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Counseling, Developmental, and Educational Psychology Courses (APSY) Lynch School of Education


Subject Area Course # Course Title Semester Credit Hours Expand
APSY 1030 Child Growth and Development Fall 3
Course Description

First part of a two-course sequence (APSY1030 - APSY1031) designed to introduce students to the multiple dimensions of child development, and the place of education in promoting healthy development for all children. This course acquaints students with multiple processes of child development, including physical, social, cognitive, linguistic, and emotional development from birth through adolescence. Both typical and atypical patterns of development will be examined. Students discuss and analyze classic theories, contemporary issues, and key research in child development in view of their application to educational and other applied settings.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 1031 Family, School, and Society Spring 3
Course Description

Second part of a two-course sequence (APSY1030-APSY1031) that introduces students to the multiple dimensions of child development, and the place of education in promoting healthy development for all children. This course considers the social and cultural contexts that shape developmental and educational processes. Focuses on understanding the nature of contemporary social problems including racism, sexism, ethnic prejudice, poverty, and violence, as they affect children, families, and schooling. Emphasizes special role of education in linking community resources for an integrated approach to serving children and families.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: APSY1030

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 2032 Psychology of Learning Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Discusses classic and contemporary theories of learning and of cognitive development and theories of the relation between learning and cognitive development. Also looks at major studies with children. Compares and contrasts theories along key dimensions on which they vary. Addresses issues and questions that include the following: Is the environment or our biological endowment and innate knowledge responsible for our learning; are babies born with a lot of knowledge or must all cognition develop from scratch; does development precede learning (readiness to learn). Also looks at role of motivational factors, and discusses practical applications of theory and research.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 2041 Adolescent Psychology Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Introduces the psychology and problems of the adolescent years. Discusses biological changes, cultural influences, the identity crisis, educational needs, and adult and peer relationships. Consideration will be given to the impact that rapid cultural change has on youth. Also discusses adolescence in other cultures to provide a better perspective on American youth.


Instructor(s): Jackie Lerner and Belle Liang

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 2152 Human Development Practicum Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Provides an introduction to the applications of psychological theory within various human and community service contexts. Readings and discussion contribute to critical analyses of how social issues and social problems are situated differently due to gender, race, social class and diversities of language, ability, sexuality, etc. Students volunteer for 8-10 hours per week at a site selected with the assistance of the instructor and meet in a weekly seminar, keep a journal of their field experience, and complete reading and written assignments that integrate theory and practice.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 2216 Research Methods and Analyses Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Prepares professionals in the fields of human development and education to understand, design, and conduct preliminary analyses of research investigations related to applied topics. Provides students with necessary strategies and techniques to read and evaluate research studies. Students will learn fundamental concepts of research design and basic statistical procedures for analyzing data. Emphasizes understanding the basic concepts underlying different approaches to research design and analysis. Highlights research examples from the fields of human development, human services, and education.


Instructor(s): Michael Russell and Laura O'Dwyer

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 2240 Personality Theories: Behavior in Context Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Introduces major theories of personality as developed by Western psychologists. Examines selected critiques of these theories with particular attention to culture, gender, and social context as key variables in understanding character and personality.


Instructor(s): Robert Romano

Prerequisites: APSY1030/APSY1031

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 2241 Mental Illness: Social and Clinical Perspectives Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Provides overview of theoretical models and phenomenology currently defining the field of abnormal psychology, focusing particularly on socio-cultural contributions to conceptualizations of mental illness and distress. First half of course reviews and critiques current constructions of the nature of mental illness, as well as classification, assessment, and treatment of mental illness. Second half highlights specific forms of mental illness, with attention to the causes and subjective experience of psychopathology.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: APSY2240

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 2242 Interpersonal Relations Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Provides an opportunity to learn a developmental and systems perspective on the nature of family and interpersonal relations. Examines both the nature of interpersonal relations and some of the conditions in contemporary life that are shaping the quality of these relationships. Gives particular emphasis to understanding the self, family life, emotions, and conflicts in field research. Views the concept of interpersonal relations from historical, multicultural, gender, and developmental perspectives.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: APSY1030

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 2295 Spirituality, Religion, and College Student Experience Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 3243 Counseling Theories Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

The purpose of this course is to learn about the major counseling theories including basic concepts, advantages and limitations, techniques, and the counseling process. There is also a focus on personal exploration aimed at helping students adopt their own personal theory of counseling. Issues of multiculturalism and client diversity will be integrated into all course content.


Instructor(s): Pratyusha Tummala-Narra

Prerequisites: APSY2241

Cross listed with:

Comments: Open to majors in Human Development only

APSY 3244 Adult Psychology Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Explores theories and research on development across early, middle, and late adulthood and offers numerous opportunities for reflection on one's own development as an adult. Also provides insights into application of adult psychology to real life situations and is especially helpful to those who wish to work with adult populations.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: APSY1030 and APSY1031 or Permission of Instructor

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 3248 Gender Roles Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines biological, social, and psychological factors that interact in contributing to men's and women's gender roles. Within the social domain, particular attention will be given to how culture affects the social construction of gender, and how factors such as racism and homophobia interact with societally prescribed norms for men and women. The second half of the class will focus on the effects of gender roles on mental and physical health, social problems like aggression, and issues in education, work, and relationships including family life.


Instructor(s): James Mahalik

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 3310 Contemporary Issues in Applied Psychology and Human Development Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This advanced undergraduate seminar course will focus on heightened income inequality and poverty in the U.S. Studying social views, empirical evidence, and social policies, the course will consider the extent of income inequality, its causes, and the effects it has on children, families, and communities, as well as mechanisms to stem the roots or repercussions of inequality. As a senior capstone seminar, this course will be innovative and demanding, run using a problem-based learning (PBL) format to explore the integration of social science and social policy to understand complex social phenomena, delineate repercussions for human development, and create innovate solutions to vexing societal challenges.


Instructor(s): Eric Dearing

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 3375 Ed Leadership/Higher Ed Spring 3
Course Description

This course will be designed to provide undergraduate students with an overview of numerous leadership concepts and theories in order to impart an understanding of how leadership is expressed within organizational contexts, specifically higher educational settings. Furthermore, students will also develop an in-depth understanding of their own personal leadership aptitudes and preferences, providing them with the knowledge and tools to further their leadership abilities as they pursue their careers within specific educational and community settings


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 4050 Public Health Practice in the Community Spring 3
Course Description

This course puts public health into practice, with an experience of community engagement and public health activity. Students will develop a deeper understanding of applying public health principles and evidence-based practice in a community setting, locally or globally. Themes stressed in the previous two courses will be reinforced, this time in practice, including: the importance of data and evidence, the interdisciplinary approach to solving public health problems, and a focus on at-risk populations and reducing health disparities


Instructor(s): Nelson Portillo

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed NURS1210 and Must have successfully completed NURS3210

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 4199 Independent Study/Internship Experience Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Provides a student independent research opportunities under the guidance of an instructor. Research project must be approved one month before the beginning of the course by the instructor, department chair, and associate dean.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: EDUC4911

Comments:

APSY 4245 Advanced Practicum: Human Development Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Students meet once a week to discuss their required field work (8-10 hours per week) and to relate their field work to psychological theories, research, and applications. Readings and discussion contribute to critical analyses of how social issues and social problems are situated differently due to gender, race, social class, and diversities of language, ability, sexuality, etc. Participants will explore strategies for translating this knowledge and experience into resources that enable them to identify future career options.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Open only to students who are juniors or seniors or have taken APSY2512.

APSY 4464 Psychological Perspectives on Schooling Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

In many countries, including the United States, children’s attendance at school, or the documentation of a plan for learning outside of a school, is compulsory until late adolescence. As former or current students of schools, most people have opinions about what makes for good teaching and good learning and they use these opinions when making decisions about schooling for their children. Rather than encourage the acceptance of the educational status quo, or promote using one’s personal anecdotes as the best evidence for making decisions about schooling, this course aims to use evidence from psychology concerning development and learning to examine the practices in some philosophically-driven approaches to schooling. Students will use this information to design schools in which the pedagogical approach, social milieu, and understandings of children’s development are evidence-based and support articulated values and goals.


Instructor(s): Jill Hogan and Mahsa Ershadi

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: EDUC4464 PSYC4464

Comments:

APSY 4901 Readings and Research Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Provides a student the opportunity to do guided readings under the supervision of a professor. Research project must be approved one month before the beginning of the course by the instructor, department chair, and associate dean.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: EDUC4901

Comments:

APSY 4921 Indep Study:Fifth Year Program Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 4961 Honor Thesis I Fall 3
Course Description

"Registration for this course requires advance approval and the submission of additional paperwork. Students, with the approval of the program coordinator and department chair, may write a thesis during the senior year. In most cases, the thesis involves empirical research, although other scholarly forms may be permitted. Students must meet with a prospective thesis advisor during the junior year to develop a thesis proposal.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 4962 Honor Thesis II Fall 3
Course Description

Registration for this course requires advance approval and the submission of additional paperwork. This course is a continuation of APSY 4961.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 6348 Culture, Community and Change Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course seeks to help students understand how culture and community influence the lives of children, families and institutions through society's systemic policies and practices. The focus is upon human development within a multicultural society in a global world. It particularly guides understanding of inequities created by society for populations in a minority, powerless, poor and underserved status as well as, in contrast, the role privilege plays in setting societal standards and the role of human service professionals. A major orientation of the class is learning how multi-systemic factors, impact the individual, family, and community across the life span.


Instructor(s): A.J. Franklin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 6397 Social Issues and Social Policy Spring 3
Course Description

This seminar provides participants with a foundation of knowledge concerning current social policy issues involving children and families in the U.S., with a particular focus on issues related to poverty and disadvantage. Considers how research, politics, and advocacy play a role in the initiation, implementation, and evaluation of policy, and how social policies impact children and families. Seeks to help students explore scientific evidence and social perceptions, and think critically about central social issues and social policies.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Gilda Morelli

Prerequisites: Course Open to Seniors, Junior only

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 7101 Readings and Research in Counseling and Developmental Psychology Fall/Spring/Summer 3
Course Description

Under the direction of a faculty member who serves as Project Director, a student develops and carries to completion a significant study.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Permission of a faculty member

Cross listed with:

Comments: By arrangement

APSY 7205 College Student Mental Illness: Campus Responses Summer 1
Course Description

From the groundbreaking Shin suicide case at MIT to the tragedy of the Virginia Tech shootings, issues surrounding mental health strategies and policies on college campuses have risen significantly in the past two decades. As a result higher education professionals have needed to increase their understanding to work with, and work for, a population that has surged exponentially. Unlike courses using counseling theories for clinical practitioners, this course will prepare participants for program management and policy development that meets the safety, legal, community, and individual needs related to campus mental health issues. The goal is to deliver a solid, practical foundation for administrators dealing with this complex matter.


Instructor(s): Richard DeCapua

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ELHE7205

Comments:

APSY 7305 Transgender Issues in Higher Education Summer 1
Course Description

This course will provide an in-depth look at the experiences of transgender students on college campuses, as well as the institutionalize challenges that shape those experiences. Participants will be introduced to the topic through research, popular media, and case studies of individual transgender college students. Participants will then be guided through the macro, systems issues facing transgender students using an Activist-Change Framework to develop institution-specific action plans. This course will be a combination of lecture, group work, and exploratory learning to provide all learners with a deeper understanding of the experiences of transgender students. This course is ideal for mental health clinicians, educators and students and practitioners interested in creating systems change for marginalized populations.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ELHE7305

Comments:

APSY 7306 Contemporary Student Activism Summer 1
Course Description

This course utilizes experiential learning techniques to explore contemporary student activism from historic foundations, present-day causes, and possible bourgeoning motivations for student protests and activism. It describes student movements in the context of the times in which they existed and where college students served as foot soldiers for activism. Student activism is explored through use of artifacts such as video footage, pictures, documents and discussion. Students in the course will work in task groups to understand and experience administrators’ roles in addressing student activism. Students will also engage in activities such as addressing scenarios, participating in role plays and other hands-on activities that enrich their understanding and practice.


Instructor(s): Vanessa Johnson

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ELHE7306

Comments:

APSY 7404 College Student Development Spring 3
Course Description

An intensive introduction to student development, this course focuses on interdisciplinary theories of intellectual and psychosocial change among late adolescent and adult learners in post-secondary education. Research on student outcomes is also covered. Special attention is paid to the implications of ethnicity, age, gender, and other individual differences for the development of students. Course projects include individual and collaborative opportunities to relate theory to professional work with college students.


Instructor(s): Karen Arnold

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Not open to non-degree students; this policy will be strictly enforced.

APSY 7410 Special Topics; Queering in the Classroom Summer 3
Course Description

This course will review and critique current theory, research, and practice related to sexual orientation in psychology and education. There will be a focus on lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender issues during earlier developmental periods. Four broad areas include: (1) Terminology and models related to sexual orientation identities, gender expression, and prejudice; (2) the intersection of sexual orientation with other social identities; (3) experiences of LGBT individuals across contexts and implications for therapy and educational interventions broadly considered; and (4) relevant policy issues. The course will provide a framework on which to base empirically-supported practices with LGBT clients and students.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: EDUC7410

Comments:

APSY 7418 Applied Child Development Fall/Spring/Summer 3
Course Description

This course will help teachers understand principles of learning and cognitive, linguistic, social, and affective development as they apply to classroom practices. Students will focus on the acquisition of strategies that enable them to assess and understand how they and the children they work with are constructors of meaning. This course is designed for individuals beginning their professional development in education who plan to work with children.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 7419 Applied Adolescent Development Fall/Spring/Summer 3
Course Description

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the theoretical and empirical knowledge base concerning adolescent development. In particular, four broad areas will be considered: (1) psychological, biological, and cognitive transitions; (2) central developmental tasks of adolescence; (3) primary contextual influences; and (4) prevalent types of problematic functioning that emerge during adolescence. The overarching goals of the course are to provide a solid and broad understanding of how and why adolescents develop in the manner they do, and to extend this developmental understanding into research, application, and practice.


Instructor(s): Belle Liang, Jacqueline Lerner and Rebekah Levine Coley

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 7440 Foundations of Counseling I Fall/Summer 3
Course Description

Provides an introduction to counseling principles and techniques with an emphasis on interviewing skills. The areas of communication skills involving the use of role playing, observation, and practice components are emphasized. Training consists of peer role-plays and laboratory experiences with individual and group supervision.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Summer course is intended for non-counseling majors only.

APSY 7441 Issues in Counseling Men Summer 3
Course Description

Examines issues related to counseling men by examining the influence of socially constructed roles on men, their families, and broader society. Specifically examines how men's roles impact on their personal development through the life span as well as on men's health, roles as partners and fathers, and how men approach mental health services. Covers issues specific to counseling men from access to services to creating therapeutic environments for men. Uses case analysis of transcripts and videotapes.


Instructor(s): James Mahalik

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 7443 Psychoanalytic Case Conceptualization Spring 3
Course Description

This seminar investigates psychoanalytic theory through the context of the clinical encounter. Students will, through reading and case presentations, develop a facility in translating psychoanalytic theory into practice and in understanding their clinical cases through the lens of theory. The course emphasizes how theory becomes alive in therapy, how it guides action and understanding, and how it impacts listening. As such, clinical practice is explored as a creative encounter guided by analytic principles. Concepts such as the unconscious, defense, repetition, neurosis, transference, the holding environment, and others are emphasized.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 7444 Theories of Counseling and Personality I Fall 3
Course Description

First part of a year-long sequence examining personality and counseling theories. To introduce students to major theories of personality in the field of psychology and how theories are applied in constructing counseling and psychotherapy models. Students will focus on humanistic, behavioral, and cognitive personality theories and how they become operationalized in person-centered, behavioral, and cognitive counseling models, respectively. In addition to examining the theoretical foundations, client and counselor dimensions, techniques, and the active ingredients of change for these major models of personality and counseling, students examine how socio-cultural context contributes to client presenting concerns and may be addressed in counseling.


Instructor(s): James Mahalik

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 7445 Theories of Counseling and Personality II Spring 3
Course Description

Second part of a year-long sequence examining personality and counseling theories. Continues introduction to major theories of personality in the field of psychology and how those theories are applied in constructing counseling and psychotherapy models. Focuses on psychoanalytic personality and counseling models as well as critical theory as manifested in the psychology of gender and counseling models that integrate gender into working with clients. Specifically, for each model, students will examine the theoretical foundations developed in its theory of personality, relevant client and counselor dimensions, counseling techniques, and the active ingredients of change that each model uses in bringing about change.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: APSY7444

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 7446 Child Psychopathology Fall 3
Course Description

Introduces the theory and research that provide the context for understanding the socio-emotional problems of children. Places particular emphasis on the role of risk and protective factors as they contribute to children's resilience and vulnerability to childhood problems. Considers implications for clinical practice and work in school settings.


Instructor(s): Julie MacEvoy

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Preference in enrollment will be given to students in the School Counseling program.

APSY 7448 Career Development Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Provides students with a comprehensive introduction to the theoretical and practice aspects of career development and the psychology of working. Students learn existing theories and related research pertaining to the vocational behavior of individuals across the life span. Through readings, case discussions, and lectures, students learn how to construct effective, ethical, and humane means of helping people to develop their work lives to their fullest potential.


Instructor(s): David Blustein

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 7460 Interpretation and Evaluation of Research Spring/Summer/Fall 3
Course Description

Improves students' understanding of quantitative research literature in education and psychology. Concentrates on developing conceptual understandings and communication, skills needed by the competent reader and user of research reports. Particularly emphasizes critical evaluation of published research. Section 12 of this course is designed for and restricted to students in the M.A. in Mental Health Counseling. Other sections do not meet licensing requirement for mental health students.


Instructor(s): Larry Ludlow

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Section 12 Mental Health Students Only

APSY 7461 Human Rights Interdisciplinary Seminar Spring 3
Course Description

Students wishing to apply for the seminar should submit a brief statement explaining their interest (no longer than 250 words) to humanrights@bc.edu with the subject-line "Human Rights Interdisciplinary Seminar." Please include your Eagle ID and academic discipline in the application. The application deadline is Thursday, November 5, 2016. In the spring of 2017, the seminar's focus will be on the ethical, politico-legal, and psychosocial issues confronting those whose human rights are affected by torture, drones, sexual violence, forced movement, deportation and migration. The differential effects of rights violations due to power based on "gender," "race," ethnicity and economic resources will be critically examined. We will also explore refugee movement and migration and the contours of asylum and other forms of protection, especially in the context of humanitarian crisis, war, and grave forms of economic injustice.


Instructor(s): Brinton Lykes and Daniel Kanstroom

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: THEO7461 EDUC7461 LAWS7461

Comments:

APSY 7462 Assessment and Test Construction Fall 3
Course Description

This course addresses the major issues in educational assessment, with emphasis on the characteristics, administration, scoring, and interpretation of both formal and informal assessments, including but not limited to tests of achievement. All forms of assessment are examined including observation, portfolios, performance tasks, and paper-and-pencil tests, including standardized tests. Basic techniques of test construction, item writing, and analysis are included. Statewide testing programs are also examined.


Instructor(s): Joseph Pedulla

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 7465 Psychological Testing Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Introduces psychometric theory, selection, and use of standardized aptitude, ability, achievement, interest, and personality tests in the counseling process from a social justice perspective. Includes measurement concepts essential to test interpretation, and experience in evaluating strengths, weaknesses, and biases of various testing instruments. Students will gain laboratory experience in administration, scoring, and interpretation of psychological tests.


Instructor(s): Janet Helms and Julie MacEvoy

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 7468 Introductory Statistics Fall 3
Course Description

An introduction to descriptive statistics. Topics include methods of data summarization and presentation; measures of central tendency and variability, correlation and linear regression; the normal distribution; probability; and an introduction to hypothesis testing. Provides computer instruction on PC and Mac platforms and in the SPSS statistical package.


Instructor(s): Laura O'Dwyer and Zhushan Mandy Li

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 7469 Intermediate Statistics Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Topics and computer exercises address tests of means and proportions, partial and part correlations, chi-square goodness-of-fit and contingency table analysis, multiple regression, analysis of variance with planned and post hoc comparisons, elements of experimental design, and power analysis.


Instructor(s): Joseph Pedulla

Prerequisites: ERME/APSY 7468 or its equivalent, and computing skills

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course normally follows APSY7468 or its equivalent.

APSY 7470 Advanced Practicum: Human Development Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Students meet once a week to discuss their required field work (8-10 hours per week) and to relate their field work to psychological theories, research, and applications. Readings and discussion contribute to critical analyses of how social issues and social problems are situated differently due to gender, race, social class, and diversities of language, ability, sexuality, etc. Participants will explore strategies for translating this knowledge and experience into resources that enable them to identify future career options.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 7471 Psychological Responses to Humanitarian Crises Fall 3
Course Description

This course develops a critical framework for understanding the psychological and social effects of selected natural and unnatural disasters and current responses to them. Course goals include: the development of a critical understanding of gendered oppression in contexts of war and humanitarian crises; an analysis of selected psychosocial interventions in the context of development and humanitarian aid; a critical analysis of international human rights as potential resources; and, the formulation of programmatic responses for mental health and human rights workers seeking to creatively respond to women and child survivors in collaboration with community-based indigenous workers and advocates.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Brinton Lykes

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: UNAS4471

Comments:

APSY 7511 Alt Strat Children/Org Vio Summer 3
Course Description

This course will cover theoretical and practical knowledge of educational, psychosocial and therapeutic strategies for culturally appropriate mental health work with child survivors of organized violence, oppression and human rights violations with recognition of the social structural context within which the children suffered and the families and communities to which they are returning. A child-right based approach of the methodologies will be applicable into both psycho-social programs and educational contexts in the United States and international settings. Also discussed is efficacy of the alternative strategies and how this can best be measured with quantitative and qualitative techniques.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Maryanne Loughry, Visiting Scholar and CHRIJ

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 7515 Interprofessional Collaboration: School/Community Services Spring 3
Course Description

This course addresses a multidisciplinary approach to problem solving in education, human services, and health care. It examines, from a holistic/ecological perspective, the health, educational, psychological, and social issues that impact children and families, particularly those living in poverty. The course will emphasize collaboration amongst mental health care professionals, health care providers, and educators in addressing child and family issues. Students in education, psychology, social work, and nursing will share knowledge and strategies as together they address the complex issues confronting children and families.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 7518 Issues in Life Span Development Fall 3
Course Description

This course addresses the major psychological and socio-cultural issues in development from childhood through adulthood. The theory, research, and practice in the field of life span development are examined and evaluated.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 7528 Multicultural Issues Fall/Summer 3
Course Description

Assists students to become more effective in their work with ethnic minority and LGBT clients. Increases students' awareness of their own and others' life experiences, and how these impact the way in which we approach interactions with individuals who are different from us. Examines the sociopolitical conditions that impact individuals from ethnic and non-ethnic minority groups in the U.S., and presents an overview of relevant research.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 7529 Psychology of Drug and Alcohol Abuse Summer 3
Course Description

Designed for the student who is interested in the study of both the theoretical and applied aspects of alcohol and substance abuse. The course will focus on the psychological, physiological, sociological, and economic aspects of addiction in society.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 7535 Exploring Spirituality in Psychological Practice Summer 3
Course Description

The proposed course is designed for applied psychology and counseling students interested in better understanding and responding to clients and community members whose symbolic worlds include a religious or spiritual framework. In order to develop tools with which to engage such frameworks with sympathetic yet critical understanding, it will integrate perspectives on spirituality with approaches to psychological treatment and interventions. These approaches include: attachment theory, cognitive behavioral therapy, constructivist work on meaning making with regard to personal narrative, and various perspectives on psychological trauma and addiction. The psychosocial function of religious texts, especially the Jewish/Christian scriptures, will be a focus.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 7540 Issues in School Counseling Fall 3
Course Description

This course traces the development of school counseling as a profession, and helps students understand the major functions of school counselors. Students gain an understanding of schools as dynamic organizations and learn to recognize and appreciate the intersection of family, school, culture, and community. Professional issues related to the practice of school counseling are examined, and recent innovations in the field are reviewed.


Instructor(s): Mary Walsh

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Restricted to students in the School Counseling program

APSY 7543 Psychopathology Fall 3
Course Description

Examines selected DSM-IV disorders and considers diagnostic issues, theoretical perspectives, and research. Through case examples, students will learn to conduct a mental status examination and determine appropriate treatment plans for clients suffering from various diagnoses.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: APSY7444 or equivalent

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 7549 Psychology of Trauma: Cross-Cultural & Social Justice Fall 3
Course Description

The focus of this course is on the biopsychosocial aspects of traumatic stress. The course involves an exploration of psychological sequelae of various types of interpersonal violence, such as physical abuse, sexual assault, and political trauma across diverse populations. Assessment and clinical and community-based interventions concerning traumatic stress will be discussed with attention to cultural and linguistic diversity. The course includes a special emphasis on the examination of social justice and human rights in the context of interpersonal and collective violence.


Instructor(s): Usha Tummula-Narra

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 7560 Seminar on Issues in Testing and Assessment Fall 3
Course Description

Provides a technical introduction to the design, analysis and reporting of various types of tests, including school-based formative and summative tests, high-stakes external assessments and large-scale survey assessments. Examines interpretation and validation issues related to test use, especially for school accountability and the formulation of education policy.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Henry Braun

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Recommended: ERME7462 and ERME7469

APSY 7561 Evaluation and Public Policy Fall 3
Course Description

The course will examine some issues that arise in educational accountability. The purpose is to develop a deeper understanding of the policy issues and a critical appreciation of the relevant methodological strategies. One topic is the establishment and use of state-specific performance standards under NCLB and the quantification of the relative rigor of those standards. A second is the evaluation of school or teacher effectiveness using so-called value-added models. A third is the policy evaluation of school reform efforts (such as charter schools) using data from large-scale cross-sectional surveys. The latter two topics both involve causal inferences from observational studies.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Henry Braun

Prerequisites: ERME7466 or Permission of Instructor

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 7565 Large-Scale Assessment: Procedures and Practice Spring 3
Course Description

Examines measurement concepts and data collection procedures in the context of large-scale assessment. Considers technical, operational, and political issues in view of measurement concepts, including reliability, validity, measurement error, and sampling error. Covers framework development, instrument development, sampling, data collection, analysis, and reporting, in relation to both standardized educational achievement tests and questionnaires.


Instructor(s): Ina Mullis

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Recommended: ERME7462 and ERME7468

APSY 7605 Ethical and Legal Issues in Counseling Summer 3
Course Description

Topics include professional codes and ethical principles; laws governing mental health professions; confidentiality, privacy and record keeping; client rights and malpractice; issues in supervision; dual role relationships; psychological assessment; and, issues specific to minorities, children and specialized treatment modalities and techniques. Emphasis is on the preparation of mental health counselors and other mental health professionals.


Instructor(s): David Blustein

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 7611 Fundamentals of Early Childhood Education Fall 3
Course Description

Focuses on learning (including behavioral, cognitive, and information processing approaches), motivation, and social development, while incorporating the role of play in the learning and development of the young child. Examines individual differences and the effects of special needs on learning and development, as well as program implications.


Instructor(s): Mariela Paez

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 7617 Learning and Cognition Spring 3
Course Description

Discusses theories of learning and cognitive development, explores roles of biology and environment, and examines different interpretations of environment. Discusses whether learning and cognitive development are similar or different processes. Also examines the nature of intelligence, role of instruction in learning, nature of instruction, and how transfer of learning to new contexts is achieved. Practical applications of theory and research are discussed.


Instructor(s): Elida Laski

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 7633 Impact of Psychosocial Issues on Learning Spring 3
Course Description

Examines, from a holistic perspective, psychological and social issues that affect learning in children and adolescents. Discusses the role of risk and protective factors in the development of vulnerability and resilience. Highlights collaboration of educators with professionals involved in addressing psychological and social issues.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: M.A. students only; not appropriate for Ph.D. students

APSY 7638 Issues in Short Term Counseling Spring 3
Course Description

This course is designed to introduce students to the techniques and issues related to the practice of short-term therapy. Special attention is given to current trends in health care delivery, including the managed care environment and how to adapt various models to this environment. Students will learn a number of coherent strategies to treat a variety of presentations and populations in a short-term model. They will also gain an understanding of the complexities of providing quality mental health care in today's clinical settings.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 7640 Seminar in Group Counseling and Group Theory Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines both the theory and practice of group counseling. Among the theoretical positions discussed are client centered, behavioral, existential, and rational emotive. Important aspects of group process are also discussed including group leadership, group membership, establishing a group, and maintaining a group. As such the course covers therapist issues, patient selection criteria, group structuring as well as basic therapeutic techniques. The course prepares students to design structured counseling groups, to prepare group counseling materials, and to lead counseling groups of various types.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Sections .01 and .02 will focus across the lifespan with an emphasis on working with adults. Section .04 will focus on working with children and youth.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Limited to 25 students.

APSY 7642 Introduction to Play Therapy Summer 3
Course Description

Examination of various theoretical approaches to play therapy as a treatment modality for school age and preschool children. Discusses techniques, methods, and processes of play therapy, as well as strengths and limitations of this treatment approach.


Instructor(s): Guerda Nicolas

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 7645 Advanced Psychological Assessment Fall 3
Course Description

Provides an introduction to a variety of assessment tools commonly used to diagnose psychological disorders and inform treatment planning for children, adolescents, and adults. Assessment tools covered in this course include projective and personality tests, intelligence tests, tests of achievement, neuropsychological tests, and symptom checklists. Focus will be upon the theory, administration, scoring, and interpretation of these tools. Critical issues in the use of these measures, including ethical, psychometric, social, and legal concerns will be addressed. Students will complete and present integrated test batteries.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Julie MacEvoy

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Restricted to Ph.D. students in Counseling Psychology. Others by instructors permission. This is a year-long course, 1 cr in the Fall, 2 cr in the Spring.

APSY 7648 Pre-practicum: Diversity and School Culture Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

A two-semester experience in schools. In semester one, students spend one-half day per week in a school with a diverse population. In semester two, students spend one day per week (minimum of 75 hours) in another school working under the supervision of a school counselor. The pre-practicum experience is processed each week in small group laboratory sections.


Instructor(s): Sandra Morse

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Open only to School Counseling students

APSY 7660 Practice and Supervision Seminar I Fall 3
Course Description

This course is designed to be a post-practicum, curricular supervised experience, and supervised internship experience and seminar. The internship consists of seminar participation and a 600-hour, year-long clinical experience at an approved internship site. The internship and corresponding seminar are designed to enable the student to refine and enhance basic counseling skills, and to integrate professional knowledge and skills appropriate to an initial placement.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Permission of Internship Coordinator, Dr. Sandra Morse

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 7661 Practice and Supervision Seminar II Spring 3
Course Description

This course is designed to build on Internship I and corresponds to the completion of 600 clock hours the student spends in the internship. The seminar is process-oriented and thus students remain in the same year-long section. As such, it is designed to enable the student to further enhance basic and advanced counseling skills, and to integrate professional knowledge and skills through direct service with individual and group supervision.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: APSY7660 and Permission of the Internship Coordinator

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 7665 Developmental Disabilities: Evaluation, Assessment, Families and Systems Fall 3
Course Description

This course focuses on issues facing professionals who work with people with developmental disabilities, their families, and the system whereby services are offered. It is designed for graduate and post-graduate students interested in learning about interdisciplinary evaluation and teams, in understanding disabilities from the person's and family's perspective, and in acquiring knowledge about the services available in the community. This course will be held at Children's Hospital.


Instructor(s): David Helm

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 7666 Developmental Disabilities: Values, Policy, & Change Spring 3
Course Description

This course focuses on issues facing professionals who work with people with developmental disabilities, their families, and the system whereby services are offered. It is designed for graduate and post-graduate students interested in learning about interdisciplinary evaluation and teams, in understanding disabilities from the person's and family's perspective, and in acquiring knowledge about the services available in the community. This course will be held at Children's Hospital.


Instructor(s): David Helm

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 7740 Topics in the Psychology of Women Spring 3
Course Description

Explores current theory and research on the psychology of women and implications of this work for psychologists and educators. The first half of course examines and critiques major themes that have emerged in the field over the last three decades and considers ways in which the field of psychology of women has influenced conceptualizations of development, psychopathology, and intervention. The second half considers some of the psychological underpinnings of a set of social and political issues commonly faced by women. The course is designed for developmental and counseling psychology graduate students.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 7743 Counseling Families Spring 3
Course Description

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an introduction to family and couple counseling theory, and perspectives of family therapy along with issues of diversity. This course will focus on theory and practice, viewing the couple/family as a unitary psychosocial system. Major topics will include history, theory, and practice models, healthy family functioning, family dysfunction, and intervention techniques. This course will also address issues relative to diversity in families and couples along with perspectives of family therapy.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: School Counseling students should take section .01 and Mental Health students should take section .03.

APSY 7748 Foundations of Counseling II Spring 3
Course Description

Pre-internship, supervised curricular experience focuses on progressive issues and the treatment of special populations. Lab training consists of peer role-plays and experiences with individual and group supervision.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Continuation of APSY7648; Open only to Counseling Psychology students.

APSY 7940 Practicum in School Counseling Pre-K-8 Fall 3
Course Description

Practicum involves placement in a comprehensive school system in both fall and spring semesters. Students typically spend three days per week at the school for the school year. The minimum hours of practicum are 600 in addition to the pre-practicum. Students enroll for 3-credit hours each semester.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Permission of Practicum Director, Dr. Sandra Morse

Cross listed with:

Comments: Open only to Counseling degree students seeking initial licensure in school guidance counseling grades pre-K-8.

APSY 7941 Practicum in School Counseling Pre-K-8 Spring 3
Course Description

Continuation of APSY7940.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Consent of Practicum Director, Dr. Sandra Morse

Cross listed with:

Comments: Open only to Counseling degree students seeking initial licensure in school guidance counseling grades pre-K-8

APSY 7950 Practicum in School Counseling 5-12 Fall 3
Course Description

Practicum involves placement in a comprehensive school system in both fall and spring semesters. Students typically spend three days a week at the school for the school year. The minimum hours of practicum are 600 in addition to the pre-practicum. Students enroll for 3-credit hours each semester.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Permission of Practicum Director, Dr. Sandra Morse

Cross listed with:

Comments: Open only to Counseling degree students seeking initial licensure in school guidance counseling grades 5-12.

APSY 7951 Practicum in School Counseling 5-12 Spring 3
Course Description

Continuation of APSY7950


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Consent of Practicum Director, Dr. Sandra Morse

Cross listed with:

Comments: Open only to Counseling degree students seeking initial licensure in school guidance counseling grades 5-12

APSY 8100 Master's Comprehensives Fall/Spring/Summer 0
Course Description

All master's students who have completed their course work and are preparing for comprehensive exams must register for this course.


Instructor(s): Elizabeth Sparks

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 8101 Interim Study: Master's and C.A.E.S. Students Fall/Spring 0
Course Description

Master's and C.A.E.S. students who need to take one to two semesters off during the academic year but wish to remain active in the University system must enroll in this course. Students cannot enroll in this course for more than two consecutive semesters during the academic year (e.g., fall and spring). Students who need to be away from their studies for more than two consecutive semesters during the academic year should file for a formal leave of absence.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 8115 Cultural Processes, Social & Emotional Development Fall 3
Course Description

This course reviews the theoretical and empirical literatures pertinent to the study of emotional and social development across the life span. Perspectives derived from the disciplines of biology, psychology, anthropology, sociology, and history are presented. The interrelations between social and affective processes, and their association with familial, societal, cultural, and historical context of development are discussed. Issues derived from social psychology, such as group processes, will also be discussed. Methodological problems present in these literatures and resultant conceptual and empirical challenges involved in developing a life span understanding of social and affective processes are reviewed.


Instructor(s): Jacqueline Lerner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 8620 Educational and Social Issues and Social Policy Spring 3
Course Description

Examines a range of social issues relevant to children and families and the social policies directed at such issues. Discusses policy creation, implementation and evaluation, and considers the roles of advocacy, research and politics. Addresses how current social policies impact children and families and compares U.S. policies to those in other industrialized countries. Likely topics include poverty, economic redistribution, work/family balance, early childhood education, educational reform, and other issues. The seminar aims to help students think critically about the political and empirical issues involved in assessing social issues and developing and evaluating social policies.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Rebekah Levine Coley

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 8645 Advanced Psychological Assessment Fall 3
Course Description

Provides an introduction to a variety of assessment tools commonly used to diagnose psychological disorders and inform treatment planning for children, adolescents, and adults. Assessment tools covered in this course include projective and personality tests, intelligence tests, tests of achievement, neuropsychological tests, and symptom checklists. Focus will be upon the theory, administration, scoring, and interpretation of these tools. Critical issues in the use of these measures, including ethical, psychometric, social, and legal concerns will be addressed. Students will complete and present integrated test batteries.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Julie MacEvoy

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Restricted to Ph.D. students in Counseling Psychology. Others by instructors permission. This is a year-long course, 1 credit in the Fall, 2 credits in the Spring.

APSY 8664 Survey Methods in Educational and Social Research Fall 3
Course Description

Covers the design of surveys and assessments, including sampling theory, instrument development, and administering surveys, including training survey administrators, quality control, data coding, data reduction, statistical analysis and inference, report writing, and presentation of results. Also covers practical issues, such as using available sampling frames and minimizing non-response.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Laura O'Dwyer

Prerequisites: ERME/APSY 7469

Cross listed with:

Comments: Ph.D. students only; all others by instructor permission.

APSY 8667 General Linear Models Fall 3
Course Description

Addresses the construction, interpretation, and application of linear statistical models. Specifically, lectures and computer exercises will cover multiple regression models; matrix algebra operations; parameter estimation techniques; missing data; transformations; exploratory versus confirmatory models; sources of multicollinearity; residual analysis techniques; partial and semipartial correlations; variance partitioning; dummy, effect, and orthogonal coding; analysis of covariance; and logistic regression.


Instructor(s): Larry Ludlow

Prerequisites: ERME/APSY 7469

Cross listed with:

Comments: Ph.D. students only; all others by instructor permission.

APSY 8668 Multivariate Statistical Analysis Spring 3
Course Description

Provides lectures, examples, and student analyses that address multiple group discriminant analysis, classification procedures, principal components and common factor analysis, and multivariate analysis of variance.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: ERME/APSY 8667

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 8669 Psychometric Theory Spring 3
Course Description

Presents a study of theoretical concepts, statistical models, and practical applications in educational and psychological measurement. General topics include the history of measurement, Thurstone and Guttman scales, true-score theory, and item response theory. Specific topics include principles of Rsch measurement parameter estimation procedures, fit statistics, item banking, and computer adaptive testing.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Larry Ludlow

Prerequisites: ERME/APSY 7462 and ERME/APSY 8667

Cross listed with:

Comments: Ph.D. students only; all others by instructor permission.

APSY 8670 Psychometric Theory II Fall 3
Course Description

This course continues the examination and application of the principles of item response theory and educational measurement introduced in previous courses. The first section of the course will address the use of a variety of item response theory models for dichotomous and polytomous items. The second section of the course will focus on application of the principles of item response theory to a variety of practical situations and problems commonly encountered in educational testing. In the final section of the course, overarching theoretical and practical issues are addressed and future directions in item response theory are discussed.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Zhushan Mandy Li

Prerequisites: ERME/APSY 8669 Psychometric Theory I

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 8714 Advanced Research in Applied Developmental and Educational Psychology Fall 3
Course Description

Students design and carry out an original empirical project on a defined area within developmental or educational psychology. Requires design, data collection and analysis, interpretation, and formal APA-style write-up. Students also required to complete two colloquium presentations of their work.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Restricted to doctoral students in Applied Developmental and Educational Psychology and MA students in the research focus. Permission of instructor required.

APSY 8741 Advanced Seminar in Psychopathology Spring 3
Course Description

A developmental approach to understanding psychological disorders across the life span. The course will examine the emergence of a range of disorders in children, adolescents, and adults (e.g., depression, violent and abusive behavior). Particular attention will be paid to factors that increase risk and resilience. The implications for prevention and intervention strategies will be discussed.


Instructor(s): Mary Walsh

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 8745 Biological Bases of Behavior Summer 3
Course Description

This course reviews a variety of topics within the biological bases of bahavior, employing a neuroanatomical starting point. Students learn neuroanatomy in some detail; moreover, course explores basic mechanics of the nervous system, basic psychopharmacology, and sensation and perception. Also examines cognitive functions associated with different regions of the brain as well as neurodevelopmental, psychiatric, and neurological disorders. In addition, students will have opportunity to read some of the more contemporary writings in the field of neuroscience.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 8813 Sociocultural Contexts of Development Spring 3
Course Description

Doctoral seminar which seeks to explore both theoretical and empirical scholarship on the primary sociocultural contexts within which human development is embedded, including families, schools, communities, and cultural environments; to consider the bidirectional relationships between such contexts and individuals' development; and to improve competencies in critically evaluating the methodological and theoretical strengths and weaknesses of research in the field.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Rebekah Levine Coley, Eric Dearing and Jacqueline Lerner

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 8822 History of Psychology Fall 3
Course Description

This course surveys the philosophical roots and the development of psychological thought from the Grecian and medieval periods to the present. Topics include: doctrines of human nature in early Greek philosophy; emergence of science in the post-Renaissance period; contributions of Descartes, Locke, the British empiricists and associationists to mental philosophy; major developments in nineteenth-century physiology; Darwin's evolutionary theory and its implications for psychology; emergence of psychology as an independent discipline; the rise and demise of the major systematic schools in psychology--structuralism, functionalism, Gestalt, behaviorism and psychoanalysis and, an overview of recent theoretical developments and controversies in contemporary psychology.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Janet Helms

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Ph.D. students only; all others by instructor permission.

APSY 8851 Qualitative Research Methods Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Introduces the foundations and techniques of carrying out qualitative research. Topics include philosophical underpinnings, planning for a qualitative research project, negotiating entry, ethics of conducting research, data collection and analysis, and writing/presenting qualitative research. Requires a research project involving participant observation and/or interviewing.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 8861 Multilevel Regression Models Spring 3
Course Description

This course introduces students to multilevel regression modeling (aka hierarchical models or mixed effects models) for analyzing data with a nesting or hierarchical structure. We discuss the appropriate uses of multilevel regression modeling, the statistical models that underpin the approach, and how to construct models to address substantive issues. We consider a variety of types of models, including random intercept, and random slope and intercept models; models for longitudinal data; and models for discrete outcomes. We cover various issues related to the design of multilevel studies, model building and the interpretation of the output from HLM and SPSS software programs.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Laura O'Dwyer

Prerequisites: ERME/APSY 8667

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 8862 Design of Experiments Fall 3
Course Description

This course will introduce experimental design as a paradigm for thinking about the conduct of educational research and evaluation. The goals of this course are to introduce students to the design and statistical principles of the experimental approach to educational research with particular emphasis on the correct analysis of data arising from designed experiments. We will discuss a variety of experimental designs, their advantages and disadvantages, estimation of treatment effects, and significance testing. The topics covered will include the underlying logic of experimental and quasi-experimental designs, regression discontinuity and factorial designs as well as cluster randomized and multi-site trials.


Instructor(s): Laura O'Dwyer

Prerequisites: ERME/APSY 8667

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 8912 Participatory Action Research: Gender, Race, Power Fall 3
Course Description

This course introduces students to theoretical and practical issues in the design and implementation of field-based participatory action research, including a review of theories and practices that have contributed to community-based knowledge construction and social change. Ethnographic, narrative, and oral history methodologies are additional resources for understanding and representing the individual and collective stories co-constructed through the research process. Students participate in a series of community-based collaborative workshops and/or have ongoing collaborative work in a site. We reflect collaboratively and contextually on multiple and complex constructions of gender, race, and social class in community-based research.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: EDUC8912

Comments:

APSY 8915 Critical Perspectives on the Psychology of Race, Class, and Gender Spring 3
Course Description

Using social and critical psychological frameworks, introduces multiple strategies for thinking culturally about select psychological constructs and processes (for example, the self, family and community relations, and socio-political oppression). Also pays particular attention to race and class as sociocultural constructs important for the critical analysis of the relationships of culture and psychology. Explores the implications of these constructs for intercultural collaboration, advocacty, and action.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Janet Helms and M. Brinton Lykes

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 8917 Cognitive-Affective Bases of Behavior Fall 3
Course Description

This course discusses theories of human development and examines empirical research on cognitive and affective processes underlying behavior. In addressing the cognitive bases of behavior, it explores key mental processes (e.g., attention, memory, problem solving) and constructs (e.g., schemas, heuristics) that have been instrumental in understanding everyday functioning. The socio-affective bases of behavior addressed in the course include emotions, temperament, and self-concept. The students in this course explore fundamental theoretical questions, such as the role of biology and environment in development, and consider practical applications of current theoretical and empirical knowledge concerning the bases of human behavior.


Instructor(s): Marina Vasilyeva

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Ph.D. students only. All others must get instructor approval.

APSY 8919 Advanced Topics in Cognition and Learning Spring 3
Course Description

This course will explore the basic processes underlying human cognition and the role of these processes in acquiring knowledge in key domains. Our main goal is to provide our students with a foundational framework in cognitive psychology that can be applied to better understand human behavior and learning. The first part of the course will focus on perception, attention, memory, categorization, and reasoning. The second part of the course will focus on learning in key domains of cognition, such as mathematics, science and language.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Elida Laski

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: For Ph.D. students in Applied Developmental Psychology, open to ADEP MA students and other doctoral students with instructor's permission.

APSY 9840 Seminar: Professional Issues in Counseling Psychology Fall 3
Course Description

This is an advanced seminar focusing primarily on ethical and legal issues in counseling psychology. Topics will also include certification and licensing, accreditation, professional identity, the history of counseling psychology, and future developments in professional psychology.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Permission of Director of Training

Cross listed with:

Comments: Open to doctoral students in Counseling Psychology only, and master's students in Counseling Psychology with permission

APSY 9841 Quantitative Research Design in Counseling & Developmental Psychology Fall/Spring 2
Course Description

In this year-long seminar, students examine quantitative research designs and application employed in the Counseling and Developmental Psychology literatures, including randomized, nonrandomized, cross-sectional, and longitudinal designs. Students present and critique published research exemplifying specific designs, propose empirical studies that could advance counseling and developmental psychology, and present findings from their own empirical work.


Instructor(s): Eric Dearing and Paul Poteat

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Doctoral students in Counseling and Developmental Psychology. Others by instructor's permission. This is a year-long course, 1 cr in the Fall, 2 cr in the Spring.

APSY 9842 Seminar in Counseling Theory Fall 3
Course Description

Deepens students' understanding of psychological theory, and facilitates a life-long journey of integrating theory with practice. Provides knowledge and understanding of traditional and contemporary theories of psychotherapy, and helps students develop a critical perspective that will enable them to evaluate the usefulness of these theories for their clinical work with clients. Class discussions cast a critical eye on the development of the discipline, including its philosophical and contextual roots, and analyze the values inherent in mainstream psychological practice. Considers strengths and limitations of each school, and uses case examples to gain expertise in applying theory to practice.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): A.J. Franklin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Doctoral students in Counseling Psychology only

APSY 9843 Seminar in Career Development Spring 3
Course Description

Advanced doctoral-level seminar on career development theory and research and on the psychology of working. First part of course consists of critical review of major approaches to understanding career behavior and development, empirical support for prevailing theoretical constructs, and empirical efforts related to career interventions. Special attention to issues specific to persons of color, women, gays, lesbians, individuals with disabling conditions, working-class adults, and non-college-bound youth. Examines space between work and interpersonal relationships.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): David Blustein

Prerequisites: APSY7448 or equivalent

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 9844 Counseling Psychology in Context: Social Action, Consultation, and Collaboration Fall/Spring 2
Course Description

Accompanying the First Year Experience (FYE) practicum, exposes students to research and practice at the meso- (community, organizations) and macro (government, policy, social norms) levels, in addition to the more traditional micro (individual) level. Students discuss their personal experiences within their FYE placement and read and discuss a series of articles and chapters central to the developing fields of critical psychology, liberation psychology, or counseling with a social justice orientation.


Instructor(s): Lisa Goodman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: For doctoral students in Counseling Psychology, and others by permission only. This is a year-long course, 1 cr in the Fall, 2 cr in the Spring.

APSY 9846 Advanced Pre-Internship Counseling Practicum Fall/Spring 2
Course Description

Pre-internship placement in a mental health setting accompanied by a biweekly seminar on campus. Placement requires 20-24 hours per week over two semesters. Focus will be on the integration of theoretical and research perspectives on clinical interventions utilizing the experience of site-based practice. Satisfactory completion of this course is a prerequisite for the doctoral internship.


Instructor(s): Belle Liang and Elizabeth Sparks

Prerequisites: Advanced Pre-Internship Counseling Practicum. Master's-level counseling practicum.

Cross listed with:

Comments: This is a year-long course, 1 cr in the Fall, 2 cr in the Spring.

APSY 9849 Doctoral Internship in Counseling Psychology Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

Internships cover a calendar year, and students must complete the equivalent of one full year (40 hours/week) or two semesters (two credit hours per semester). Applications should be submitted in November of the preceding year. Placement must be in an approved counseling setting for psychodiagnostic and interviewing experience with clients, group counseling, and other staff activities.


Instructor(s): David Blustein

Prerequisites: Permission of Director of Training; minimum of 400 clock hours of counseling practicum (e.g., APSY 7660, 7661, 9846)

Cross listed with:

Comments: Doctoral candidates in Counseling Psychology only. By arrangement only.

APSY 9864 Advanced Qualitative Research Fall 3
Course Description

Building upon the foundation concepts of qualitative research and initial exploration of an introductory course in qualitative methodologies, this course explores the theoretical, methodological, and analytic implications of conducting qualitative research from differing theoretical perspectives. Key readings include texts on social theory, qualitative methodologies, and exemplar qualitative research from various social scientific fields. Students will distinguish between methodology and methods, analyze data, and produce either a report for a specified audience or a research manuscript for possible submission to an educational research journal.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 9901 Doctoral Comprehensives Fall/Spring 1
Course Description

All doctoral students who have completed their course work, are not registering for any other course, and are preparing for comprehensive exams must register for this course to remain active and in good standing.


Instructor(s): Elizabeth Sparks

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 9911 Doctoral Continuation Fall/Spring/Summer 0
Course Description

All students who have been admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree are required to register and pay the fee for doctoral continuation during each semester of their candidacy. Students are expected to work on their dissertation at least 20 hours per week.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

APSY 9920 Seminar on Current Issues in Counseling, Applied Developmental and Educational Psychology Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Introduces students to a variety of current research topics, professional development issues, teaching preparation, and application in the fields of Applied Developmental and Educational Psychology. Includes colloquia by invited speakers and by students.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Open only to doctoral students in Applied Developmental and Educational Psychology.

APSY 9941 Dissertation Seminar in Counseling/Developmental Psychology Fall/Spring 2
Course Description

This course is designed to assist students in the preparation of a formal doctoral dissertation intent. All aspects of dissertation development will be discussed. Students must present a series of draft proposals for faculty and student reaction. An acceptable dissertation intent is required for completion of the course.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: Advanced Statistics and Research Design. Permission of instructor required.

Cross listed with:

Comments: This is a year-long course, 1 cr in the Fall, 2 cr in the Spring.

APSY 9988 Dissertation Direction Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

All advanced doctoral students are required to register for six credit hours of dissertation related course work, at least three of which are ELHE/APSY9988. The other three are typically the Dissertation Seminar for the student's area of concentration. Students are expected to work on their dissertation at least 20 hours per week.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: