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Administrative Studies (Woods College) Courses (ADGR) Woods College of Advancing Studies


Subject Area Course # Course Title Semester Credit Hours Expand
ADGR 7200 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory Spring 3
Course Description

This course covers the theory and practice of macroeconomics. The course focuses on the underlying determinants of economic growth, unemployment and inflation by developing and assessing a variety of simple models. The course will also teach the skills needed for interpreting and using macroeconomic data to formulate macroeconomic policy. A central feature of the course includes understanding the ability and limitations of policy for stabilizing the business cycle and promoting long-term growth.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADGR 7201 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines the basic models economists use to study the choices made by consumers, investors, firms, and government officials, and how these choices affect markets. The course focuses on both policy applications and business strategies. Topics includes optimization, consumer choice, firm behavior, market structures, risk and uncertainty, and welfare economics.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADGR 7701 Strategic Communication Fall 3
Course Description

Success at every level in today’s competitive environment requires strong and sophisticated communication skills. Course offers the knowledge and expertise to effectively tailor your writing style to your message; produce effective business reports, proposals, letters, and memorandums; create and deliver professional presentations; contribute successfully to team meetings and team writing projects through interactive applications of communication technology.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADGR 7702 Mobilizing for Change Fall 3
Course Description

Material factors (trade, investment, production of goods and services, and resources consumption) are discussed first when the topic of globalization is raised, and prevail over non-economic factors that relate to the human condition. Whereas material factors determine economic success or failure, non-economic factors profoundly affect globalization. Course examines the fundamentals of globalization from an economic and non-economic perspective. Topics range include international trade, finance, aid, migration, ideas, and policy. Looks at where the factors overlap, cause individuals to re-evaluate their trust in and reliance upon governments, non-government organizations, or employers to sustain them, and their loyalties to family, nationality and culture.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADGR 7703 Research Methods and Data Analysis Fall 3
Course Description

This course introduces students to basic social science research methods. The primary objective is for students to learn to read and evaluate research as well as create contributions to their chosen profession or field of research. By the end of the course, students will be more knowledgeable of basic research design and statistical methods. Additionally, students will better understand how to use research findings to improve and enhance their professional roles. Note: This course is required for all students who entered the MS in Administrative Studies Program AFTER June 1, 2014. Please see an academic advisor to ensure appropriate placement in courses.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADGR 7705 Law and Social Responsibility Fall 3
Course Description

Laws define and reinforce personal and professional relationships. Course explores how laws influence society and how society influences the law. Considers the broad social and professional contexts connecting individuals, families and organizations. Presents an overview of the structure of the Federal and Massachusetts Courts as well as the criminal and juvenile justice systems. Examines civil laws applicable to the family, including the legal aspects of marriage, child custody, adoption, divorce and liability for conduct. Addresses issues of ethics, equality and privacy.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADGR 7706 Communication In A Global Work Environment Fall 3
Course Description

Successful organizational leaders recognize the enormous potential of globalization, and the absolute need to interact competently with complex multicultural work environments. Students learn to better understand the subtle cultural dynamics and nuances that build and maintain relationships at work and at home as well as in corporate negotiation. Topics include addressing the tension between “culture” as something fixed, and the push for change, the dynamics of men and women working in partnership, leaders as influencers of a collaborative culture. Media influences, nonverbal cues, and the formation of worldviews are examined. Explores values, stereotyping and cultural biases through readings, presentations and films.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: A hybrid course combining required classroom attendance on certain weeks, and virtual attendance on other weeks; those other weeks will require monitoring and posting to the virtual classroom on Canvas 2-3 days each of those on-line weeks to submit work and engage in on-line discussion.

ADGR 7707 Conflict Resolution: Negotiation Skills Fall 4
Course Description

Negotiation is a central process in decision-making and conflict resolution. This course examines the theory and practice of negotiation in a variety of contexts, including labor-management relations, buying and selling, mergers and acquisitions, civil liability suits, international diplomacy, and intra-organizational bargaining. Topics include target setting, concession making, power and influence, team management and negotiations, strategy and tactics and phases of competitive and cooperative negotiations.


Instructor(s): Richard Nielsen

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ADBM5001

Comments:

ADGR 7708 Project Management Fall 3
Course Description

This course introduces students to the basic tenets and components involved in project management. The primary objective is to provide frameworks that make it possible to track and measure project performance, overcome challenges, and adapt to changes in a variety of professional environments. Specific topics covered in the course include project scope, time, cost, quality, human resources, communications, risk and stakeholder management and a variety of other operational issues that emerge during project planning initiation, monitoring, and execution.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

ADGR 7709 Applying New Technologies: Forward Thinking Fall 3
Course Description

The speed, mobility, convenience and access to emerging technologies is forcing a shift in the landscape to faster and smaller platforms. Course explores the impact of increased mobility, miniaturization, software systems and the evolving procedures and requirements. Examines how to make acceptance of these changes more efficient to effect a dynamic transition from the traditional to the more advanced technologies. Topical and current readings and policy guidelines for this situation lead to the examination of better methods for understanding, selection and evaluating upgrades as well as the introduction of any new system. The course also explores the positive and negative consequences of such innovation. In this hybrid distance-learning environment, students attend six classroom meetings. Distance learning using the class MyFiles site, e-mail and immersive techniques will be applied.


Instructor(s): William O'Keefe

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

ADGR 7710 Solving Information Problems: Wide Bandwidth Thinking Fall 3
Course Description

As the creation, communication, management, and preservation of information drive social and economic change, decision makers who understand the far reaching effects of digital information technology will be highly valued. How to protect privacy and thwart hackers is becoming critical. Topical and current readings and policy guidelines for these ideas lead to the examination of causes and effects of information overload and the need for better information fluency. Course also explores the positive and negative consequences of technological innovation. In this hybrid distance-learning format, students attend six classroom meetings. Distance learning using the class MyFiles site, email and immersive techniques will be applied.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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ADGR 7712 The New Professional Fall 3
Course Description

What does it mean to be a professional in the new millennium? Does it mean we can make the tough decisions and justify any collateral damage as being just the "cost of doing business" or do we have an obligation to the world and to ourselves to personally engage and make decisions in a moral context? Do we compromise ourselves by disengaging from our own moral compass? Course explores the difficult struggles professionals face as they try to integrate values and morals into a profession where the bottom line often defines the corporate culture.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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ADGR 7714 Focusing the Message: Creative Formats Fall 3
Course Description

Course encompasses all levels and forms of literature to enhance communication in professional and social settings. Imagination and creativity are the prevailing vehicles through which the reader delves into literature. In an informal, encouraging atmosphere students adopt new perspectives in presenting persuasive, ceremonial and expository positions.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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ADGR 7716 Leading and Managing Transitions in Sports Fall 3
Course Description

Transitions are a fact of life in all fields – and clearly in sports. College athletes become professional athletes, coaches. Professional athletes retire. Athletes become executives in sports management and executives in other fields that benefit from their goal orientation and ability with teams. Even if roles remain constant, technology is always evolving, changing leadership responsibilities and skills. Understanding change and effective strategies to master is essential to sports leadership. Course examines transition theories; motivations and values that drive our transitions; rituals and strategies for building anchors during uncertain times; identifying and managing conflict during times of change; theories of grief and hope that affect them; habits that hinder and foster transitions; and proven qualities that help us master transitions-- resilience, grit, faith, emotional intelligence, support and courage.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

ADGR 7718 Effective Listening: Techniques and Applications Fall 3
Course Description

We spend at least 80 percent of our time in communication situations listening, and only 20 percent of the time speaking. Effective listening is a learned technique, a critical component in the communication process, and a career and personally enhancing dynamic. Course views major listening theories and research including significant components of the learning process: hearing, understanding, remembering, interpreting, evaluating and responding. It also examines the impact of listening filters such as voices, personal biases, gender and culture. Specific listening contexts: non verbal, interpersonal, organizational, health communication and media are explained to better understand how to maximize opportunities. Explores the myth of the “Good Listener”, highlighting the strengths and weaknesses in professional and personal listening skills.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADGR 7719 Maximizing Intellectual Capital Fall 3
Course Description

Competitive and globally interconnected climates demand new competencies. Successful organizational leaders know how to tap people’s capacity to learn. They develop a vision for transforming the way people work, learn and interact and understand how patterns developed in one context can be adapted in others. Course explores techniques which expand an organization’s capacity to create the future. It examines adult learning styles, behavior and the drive for success, and explores the impact of decisions that affect career, family and financial security. Presents a variety of frameworks for maximizing personal and professional growth. Readings include A Hope in the Unseen, Suskind; Sari, Pio; Understanding Men's Passages, Sheehy; Life Entrepreneurs, Gergen and Vanourek; Class Matters, NY Times; Disrupting Class, Christensen; Outliers, Gladwell.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

ADGR 7720 Social Media's Landscape Fall 3
Course Description

The advent of social media: online social networks, virtual communities, smart mobs, represents a fundamental and global shift in the way we develop and maintain personal and professional relationships. To better understand our transformative partnership with technology, this course views the meaning of human social behavior, of community, of trust, anonymity, ethics and privacy. It examines social media’s impact on society as a whole: on communication, on business, organizational patterns, family and careers. Integrating theory and practice, students learn to leverage social media tools in business and social organizations, and develop practices to succeed personally and professionally.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

ADGR 7722 High Performers:New Market Leaders Fall 3
Course Description

Today’s high profile performers grab attention, headlines and market-place rewards. What makes a “winner”? Changing models of leadership and authority in American culture have crafted new paradigms of high profile performers. Course looks at individuals living and working in contemporary America, the paradox of success and failure, previous models, and personal pathways of leadership that influence new designs.


Instructor(s): Bernie Farwell

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

ADGR 7724 Consultation Fall 3
Course Description

Every productive member of any organization consults. Sometimes an organization wants a specific problem “fixed;” other times information and expertise is needed; at times personal problems need resolution. Competitive organizations, departments and individuals will ask for assistance. A consultant needs a full compendium of skills: the theory, professional skill building and specific tools. Applies theory to concrete situations, presents practical solutions.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

ADGR 7725 Navigating Organizational Politics Fall 3
Course Description

Workplace politics permeates every organization. Some avoid it, believing politics is manipulative and competence alone will assure advancement. This puts career success at risk. Ethically approached, workplace politics can generate power and influence and advance an organization’s and an individual’s goals. Course addresses strategies to influence the outcome of political situations during different career stages. Focus is on developing emotional intelligence; conducting a political self-assessment; building networks of relationships based on trust; identifying and responding to the generational perspectives through which individuals examine issues; and handling political attacks. Course explores socializing with savvy; dealing with office romance and sexual harassment; assessing the career impact of work-life balance programs; uncovering an organization’s hidden politics; accessing opportunities and surviving reorganizations.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

ADGR 7727 Career Strategies Fall 4
Course Description

This course examines the critical elements involved in self-assessment, career exploration, goal setting, adult development, decision-making, job search strategies and career progression. Looks at how to integrate career information resources, and explores specific techniques and strategies designed for a competitive job market.


Instructor(s): Amy Flynn

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ADCO5001

Comments:

ADGR 7728 Public Relations Fall 4
Course Description

Public Relations is a vital and versatile communication tool. This course explores the techniques and media used to influence special publics, including the news media. It reviews the principles and practices of on-line communications, how electronic media differ from traditional media, reaching new audiences, advantages and limitations. Students study examples of public relations campaigns and design their own. Focuses on non-profit public relations, corporate problems and the relationship between management strategies and promotional objectives.


Instructor(s): Donald Fishman

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ADCO5002

Comments:

ADGR 7729 Labor Relations and Human Resources Fall 4
Course Description

Workplaces are dynamic and fluid environments that are impacted by internal and external forces. This course examines the economic, social, psychological and political factors that influence employee relations systems. Through case studies and role playing, the course examines basic rights under federal and state statutes, the negotiation and administration of collective bargaining agreements, and the utilization of alternative dispute resolution methods to resolve conflict in the workplace.


Instructor(s): Richard Zaiger

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ADLA5001

Comments:

ADGR 7730 Leading in Turbulent Times Fall 3
Course Description

Positioning organizations and individuals for success amid volatile global financial, economic, technological and political uncertainty demands principled, insightful leadership as well as imaginative, innovative and operational expertise. Course examines disruptive sources (including fraud, scandals), the accelerating pace of change which renders past experience and knowledge insufficient, and the need for leaders making decisions about the future to think and behave like innovators. Focus is on creating open optimistic climates that engage employees, develop skills and talents, and promote continuous knowledge sharing, smart work designs and creative problem solving. Explores strategies critical to influencing performance and implementing customized responses to motivation, morale and performance issues.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

ADGR 7731 Gender and Generational Barriers in the Workplace Fall 3
Course Description

To succeed in these times of economic uncertainty, organizations must maximize their human capital. The challenge in today’s workplace, where four generations of men and women work side-by-side, is to build from this diversity a stable core of productive employees. Achieving this requires overcoming gender and generational barriers which impede individual and group performance. Course generational topics include improving intergenerational communications; building cohesive teams; and employing targeted strategies for motivation, rewards, recruitment, and retention. Gender topics include strategies for overcoming male and female conversational style differences; leadership development; the glass ceiling challenge; sexual harassment avoidance; and the work-life balancing act.


Instructor(s): Teresa Byrne

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

ADGR 7732 Developing High Performance Leaders Spring 3
Course Description

High performance is an art and science, a goal in all fields --sports, business, education, and medicine. Elements of high performance, the focus of this course, are similar across fields. Recognizing the increasing number of adults participating in athletics while striving for professional goals, this course examines how to achieve high performance while realizing balance and happiness in life. Readings cover the physiology of exercise, aging, and performance; memory and time management; theories of goal setting, excellence, success, nature versus nurture, habit, and motivation; and perspectives from adult developmental and positive psychology. In a goal-setting project, students will experiment with the benefits, challenges, and risks of aiming high as well as its effects on self-confidence and time management, and the ability to focus, handle stress, set limits, and perform in other areas of life.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADGR 7735 Developing Dynamic and Productive Organizations Fall 3
Course Description

Dynamic organizational cultures spark innovation and productivity. In an age of increasing globalization, an awareness of personal, systemic and national cultures prompts a broader grasp of the ways individuals and groups view work, leadership and productivity. Course explores the paradigms and mental models, personal, interpersonal, group and systemic behaviors which weave together to form an organizational culture and how a particular culture impacts productivity. Examining the larger social context with its myriad contemporary issues (immigration, ecology and sustainability, health, mental health and substance use etc), allows us to examine how modern life impacts productive outcomes.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

ADGR 7739 Public and Non-Public Accounting Fall 3
Course Description

Examines nonprofit and state and municipal budgeting policies and practices as well as the fiscal climate within which these organizations operate. Students gain a better understanding of the role of accounting in public and nonprofit organizations and the theories underlying major fiscal policy debates. Topics include constructing budgets and capital improvement plans, and how to successfully generate funds to support nonprofit sector organizations.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

ADGR 7740 Behavioral Economics: Emerging Perspective Fall 4
Course Description

Why do people often behave in ways that are clearly not in their best interest? Integrating an understanding of human behavior into the more traditional economic models offers a fuller explanation of how behavior influences seemingly rational choices and suggests ways to optimize decision-making. This course explores the impact of the current economic crisis, competition, procrastination, certainty/uncertainty, investments, emerging technologies, career flexibility, obesity and divorce to explain outcomes and performance.


Instructor(s): Robert Anzenberger

Prerequisites: Prerequisite: Principles of Economics

Cross listed with: ADEC5002

Comments:

ADGR 7741 Persuasive Communication Fall 3
Course Description

In our culture, image is about conveying success. It is what makes us want to buy a brand or vote for a candidate. Course explores the powerful role of imaging, the use of trademarks as a vehicle to convey a corporate image, and how a “marketable personality” (for a product, service, organization or individual) is defined, developed and communicated. Examines strategies for balancing the emotional and rational factors of a message, finding a position with “soul,” and using research to full advantage in relation to image failure and crisis management. A look at how imaging is affected by the exploding world of media and how it influences the corporate bottom line. Video and audio presentations and case studies provide stimulating examples. Students will better understand the imaging process and develop the know-how to evaluate and use it.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

ADGR 7743 Mastering the Media Fall 3
Course Description

In depth knowledge of how mass media shapes and reshapes thoughts, attitudes and behavior brings desired expertise to professional responsibilities and personal opportunities. Course explores the theories and data documenting the impact of mass media and examines the positive and negative effects of different types of media content on different individuals to help tailor decision making and execute solutions. Discusses future innovations and global implications.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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ADGR 7744 Leadership:Theory and Practice Fall 3
Course Description

Student must have access to computer with web-cam. Have you ever asked: what makes a great leader? If so, you join countless researchers and practitioners who have been trying to answer this for decades. Are leaders born? Are they bred? What distinguishes them? Course examines a number of theories, and provides a bedrock of leadership practice that can be readily transferred to many different organizations. Focus is on practical applications including an introduction to different leadership theories, case analysis, and hands-on experience with leadership instruments for both the individual and organizations. Course will require monitoring and posting to the virtual classroom on Canvas 2-3 days each week to submit work and engage in on-line discussion.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ADBM5005

Comments:

ADGR 7746 Organization Theory and Design Fall 3
Course Description

Designed to identify and explore current strategies and measures that enhance organization productivity within a healthy workplace environment. The course examines the current literature that focuses on workplace productivity in the public, private and non-profit sectors. A look at the changing roles of the game, the melding of the physical and virtual worlds; the evolution from a more vertical hierarchical design into more collaborative, interactive, and horizontal structures, joining with global endeavors. Course is sensitive to cultural dynamics, new patterns of participation and behavior, examines personal, interpersonal, and group behavior and suggests practical approaches to better respond.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: A hybrid course utilizing required classroom attendance on specific dates. The other weeks will require monitoring and posting to the virtual classroom on Canvas 2-3 days each of those on-line weeks to submit work and engage in on-line discussion.

ADGR 7747 Lives in Motion:Increasing Personal Effectiveness Fall 3
Course Description

The popularity of television shows like Extreme Makeover suggest a culture in pursuit of perfection; a culture in which many are uncomfortable or dissatisfied with how they see themselves; how they perceive others see them. Course explores a variety of theories and assessment measures which will provide the information necessary to lead more effective and examined lives. How do we get comfortable with who we are once we know more about who we are, with whom we interact, what we value, what choices matter. Assessment inventories will assist students in discovering personality traits, cultural interests, their attitudes about relationships, money, and conflict and how to integrate these dynamics successfully into a new understanding of themselves.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

ADGR 7748 Elements of Competitive Performance Spring 3
Course Description

High levels of accomplishment in one area of life can inspire greater accomplishment and satisfaction in other areas of life. Course explores theories of excellence, success, motivation, happiness, adult development and aging that help us achieve and compete. Recognizing the extreme competitiveness of today’s business world as exemplified by Steve Jobs and the growing phenomenon of adult participation in athletics, this course uses athletics as a template to see what is possible in all areas of adult life: the positive physical and emotional outcomes of risking and reaching; the impact on overall life balance, personal relationships and professional success; the benefits of increased self-confidence; and the enhanced ability to set goals, focus, manage time, handle stress, compete in other areas of life and set limits. Offers practical suggestions and strategic designs.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Utzschneider

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADGR 7750 Geographic Information Systems Fall 4
Course Description

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is an information technology used for the management, analysis, and display of geographic--or spatial--data, and is represented by information sets such as common maps and more sophisticated data models. This course introduces the fundamental concepts of spatial technology and the increasing application of GIS in academic research, government, and business. The course provides an overview of spatial analysis as a decision support tool, the use and management of spatial data, an introduction to GIS applications, and the unique demands GIS places on IT. Requires no programming experience.


Instructor(s): Donald Brady

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ADIT5001

Comments:

ADGR 7751 Public Affairs Challenges Fall 3
Course Description

One of every seven jobs in Massachusetts is found in the not-for- profit sector. In many ways, our non-profit higher education and health care institutions define our state's economy and help to create entire industries such as biotechnology, green technology, financial services and consulting services to name but a few. Course explores the emerging public relations, government relations, branding and strategic communication challenges faced by not-for-profit entities such as hospitals, universities, and other non-profit organizations, as they work to promote and protect their brand and reputation. Case studies draw on recent crises and management challenges to explore responses in communications, strategic planning, and innovative initiatives designed to advance the non-profit mission and market position.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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ADGR 7752 Social Entrepreneurs Fall 3
Course Description

New concepts designed to address the world’s pervasive social ills invite individual response. Social entrepreneurs blur the lines between the nonprofit and for-profit sectors. They have emerged in response to government and philanthropy’s inability to alleviate the world’s social ills such as hunger, poverty, HIV/AIDS, and global warming. Course examines three current models: nonprofits starting for-profit ventures, for-profit companies with a social purpose, and nonprofits that approach social needs in a new and innovative way. Students address such questions as: What does it take to be a social entrepreneur? Who are the leaders? What determines success and failure? Which is the appropriate business model for my idea? What about funding? How are corporations helping? And how does one assess the positive impact of the social venture?


Instructor(s): Francis Fallon

Prerequisites: None

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ADGR 7753 Employment Law Spring 3
Course Description

This introduction to the rapidly evolving law of the workplace focuses on how the law works in practice today providing important information for employees and managers. Looks at traditional common law such as “Employment At Will” and areas of employment law topics including hiring, promotion and termination, workplace security, privacy and safety, compensation and benefits, immigration, and labor-management relations. Course also covers the various laws prohibiting discrimination in the workplace, with a focus on federal statutes and regulations as well as the emerging legal issues around Social Media in the workplace.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ADLA5053

Comments:

ADGR 7754 Business of Sports Fall 3
Course Description

From team sports, there is much to learn about team play, leadership, management, and motivation that can be applied to many careers. Events happen so quickly on the playing field that players don't have time to process lessons which can be so valuable for success elsewhere. Including a study of the explorer Ernest Shackleton, this course explores theories of leadership, followership, motivation, effective communication, and goal achievement as well as types of followership. Topics covered include selecting, building, and motivating a team; identifying team leadership qualities and delegating power; and developing strong leadership skills. Team leadership skills include instilling organizational values; setting a positive tone with humor and goal setting; resolving conflict; introducing new initiatives; managing setbacks and failure; refocusing perspective; and effective strategies for improvement and feedback on performance.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Cathy Utzschneider

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

ADGR 7755 Human Resource Development Summer 3
Course Description

This course focuses on employees and how to get the highest level of performance out of employees. What motivates your employees? What makes them want to stay? How do you prevent attrition? This course will start with an introduction to organizational design and relevant organizational development theories. It will then move to talent acquisition and employee training, where use of analytics and metrics will be introduced. Next, students will learn performance management methods and appraisal, including use of instruments and rating scales. The course will then move to career development and leadership development including assessing talent, developing career paths, and succession planning. The course will conclude by helping students understand the differences between coaching and mentoring, and how to effectively manage organizational talent.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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ADGR 7775 American and Global Business Fall 3
Course Description

Global business has been shaken by anti-globalization movements, the new era of terror, climate change, and a deep economic crisis. Course explores the causes of the 2008 global crisis, the economic and political forces explaining the severity of our financial meltdown, and policy solutions. We examine US and global business and the meaning of globalization in the new climate. Focuses on how corporations can develop strategies that help to create new jobs, alleviate poverty, climate change, and bolster peace. We will look at how ideas of socially responsible business in the US may help in a global context and what their limit is.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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ADGR 7777 Evolution of Marketing Strategies in the Digital Era Fall 3
Course Description

A practical overview of the role and potential of marketing. Developing a market strategy to reach new and evolving markets depends on understanding emerging communication activities and styles, the accurate identification of needs, and expertise in generating and converting inquiries. Elements of a marketing strategy, including pricing, promotion, product decisions, and distribution are included. Creative development of the marketing mix utilizing traditional and interactive components. Strategy formulation and control of the marketing function in a digital world are emphasized.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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ADGR 7778 Environmental Issues Fall 3
Course Description

This interdisciplinary course explores the growing interest in sustainability and changing global landscapes as an interdependent and interconnected world community exerts new pressures on the use of resources and assets. New discoveries, advancing technologies and greater demands on limited supplies and availability prompt questions about policy regulations, preservation, privatization, and protectionism.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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ADGR 7779 Aging Well:Nutrition and Lifestyle Connections Fall 3
Course Description

Will the diet you eat now influence your health in the years to come? What do we really know about food practices as we age? Treats basic nutrition principles in the physiology of the aging process. Explores national initiatives developed for nutrition research and the impact of diet(genetics) and lifestyle practices on chronic disease incidence, prevention and treatment. Topics include conditions typically experienced in the maturing population such as diabetes, arthritis, heart and eye disease, obesity, cancer, and food and drug interactions.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADGR 7781 Coming to America Fall 3
Course Description

American hopes and anxieties ebb and flow about immigration and our laws, proposed laws, debates, and political platforms follow suit. The class addresses immigration in the United States, historically and present day, including principal US legislation and proposed bills. We’ll discuss the need for immigration as the century progresses and what is fair for the 12.5 million undocumented immigrants who harvest and prepare our food, mow our lawns, and care for our infants and elderly.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADGR 7782 Law and Society Fall 3
Course Description

Radical changes in the basic social fabric that dictate how people live, interact, communicate and work with one another create new demands for a legal system obligated to interpret and establish law. Examines emerging challenges to freedom of expression, public and private communication: cyberspace, bullying, the disparity of access to resources, family protection, national security and individual rights, and different ways of representing justice. It also explores how the balance of emotion and reason in our idea of justice “shifts” over time, corporate responsibility/irresponsibility, new definition of guilt and innocence, what is just/unjust social behavior, can citizens depend on the legal system, what holds society together.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

ADGR 7783 Sustainability:Science of Survival Fall 3
Course Description

Dynamic and innovative scientific advances, and the rediscovery of traditional farming and energy practices are transforming the ways in which we meet basic human needs as well as how we preserve and renew the planet’s life support systems. Course examines essence of sustainability theory and application, agricultural and food production principles and practices, how production impacts local, regional, and global health status, economies and environments, and how sustainable practices benefit poor and wealthy nations. Topics include: climate and global environments, trends in organic and local food sources, food crops versus fuel crops and access to safe water. Examines selected strategies and initiatives that promote a sustainable global community.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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ADGR 7784 Persuasion:Power&Influence in Media Age Fall 3
Course Description

Radical changes in the basic social fabric that dictate how people live, interact, communicate and work with one another create new demands for a legal system obligated to interpret and establish law. Examines emerging challenges to freedom of expression, public and private communication: cyberspace, bullying, the disparity of access to resources, family protection, national security and individual rights, and different ways of representing justice. It also explores how the balance of emotion and reason in our idea of justice “shifts” over time, corporate responsibility/irresponsibility, new definition of guilt and innocence, what is just/unjust social behavior, can citizens depend on the legal system, what holds society together.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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Comments:

ADGR 7785 Leadership and Decision Making: Ignatian-Based Applied Ethics Fall 3
Course Description

What role can ethics and morals play in influencing leaders? Too often, decisions are made based solely on numbers or shareholder value, and without reflection. Any collateral damage is then justified as being just the "cost of doing business." We have an obligation to each other and to ourselves to personally engage and make decisions in a moral context. Using Ignatian discernment and values as a guide, this course will explore strategies and options for integrating values into leadership decision-making. Applying those strategies to real world case studies, we will develop tools to help navigate those situations where there is pressure to compromise values or disengage from our moral compass.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADGR 7790 Workforce Planning and Employment Fall 3
Course Description

Strategic Workforce Planning takes a broad view of the organization to assure the right people and right skillsets are in place to drive strategy and reinforce culture. Key stakeholders are partners in the process to ensure adoption within the organization, and collaboration is necessary to drive alignment of people, process and technology. Workforce planning considers the balance between the current state, the organization’s evolution, and the desired future state. Finding that balance requires measuring the system, and evaluating both the internal and external environments. This course will help you think about how to assess organizations, learn to work with the organization’s strategy and culture to determine the key factors driving Workforce Planning, how to apply different frameworks, and to create a gap analysis between the current state and the desired state. From this framework, you will look at ways to implement the strategy, and learn to use data to inform your thinking.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADGR 8006 Communication In A Global Context Fall 3
Course Description

Successful organizational leaders recognize the enormous potential of globalization, and the absolute need to interact competently with complex multicultural work environments. Students learn to better understand the subtle cultural dynamics and nuances that build and maintain relationships at work and at home as well as in corporate negotiation. Topics include addressing the tension between “culture” as something fixed, and the push for change, the dynamics of men and women working in partnership, leaders as influencers of a collaborative culture. Media influences, nonverbal cues, and the formation of worldviews are examined. Explores values, stereotyping and cultural biases through readings, presentations and films.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: A hybrid course combining required classroom attendance on certain weeks, and virtual attendance on other weeks; those other weeks will require monitoring and posting to the virtual classroom on Canvas 2-3 days each of those on-line weeks to submit work and engage in on-line discussion.

ADGR 8010 Leader as Change Agent Spring 3
Course Description

A leader’s job is to drive change to respond to a changing environment. The ability to navigate and execute responsive, expedient organizational change is a crucial component for contemporary leaders, yet over 70% of planned change campaigns fail. This course is a study of successful change processes, and the leader's role in creating a culture conducive to change; establishing vision, buy-in and purpose among the influencers; and implementing sustainable, transformative change within an organization. Through the examination and discussion of change theory, case studies, and interviews with change agents, this course considers effective approaches to confronting resistance, as well as leading change both vertically and horizontally. This course includes a leadership style assessment to identify personal strengths and challenges as an influencer and change agent. MEETS ONLINE ON THURSDAYS


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADGR 8015 Business Strategy Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Strategy is how leaders distinguish the organizations advantage in competitive markets. It is a set of guidelines that help direct decision making and the allocation of resources to accomplish the company’s key business goals and objectives. To succeed in the future, leaders must develop the means and capabilities needed to gain and sustain these advantages. This course introduces the concepts of strategic management by using readings, discussion and case studies. The key components the course will cover are: the three horizons of strategy; external environments (social, political, technological and economic); global markets; internal Factors and Implications (capabilities, talent, resources); the role of Culture and Change Management.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADGR 8016 Leading and Managing Transitions in Sports Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Transitions are a fact of life in all fields – and clearly in sports. College athletes become professional athletes, coaches. Professional athletes retire. Athletes become executives in sports management and executives in other fields that benefit from their goal orientation and ability with teams. Even if roles remain constant, technology is always evolving, changing leadership responsibilities and skills. Understanding change and effective strategies to master is essential to sports leadership. Course examines transition theories; motivations and values that drive our transitions; rituals and strategies for building anchors during uncertain times; identifying and managing conflict during times of change; theories of grief and hope that affect them; habits that hinder and foster transitions; and proven qualities that help us master transitions-- resilience, grit, faith, emotional intelligence, support and courage.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADGR 8020 Pricing and Distribution Spring 4
Course Description

This course examines how companies price goods and services, including pricing strategies and tactics, value creation, price structures, the role of competition, profit and costs in pricing, and pricing policy and regulation. We also examine the ways goods and services reach their customers, including distribution strategies, channel players and relationships, and channel effectiveness.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ADBM5020

Comments:

ADGR 8028 Public Relations Fall 3
Course Description

Public Relations is a vital and versatile communication tool. Course explores the techniques and media used to influence special publics including the news media. Reviews the principles and practices of on-line communication, how electronic media differs from traditional media, reaching new audiences, advantages and limitations. Students study examples of public relations campaigns and design their own. Focuses on non-profit public relations, corporate problems and the relationship between management strategies and promotional objectives.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADGR 8030 Talent Management Spring 3
Course Description

Companies often describe the people they employ as their most important asset. The best companies view talent as competitive differentiator and one where the acquisition, engagement, development, and retention of talent is a strategic priority. This course exposes you to methods and practices to acquire, engage, and develop talent, focuses on the development of leaders within an organization, and examines how executive succession is managed. Through readings, cases studies, on-line and in class discussions student will develop their definition of talent management and perspectives on the most effective practices. The course will culminate with a research project and in class presentation that allows learnings throughout the semester to be shared and reflected with the full cohort group.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADGR 8032 Developing High Performance Leaders Spring 3
Course Description

High performance is an art and science, a goal in all fields --sports, business, education, and medicine. Elements of high performance, the focus of this course, are similar across fields. Recognizing the increasing number of adults participating in athletics while striving for professional goals, this course examines how to achieve high performance while realizing balance and happiness in life. Readings cover the physiology of exercise, aging, and performance; memory and time management; theories of goal setting, excellence, success, nature versus nurture, habit, and motivation; and perspectives from adult developmental and positive psychology. In a goal-setting project, students will experiment with the benefits, challenges, and risks of aiming high as well as its effects on self-confidence and time management, and the ability to focus, handle stress, set limits, and perform in other areas of life.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADGR 8041 Persuasive Communication Fall 3
Course Description

In our culture, image is about conveying success. It is what makes us want to buy a brand or vote for a candidate. Course explores the powerful role of imaging, the use of trademarks as a vehicle to convey a corporate image, and how a “marketable personality” (for a product, service, organization or individual) is defined, developed and communicated. Examines strategies for balancing the emotional and rational factors of a message, finding a position with “soul,” and using research to full advantage in relation to image failure and crisis management. A look at how imaging is affected by the exploding world of media and how it influences the corporate bottom line. Video and audio presentations and case studies provide stimulating examples. Students will better understand the imaging process and develop the know-how to evaluate and use it.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADGR 8044 Leadership:Theory and Practice Fall 3
Course Description

Student must have access to computer with web-cam. Have you ever asked: what makes a great leader? If so, you join countless researchers and practitioners who have been trying to answer this for decades. Are leaders born? Are they bred? What distinguishes them? Course examines a number of theories, and provides a bedrock of leadership practice that can be readily transferred to many different organizations. Focus is on practical applications including an introduction to different leadership theories, case analysis, and hands-on experience with leadership instruments for both the individual and organizations. Course will require monitoring and posting to the virtual classroom on Canvas 2-3 days each week to submit work and engage in on-line discussion.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ADBM5005

Comments:

ADGR 8046 Organization Theory and Design Fall 3
Course Description

Designed to identify and explore current strategies and measures that enhance organization productivity within a healthy workplace environment. The course examines the current literature that focuses on workplace productivity in the public, private and non-profit sectors. A look at the changing roles of the game, the melding of the physical and virtual worlds; the evolution from a more vertical hierarchical design into more collaborative, interactive, and horizontal structures, joining with global endeavors. Course is sensitive to cultural dynamics, new patterns of participation and behavior, examines personal, interpersonal, and group behavior and suggests practical approaches to better respond.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: A hybrid course utilizing required classroom attendance on specific dates. The other weeks will require monitoring and posting to the virtual classroom on Canvas 2-3 days each of those on-line weeks to submit work and engage in on-line discussion.

ADGR 8053 Employment and Labor Law Spring/Fall 4
Course Description

This introduction to the rapidly evolving law of the workplace focuses on how the law works in practice today providing important information for employees and managers. Looks at traditional common law such as “Employment At Will” and areas of employment law topics including hiring, promotion and termination, workplace security, privacy and safety, compensation and benefits, immigration, and labor-management relations. Course also covers the various laws prohibiting discrimination in the workplace, with a focus on federal statutes and regulations as well as the emerging legal issues around Social Media in the workplace.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ADLA5053

Comments:

ADGR 8054 Business of Sports Fall 3
Course Description

From team sports, there is much to learn about team play, leadership, management, and motivation that can be applied to many careers. Events happen so quickly on the playing field that players don't have time to process lessons which can be so valuable for success elsewhere. Including a study of the explorer Ernest Shackleton, this course explores theories of leadership, followership, motivation, effective communication, and goal achievement as well as types of followership. Topics covered include selecting, building, and motivating a team; identifying team leadership qualities and delegating power; and developing strong leadership skills. Team leadership skills include instilling organizational values; setting a positive tone with humor and goal setting; resolving conflict; introducing new initiatives; managing setbacks and failure; refocusing perspective; and effective strategies for improvement and feedback on performance.


Instructor(s): Cathy Utzschneider

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADGR 8055 Human Resource Development Summer/Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course focuses on employees and how to get the highest level of performance out of employees. What motivates your employees? What makes them want to stay? How do you prevent attrition? This course will start with an introduction to organizational design and relevant organizational development theories. It will then move to talent acquisition and employee training, where use of analytics and metrics will be introduced. Next, students will learn performance management methods and appraisal, including use of instruments and rating scales. The course will then move to career development and leadership development including assessing talent, developing career paths, and succession planning. The course will conclude by helping students understand the differences between coaching and mentoring, and how to effectively manage organizational talent.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADGR 8090 Workforce Planning and Employment Fall 3
Course Description

Strategic Workforce Planning takes a broad view of the organization to assure the right people and right skillsets are in place to drive strategy and reinforce culture. Key stakeholders are partners in the process to ensure adoption within the organization, and collaboration is necessary to drive alignment of people, process and technology. Workforce planning considers the balance between the current state, the organization’s evolution, and the desired future state. Finding that balance requires measuring the system, and evaluating both the internal and external environments. This course will help you think about how to assess organizations, learn to work with the organization’s strategy and culture to determine the key factors driving Workforce Planning, how to apply different frameworks, and to create a gap analysis between the current state and the desired state. From this framework, you will look at ways to implement the strategy, and learn to use data to inform your thinking.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADGR 8120 Marketing Analytics Summer 3
Course Description

As industries become increasingly competitive, companies rely more and more on marketing to attract buyers and prove the value of their spend from brand awareness to impact on revenues. Doing so in today’s digital world requires a clear understanding and management of metrics and analytics. The Internet promises to revolutionize the dynamics of international commerce and permits new types of measurement tools that will expand the data available to marketers, including advertising measurement and customer profiling. This course will provide students with the main tools to lead marketing performance and help them answer key questions such as: How can I lead marketing performance by designing the appropriate metrics? What are the most important marketing metrics and analytics for me to use? How can I measure my various marketing programs’ impact on revenue and profit? How can I best communicate marketing results with my executive team and board?


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADGR 8201 Applied Techniques: Software and Reporting Fall 3
Course Description

The objective of the Course is to provide students with deeper dive in subjects of Planning and Scheduling, Monitoring, and Reporting. Building on the Project Management Fundamentals. This Course will also provide a hands-on learning of a Critical Path Method (CPM) based software such as Microsoft Project. The students will be introduced to various techniques on how to develop a Schedule step-by-step. Students prepare and present sample work to the instructor and to the classmates. The students are introduced to the terminology used in the software as well as the terminology referenced in the PMI PMBOk® Guide. This Course is a hybrid delivery of a combination of in-class sessions and online asynchronous work. Other Project Controls functionalities are introduced such are Status Reporting, Earned Value Management, Resource and Cost Loading the Schedule.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADGR 8203 Stakeholder Management Fall 3
Course Description

Course provides students with deeper dive in subjects of Managing the various Stakeholders who affect Project progress. Stakehoholders are not just the team members, they are also people with the company at all levels and all functions, including the executive management and the executive Champion. Students are alerted on how to identify, enhance or minimize the impact and the support of external Stakeholders be it clients, business partners, Government agencies at the local, state, and Federal levels. Stakeholders may also be members of the general public and/or public organizations either in support of or in opposition of the Project. The students will be introduced to various Communications methods and techniques to improve the Stakeholder support and keep them engaged. Course is a hybrid of in-class sessions and online asynchronous work.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADGR 9902 Applied Research Project Fall/Spring/Summer 3
Course Description

The Applied Research Project for Leadership & Administration is designed to give students the opportunity to apply the knowledge they have acquired throughout their graduate program to real-world situations. The culmination of such knowledge will be directed at a final presentation and major paper. Also, the learning objectives of their particular MS specialization will be encapsulated through their in-depth, individualized research. An applied research project is meant to be a cumulative experience. As such this course provides opportunities for students to integrate knowledge from their core and concentration courses, to gain insight into the meaning of professionalism and professional practice, and to produce a research project that can be utilized in their current work setting to showcase their skills and talents. Alternatively it can also be used to highlight their background to prospective employers or in fields in which they have an interest but may not be currently employed.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed ADGR7703

Cross listed with:

Comments: Course is taken in final semester only.