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English (Woods College) Courses (ADEN) Woods College of Advancing Studies


Subject Area Course # Course Title Semester Credit Hours Expand
ADEN 1052 Introductory College Writing Fall 4
Course Description

Course presents the basic techniques that are necessary for successful college writing. It provides the essential tools for clear, organized, effective analytical expression. Opportunities for revisions heighten self-confidence.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 1053 Introductory College Writing for Non-Native Speakers Fall 4
Course Description

Designed for non-native English speakers who for personal/professional interests wish to sharpen their writing skills. In a supportive environment, students study the finer points of grammar and punctuation, patterns for composing sentences, paragraphs, and essays. Analysis of literature enhances critical reading and writing skills. Weekly writing exercises build confidence.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 1054 College Writing Spring 4
Course Description

This course, which introduces flexible strategies for approaching each stage of the writing process, prepares students to succeed in their college-level writing. Students learn from readings that illustrate conventions and techniques of composition and from their own regular practice in drafting, revising, and editing.


Instructor(s): Dustin Rutledge

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADEN 1060 Literary Works Fall 4
Course Description

This course offers students a concentrated, introductory study of drama, poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Students read a selection of contemporary works, learning how to analyze and appreciate literature.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 1096 The Craft of Writing Fall 4
Course Description

Introductory course addressing frequent problems in writing. Students write short weekly papers that encourage the development of individual strategy and style. Class essays, as well as creative prose works, provide models. Course is an elective or alternative for Introductory College Writing.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 1129 Informing Writers Fall 4
Course Description

All good writing flows from good information. The four library sessions will familiarize students with the organization of libraries, the organization and presentation of information in print, online, and other formats and its importance to writers. A primary goal is for students to become more proficient at finding the information they need at libraries, on the Web, and from other sources. Students also learn about new tools and techniques that will inform their research and writing projects. Practical application is stressed.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 1132 Practice of Criticism Fall 3
Course Description

Surveys a variety of literary forms (romance, elegy, tragedy, comedy, novels, lyric poetry and modern drama) as well as approaches to these forms. It considers the text as an artifact in a field to be studied from many angles, including Shakespeare's Macbeth and Much Ado About Nothing, Milton's Lycidas, Bronte's Wuthering Heights, poetry by T.S. Eliot and Adrienne Rich, Joyce's Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, and Brian Friel's Translations.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 1161 Crime, Criminals and the Courts Fall 4
Course Description

Real life crime captivates our sense of intrigue, imagination and our investigative nature. The Whitey Bulger saga, the Lindbergh kidnapping, the Lizzie Borden case, the Boston Strangler murders and the Charles Manson family, and are just some of the fascinating cases that enthrall the public. Analyzing alleged criminals, their suspected motives, and the justice system, students discover how true crime writers master the art of recreating and retelling notorious crimes. Videos and guest lecturers supplement class discussions.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): McAleer

Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 1173 Introduction to Literary and Cultural Theory Spring 3
Course Description

We will take up several fundamental questions such as: What is theory? What is its relevance to English majors? What is the difference between terms such as text/work; discourse/author; subject/person? Why are English majors reading European and other thinkers who are not directly studying literature? What is literature anyway and what is its relation to culture? How does theory address reality, identity and sexuality? No prior knowledge of theory required, but students must be willing to be challenged by complexity. Students will be introduced to a variety of rhetorical terms and theoretical orientations.


Instructor(s): Kalpana Seshadri-Crooks

Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 1195 College Years:Literary Images Fall 4
Course Description

This class considers fiction, nonfiction, drama and movies describing the experience of higher education. We examine and analyze the works on their own merits and we also use them to inform reflection on our experiences in education. Works include A Hope in the Unseen, by Ron Suskind; The Student Body: Short Stories About College Students and Professors, John McNally, editor; Educating Rita, by Willy Russell.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 1203 Social Networking in the Digital Age Fall 4
Course Description

Social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter have, for better or worse, changed the nature of friendship. Today people meet, converse and interact online. Networks connect people across continents, enable collaboration from afar, facilitate sharing of news and information, offer group support, and provide a vital means of communication for the elderly and the housebound. Social networking also raises many questions: among the troubling developments, power-users "collect" friends; digital conversations are easily misinterpreted; news is sometimes skewed and traditional news outlets undermined; and conversations, once private, are now visible to entire networks. Readings, discussion and reflection explore the positive and negative aspects of social networks, providing a rich palette for writing.


Instructor(s): Thomas MacDonald

Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 1213 Cityscapes:Literary Portraits Fall 4
Course Description

Cities offer authors rich geographic and imaginative space in which to explore quests for life, love, happiness, excitement and success. Course explores how authors invest the urban landscape with symbolic meaning so that the setting almost becomes another character in the text. Discussion focuses on how setting affects character, including urban socialites, capitalists, gangsters and entrepreneurs. Readings include Edith Wharton’s House of Mirth, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man, Toni Morrison’s Jazz, Ron Suskind’s A Hope in the Unseen, and select poetry and drama.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 1214 Writers of New England Fall 3
Course Description

As hope and promise focus our nation’s attention, we look at gifted writers, present and past, from the New England School of Writers whose works share an uplifting, optimistic outlook in the face of adversity and challenge. Writers include Dickinson, Hawthorne, Alcott, Thoreau, Emerson, Frost, Dubus, and Updike.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 1218 Post-Modern Literary Laurels Fall 3
Course Description

A look at the best in postmodern fiction. Works by recent recipients of prestigious national and global literary awards including the Nobel Prize and National Book Awards. Course explores the social, historical and psychological issues in novels that examine the lessons of the near past, speak to changing times, and look to the future. Readings include: The Feast of the Goat, Mario Vargas Llosa; The Fifth Child, Doris Lessing; Out Stealing Horses, Per Petterson; Beloved, Toni Morrison; Mister Pip, Lloyd Goods; Tree of Smoke, Denis Jonson and short works by Olga Grushin.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 1231 Investigative Journalism Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 1232 Investigative Journalism Fall 4
Course Description

Whether your interest lies in the human interest story, breaking news, the exposé or in honing your critical thinking and writing skills, this course offers the practical skills necessary for mastering journalistic form, drawing on credible sources, reporting the facts and sharpening your inquiry and interpretive skills. Introduces the public documents on which investigative reporters depend and the various locales, City Hall, State House, courthouses, where such records reside. Students learn how to access, read, and interpret records which inform decision making.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 1244 Film: Literature and Law Fall 4
Course Description

Interest in the rapport between film and literature as it relates to the law intrigues us as much today as ever. Literature captures the drama of a legal trial or an investigation into a brutal, racial murder. Film then takes this rich material and shapes it into a compelling form with dynamic visuals and other narrative techniques. The course explores the power of story-telling and the impact of film to embody and inhabit law and its relationship to ideas about inferiority, liberty, citizenry, race, justice, crime, punishment, and social order. Film adaptations from short stories, plays, and novellas will comprise the body of the curriculum.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Michalczyk

Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 1251 Visual Storytelling Fall 4
Course Description

Fiction that combines text and art, sometimes called graphic fiction, has always been popular and is gaining increasing respect as an art form. Course looks closely at a variety of visual stories and analyzes their relationship to traditional, text-only works. Readings include Maus, Art Spiegelman; Persepolis, Marjane Satrapi; Watchmen, Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 1264 The Master Sleuths Fall 4
Course Description

Igniting our sense of intrigue and imagination, master detectives like Sherlock Holmes, Miss Marple, Fr. Brown and their illustrious colleagues; Poirot, Spenser, Inspector Maigret and the usual suspects, elevate crime fiction to a true art form. Through reading, guest appearances by experts in the field, classroom discussions, classic films, and creative writing, students become familiar with most forms of detective fiction including malice domestic, modern suspense, English cozy, amateur sleuth, hard-boiled, and police procedural.


Instructor(s): John J. McAleer

Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 1265 Popular Novels with A Social Conscience Fall 4
Course Description

A look at novels that illuminate the injustices evident in cultures and communities, including injustices related to gender, race, and class. Memorable and moving literature opens learners hearts and minds to the universal nature of the human condition. Course examines and critiques works including Wright’s Native Son; Dickens, Oliver Twist; Naylor, Women of Brewster Place; Steinbeck, Of Mice and Men, Stockett, The Help; Pollan, The Omnivore’s Dilemma.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 1266 Studies in American Ethnic Literature Fall 4
Course Description

Ethnic difference has a profound effect on personal and social understandings of what it means to be an American. Multicultural fiction navigates the complex terrain of race and ethnicity in America. Fiction depicts a variety of experiences and suggests that what constitutes an American identity is far from settled. A discussion of the literature invites students to share their own personal narratives - stories of race, ethnicity, class, gender, faith, and nationality - to further uncover what it means to be “ethnic” in America. Writers include: S. Alexie, E. Danticat, J. Diaz, J. Eugenides, and J. Lahiri.


Instructor(s): James Murphy

Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 1286 Creative Non-Fiction Fall 3
Course Description

Adventure stories always capture our imagination–narratives of travel to exotic lands, battles with monsters, quests for treasure, the rescues of fair maidens and extreme experiences. Adventure means travel and quests as it intersects with technology, clashes with the forces of nature, sparks political intrigue and prompts growth and change for all who reach for the challenge. Texts include Junger’s The Perfect Storm, Erdrich’s, Books and Islands in Ojibwe Country, Shakespeare’s Four Great Tragedies, Hillenbrand’s Unbroken, Erik Weihenmayer’s Touch the Top of the World, and that classic twentieth-century adventure story, Jaws.


Instructor(s): Terry A. Long

Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 1287 Popular Fiction: Action Thrillers Fall 4
Course Description

James Patterson has defined action thrillers by the “intensity of emotions they create ... of apprehension and exhilaration, of excitement and breathlessness. ... By definition, if a thriller doesn’t thrill, it’s not doing its job.” John Grisham, Dan Brown, Stieg Larson, Michael Crichton, Tess Gerritson, Thomas Harris - whether legal, political, military, medical, psychological or sci-fi writers - nonstop action, precarious situations, hair-raising suspense, and heroic characters all exemplify the best thrillers. Course examines the various thriller genres, the control of pacing, the treatment of time, the use of language, and the manipulation of event. Students come to understand and work with the ways authors tell a story and sense what is essential for making fiction.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 1293 Laughter: A Literary Approach Fall 3
Course Description

One of the great delights of being fully human arises from an individual’s ability to share in mankind’s infinite capacity for laughter. Course explores relationship between laughter and happiness through the examination of some important sources of laughter in contemporary literature: irony, paradox, wit, absurdity, and satire. This loving reflection on the human condition includes Hassler, Staggerford; Anne Tyler, Breathing Lessons; Russell Baker, Growing Up; Kurt Vonnegut, Jailbird and essays by Lewis Grizzard.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 1295 Survivals Fall 4
Course Description

Various American writers portray the survival of individuals faced with emotional, cultural, economic and social stress in a rapidly changing world. Course examines how changes in the workplace, society and family affect the psychological and spiritual growth of characters who must cope with conflicting demands and envision new solutions. Works include Wharton, Ethan Frome; Cather, O Pioneers; Guest, Ordinary People; Tyler, Saint Maybe; and short fiction by Kate Chopin, Theodore Dreiser and others.


Instructor(s): Robert Farrell

Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 1300 Youth in Twenty-First Century Fall 4
Course Description

As national and international boundaries evaporate in this interconnected always “on” world, our understanding of young people as a force in the 21st century changes continuously. Topics include the relationship between youth and mass culture, youth as consumers and producers. Examines growing up without a childhood, the impact of dislocation, instability, youth’s political activism, the emergence of “teenage”, “student”, “young adult” as social constructs and how these interact with categories of race, gender and identity. Readings include: A Thousand Splendid Suns, Khaled Hosseini; Life of Pi, Yann Martel; Secret Life of Bees, Sue Monk Kidd; Coming of Age in Mississippi, Anne Moody; The Next Better Place: A Father and Son on the Road, Michael Keith; Twilight, Stephanie Meyer.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 1326 Shakespeare I -The Author and His Times: Comedies and Dark Humor Fall 4
Course Description

In this study of selected plays from the Shakespearean canon, we shall learn that his comedies are far more than “the plays which end in marriages”. As our cornerstone, students will understand Elizabethan culture, and become familiar with Renaissance theories of love (including Plato, Christian ideals, and courtly love). We will also examine the deft use of humor in the plays, including the roots of what we enjoy in contemporary comedy: puns, double entendres, gender confusion, and slapstick physical comedy. Finally, we will analyze darker themes shared in common with his tragedies: oppression, the dangers of urban life, loneliness, marginalization and social injustice. We will evaluate selected plays as exemplars of his best work: A Midsummer Night's Dream; The Tempest; Much Ado about Nothing, and one darkly humorous tragedy--Hamlet.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1700 requirement

ADEN 1339 Shakespeare's Tragedies Fall 4
Course Description

At the height of his creativity, Shakespeare wrote his Golden Tragedies, poignant revelations of humanity’s struggle between good and evil and search for moral order. We’ll explore these works from the philosophical, political, and moral context of the Elizabethan world, spotlighting Shakespeare’s artistry as a poetic dramatist. Whether you’re a novice or scholar of Shakespeare’s plays, you’ll discover new insights and meaning in our exploration of these great works: Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, and Macbeth.


Instructor(s): Maureen R. MacDonald

Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 1365 Film Criticism Fall 3
Course Description

Literature and film have shared a symbiotic relationship from the birth of the cinema at the end of the 19th century, since plays, novels, and short stories became the source for many films. This course will focus on the various styles of adaptation to the screen with an emphasis on writing exercises which will include blurbs, newspaper reviews, comic-critiques, and will end with a short scholarly article. The material will be drawn from a Civil War short story by Ambrose Bierce, a hard-boiled Noir novel, and other popular literary works covering diverse genres.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 1372 Film Adaptation of Fictional Works Fall 4
Course Description

This course will focus on literary works that have been adapted to the screen, analyzine various approaches in style and technique. At times content and thematic focus remain similar, while for other adaptations, there can be significant changes from the written word to the cinematic image. Plays, short stories and novels for the course include, among others, The Conformist by Alberto Moravia, In the Bedroom by Andre Dubus, To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, A Man for All Seasons by Robert Bolt, Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury, and The Lottery by Shirley Jackson.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 1374 Medieval Arthurian Literature Fall 4
Course Description

Myth, legend, and history conspired to make the most popular and enduring set of characters in all of medieval literature. The stories of Arthur and Guinevere, the sorcerer Merlin, the lustful Uther Pendragon, Sir Gawain, Sir Lancelot, Sir Perceval, and the Knights of the Round Table exerted a fascination that has outlived most other popular literature from the Middle Ages. Texts and authors will include Mabinogi, Culhwch, Geoffrey of Monmouth, Chrtien de Troyes, Marie de France, Prose Vulgate, Alliterative and Stanzaic Mortes d'Arthur, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Malory's Morte d'Arthur.


Instructor(s): Robert Stanton

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Fulfills the pre-1700 requirement.

ADEN 1390 Global Literature Fall 4
Course Description

Global literature goes beyond the notion of the globe as a physical geographic entity and transcends national boundaries to comment on the most prevailing aspects of the human condition. This course will attempt to redefine the borders of the world we live in through narratives that recognize the many conflicting issues of race, language, economy, gender and ethnicity, which separate and limit us, while also recognizing that regardless of the differences in our stories, we are united by our humanity. Through literature, students will journey across continents, countries, cultures and landscapes, to reflect on various renditions on the human experience. Writers will include: Aravind Adiga (India), NoViolet Bulawayo (Zimbabwe), Edwidge Danticat (Haiti), Yu Hua (China), Dinaw Mengestu (Ethiopia), and Marjane Satrapi (Iran)..


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Akua Sarr

Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 1413 New World Classics Fall 3
Course Description

Course explores six classics of American fiction and the distinctive American form and style which emerges.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 1425 American Popular Literature Fall 3
Course Description

Certain formulas continue to produce books that millions of Americans read for pleasure: mysteries, romances, spy thrillers, detective stories, westerns, science fiction. Are these books trash or art? How can readers determine their significance? This course raises questions about literature, culture and society, and considers whether critical methods used to read "great books" can help interpret popular literature. Works include Louis L'Amour, The Burning Hills; Thomas Harris, The Silence of the Lambs; Robert B. Parker, Early Autumn; Danielle Steel, Zoya, and others.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 1477 Modern Irish Literature Fall 4
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): James Murphy

Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 1479 Creative Nonfiction Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 1572 Techniques of Precise Expression Fall 4
Course Description

With instant communication, delivering the message fast sometimes seems to trump getting it right. Yet, whether communicating in business, disseminating information online or blogging for pleasure, writing clearly, with precision, economy and style, is more important than ever. Course expands powers of expression, develops a large and vital vocabulary and enables learners to write and speak with precision. Sharpens writing skills through exercises and brief assignments, with special attention paid to writing for the Web.


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Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 1575 Corporate Communication Spring 4
Course Description

In a globally competitive and technologically advanced world, the ability to convey ideas and persuade diverse audiences is critical to professional success in every organization. Course provides a learning environment which develops proficient communication skills. Focusing on business writing and oral presentations with attention to purpose and audience, the curriculum offers strategies for effective business communication in letters, memos, email, reports, proposals, resumes, meetings, and presentations. Classroom interaction, written assignments, collaborative media design, and team presentations provide multiple opportunities to demonstrate and enhance skills and to receive feedback on your professional communication style.


Instructor(s): Joseph T. Gibbs

Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 1599 Readings and Research Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 2218 Literary Laurels Fall 4
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 2244 Film: Literature and Law Summer 3
Course Description

Interest in the rapport between film and literature as it relates to the law intrigues us as much today as ever. Literature captures the drama of a legal trial or an investigation into a brutal, racial murder. Film then takes this rich material and shapes it into a compelling form with dynamic visuals and other narrative techniques. The course explores the power of story-telling and the impact of film to embody and inhabit law and its relationship to ideas about inferiority, liberty, citizenry, race, justice, crime, punishment, and social order. Film adaptations from short stories, plays, and novellas will comprise the body of the curriculum.


Instructor(s): John Michalczyk

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ADFM1241

Comments:

ADEN 2289 New Forms, New Fictions Summer 3
Course Description

This course studies literary adventurers struggling to represent the changing world of the Twentieth Century. Confronting altered personal and political realities, these writers experiment with new forms and fictions; texts reflect dramatic changes in ethics and aesthetics. A variety of works are read: Joyce, Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man; Woolf, To the Lighthouse; Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five; Burgess, A Clockwork Orange; Faulkner, As I Lay Dying.


Schedule: Periodically

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Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 3025 From Gothic to Sublime: A Survey of 19th Century British Literature Spring 4
Course Description

Coinciding with the expanding Imperial Empire, 19th century Britain experienced great advances in both education and technology, leading to greater literacy among the populace, as well as mass production in the publishing industry. As such, popular literature emerged. This course explores the poetry and short fiction of the Romantic and Victorian eras, considering how the literature of the period reflects the social and political sensibilities of the age. Highlighted authors include Wordsworth, Keats, Browning, Rossetti, Tennyson, Wilde, Dickens and Kipling.


Schedule: Periodically

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Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 3200 American Renaissance: Brahmins, Transcendentalists, & Dark Romantics Fall 4
Course Description

The latter half of the 19th century was a fertile period for the New England literary establishment: the Harvard elite (“Brahmins”) such as Lowell, Longfellow and Holmes, told tales reminiscent of their European counterparts; Thoreau and Emerson reflected the cultural immersion of the Transcendentalist movement; while Hawthorne, Melville and Poe presented a Dark Romanticism in their writing. This survey course will consider the major authors of the era, their contribution to the American literary canon, and the cultural movements which inspired their works.


Schedule: Periodically

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Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 3260 Survey of African Literature Spring 4
Course Description

An introduction to the major writers and diverse literary traditions of the African continent. We will study the historical and cultural contexts of fiction from different regions, and themes from various periods: colonialism and cultural imperialism, nationalism and independence, post-colonialism, and contemporary voices of African writers in America. Writers include Chinua Achebe (Nigeria), Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (Nigeria), J.M. Coetzee (South Africa), Tsitsi Dangarembga (Zimbabwe), Laila Lalami (Morocco), Ngugi wa Thiongo (Kenya).


Schedule: Periodically

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Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 3500 Writers and the Catholic Imagination Spring 4
Course Description

Boston College's Jesuit Catholic tradition encourages students to "find God in all things." This course examines spiritual expression in a sample of modern and contemporary Catholic literature: short stories (1955-1965) by Flannery O'Connor, the memoir Redeemed (2008)by Heather King, the play Good People (2011) by David Lindsay-Abaire, and the essay collection The Thorny Grace of It (2013) by Brian Doyle. What is Catholic literature? How does it provide unique opportunities for reflection, even inspiration? How do art, spirituality, and human experience intersect? As students learn about Catholicism to better understand Catholic literature, they explore the themes, questions, and formal and linguistic literary techniques that inform the Catholic imagination.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s): Dustin Rutledge

Prerequisites: None

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ADEN 4413 New World Classics Summer 3
Course Description

This course explores six classics of American fiction and the distinctive American form and style which emerges.


Instructor(s): Robert Farrell

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

ADEN 5572 Techniques of Precise Expression Spring/Summer 3
Course Description

Since the art of communication prospers only when we fully realize the power of words, this coures is designed to expand your powers of expression, both written and verbal. We will explore what some great communicators (Lincoln, Churchill, William Faulkner, Martin Luther King, Joan Didion, John Updike, others) have to teach us about precise expression. We will also glean lessons from such contemporary sources as journalism (the daily newspaper), narrative nonfiction (magazines and books), arts criticsm (movies, music, theater), the advertising industry, and the blogosphere. A further goal of the course is to help students develop a large and vital vocabulary, and an understanding of usage, that will enable them to write and speak with precision.


Instructor(s): Don Aucoin

Prerequisites: None

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