Skip to main content

Philosophy (Woods College) Courses (ADPL) Woods College of Advancing Studies


Subject Area Course # Course Title Semester Credit Hours Expand
ADPL 1005 Introduction to Basic Problems of Philosophy Fall 4
Course Description

This course introduces students to the problems and procedures of the Western philosophical tradition. Examines selected works of such key thinkers as Plato, Aristotle, St. Augustine, Descartes, Locke and Rousseau.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPL 1083 Explorations in Social Ethics I Fall 4
Course Description

Every culture treasures and transmits stories that graphically convey its values. Some stories, like the Exodus story of liberation and new freedom, resonate across time and cultures. Others are more localized and sometimes at odds with dominant cultural stories. This course examines both kinds of stories in works of literature, film, journalism, social analysis and theology. Readings include a study of Exodus, Jaroslav Pelikan’s Jesus Through the Centuries, Arundhati Roy’s Power Politics and Michael Walzer’s Exodus and Revolution. In the study of clashing stories, we conclude with the story of the universal family as articulated by Pope Paul VI’s On the Development of Peoples.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPL 1087 Perspectives:Shaping Ethical Traditions Fall 4
Course Description

What does it mean to be good? Is it possible to be both good and happy, both good an successful? Is morality subjective or are there clear ways to regulate it? How can we balance the individual and the community in our moral struggles? This course examines eight traditions of morality and ethics: existentialist, utilitarian, Catholic, Protestant, Christian feminist, Black theology, rights theories, and Aristotle. Students apply classic and modern thinkers to contemporary ethical problems with emphasis on current events and movies. Class meetings emphasize interactive discussion. Students discover the sources of values that formed their lives and develop a perspective for themselves and their futures.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPL 1252 Practical Logic Fall 4
Course Description

Basic principles and practice of classical Aristotelian (common-sense, ordinary-language, not mathematical) logic. One of the most practical courses any learner can take; on the very structure of rational thought itself and how to put this order and clarity into individual thinking.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPL 1275 Philosophy in Literature Spring 4
Course Description

Exploration of such philosophical themes as self-identity, happiness, death, morality, love, truth, fate, God, friendship, violence, hope, and community in two great epics of very diverse form yet surprisingly similar content: Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings (recently voted the greatest book of the twentieth century by two worldwide polls) and Dostoyevsky's The Brothers Karamazov (recently selected the greatest novel written by a Time magazine poll of living writers).


Schedule: TR

Instructor(s): Peter J. Kreeft

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPL 1287 Three Philosophies of Life Fall 4
Course Description

Life’s complex and daunting realities bring us face to face today with issues that divide us more passionately than any other, religious issues. What does philosophy, a combination of human wisdom and logical agreement, say about God and evil, God and human suffering? Are faith and reason allies, enemies or neutrals? What about religion and morality, religion and sexuality, religion and politics, life after death, free will? Short readings and class discussions explore the questions that challenge and perplex us.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPL 1309 Marriage and the Family Spring 4
Course Description

This course explores the significance of the most fundamental and intimate relationships, marriage and family. Through analysis of film, popular literature, social science research, philosophical sources, and theological texts, the course will survey the philosophies of personhood and relationality that function as the foundations for how we understand the historical and modern institutions of marriage. The course will consider how contemporary political, economic, ideological, and technological pressures have altered the condition of the family system and intimate relationships in the context of 21st century American life.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: This course is a hybrid course, which combines some in-person and some online class meetings.

ADPL 1311 Philosophy and Fantasy Fall 4
Course Description

Is time travel possible? Will the future be better or worse than the past? Are there extraterrestrials? Does technology make us more or less human? Can you leave your body and enter another’s? Is there a more real world beneath the apparent one? Can we experience Heaven or Hell in this life? What morality would apply to a radically different culture? A look at such philosophical questions through the fiction of C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, Charles Williams, Ray Bradbury, Aldous Huxley, George Orwell, and George MacDonald.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPL 1454 Law and Morality Fall 4
Course Description

What is the relationship between man-made law created by the courts and the legislature and religious values? Is there a religious and moral foundation to our civil law? What do we do when confronted by a “wrong” law such as segregation? This course, taught by a sitting family court judge, compares the classic moral thinking of such authors as Plato, Aquinas, Mill and Locke to actual Constitutional decisions on such issues as the war on terror, capital punishment, gay marriage, sexual privacy, immigration, freedom of religion, abortion and the right to refuse medical treatment.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPL 1483 Philosophy of Human Sexuality Fall 4
Course Description

This topic generates more talk and less light than almost any other subject. Course considers what is sexuality? Why is it so mysterious? How important is it to self-identity, self-knowledge and relationships? How can we think clearly and fairly about current controversies such as surrogate parenting, AIDS, contraception, gender identity and roles, relation between sex and family, marriage, religion and society? Philosophers, novelists, scientists, theologians, psychologists and even mystics shed light on this issue.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPL 1498 Philosophy of Cinema Spring 4
Course Description

Just as some of the world's greatest philosophy is to be found in novels, some is to be found in cinema, both films of philosophical novels or plays or original screenplays. This course will be much more than "philosophical discussion of movies." It will raise and debate fundamental issues in the history of Western philosophy in and through selected films. We will also read the books or screenplays on which the films are based and compare the written texts with the film version.


Instructor(s): Peter J. Kreeft

Prerequisites: Philosophy core courses completed.

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPL 1500 Ethics Fall 4
Course Description

This course introduces students to the main schools of ethical thought in the Western philosophical tradition. We examine works by philosophers such as Aristotle, Kant, and Mill, and we ask how the ethical systems developed by these figures can help us to think through issues like economic inequality, the treatment of animals, and euthanasia.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Evan Clarke

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPL 2220 Miracles,Angels,Ghosts, & Demons Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ADTH4417

Comments:

ADPL 2254 After Death and Dying Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPL 2274 Meaning of Life Fall 4
Course Description

Happiness is everyone's end. It is not a means to any other end; other things are desired as means to happiness. But what is happiness, how is it attained? Some people are happy, some are not; what makes the difference? A variety of philosophers' answers to this very practical question are explored including Socrates, Aristotle, Aquinas, Freud, Dostoyevsky, Buddha and C.S. Lewis.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPL 2500 Philosophy of Human Experience Fall 4
Course Description

This course examines the nature of human experience from a variety of philosophical perspectives. Drawing insights from the phenomenological, existentialist, and Thomist traditions, we consider themes such as embodiment, the experience of others, and the experience of time.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Evan Clarke

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPL 3010 History of Philosophy I: Ancient/Medieval Spring 4
Course Description

Two of the best ways to know yourself are to know your ancestors and to know the differences between yourself and others. The same applies to cultures. Premodern thinkers are both our intellectual ancestors and our significant 'others.' We will explore the "big ideas" of Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, and many more (e.g. Solomon and Buddha) in this survey.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPL 3500 Philosophy of Science Spring 4
Course Description

What is science? How does science work? What is the nature of progress in science? Where does science stand in a broader social and cultural context? In this course, we take up these and other philosophical questions concerning the nature of science. We draw on a wide range of writings. from the works of early modern figures like Francis Bacon and Descartes to those of more recent thinkers like Thomas Kuhn and Karl Popper.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Evan Clarke

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPL 3540 Law and Morality Fall 4
Course Description

What is the relationship between man-made law created by the courts and the legislature and religious values? Is there a religious and moral foundation to our civil law in the United States? What do we do when confronted by a "wrong" law such as segregation? How do we determine if a law is wrong? Should religious and moral codes be part of the fabric of decisional case law? This course will compare the classic moral thinking of such authors as Plato, Aquinas, Mill and Locke to actual Constitutional decisions on such issues as the war on terror, capital punishment, gay marriage, sexual privacy, immigration, freedom of religion, abortion and the right to refuse medical treatment.


Instructor(s): James Menno

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADPL 6602 Philosophy of World Religions Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: