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History (Woods College) Courses (ADHS) Woods College of Advancing Studies


Subject Area Course # Course Title Semester Credit Hours Expand
ADHS 1028 Social/Cultural Europe Since 1789 Summer 3
Course Description

A survey of European history from the end of the French Revolution to the present. Topics include the impact of industrialization on European society, the expansion and retreat of European imperialism, the Enlightenment tradition and challenges to it, 20th century capitalist crises and responses to them.


Instructor(s): Michael Paul

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

ADHS 1040 West and World Since 1789 Summer 3
Course Description

This course examines the major developments of European history from the French Revolution to the present. These developments are studied from a political, social, economic and cultural point of view, not simply for the impact they had on Europe, but also for their wider global significance.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Michael Paul

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

ADHS 1081 Modern History I Fall 3
Course Description

Survey of the great ideas of the western tradition from the Renaissance to the French Revolution. The focus is on the rise of the modern state in Germany (Holy Roman Empire, Treaty of Westphalia), England (Glorious Revolution and the roots of constitutional rule), and France (Divine Right Absolutism), the relationship of religion and politics (which suffers more, religion or politics?), and early modern European culture (Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, Classicism) as well as Europe's interactions with Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Each class consists of a slide lecture and primary source-based discussion.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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ADHS 1092 Modern History II Fall 4
Course Description

Survey of European history in global context from the revolutionary movements of the late enlightenment in Europe and in the Americas to the revolutions in Europe, Africa, and elsewhere at the end of the 20th century. The focus will be on the post enlightenment responses to the fundamental questions of human existence as well as economic social and political organization from conservatism and capitalism to Marxism and fascism, as well as the relationship between Westerners and peoples all over the globe.


Instructor(s): Martin Menke

Prerequisites: None

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ADHS 1111 The Vietnam Experience Fall 4
Course Description

Constant references to Iraq and Afghanistan as America’s new Vietnam suggest an examination of America’s thirty year military involvement in Southeast Asia, a most controversial episode in U.S. history. Looks at the origins of the Cold War, the Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson and Nixon presidencies, antiwar activism and other Vietnam era movements, the American soldier’s experiences during and after service, and relevant parallels and differences with our current involvement.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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ADHS 1125 Diplomatic U.S. History Fall 4
Course Description

An overview of the main developments of United States diplomatic history from its earliest beginnings to the present day. A look at how United States foreign relations emerged from revolutionary impulses to become a significant feature of American life. Uncovers the underlying trends during this period to see how the U.S. transformed itself from a collection of thirteen colonies into a major superpower. Issues of class, gender and race are at the fore as we discover how the United States came to integrate itself into the world community of nations.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADHS 1127 America Between the Wars Spring 4
Course Description

A survey of the years 1918–1945, covering the roaring 20s, the Stock Market Crash, the Depression, the New Deal and the American involvement in World War II. Course investigates the political events of these years, the changing patterns of American life, the social and cultural trends, and the emergence of America as an international power.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HIST1001–1094

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Comments:

ADHS 1130 History of Boston: Puritans to Patriots Spring 4
Course Description

Course covers the history of Boston from its founding through the momentous events of the 17th and 18th centuries when Boston became the second most important city in the British Empire. During the tumultuous 18th century, Boston significantly expanded financially and geographically, becoming the capital of New England before facing a number of difficulties in the mid-1700's. Course traces Boston's central role in the American Revolution, with an emphasis on Adams, Revere and others, as well as the Boston Massacre, the Tea Party and the Battle of Bunker Hill. We will then focus on how Boston reinvented itself after independence to become by the 1820's, the "Hub of the Universe."


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094

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ADHS 1133 Modern America 1945-Present Fall 3
Course Description

An investigation of America since World War II. Topics include the Cold War, McCarthyism, Civil Rights, Vietnam, the women’s movement, the Reagan years and life in the 1980’s, 1990’s to the present.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADHS 1141 Defining Moments Fall 4
Course Description

Course looks at decisions, events and expectations that influenced the evolving direction of the United States. Course explores the framework, incentives, barriers, personalities, positions and power brokers determining the emerging presence of the United States in the world. Topics include America’s spreading influence before and after WWI; the Great Depression; US and WWII; Vietnam, the Cold War. Some readings: Michael Adams, The Best War Ever; Tim O’Brien, The Things They Carried; Emily Rosenberg, Spreading the American Dream; W.A. Williams, Tragedy of American Diplomacy; M. Walker, Cold War.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADHS 1142 An Emerging World Fall 4
Course Description

Focuses on events in Europe to view how the world community of nations defined their role in and came to terms with the twenty-first century. Novels, memoirs, essays and documentaries reveal the events and decisions that forced or allowed nations to define themselves in the modern world. Topics include Europe and World War I; the Great Depression; World War II; decolonization and the Cold War; and resurgent nationalism and the “new world order, globalization and terrorism.” Books include Regeneration, Pat Barker; The Road to Wigan Pier, George Orwell; The European Home Fronts, Earl Beck; Blood and Belonging, Michael Ignatieff; and brief readings.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADHS 1147 History of Horror Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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ADHS 1152 Politics of Democracy: The West, the World, and the Coming of Democracy Since 1789 Summer 3
Course Description

This course examines the ways in which Democracy became the established political form for many nations, particularly those in the West, after the French Revolution. After the upheavals of the American and French Revolutions, Democracy, and its economic counterpart, Capitalism, became the accepted norms for many countries of the world. In this course, we will investigate the processes which allowed this political and economic transformation to take place. The course will look at the French and Industrial Revolutions; imperialism; the World Wars of the twentieth century; and the resurgence of nationalism in the twenty-first century. Throughout the course, issues of class, race, gender, and ethnicity will be to the fore, as we strive to discover how the world came to be as it is today.


Instructor(s): Michael Paul

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

ADHS 1168 Anglo-American Relations in 20th & 21st Centuries Fall 4
Course Description

Course examines the actions of Anglo-American relations in a global context during key events of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, including World War I, World War II, the Cold War, and the recent wars in the Middle East, to discover whether or not the U.S. and Britain followed parallel policies on the world stage based on an idea of a "special relationship."


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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ADHS 1177 Resistance:Call to Action Fall 4
Course Description

Course explores the lives, motivations, and outcomes of individuals who for a myriad of reasons responded to the emerging Nazi catastrophe. Course defines resistance from religious, ethical, moral, political as well as military perspectives identifying the main protagonists, their moral or ethical dilemmas and final composite failure. What makes resistance permissible, legitimate or even mandatory? Do the gospels encourage resistance? Looks at religious organizations, political groups, and student movements during this tumultuous period in history. Analyzing confrontation, adaptation and alternative strategies enriches class insight. Guest speakers.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADHS 1185 A Half-Century of American Film Fall 4
Course Description

A brief history of American film from the days of the silent nickelodeon through the end of the Romantic years of the 50s. Films are viewed, analyzed and discussed.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADHS 1191 History of Jazz in America Fall 4
Course Description

Course explores the development of jazz and how the times and music came together. It looks at American culture through immigration, society, popular culture and entertainment. It examines jazz through texts, records and performances as a distinctly American contribution – from its West African roots, spirituals, work songs, its West Indies’ influence, through New Orleans, Kansas City, Chicago and Harlem, its urban blues, swing, bebop, Afro-Cuban rhythms and rock and roll. Students develop an understanding of our nation’s history through music.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADHS 1209 Sports in America Fall 4
Course Description

TBD


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Prerequisites: None

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ADHS 1263 Hitler, the Churches and the Holocaust Fall 4
Course Description

To better understand the climate and complexities that contributed to the Christian church's weakened responses to Hitler’s policies, the course examines the development of Christian anti-Judaism, anti-Semitism and nationalism. It analyzes the resistance that emerged in response to totalitarianism and to the Holocaust, and considers the main Christian post-Holocaust efforts as they contribute to theological development and current thinking.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADHS 1537 American Politics Since 1932 Fall 4
Course Description

An examination of the political history of the last eighty years, focusing on the Presidents from Roosevelt to Obama, on the electoral process by which they gained and lost office, and on the impact of significant domestic and international events on their presidencies and their legacies.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADHS 1556 Boston Neighborhoods Spring 3
Course Description

An historical look at Boston through parts of its "neighborhoods," including the South End, the north End, South Boston, East Boston, Jamaica Plain, Roxbury, Charlestown and Dorchester. Walking and bus tours are planned.


Instructor(s): Andrew Bunie

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094

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ADHS 1569 20th Century Boston Fall 4
Course Description

An historical inquiry into the growth, development and emergence of Boston from a fledgling city to a present day major metropolis. Special attention is given to development of Irish politics, neighborhoods, race and immigration, education, sports, urban concerns and the city since 1974.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADHS 1605 History of New England Fall 4
Course Description

For nearly four centuries, this region has managed to maintain an identity broadly American and distinctly New England. Course examines the region’s social, cultural, and political history, with particular attention to the Boston area in periods of momentous change. Topics explored include witchcraft in Salem; the Minutemen and the American Revolution; nineteenth-century immigration from Ireland; Boston’s Civil War; urban and suburban growth and the social crises of the 1960s and 1970s. Analysis of local historical sites serves to deepen understanding of New Englanders’ enduring attachment to the past.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADHS 2210 For God and Country Spring 4
Course Description

“For God and Country” seems self-evident, but what if obeying God requires disobeying the country’s government? Can a person of faith endorse the slogan “my country, right or wrong?” In this course, historical examples serve to achieve a greater understanding of the tension between religious and civic imperatives. Historical examples will range from Christian martyrdom in the Roman Empire or the Jewish uprising at Masada to Christians resisting the Nazi regime. Examples from the three monotheistic religions of the West will be analyzed. Required readings consist of historical documents. This course is fully online and class discussions will occur synchronously and asynchronously.


Schedule: Periodically

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Prerequisites: None

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Comments: This is an online course.

ADHS 3001 History of Boston: Brahmins to Bosses to Busing Spring 4
Course Description

The history of Boston from its height as "the Hub of the Universe" in the 1820s, through the tumultuous Civil War and post-war periods. The course will then examine 20th century Boston and the great events and figures which have shaped its destiny as one of America's most important cities. It will include the era of forced busing in Boston and assess the lasting impact of this period for Boston.


Schedule: Periodically

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Prerequisites: None

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ADHS 3011 Development of the Pre-Modern World Fall 4
Course Description

In this course, we will trace the development of our pre-modern world society, from Neolithic hunters and gatherers to Early Modern global explorers and scientists. Why did humans shift from a nomadic to a settled lifestyle and how did this facilitate the rise of the first great civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, China and the Indus Valley? We will also focus on the contributions of, and interactions among, the critical civilizations of Greece, Rome, Byzantium, the Middle East, Sub-Saharan Africa, and the Americas, as well as the roots of our contemporary global religions, including, Judaism, Christianity, Buddhism and Islam. While this time period featured incredible human ingenuity and technical advancements, it also witnessed catastrophic natural disasters and man-made conflicts that combined to dramatically reshape the course of human progress and lay the foundations of our modern world.


Schedule: Periodically

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Prerequisites: None

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