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Theology (Woods College) Courses (ADTH) Woods College of Advancing Studies


Subject Area Course # Course Title Semester Credit Hours Expand
ADTH 1001 Biblical Heritage I: Old Testament Spring 4
Course Description

An introduction to the literature, religious ideas and historical setting of the Hebrew Bible. The focus is on major biblical concepts such as creation, election and covenant in the pentateuch, historical and prophetic books.


Instructor(s): John Darr

Prerequisites: None

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ADTH 1002 Biblical Heritage II: New Testament Spring 4
Course Description

An introduction to the literature, religious ideas, and historical settings of the New Testament. Focus is on major biblical concepts such as Christology, ecclesiology, grace, election, and ethics in the Gospels, the Pauline epistles, the Acts of the Apostles, and other canonical books.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADTH 1016 Introduction to Christian Theology I: Christian Life and Spirituality Fall 4
Course Description

This course considers significant questions in conversation with some of the most important writings in the tradition of Western Christian thought. Its purpose is to encourage students by drawing systematically on primary sources of historical significance to uncover the roots of the Christian faith and life and to delineate the values for which this tradition of faith stands.


Instructor(s): James Weiss

Prerequisites: None

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ADTH 1017 Introduction to Christian Theology II:Shaping Cultural Traditions Spring 4
Course Description

What does it mean to be good? Is it possible to be both good and happy, both good and successful? Is morality subjective or are there clear ways to regulate it? How can we balance the individual and the community in our moral struggles? This course examines eight traditions of morality and ethics: existentialist, utilitarian, Catholic, Protestant, Christian feminist, Black theology, rights theories, and Aristotle. Students apply classic and modern thinkers to contemporary ethical problems emphasizing current events and movies. Interactive discussion is emphasized, so students discover the sources of values that formed their lives and develop a perspective for themselves and their futures.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): James Weiss

Prerequisites: None

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ADTH 1074 Christian Social Ethics Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


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Prerequisites: None

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ADTH 1083 Explorations in Social Ethics I Fall 4
Course Description

Every culture treasures and transmits stories that graphically convey its values. Some stories, like the Exodus story of liberation and new freedom, resonate across times and cultures. Others are more localized and sometimes at odds with dominant cultural stories. This course examines both kinds of stories in works of literature, film, journalism, social analysis and theology. Readings: Exodus, Jaroslav Pelikan’s Jesus Through the Centuries, Michael Walzer’s Exodus and Revolution. In the study of clashing stories, we conclude with the story of the universal family as articulated by Pope Paul VI’s On the Development of Peoples.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADTH 1149 Perspectives on Christian Life Fall 4
Course Description

Happiness is everyone's end. It is not a means to any other end; other things are desired as means to happiness. But what is happiness? How is it attained? Some people are happy, some are not; what makes the difference? A variety of answers are explored including Socrates, Aristotle, Aquinas, Dostoyevsky, Freud, Buddha and C.S. Lewis.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADTH 1287 Leadership:Passion&Meaning Spring 4
Course Description

A primary source for Americans to derive meaning and purpose in their lives is work. Career and professional advancements alone do not seem to be sufficient in creating a life that captures the human spirit and makes a difference in the world. Leadership is the practical activity of those who would compose an adulthood that is responsible to a world larger than themselves, and at the same time personally fulfilling. This course will use fictional and non-fictional voices as well as psycho/social analysis, cultural critique, and theological/spiritual concepts to help envision a balanced life.


Instructor(s): Joseph Marchese

Prerequisites: None

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ADTH 1482 Hitler, The Churches, and the Holocaust Fall 4
Course Description

To better understand the climate and complexities that contributed to the Christian church's weakened responses to Hitler's policies, the course examines the development of Christian anti-Judaism, anti-Semitism and nationalism. It analyzes the resistance that emerged in response to totalitarianism and to the Holocaust, and considers the main Christian post-Holocaust efforts as they contribute to theological development and current thinking.


Instructor(s): Lorenz Reibling

Prerequisites: None

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ADTH 1489 Liberation Theology Spring 4
Course Description

This course will examine the Latin American liberation theology movement, its historical development, priniciple theological themes, and implications for North American Christianity.


Instructor(s): Roberto S. Goizueta

Prerequisites: None

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ADTH 1491 Ignatian Spirituality Fall 4
Course Description

Course explores the lives, motivations, and outcomes of individuals who for a myriad of reasons responded to the emerging Nazi catastrophe. Course defines resistance from religious, ethical, moral, political as well as military perspectives identifying the main protagonists, their moral or ethical dilemmas and final composite failure. What makes resistance permissible, legitimate or even mandatory? Do the gospels encourage resistance? Looks at religious organizations, political groups, and student movements during this tumultuous period in history. Analyzing confrontation, adaptation and alternative strategies enriches class insight. Guest speakers.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADTH 1575 Family,Career, & the Christian Life Fall 4
Course Description

The challenges and opportunities of relating family life and faith create this course. Understanding the influences and dynamics from childhood to adulthood that shape a person’s choice of partner, career and religious convictions provide the basis for looking at the self in relationship to another. Course examines the nature of interaction, different ways of timing career, marital and parenting decisions, dual versus single career marriages, careers and alternative lifestyles, gender differences in work-family stress, and ethical and religious dimensions of the family-career relationship.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADTH 2246 After Death and Dying Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


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Prerequisites: None

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ADTH 3000 Catholic Crisis Points I: Twelve Events that Transformed the Church Fall 4
Course Description

This course is the first in a two-course sequence, which offers a comprehensive introduction to the conciliar tradition of the Roman Catholic Church. This first course covers the period beginning with the first-century Council of Jerusalem and ending with the sixteenth-century Council of Trent, offering an historically-schematized overview of the ecumenical and Catholic councils of the period in question. This course attends to the evolution of councils as a means for church governance, decision-making, and conflict resolution. It also attends to the central doctrinal developments which the councils generated, including such doctrines as the Trinity, Christology, Eucharist, Church, papacy, sin-grace. Finally, the course situates these conciliar traditions within their wider historical, political, and cultural contexts. In this way, the course provides a comprehensive introduction to the history of the Catholic church and its central theological tenets.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Boyd Coolman

Prerequisites: None

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ADTH 3002 Catholic Crisis Points II: Twelve Events that Transformed the Church Spring 4
Course Description

This course is the second in a two-course sequence, which offers a comprehensive introduction to the conciliar traditions of the Roman Catholic Church. This second course covers the period beginning with the Council of Trent and ending with the Second Vatican Council, with an extended exploration of Vatican II’s interpretation and reception, offering an historically-schematized overview of the councils of this period. This course attends to the evolution of the place of councils within the modern Catholic Church and it situates these conciliar traditions within their wider historical, political, and cultural contexts. In this way, the course completes a comprehensive introduction to the history of the Catholic Church and its central theological tenets.


Instructor(s): Boyd Coolman

Prerequisites: None

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ADTH 4417 Miracles,Angels,Ghosts, & Demons Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ADPL2220

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ADTH 5541 Understanding Church Through the Ages Spring 4
Course Description

This course considers key moments in ecclesiology, the Christian community's self-understanding. Beginning with its Jewish Christian roots and the broader Hellenistic world, and continuing through the patristic, medieval, reformation, and enlightenment periods, into the nineteenth and early twentieth century movements which contributed to the First and Second Vatican Councils. Lectures will review the church's history as illustrated by relevant documents of each era. There will be weekly reports, discussion and a short paper.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Francis P. Kilcoyne

Prerequisites: None

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