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Sociology (Woods College) Courses (ADSO) Woods College of Advancing Studies


Subject Area Course # Course Title Semester Credit Hours Expand
ADSO 1001 Introductory Sociology Fall/Spring 4
Course Description

This course introduces students to historic and current topics in sociology. Sociology is the study of the development, structure, function, collective behavior and collective problems of human society. The course introduces essential concepts, theories and methods of the discipline. Special topics include group interaction in everyday life, altruism and morality in social contexts, evolving conceptions of the family and other social groups, societal facets of economics, and how group conduct is shaped by conceptions of gender, race, ethnicity and class.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADSO 1092 Peace or War Spring 4
Course Description

We analyze issues of war and peace before and after the Cold War, focusing on U.S. wars, largely in the Third World. In the first part of the course, we explore core theories of the roots of war. In the second part, we focus on the Cold War era, examining Vietnam, El Salvador, and other U.S. conflicts. In the third part, we focus on more recent wars: Iraq, Syria, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the "war on terrorism" as well as conflicts such as Rwanda and Sudan. The fourth section explores the United Nations, social activism among students, and other routes to peace.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Charles Derber

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADSO 1121 Professional Criminals Fall 4
Course Description

Wall Street executives, corporate and government officials, high tech computer wizards give a new focus to white collar crime. Course identifies the various frauds and swindles utilized by professional criminals as well as the rackets and methods of operation conducted by organized crime. Critical readings of Sutherland, Cressey, Ianni and others are contrasted with the more recent perspectives which focus on illegal developments and corporate violations such as corporate dumping and insider trading.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADSO 1122 Crime and Corrections in America Fall 4
Course Description

Course explores basic concepts in criminology; how criminal laws are made and enforced by police, courts, prisons, probation, parole and public agencies. Examines criminal behavior systems, theories of crime and delinquency causations, gangs, victimization, perceived notion of dual systems of justice, the impact of technology, alternative correction programs, inequalities in the systems as well as mass media coverage and policy questions.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADSO 1130 Deviant Behavior and Social Control Fall 4
Course Description

A look at patterns of deviant behavior such as crime, drug abuse, unconventional sexual behavior, suicide and mental illness. Course examines how people define and respond to deviant behavior, issues of punishment and victim compensation; theories of social control and power; implications for social policy and change.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADSO 1151 Class, Power and Social Change Fall/Spring/Summer 4
Course Description

Examines the dynamic changes now crafting new definitions of the “elite” social class, the disappearing middle class, and the increasing visible, disenfranchised “other” class. Changing social systems and power shifts are analyzed in such cities as Boston, Dallas, Chicago, New York and Miami. Explores the cultural, medical, commercial and financial worlds as well as reactions to the power system with respect to ethics, race and gender, and economic opportunities.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADSO 1190 New Social Order Fall 4
Course Description

As a new social order emerges from the changing national and global landscape, new questions surface. Who will participate in society fully, marginally, not at all? How will the social structure accommodate a fluid economy, the impact of technology, an unstable world order, an ethnically diverse and unevenly prepared work force? How do gender issues in the labor force, in families, in the military influence participation and success? What is the relationship of military spending and domestic policy? Who determines access to education and health care? Examines the social interaction and organizational issues and poses a likely order.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADSO 1200 Statistics Fall/Spring/Summer 4
Course Description

Introduction to inferential statistics covering description of sample data, probability, binomial and normal distribution, random sampling, estimation, and hypothesis-testing,


Instructor(s): Professor Chambers

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ADMT1353 ADPS1188

Comments:

ADSO 1212 Methods Social Research Fall 4
Course Description

This introductory course in research methodology examines issues underlying research from a theoretical and practical point of view. It explores the basic concepts and problems encountered in designing and conducting research and develops the practice of critically thinking about resources located in the research process. Focus is on the tenets of sound research practice to enable students to make reasonable judgments about research read and undertaken.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADSO 1357 Social Change in Action Fall/Spring 4
Course Description

What can ordinary people do to bring about social change? In this course you'll learn about the history and theory of community organizing and campaign strategy, through readings, interactive exercises and discussion. You will also gain practical skills in participatory decision-making, strategizing, publicity, alliance-building and more, through trainings and a hands-on collective action project. The class will choose a current injustice as an issue, set a goal, design a campaign strategy, then carry out the first steps of that campaign.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Betsy Leondar-Wright

Prerequisites: Either one class in social problems, social change or social movements, or prior activist experience

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADSO 1365 Law and Society Fall 4
Course Description

Radical changes in the basic social fabric that dictate how people live, interact, communicate and work with one another create new demands for a legal system obligated to interpret and establish law. Examines emerging challenges to freedom of expression, public and private communication: cyberspace, bullying, the disparity of access to resources, family protection, national security and individual rights, and different ways of representing justice. It also explores how the balance of emotion and reason in our idea of justice “shifts” over time, corporate responsibility/irresponsibility, new definition of guilt and innocence, what is just/unjust social behavior, can citizens depend on the legal system, what holds society together.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADSO 1382 Cities: A World of Change Fall 4
Course Description

What makes a city world class? What contributes to its growth, endurance, or decline? Course looks at the changes and challenges faced by urban societies, home to more than half the world's population. Drawing from examples of American and world cities (New York, San Francisco, London, Rome, Dublin, Moscow, Mumbai, Baghdad) course examines urban theories and topics; social and cultural life, political and economic realities, new faces and tensions, power, development and technology.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADSO 2500 Sociology of the Family Fall 4
Course Description

Transformations in US families have proceeded steadilly for more than two centuries as economic, social, cultural, and political forces shape the contours of dailly family life. Simultaneously families influence the broader cultural worlds of which they are a part. In time of accelerating social change, how then, is contemporary family life to be understood? In this course, students investigate the changes in character of American families and the evolution of a broad range of family constellations. The course charts a sociological inquiry that considers how family experiences of men and women vary by social class, race, ethnicity and sexuality. In this interactive course, students explore present theoretical debates and contemporary research regarding the everyday lives of families and the larger social policy issues that surround it.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Rebekah Zincavage

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADSO 2501 Sociological Theories Spring 4
Course Description

Sociological theory explores many complex questions that people have pondered for centuries, including the nature of human interdependence and how it evolves, inequality and why it is tolerated, social change and how it occurs, and social order and how it is maintained. This course introduces students to the major thinkers, classic texts, and relevant theoretical questions that have been and continue to be central perspectives within sociology. Through examining both classic and contemporary schools of sociological thought, we explore the basis for many of the core questions, debates, and methodological approaches within the discipline of sociology. Attention is paid to social and intellectual contexts, conceptual frameworks and methods, and contributions to contemporary social analysis. Throughout this course, we will also consider the application of theory and how these emergent ideas are relevant for contemporary society and current sociological research.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Rebekah Zincavage

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADSO 2850 Peace or War Spring 4
Course Description

We analyze issues of war and peace before and after the Cold War, focusing on U.S. wars, largely in the Third World. In the first part of the course, we explore core theories of the roots of war. In the second part, we focus on the Cold War era, examining Vietnam, El Salvador, and other U.S. conflicts. In the third part, we focus on more recent wars: Iraq, Syria, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the "war on terrorism" as well as conflicts such as Rwanda and Sudan. The fourth section explores the United Nations, social activism among students, and other routes to peace.


Instructor(s): Charles Derber

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADSO 3558 Qualitative Methods Spring 4
Course Description

Students will be introduced to the techniques of carrying out qualitative research. We will compare and contrast the major analytical approaches to different qualitative research designs. Students will carry out a qualitative research project, data collection (e.g., conduct intensive interviews, participant observation) and analysis, and writing/presenting qualitative research.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: