighteenth-century revival styles to modernism, post-modernism, and deconstructivist architecture. We examine the work of F.L. Wright, Gropius, Mies van der Rohe, LeCorbusier, Aalto, Louis Kahn, Venturi, and Gehry, among others, and explore how their work embodies social, political, and economic issues.


Instructor(s): Katherine Nahum

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 2256 Impressionism and Neo-Impressionism Spring 3
Course Description

After an examination of the intellectual and artistic bases of Impressionism, we consider each of the eight Impressionist exhibitions against the social, political and economic background. We follow these artistic currents into Neo-Impressionism on other, sometimes distant countries.


Instructor(s): Katherine Nahum

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 2257 Nineteenth-Century Art Spring 3
Course Description

An introduction to European and American art of the late eighteenth century to 1900. The work of major painters and sculptors will be investigated in the context of contemporary cultural and political developments. Beginning with art in the age of revolutions in France and America, we will study the movements of Neoclassicism and Romanticism. The evolving role of the academy will be studied, as well as independent movements such as Realism, Impressionism and Post-Impressionism. Artists to be studied include David, Goya, Turner, Monet, Van Gogh and Rodin.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jeffery Howe

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 2258 Twentieth Century Art Fall 3
Course Description

The early twentieth-century European and American art world was a hotbed of visual experimentation. A study of French Fauvism and Cubism, Italian Futurism, German and Austrian Expressionism and Bauhaus, Russian Suprematism and Constructivism, Dutch Neo-Plasticism, International Dada and Surrealism, and American Modernism, will highlight the cross-national influences that led to radical artistic invention and new definitions of art.


Instructor(s): Judith Bookbinder

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 2262 The City of Rome Spring 3
Course Description

What was a normal day like for ancient Romans? What did they see, hear, and do while going about their lives? How did those things change as Rome shifted from a Republic to an Empire and as their city became caput mundi ("Head of the World")? In this course we will reconstruct the lived experiences of Romans by examining Rome's urban spaces through art, architecture, artifacts, and texts. Along the way, we will explore: public buildings, mundane and monumental; recreation (baths, theaters, arenas); civic infrastructure (aqueducts, sewers, roads); economy and commerce (shopping, harbors, slavery); gender and sexuality (domestic spaces, brothels); religion (temples, sacrifices, funerals); and other topics as appropriate.


Instructor(s): Christopher Polt

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: CLAS2262

Comments:

ARTH 2263 American Icons: Nineteenth-Century Images of National Identity Fall 3
Course Description

The nineteenth century was a time of turmoil and change in America. From the taming or destruction of the wilderness, to the exploitation of natural resources, the fate of Indians, the expansion of slavery, and the spread of industry, painters, sculptors, photographers, and architects created iconic works that spawned public debates about the frontier, industrialization, and the environment that sometimes percolated and sometimes raged throughout society. By depicting European-American perceptions of Native Americans, African-Americans before and after the Civil War, and women in public and private life, artists escalated the debate over who is an American.


Instructor(s): Judith Bookbinder

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HIST2440

Comments:

ARTH 2264 American Modern: The Triumph of U.S. Art Spring 3
Course Description

Americans began the twentieth century still looking to European leadership in art and politics. By mid-century, the United States became "the leader of the free world" and the center of the art world. This course traces the transformation of American art in the context of the changing political, social, and cultural environment of the twentieth century. Precisionist and Expressionist interpretations of the modern world, Abstract Expressionism, Pop and Op Art, Earthworks, Environmental Sculpture, and Neo-Expressionism will be viewed in relation to evolving political hegemony of the U.S., the relationship of individuals to society, growing commercialism, and environment.


Instructor(s): Judith Bookbinder

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 2267 From Salt-Box to Skyscraper: Architecture in America Seventeenth to Twentieth Centuries Fall 3
Course Description

This course will trace the development of American architecture from colonial times to the present. Particular attention will be paid to monuments in New England, with field trips to important buildings in the Boston area. In addition to studying stylistic changes, the class will consider the significance of changes in building technology and social needs for the history of architecture. This course will make extensive use of a networked archive of scanned photographs. The Digital Archive of American Architecture is available on BCInfo.


Instructor(s): Jeffery Howe

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 2270 The Arts of India Spring 3
Course Description

This course will survey the Arts of the Indian Subcontinent: Hindu, Mughal, Colonial and Modern. From the earliest extant shrines of the Hindu religion to the art of today, we will explore how religious beliefs and rituals, ideals of royal authority, and societal roles were reflected in the visual arts. Architecture, sculpture, painting, and metalwork reveal the forms and symbols during the Hindu Renaissance (c. 500-1500 CE). We will also explore the later spread of Islamic traditions to the Indian subcontinent which created a rich overlay to this already culturally diverse world regions.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Cecelia Levin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 2273 The Arts of China Fall 3
Course Description

The arts of China are explored from their earliest archaeological evidence through contemporary idioms with an understanding of how they were shaped by cultural aesthetics; a variety of religions and philosophical systems; scientific advances, and a rich legacy of written sources including poetry, philosophical treatises, epic narratives, and historical chronicles. Through a study of a broad range of media, it will be suggested that China’s artistic traditions served as a means of self-identity and continuity during eras of disunity and foreign domination— unceasingly imbued with expressions of the interrelationship between man, nature and the universe; mysticism, and even political dissent.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Cecelia Levin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 2274 The Arts of Buddhism Spring 3
Course Description

In the early centuries AD, Buddhism spread eastward from its origins in India across Central Asia to China, Korea, and Japan. As is spread, it profoundly impacted the visual cultures of these regions. Students in this course will be introduced to the major styles and types of Buddhist art and architecture, as well as to the fundamental role it played in religious practice. Topics to be explored include the origins of the anthropomorphic Buddha image, pictorial narratives of the Buddha’s life, the sacred architecture of mandalas, and visual representations of hells and paradises. Students will also deepen their knowledge about one aspect of Buddhist art or architecture through an in-depth research project on a well-conceived topic.


Instructor(s): Aurelia Campbell

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 2275 Arts of Japan Spring 3
Course Description

Although Japanese art was influenced by Chinese art, it had a distinct character of its own and maintained its originality from the beginning. The Japanese found pleasure in relating art to man and his activities, and a large element of humor is present in their works. Decorative design is probably their greatest genius, and is not matched by any other culture in the Far East. This is best illustrated by all articles of daily use where they placed great value on the visual impact of the object at hand.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Cecilia Levin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 2280 Masterpieces of Islamic Art Spring 3
Course Description

A detailed examination of a dozen masterpieces of Islamic art ranging from architecture to ceramics, the seventh century to the present, and Spain to India. Emphasis on placing the works in their historical, social, craft, and visual contexts.


Instructor(s): Sheila Blair

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 2286 History of Photography Spring 3
Course Description

This course looks at the evolution of vision and practice through a selected survey of the history, technology, and aesthetics of photography from the earliest experiments in the medium to the present day. We will focus primarily on photographic practice in Europe and the USA. In this course, we will investigate the social, cultural, and political implications of the revolution of photography, paying critical attention to its manipulations within the contexts of entertainment, advertising, the state, science, journalism, modern and postmodern art. We will also carefully explore our relationship with the proliferation of mass media imagery today.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

ARTH 3309 Artists and Their Writings Fall 3
Course Description


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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ARTH 3311 Greek Art and Archaeology Spring 3
Course Description

The art of the ancient Greeks is the visible testimony of one of the great ages of Western civilization. We will study architecture, sculpture and painting. This class will consider the art of Minoan, Crete, and Mycenae on the mainland of Greece as precursors to Greek art. Then we will study Greek art proper from its earliest appearance to the end of the Hellenistic period. Archaeological material will be covered primarily in relation to the major artistic monuments.


Instructor(s): Kenneth Craig

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 3314 The Art and Archaeology of Egypt and the Ancient Near East Spring 3
Course Description

This course will examine two of the world's oldest civilizations. We will concentrate on the architecture, sculpture, and painting of Egypt and on the early cultures of Mesopotamia with frequent reference to the broader archaeological contexts of the material. While the class will focus on the physical remains of these civilizations, ancient literary sources—read in translation—will be employed to enrich our understanding.


Instructor(s): Kenneth Craig

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 3315 Arts of Islamic Spain Fall 3
Course Description

Seminar introduces students to the rich artistic heritage of the Iberian Peninsula and adjacent regions in northwest Africa when Muslims ruled much of the region. From the eighth century through the fifteenth, Iberian cities, Cordoba, Seville, Granada were centers of brilliant Arab Islamic civilization. Course examines extraordinary architecture and decorative arts including ivory, woodcarving, metalwork, textiles, manuscripts. As Muslims lost control of large areas of the Iberian peninsula, impact of Spanish Islamic art and culture remained strong among the Christians and Muslims elsewhere in Islamic lands. Students participate in class discussions, research a topic,prepare oral presentations,submit a written research paper.


Instructor(s): Jonathan Bloom

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HIST2151

Comments:

ARTH 3316 Eastern Influences on Western Art Spring 3
Course Description

Nineteenth and twentieth century European and American painters were affected by Eastern paintings, prints, decorative arts, spiritual ideas as Chinese and Japanese trade opened. Results were new ways of depicting reality, light, space and invention of abstract line, shape, color and texture rendering spiritual states of mind. Through comparisons of Asian paintings, prints, decorative art objects and European and American paintings and prints, students will study the impact of Eastern art on path-breaking developments of modern art in the West.


Instructor(s): Judith A. Bookbinder

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

ARTH 3318 Making it Irish: Cultural Revival and Revolution Spring 3
Course Description

This interdisciplinary course will explore the relationships between visual, literary and material culture, with examination of the early Medieval Irish sources for the nineteenth century Celtic Revival. Its focus is the 2016 McMullen Museum of Art exhibition, The Arts and Crafts Movement: Making it Irish, which will constitute the primary visual course text. The Arts and Crafts movement in Ireland occurred alongside the more prominent Literary Revival—both arising during a period of growing nationalist pressures that would culminate with the 1916 Easter Rising and in 1921, with independence. Scholars from Boston College and Ireland working on this exhibition will present lectures and lead workshops during the semester


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kevin O'Neill, Nancy Netzer, Robert Stanton and Vera Kreilkamp

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with: HIST4270 ENGL3362

Comments:

ARTH 3327 Early Medieval Art in Ireland and Britain Spring 3
Course Description

This seminar will examine the origins and development of art in Ireland and Britain in the Early Medieval period and the production of Irish and English missionaries on the Continent. Emphasis will be placed on manuscripts, sculpture, and metal work of the sixth to the ninth century, on understanding works of art in their historical contexts, and on their sources in the Celtic, Germanic, and Mediterranean worlds. Students of art history, history, medieval studies, and Irish Studies are encouraged.


Instructor(s): Nancy Netzer

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

ARTH 3330 Review Spanish Art: From Altamira to Picasso Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

ARTH 3332 The Age of Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raphael and Beyond: Sixteenth Century Art in Italy Spring 3
Course Description

The course begins with High Renaissance, of brief duration (1500-1520) but whose artists, especially Leonardo, Michelangelo, and Raphael, attained a level of creative accomplishment that served as a model for years to come. Some key themes include: the development of style, artistic competition, relationships between patrons and artists, restoration of Rome to its ancient glory, and the competing artistic developments in Venice. The second part of the course will trace the development of art after Raphael's death in 1520, understand how Michelangelo's art continuously evolved, and how other artists reacted to the challenge of the High Renaissance.


Instructor(s): Stephanie Leone

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 3340 Rebels and Revolutionaries: Expressionism Fall 3
Course Description

The 20th century witnessed a sea of changes in how individuals related to society that inspired artists in Germany and America to reject images of classical order and slavish representation. They experimented with radical distortion and complete abstraction to express the exuberance, terror, hope, and despair they felt as participants in a tumultuous age. Their Expressionist approaches fomented artistic revolution throughout the century. This course will explore the varied manifestations of Expressionism, from the German Brücke and Blaue Reiter groups to the American Figurative and Abstract Expressionists and Neo-Expressionists in both countries in the later decades of the century.


Instructor(s): Judith Bookbinder

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

ARTH 3342 Age of Rembrandt Fall 3
Course Description

In the seventeenth century the prosperous Dutch middle class became passionate art collectors. Wealthy merchants and tradesmen, and even butchers and bakers, bought art of the highest quality and displayed it proudly in their homes and shops. The artists living in the Netherlands responded by producing wonderful genre pictures, landscapes, still lifes and portraits as well as religious and mythological pictures for this, the first free market in the history of art. Among the artists we will study are Rembrandt, Jan Vermeer, Frans Hals.


Instructor(s): Kenneth Craig

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 3344 Venetian Art and Architecture Spring 3
Course Description

Until its end in 1797, the Republic of Venice, called “La Serenissima” (the most serene), occupied a unique position on the Italian peninsula and, even today, it remains a distinctive city. This character of otherness, called “Venezianità,” derived from its geographic location, topography, history, society, economy and culture and resulted in art and architecture that differed from, but at times dovetailed with, the visual arts of other major Italian cities. This course will study the art and architecture of Venice from the Byzantine church of San Marco (11th century) to the fall of the Republic (1797), with a particular focus on the Renaissance (15th-16th centuries) that produced many of its major artists: Giovanni Bellini, Titian, Veronese, Tintoretto, Pietro and Tullio Lombardo, Palladio, and others. Intermediate-level art history course with advanced readings and research project. Meets Renaissance/Baroque requirement for Art History Majors.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Stephanie Leone

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 3347 Age of Baroque: Seventeen Century Art in Italy Fall 3
Course Description

This course will study the painting, sculpture, architecture, and urban development of Italy during the late sixteenth and seventeenth century. We will focus on the abundant artistic projects in Rome, the home to the papacy and the birthplace of the Baroque. Particular emphasis will be placed on the relationship between artistic endeavors and powerful patrons, many of whom were members of the Roman Catholic Church. We will investigate the meanings and uses of art in relation to its social and cultural contexts to understand how art served both sacred and secular goals.


Instructor(s): Stephanie Leone

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 3350 The Art of the Object/Islamic Art Fall 3
Course Description

Unlike other traditions, much Islamic art comprises everyday objects—dishes, bowls, jugs, bottles, etc.—that are transformed into works of art by their forms and decoration. This seminar focuses on the manufacture, function, collecting and exhibition of these objects. The class will meet several times at the Museum of Fine Arts, and students will be expected to present a paper on an object in their collection.


Instructor(s): Sheila Blair

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 3356 Art Since 1945 Spring 3
Course Description

An analysis of artistic movements from 1945 to the present: Abstract Expressionism, Color Field, Neo-Dada, Pop Art, Minimalism, Post-Minimalism, Performance Art, Conceptual Art, Photo-Realism, Earthworks, Neo-Expressionism, and the more recent manifestations of appropriation associated with the Postmodern.


Instructor(s): Judith Bookbinder

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 3362 Photography & Modernism Fall 3
Course Description

After decades of constant change in photography's use and technology, at the turn of the 20th century photographers began exploring the defining conditions of their quintessentially modern medium. Photography came into its own in the years that followed, as it became a primary medium of mass-communication and solidified its place among the fine arts. This course will trace the intertwined iterations of modernism in photography, focusing on European and American art movements. We will look at photographers including Alexander Rodchenko, László Moholy-Nagy, Alfred Stieglitz, Imogen Cunningham, Edward Weston, and Ansel Adams, and read both theoretical texts and artists' own writing about photography.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

ARTH 3368 Contemporary Photography Spring 3
Course Description

The course will trace the development of photography from the 1960s—when its status in the art world was fundamentally changed by the rise of conceptualism—to the present. The course will address themes including the relationship between photography and performance art, the culture wars, identity politics, environmental concerns, globalization, digital media, and how photography has been shaped by the art market. Although the course will focus on fine art photography, we will also consider commercial and journalistic work.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

ARTH 3370 The Art Museum: History, Philosophy and Practice Spring/Summer 3
Course Description

A study of the emergence of museums tracing their development from private collections of the classical and medieval periods to their present form as public institutions. Topics include: the museum's function in its social context; the role of museums in creating culture; how practices of visual and material culture are linked to constructing meaning; the constituency of museums and their educational mission; philosophy of installation and care of collections. The course will meet in the McMullen Museum; field trips to local museums.


Instructor(s): Nancy Netzer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 3387 Photography in Paris 1900-1945 Fall 3
Course Description

Photography in Paris 1900-1945 In the first half of the 20th century, and particularly between the First and Second World Wars, Paris drew a diverse group of ambitious photographers from across Europe and the United States. The course will explore this vibrant, changing city through the visionary work of photographers including Eugne Atget, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Ilse Bing, Brassa, Andr Kertsz, and Man Ray.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Asher Anderson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ARTS3387

Comments:

ARTH 4214 Art of the Silk Road Fall 3
Course Description

This research seminar investigates the material culture of the "Silk Road," a vast network of trade routes that stretched overland from China across Central Asia to the Mediterranean. By considering a diverse range of visual objects—including textiles, porcelains, grave goods, Buddhist cave paintings, mosques, and ruined cities—we will think critically about the term "Silk Road": is it a real territory, for instance, or just a romantic Western image? Readings will delve into the role of art in trade, travel, and religion, as we explore the spread of ideas across space and over time. Students will also deepen their knowledge about one aspect of Silk Road art through a substantial research project.


Instructor(s): Aurelia Campbell and Sheila Blair

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 4315 The Material Culture of Private Life in China Spring 3
Course Description

This research seminar employs close readings of primary objects, images, and texts as windows into the lives and minds of people living in Ming-Qing China (c. 1400-1900). We will focus on the Chinese house, as well as its gardens and furnishings, seeking to uncover the complex meanings embedded within them. Themes to be explored include the family, gender, love, death, cultural consumption, artistic practice, and aesthetic theory. Throughout the semester we will take trips to local museums, including to Yin Yu Tang, a two-hundred-year-old Chinese house at the Peabody Essex Museum. Students in this course will also take part in the planning of an upcoming exhibition at the McMullen Museum of Art on domestic objects from the Ming and Qing periods.


Instructor(s): Auriela Campbell

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

ARTH 4401 Seminar in Art Historical Research Fall 3
Course Description

The seminar acquaints the student with the bibliography and research methods necessary for scholarly work in art history. The student prepares a substantial research paper under the direction of the professor and presents it to the class.


Instructor(s): Claude Cernuschi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 4402 Art and Architecture of the Forbidden City Spring 3
Course Description

The Forbidden City palace in Beijing constituted the center of Chinese imperial power from the year 1420, when it was constructed, until the early twentieth century. Now home to the Palace Museum, the Forbidden City attracts millions of tourists annually. In addition to examining the Forbidden City’s magnificent halls, temples, gardens, and art objects, produced exclusively for the members of the Ming and Qing imperial courts, students in this course will discuss the shifting roles of the Forbidden City—as a monument, a symbolic form, a social space, a political entity, and a center of cultural production—over a period of approximately six centuries, including the Mao and post-Mao eras.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 4403 Independent Work I Fall 3
Course Description

This course may be given on an as needed basis to allow students to study a particular topic that is not included in the courses that are offered.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 4405 Vienna 1900 Spring 3
Course Description

An analysis of the interdisciplinary crossfire that is Vienna 1900, concentrating on the interaction of aesthetics, culture, music, politics, philosophy, and psychology. Special emphasis on how the issues raised by the painting (Klimt, Kokoschka, Schiele) and architecture (Loos, Hoffmann, Wagner, Olbrich) of the period intersect with other domains, e.g. the philosophy of Wittgenstein, the music of Schoenberg and Strauss, the psychoanalysis of Freud, and the writings of Karl Kraus and Hugo von Hofmannsthal.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Claude Cernuschi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 4406 Independent Study III Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Aileen L. Callahan

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 4409 The Art of the Islamic Book Spring 3
Course Description

Muslims revere the Koran as God's word revealed to the Prophet Muhammad, 7th century CE, consequently writing, books became a major art form in Islamic culture. This seminar traces development of a distinctive tradition, from manuscripts of the Koran, copies of Persian classics some of the finest illustrations and illuminations ever produced to the modern trend for "artists books."


Instructor(s): Sheila Blair

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HIST2152

Comments:

ARTH 4412 Cairo: City of 1001 Nights Fall 3
Course Description

Cairo was founded by Muslim armies near a Roman fort in the 7th century and enlarged by subsequent rulers, the center of Arab-Islamic civilization since the 13th century and is now the most populous city in Africa and or Middle East. This seminar will explore Cairo's history through its architecture and art, with a particular emphasis on the period between 1000 and 1500. Students, who should have some familiarity with Middle Eastern or art history, will research and present a topic of their choice.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jonathan Bloom

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 4417 Paper Trails Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 4420 Italian Palaces, 1450-1650 Fall 3
Course Description

In mid-fifteenth-century Florence, the Medici, the city's de facto ruling family, built a private palace unprecedented in its monumentality. This bold move prompted other wealthy families, first in Florence and then in centers like Rome and Venice, to express their status through grand private residences. This seminar will study the architecture, painted decoration, and material culture (furniture, collections, and objects) of Italian palaces from 1450 to 1650. Particular focus will also be placed on the motives and justifications behind living magnificently in Renaissance and Baroque Italy.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 4426 Loot:Collecting Art in Italy Spring 3
Course Description

This century of European art saw the emergence of enlightened questioning, the exploration of both reason and the dark side of the mind, and a redefinition of the ideals of beauty. In response, myriad art styles, genres and movements flourished; in response, the art academies were formed and the Critic was born. The critic began to shape the nature of the art; the art became increasingly tied to political events, and wars and revolutions broke out. Revolution had its imagery, and so, too did Napoleon. We will explore paradoxical imagery within the context of extraordinary circumstances.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Stephanie Leone and Nancy Netzer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 4427 Early Medieval Art in Ireland and Britain Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 4430 Problems in Bosch and Bruegel Fall 3
Course Description

This class is a seminar on two great masters of the 16th century art in Flanders, Hieronymus Bosch and Pieter Bruegel the Elder. Bosch's paintings, often perplexing and enigmatic, have been the focus of a wide spectrum of interpretations, some of them outlandish and bizarre. Bruegel's pictures seem at first more genial, but when probed they bristle with social commentary. We will try to understand their style and iconography and place the work of these two artists in the context of their turbulent era.


Instructor(s): Kenneth Craig

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 4443 Realism and Symbolism Fall 3
Course Description

Gustave Courbet puzzled many in 1855 by titling one of his works a real allegory, highlighting the tensions between Realism and Symbolism which would challenge many in the next decades. This seminar will explore the Realist and Symbolist movements, including one the one hand artists such as Courbet, Manet and Degas, and on the other, Moreau, Gauguin, Fernand Khnopff and Edvard Munch.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jeffery Howe

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 4451 Symbolism and Art Nouveau Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar will be an exploration of the parallels between the visual arts and literature of this era. The course will involve study of some of the most intriguing artists of the period, such as Gustave Moreau, Gauguin, Redon, Fernand Khnopff, Edvard Munch and Gustav Klimt. Corresponding themes in Symbolist literature will be examined to enlarge the context of the inquiry. Readings will include works by Baudelaire, Mallarme, Maeterlinck, J.-K Huysmans and Oscar Wilde. As Symbolism was truly a multidisciplinary movement, the sculpture of Rodin and Art Nouveau architecture and decorative arts will also be included.


Instructor(s): Jeffery Howe

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 4453 Art and the Mind Fall 3
Course Description

How can art be interpreted psychoanalytically? The focus of this seminar is on late nineteenth century artists such as, but not limited to, Manet, Gauguin, Cézanne, and Van Gogh, and on those psychoanalytic ideas that have been, and have yet to be applied to art. We will read Freud, Ernst Kris and Donald Winnicott, and presumably, the most recent ideas in psychoanalysis. Our particular concern is the lack of attention paid, as Meyer Schapiro and others have noted, to the historic, iconographic and stylistic context of artistic expression as the means of psychoanalytic interpretation.


Instructor(s): Katherine Nahum

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 4454 Abstract Expressionism Spring 3
Course Description

An analysis of the artistic movement commonly called Abstract Expressionism and the New York School. Emphasis on gestural painting and color field with particular attention to issues of intellectual context, criticism and interpretation. Among the artists covered are Baziotes, Gorky, de Kooning, Kline, Pollock, Motherwell, Hofmann, Gottlieb, Rothko, Newman, Krasner, Still, Reinhardt, as well as lesser known figures such as Stamos, Poussette-Dart, Tworkov, Tobey, and Tomlin. Attention shall also be given to sculptural manifestations of Abstract Expressionism in Smith, Roszack, Feber, etc.


Instructor(s): Claude Cernuschi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 4456 Bad Boy Gauguin Spring 3
Course Description

Thumb sucking self portraits in paintings and ceramics define one side of Paul Gauguin; the other comes off as an aged sophisticate. We will explore several dualities in the life and work of Gauguin (saint/sinner, French/Spanish, male/female, real/hallucinatory) against the art-historical and social background.


Instructor(s): Katherine Nahum

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 4458 Surrealism Spring 3
Course Description

This course will explore twentieth-century crosscurrents in literature and art by examining the artistic works and the literary influences of the Surrealist movement. This movement was expressed in a revolution of forms and ideas drawing from psychology, African cultures and indigenous American cultures. In the process, as Jean-Paul Satre noted, the dominant European colonial tradition was "colonized in reverse." Six readings and artistic works will be chosen from but will not be limited to the following list: André Breton, Paul Eluard, Federico García Lorca, Octavio Paz, Alejo Carpentier, Salvador Dalí, and Max Ernst among others.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Claude Cernuschi and Elizabeth T. Goizueta

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SPAN3324

Comments:

ARTH 4459 The World of Edouard Manet Spring 3
Course Description

Manet stands as the pivot between the past, contemporary Paris, and the future; he determines the course of Modern Art. We will consider how and why he achieved importance, his paradoxical position as avant-garde artist and haute-bourgeois dandy, his regard for past masters, and his relation to contemporary writers, the Impressionists, and other artists.


Instructor(s): Katherine Nahum

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 4461 Frank Lloyd Wright Spring 3
Course Description

A seminar investigating the architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright. Arguably America's greatest architect, his career spanned eight decades, from the 1880s to the 1950s. We will explore his roots in the Shingle style and his experience as a young architect in Chicago, where he forged the Prairie Style. His evolving conception of architecture and urbanism in his later career will also be studied.


Instructor(s): Jeffery Howe

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 4464 Boston Architecture Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 4469 Goya, Spain, and Modernism Spring 3
Course Description

Goya, the commanding figure of Spanish art at the end of the 18th century has garnered a complex scholarship. Writers have addressed his Spanishness, his position within history as the ordinary modernist, and his vital psychology. We will explore these topics as well as the realist/idealist nature of his paintings and prints, and his enlightened interpretation of human seeing and not seeing--as a way of understanding the coherence of the man and his art.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Katherine H Nahum

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 4473 Art of the Mediterranean Spring 3
Course Description

This seminar will investigate the visual cultures of the Mediterranean world, Byzantium, Islam, Latin Christendom, the period between the rise of Christianity and Renaissance, 300 to 1600. The focus, cross-currents and interactions facilitated by trade, diplomacy, war and intellectual life. Topics considered will include artistic exchanges during the Crusades, Arabs and Normans in Sicily, and oriental influences in renaissance art and architecture.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Stephanie Leone and Jonathan Bloom

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 4480 History, Literature, and Art of Early Modern Rome Spring 3
Course Description

See course description in the Romance Languages and Literatures Department. Not open to students who have taken HS 232.


Instructor(s): Stephanie Leone, Franco A Mormando and Sarah Ross

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HIST4231

Comments:

ARTH 4481 Bernini and the Baroque Fall 3
Course Description

An interdisciplinary study of the art, literature and culture of the Baroque age (ca. 1600-1680), focusing on its epicenter, the city of Rome, and on the one artist who more than any other defined and disseminated that style, Gian Lorenzo Bernni. Against the backdrop of the political and institutional crises and social-religious metamorphoses of the period, we will explore the fertile and intimate inter-relationship between the arts (sculpture, architecture, theater, music) and the other forms of cultural expression.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Franco Mormando and Stephanie Leone

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Open to both graduate and undergraduate students

ARTH 4499 Advanced Independent Research Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences students who want the challenge of working intensively on a scholarly or creative project of their own design during their senior year should consider applying for this program. The application deadline is usually in the late fall of a student's junior year. See the Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences section of this Catalog or contact the Dean's Office for a full description of the requirements.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 5581 Religion,Arts&Politics Spring 3
Course Description

Nowadays, we accept the idea that religion, like so much else, is political. It makes sense, then, that visual culture, which can be used, situated, manipulated and exploited in the service of religion can serve to affirm and in some cases to subvert the political messages of religion. This class will explore examples of the collusions of religion, art and politics, as well as their collisions in the productions of majority and minority culture in Judaism, Christianity and Islam in the West, from antiquity to postmodernity.


Instructor(s): Marc Michael Epstein

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ARTH 7799 Independent Research Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Jeffrey W. Howe

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: