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African&African Diaspora Studies Courses (AADS) College of Arts and Sciences


Subject Area Course # Course Title Semester Credit Hours Expand
AADS 1101 Africa Since 1850 Spring 3
Course Description

This course provides an overview of the recent history of sub-Saharan Africa. It begins by examining colonization and the dynamics of colonialism, then traces the development of anti-colonialism and nationalism, and concludes by surveying the trajectories of post-colonial states and societies. Throughout the semester we will think about popular experiences in addition to institutional or elite narratives, ask questions about the changing position of Africa in the world, and contemplate the stakes of conceptualizing African history in the present. Materials will include a range of academic literature, fiction and non-fiction works by African intellectuals, and visual media.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Priya Lal

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 1104 African-American History I Fall 3
Course Description

This two-semester survey examines the history and culture of African-Americans from the pre-colonial period to the present. The first semester treats the period before the middle passage, the evolution of slave and free society, the development of Black institutions, and the emergence of protest movements through the Civil War's end. During the second semester, the emphases are placed on issues of freedom and equality from Reconstruction, urban migration, and civil rights struggles through current consideration of race, class, and gender conflicts.


Instructor(s): Karen Miller

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HIST2481

Comments:

AADS 1105 African American History II Spring 3
Course Description

The two-semester survey examines the history and culture of African-Americans from the pre-colonial period to the present. The first semester treats the period before the middle passage, the evolution of slave and free society, development of Black institutions, and emergence of the protest movements through the Civil War's end. During the second semester, the emphases are placed on issues of freedom and equality from Reconstruction, urban migration, civil rights struggles through current consideration of race, class, and gender conflicts.


Instructor(s): Karen Miller

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HIST2482

Comments:

AADS 1108 African and African Diaspora Literature Spring 3
Course Description

By studying creative writing by African writers and writers of African descent, this course examines how diasporic Africans created viable lives for themselves in the "New World." Questions that define this study include: how were Africans in the diaspora able to negotiate the complex social, political, and cultural spaces they encountered? What ancestral traces have they retained and how do these traces co-exist within New World realities?


Instructor(s): Rhonda Frederick

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL2150

Comments:

AADS 1110 Introduction to African Diaspora Studies Fall 3
Course Description

A survey of the African continent and the Diaspora that would include geography, history, politics, economics and literature. The purpose of the course is to introduce students to specific historical, cultural, social and political topics related to Africa and the African Diaspora. Because the scope of the course is so vast, we will explore important issues and themes to give students a desire to further pursue more specific classes in African and African Diaspora Studies. Boston College faculty members will be invited to lecture in their area of expertise specific to Africa and the Diaspora throughout the semester.


Instructor(s): Rhonda Frederick

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 1114 Intro to African&African Diaspora Religion Spring 3
Course Description

This course will focus on indigenous traditions of Africa, like those of the Akan, Yoruba, Ndebele, and Fon, as well as related traditions of the Americas like Candomble, Lukumi, and Haitian Vodou with attention to the movement of these traditions through the slave trade and, more recently, through voluntary migration and digital travel. This course will explore topics including: concepts of God and cosmology, ways of knowing, spirit possession, ritual, ceremony, divination, and art, within a religious studies framework that employs phenomenology, anthropology of religion, and other approaches.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Funlayo Wood

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 1118 Haiti and the DR: Haitian and Dominican Literature Fall 3
Course Description

The Island of Hispaniola, the two nations know known as Haiti and the Dominican Republic - has a complex history. This class examines that history through the literature of both countries. Looking at different historic time periods and themes such as dictatorship, migration, race and national identity we will focus on how fiction writers express what it means to be Dominican/Haitian and how the two are constantly in conversation with one another both implicitly and explicitly. We will focus on readings from Junot Diaz, Edwidge Danticat, and Julia Alvarez, and draw from music, politics and current events of both countries.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Regine Michelle Jean-Charles

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 1120 Religion in Africa Fall 3
Course Description

The course is designed to introduce the variety of African religious experiences within the context of world religions. The significance and contents of Africism as the African autochthonal religion will be outlined. Heterochthonal religions to Africa will be discussed. These include the following: Middle East originating religions, like Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, and those originating in India, like Hinduism, Jainism, Sikhism, and Parseeism. While emphasis will be laid on the impact religion has had on African communities within the context of peace and justice in the world, the course will also consider the role of Africism in a changing Africa.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Aloysius M. Lugira

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: THEO1107

Comments:

AADS 1121 Christianity in Africa Spring 3
Course Description

This course is intended to give a historically interdisciplinary bird's-eye-view of Christianity in Africa. While Christianity in general will be touched upon, emphasis will be laid on the development and extension of the Christian tradition in Africa. The three stages within which Christianity has so far been established in Africa will be discussed. Finally, the response Christianity has received in Africa will be considered for the purpose of visualizing the future role of Christianity in a changing Africa.


Instructor(s): Aloysius M. Lugira

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: THEO1108

Comments:

AADS 1137 Managing Diversity Fall 3
Course Description

Students in this course will learn about contemporary empirical and theoretical research on the dynamics of international culture, gender, race, and other special differences in the workplace. They can also increase skills in diagnosing and solving diversity-related conflicts and dilemmas, and develop a capacity to distinguish a monolithic organization from one that treats diversity as a competitive advantage.


Instructor(s): Judith Clair

Prerequisites: MGMT 1021, MGMT 1031, or permission of instructor

Cross listed with: MGMT2137

Comments:

AADS 1138 Race, Class, and Gender Fall 3
Course Description

Viewing race, class, gender, sexuality, and other identities as inseparable from discussions of inequality and power, this course will begin by discussing the social construction of these categories and how they are connected. We will then look at how these social identities shape and are also shaped by four general subject areas: (1) wealth and poverty, (2) education, (3) family, and (4) crime, law, and social policy. Although this course is separated into subject areas, we shall see that these areas greatly overlap and are mutually influenced by one other.


Instructor(s): Shawn McGuffey

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SOCY1038

Comments:

AADS 1139 African World Perspectives Spring 3
Course Description

The aim of this course is to provide a broad overview of how Africa has impacted the world and how the world has impacted upon Africa. The course is divided into six basic topic of "units." Each unit deals with a major area of debate in the field of African studies.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Zine Magubane

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SOCY1039

Comments:

AADS 1150 Intro to Sub-Saharan African Politics Spring 3
Course Description

This course provides students with the necessary analytical tools for understanding politics in sub-Saharan Africa. It follows the historical-institutional approach, and departs from the assumption that history matters. Thus, students will critically survey the key historical events (such as colonialism, decolonization, one-party state, democratization, among other issues), which have impacted overall political development in the continent. This course seeks to eradicate the overwhelmingly negative image of the continent, often the result of media reports, which may adversely influence a serious analysis of politics in Africa.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Abel Djassi Amado

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 1152 Topics on Contemporary Sub-Saharan Africa Fall 3
Course Description


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 1155 Introduction to African-American Society Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

In 1896, distinguished scholar W.E.B. DuBois became convinced that the experience of Africans in the Americas was so distinctive that it was imperative to study Black people in order to understand power dynamics at all levels of society. This course will study those power dynamics. While paying particular attention to the many ways that racial power dynamics have impacted all people of African descent in the United States, this course does not assume a uniform Black experience. We shall see that gender, class, and sexuality greatly shape the differing experiences of African-Americans.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): C. Shawn McGuffey

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SOCY1043

Comments: To get Sociology credit for the major or minor (or social science core credit), you must register for SOCY1043 rather than cross-listed course.

AADS 1172 Post Slavery History of the Caribbean Spring 3
Course Description


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Frank Taylor

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement

AADS 1174 Modern Latin America Spring 3
Course Description

This class will study how different cultural, political, economic, and environmental trends have shaped Latin America since the mid-nineteenth century to today. Throughout the semester we will analyze how the region has changed over time, and we will learn the historical origins of debates, (involving issues such as migration, violence, social justice and economic development) that affect the region today. This history will be approached from different perspectives in order to offer a general but complex view of the region.


Instructor(s): Rodolfo Fernández

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HIST2302

Comments: Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core requirement Fulfills the Non-Western Requirement for the History Major

AADS 1175 Booker T. Washington Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines the life, times, and legacy of Booker T. Washington, 1856-1915. A complex and often polarizing historical figure, Washington alienated almost as many as he influenced domestically and internationally with his conflicting public statements and private acts regarding race, politics, violence, education, capitalism, and foreign relations, but he never failed to elicit impassioned responses from adversaries and supporters alike. Despite his death in 1915, Washington's ideas and influence continue to spark debate even today.


Instructor(s): Karen Miller

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 1199 Introduction to Caribbean Literature Spring 3
Course Description

The Caribbean, merely viewed through the lens of colonial history, often does not reflect the diversity and complexity of the region. From a colonial perspective, therefore, the Caribbean is both "known" and "unknown." Our work for this course compares and contrasts versions of the region by examining colonial histories and current literary traditions. We will pay particular attention to the ways oppositional cultures and identifies manifest in Caribbean literature. Themes of this course include: colonialism, History/histories, gender, geography ation, sexuality, class, and culture. Varied texts and media will assist in our interpretations of the Caribbean and its diaspora.


Instructor(s): Rhonda Frederick

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 1226 Religion, Racial Justice, and Reconciliation in South Africa Summer 3
Course Description

We will begin the course in Cape Town and then move to Pretoria for the remainder of the course. We will cover the following topics: key points in the history of South Africa; religious perspectives on apartheid; intellectual and armed conflict; fifty years of American foreign policy toward South Africa; Desmond Tutu and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission; reparations, forgiveness, trauma and healing; economic empowerment, gender. justice and religion; refugees, migrants, and xenophobia; HIV/AIDS; Christians-Jews-Muslims in South Africa; community organizing and economic justice


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: INTL1226 THEO1226

Comments: The course requirements and evaluations are based on the following: daily journal and reflection pieces; class participation; and a final paper. For the duration of the program, the class will meet from 9:00 am to approximately 1:00 pm in the arranged classroom followed by lunch and an afternoon excursion.

AADS 2194 Reading Race at the Millennium Fall 3
Course Description

Hipster racism, hashtag activism, and Columbusing are just some of the new ideas used to talk about race in this post-Millennial moment. This course will explore the new vocabulary of race emerging in this purportedly post-racial moment through study of cases drawn from popular culture, politics, and increasingly important digital spaces. We will focus on reading and writing about race in this moment through case studies such as Wes Anderson's films, Black Twitter, racially appropriative Halloween costumes, Asian food trucks, and the Obama presidency in order to understand how race, racialization, and racism continue to evolve.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Anjali Vats

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: COMM2194

Comments: COMM2194/AADS2194 satisfies one of the three elective courses required within the Communication major.

AADS 2199 Introduction to Caribbean Writers Spring 3
Course Description

The Caribbean, merely viewed through the lens of colonial history, often does not reflect the diversity and complexity of the region. From a colonial perspective, therefore, the Caribbean is both "known" and "unknown." Our work for this course compares and contrasts versions of the region by examining colonial histories and current literary traditions. We will pay particular attention to the ways oppositional cultures and identifies manifest in Caribbean literature. Themes of this course include: colonialism, History/histories, gender, geography ation, sexuality, class, and culture. Varied texts and media will assist in our interpretations of the Caribbean and its diaspora.


Instructor(s): Rhonda Frederick

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL2199

Comments:

AADS 2201 Versions in Black: Genres of Black Women's Writing Fall 3
Course Description

The phrase "Black Women's Writing" suggests that such writing is a fixed or homogeneous body of work that can be neatly defined and represented. Our course constitutes itself against this idea. By re-thinking these works, we also re-examine notions of literary canon, race, gender, sexuality, community, and history. Significantly, we "de-construct" common notions of Black Women's Writing by examining the varied genres these writers use to express their imaginings. Required readings come from the fields of science fiction (Octavia Butler), prose/experimental (Gayl Jones and Martha Southgate) novels, drama (Suzan-Lori Parks), poetry (Elizabeth Alexander), and autobiography/memoir (Toi Derricotte).


Instructor(s): Rhonda Frederick

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL2201

Comments:

AADS 2205 Race and Ethnicity in African Film and Literature Spring 3
Course Description

Africa is an extremely diverse continent. This course will critically engage with issues of diversity, identity and belonging on the African continent. This course will examine how histories, legacies and experiences of slavery, colonization and globalization have impacted issues of identity and belonging in Africa. Students will engage with and examine works from Anglophone, Francophone and Lusophone Africa.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Siphiwe Ndlovu

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 2208 Contemporary Francophone Women Writers Fall 3
Course Description

This course explores the specificity of francophone women's writing in a contemporary context, examining narratives from a wide variety of geographic locations including the Caribbean, North Africa and Sub-Saharan Africa. The question of genealogy is central to this course as we attempt to delineate a matrilineal francophone literary tradition. As such we will also consider these narratives in relation to feminist theory, history, socio-cultural politics, culture and ethnicity. Some of the themes we will study include silence and voice, the female body, mother-daughter relationships, migration and immigration, and canon formation.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Regine Jean-Charles

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with: FREN4454

Comments: Conducted in French
Elective for French major or minor

AADS 2209 Ethnic Theatre Studies Fall 3
Course Description


Instructor(s): Sun H. Kim

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: See Theatre Department description.

AADS 2214 Modern Southern Africa Fall 3
Course Description

Conflicts between Africans and European settlers in southern Africa have deep historical roots. Beginning with the first encounters between European and African societies, the course examines the expansion of European dominance, the politics and economics of racial inequality, and the resulting African protest movements and guerrilla warfare. The course covers South Africa, Angola, Mozambique, and Zimbabwe with an emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): David Northrup

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 2217 Politics and Society of Contemporary Sub-Saharan Africa Fall 3
Course Description

Focusing on the study of politics and government in Africa, this course surveys the different approaches used to examine the history of political development on the African continent as well as the institutional structure of the African states. We will explore some of the dimensions of social change and poltical reform in Post-Colonial Africa, with special reference to factors such as nationalism, ethnicity, state dysfunctionality, the problem of political order, democratization, and development, doing so against the backdrop of the debate between Afro-pessimism and Afro-optimism as we grapple with the fate of the continent -- the subject of various controversies.


Instructor(s): Masse Ndiaye

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: POLI1227

Comments:

AADS 2222 Black Education Movements Spring 3
Course Description

This course will cover the history of Black education movements, including freedman schools, citizenship education, court ordered school desegregation, war on poverty's education programs, community control of schools, revolutionary political education, liberation schools, affirmative action, and the twenty-first century issue of re-segregation.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Lyda Peters

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HIST2486

Comments: Fulfils Cultural Diversity Core Requirement

AADS 2223 Jamaican Culture & Globalization Fall 3
Course Description

This course focuses on "culture," specifically Jamaican culture, as an important global commodity. We will consider how Jamaican culture moves into global markets and is transformed into products and identities that are often at odds with the ideologies and values of the people who made it. We will examine definitions of globalization and then locate the role of culture within it. We will then consider how globalization influenced definitions of Jamaican culture and cultural values. Lastly, we will investigate how and/or if globalization has created opportunities for re-thinking nationalism, commodities, and in/formal economies.


Instructor(s): Rhonda Frederick

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL2209

Comments:

AADS 2228 Growing Up Ethnic in America:Multicultural Fiction Fall 1
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 2229 Capstone: Global Narratives Spring 3
Course Description

Guided by global literature, from Africa, the Caribbean, the Middle East and South Asia, students in this course will reflect on and explore the personal narratives that have contributed to their development. While examining the complex emotional lives of characters in the texts, we will also uncover, our own intricate his (and her) stories. Stories of family, faith, race, gender, class and nation; and the rites of passage that have made us who we are and brought us to where we are emotionally, intellectually and spiritually are the narratives we will share.


Instructor(s): Akua Sarr

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: UNCP5555

Comments: You can take a Capstone class only as a senior or second-semester junior.
Capstone classes may not be taken Pass/Fail.
You may take only one Capstone class before graduation.

AADS 2241 Black Feminisms 101: From Harriet Tubman to Beyoncé Fall 3
Course Description

Black feminists have long explored the question of race versus gender in their politics, theories, and writing. This class takes a closer look at the intersection of race and gender by using Black feminist thought as a lens to examine literature and popular culture. We will read writers and theorists from Africa and the diaspora to provide definitions of Black feminism. We consider how race and gender have been thought about over time.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Regine Jean-Charles

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 2243 Gender and Slavery Fall 3
Course Description

Discussions of slavery have focused upon the enslaved males' roles and responses. To gain a more complete picture of the complex social interactions and political and social consequences of slavery, we will examine it from the enslaved female's perspective as well. This course focuses upon women's labor, their roles in family life, the plantation community, and how gender informed the style and types of resistance in which men and women engaged. We will also discuss the effects of white paternalism upon gender roles in the slave communities and white female responses to the effects of slavery upon their lives.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): M. Shawn Copeland

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 2247 African American Critical Thought Spring 3
Course Description

This is an intensive survey of various thinkers and strategies, which have shaped the African American quest for human flourishing, self-realization, and equality in the United States of America. Readings will cover the 19th and 20th centuries.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): M. Shawn Copeland

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 2248 Community Service Research Seminar Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

CRP is a two-semester program that offers leadership, research, and public policy training for students interested in working with communities of color in Massachusetts. In the fall, students will participate in a seminar to study the process of community-based research and its methodologies and begin to design a research proposal for an independent study with a faculty advisor for the spring semester research project. The seminar will also include a lecture series, in which academic researchers and community professionals will discuss their current work and experiences on issues related to four research-interest communities.


Instructor(s): Deborah Piatelli

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: UNAS2254 SOCY2254

Comments: Students should contact the Thea Bowman AHANA and Intercultural Center to obtain permission to register.

AADS 2253 The Modern Black Freedom Movement Fall 3
Course Description

This course is a comprehensive history of the people, the stories, the events, and the issues of the civil rights struggle in America. The course focuses on the stories of the little-known men and women who made this social movement and presents the material so that both those who lived through these turbulent years and those too young to remember them will come to know their importance in our lives.


Instructor(s): Lyda Peters

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 2254 Introduction to Post-Colonial Literature Fall 3
Course Description

India, Nigeria, Colombia, Haiti: all four were at one point ruled by European powers. In this course we will examine colonialism's impact on nations around the world by reading a diverse array of novels written by the formerly colonized. In addition to learning about the history of colonialism, we will explore how colonialism's legacy continues to shape the world through the perspectives of those it has affected most.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Amelie Daigle

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL2255

Comments:

AADS 2262 Gospel According to Hip Hop Spring 3
Course Description

This course will examine the history of hip hop pioneers and their media as it developed on the stage of American history, and then follow hip hop as it emerged as the most powerful force in popular culture in the world. We will then examine the assumptions of homogeneity within the black community of the 20th Century and consider the future of this community that now has disintegrated from "one black America" into four: The Mainstream, The Transcendent, the Emergent and the Abandoned.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Chauncey McGlathery

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 2263 Hip Hop, Rap: Language of Protest Spring 3
Course Description

See Department.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Sandra Sandiford Young

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 2266 Rhythm and Blues in American Music Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the elements of rhythm and blues in the Afro-American sense, and traces the influence of these elements on American popular and classical music from the early 1900s to the present. Records, tapes, and audio-visual material that include music from the early New Orleans period to present-day jazz/rock and music videos will be used throughout the course.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: MUSA2331

Comments: Cross-Cultural Course within the major/minor

AADS 2267 Red, Whites, and the Blues: Fears & Faith in America Spring 3
Course Description

This course will first explore the how political media has exploited fear in its constituents to attain more political power. This course will also track how performers of protest songs within popular music in general and within African American music in particular have used their platform to publish and challenge this exploitation. From Bob Dylan to Bob Marley, the tradition of combating politics with protest music has flourished to create a grassroots system of checks and balances that is needed now more than ever.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Chauncey McGlathery

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 2280 Race and Visual Culture Spring 3
Course Description

This course considers representations of race in U.S. film, television and the visual arts. We will consider how the U.S.'s history of racial conflict and cooperation is imagined in various genres including art installations, t.v. and film. We will consider how such depictions are enabled or limited by their particular genre. How do police procedurals handle race differently than do sci-fi or family dramas? What typical metaphors, characters and/or visual signs arise and which topics seem particularly prevalent or taboo? Texts under consideration may include The Wire, Battlestar Galatica, Torchwood, For Coloured Girls, the Siege, The Help.


Instructor(s): Cynthia Young

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL2284

Comments:

AADS 2284 History of Black Nationalism Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the evolution and diversity of Black Nationalism and nationalist ideologies in the United States from the early nineteenth century through the present. Detailed study of several distinct nationalistic strategies, including emigrationist, separatist, cultural, and accomodationist, and their proponents will allow students to analyze and compare the forces influencing the evolution, proliferation, retrenchment, and resurgence of nationalist constructs at various points in African American history.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Karen Miller

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094

Cross listed with:

Comments: Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement

AADS 2285 Jazz in America Spring 3
Course Description

This course provides a thorough and detailed study and examination of the Black music that has come to be known as jazz. The socio-political nature of Black music in America, Black music in education, and the relations of Black music and the mass media are considered. Students will have the opportunity to experience live performances of jazz and will be asked to do a general analysis of at least one recording (LP) of a jazz performance.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: MUSA2332

Comments: Cross-Cultural Course

AADS 2290 Gospel Workshop Fall/Spring 0
Course Description

This course is a study and performance of the religious music of the Black Experience known as Spirituals and Gospels. One major performance is given each semester. Concerts and performances at local Black churches are also presented with the Voice of Imani Gospel Choir. The Gospel Workshop will provide the lab experience for MUSA2331 (AADS2266) and MUSA2332 (AADS2285). Members of these classes will be required to attend a number of rehearsals and performances of the Gospel Workshop. Members of the classes may sing in the choir but it is not required for the course.


Instructor(s): Chauncey McGlathery

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: MUSP1770

Comments: Performance course
No experience is required for membership, but a voice placement test is given to each student.

AADS 2291 Voices of Imani Spring 0
Course Description

This course emphasizes study and performance of the religious music of the Black experience known as Spirituals and Gospels. One major performance is given each semester. Concerts and performances at local Black churches also occur with the Voices of Imani Gospel Choir. Members are required to attend a number of rehearsals and performances. Members of the classes may sing in the choir but it is not required for the course.


Instructor(s): Chauncey McGlathery

Prerequisites: Performance course.

Cross listed with:

Comments: Zero credit for class 2014 and beyond

AADS 2299 Readings and Research Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 2306 Musics of Africa Spring 3
Course Description

This course is a survey of the musical diversity and cosmopolitanism of one of the world’s most populous continents. Drawing from ethnographic studies of African musics, we will explore some of the political, economic, and historical circumstances out of which certain genres and styles of music emerge and at the ways in which these genres and styles circulate in global music and performance markets.


Instructor(s): Kivenko, Sharon

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: MUSA2306

Comments: Cross-cultural course within the major/minor. The ability to read western European music notation is not required.

AADS 2330 History of Jazz Fall 3
Course Description

A history of America's music from its origins in African traditions through the contemporary scene. The course will explore its African roots; its consolidation in New Orleans and its spread into the cultural mainstrean in the Jazz Age; its transformation into bebop, cool, third stream, funk, and avant-garde trends; and the return to traditionalism. Key figures covered will be Armstrong, Ellington, Parker, and Marsalis, among others.


Schedule: Biennially

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: MUSA2330

Comments:

AADS 2334 Hip Hop in American Culture Spring 3
Course Description

This course is an historical and ethnomusicological review of hip hop. We will examine the roots of hip hop in African expressive culture, the emergence of the hip hop genre in the United States, and hip hop’s impact in other places around the globe. The course requires active listening, readings, and use of multimedia.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Timothy Mangin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: MUSA2334

Comments:

AADS 2470 Black and Popular: Speculative Fictions by Black Writers Fall 3
Course Description

This course asks: what do discussions of contemporary social issues look like when depicted in popular literatures written by writers of African descent? What is the benefit of fictionalizing these issues in genre literatures? Students address these questions by examining the forms of "speculative fictions" (specifically thriller, science fiction/fantasy, and mystery/detective) as well as urban romance to determine how each represents concerns of 20th/21st century black peoples in the US, Canada, Jamaica, and Martinique. Our focus on these genres' explorations of race, class, culture, incest, social engineering, and intimate relationships is complemented by socio-historical studies of these issues and countries.


Instructor(s): Rhonda Frederick

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL2470

Comments:

AADS 2484 Focus on Civil Rights: The Montgomery Bus Boycott Fall 3
Course Description

This course dissects the 382-day bus boycott by Montgomery, Alabama's black residents. Though not the first protest of its kind, it introduced two iconic figures to the national stage: Martin Luther King, Jr. and Rosa Parks. Four simple questions provide the foundation for the class, but the answers are unexpectedly complicated: What "law" did Parks violate? Why did Montgomery's black residents rally around Parks' 1955 arrest? How did Rev. King become the boycott's "voice" and "face," even though he was a relative newcomer to the city? How did this lengthy boycott change Montgomery's black community in the short term?


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Karen Miller

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HIST2484

Comments:

AADS 2485 Foodways and Folkways in African American History Spring 3
Course Description

Food provides a lens through which to explore and compare the impact of this dispersal on a people as they moved, adapted long-held practices to new places, new times, and new concerns. This course focuses on several themes such as evolving food customs and traditions, how those traditions reflect the common bonds as well as the limitations of diaspora, the politics, economics, and health implications of food availability and scarcity, and the presence of food as a dynamic element in cultural production and representation in art, literature, film, and history. Students will examine and share their own familial food traditions and histories.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Karen Miller

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: HIST2485

Comments:

AADS 3211 Modern Brazil Spring 3
Course Description

This course covers the making of the modern Brazilian state, from the rise of the Brazilian Empire in 1808 through the modern day. Through readings and the analysis of both popular and documentary films, we focus on the importance of race, class, and violence in the abolition of slavery, the rise of the state, the militarization of government, and the foundation of Brazil's modern government.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Zachary Morgan

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with: HIST4360

Comments: Fulfills Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

AADS 3213 African Slave Trade Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines the origins of this nefarious trade with particular emphasis on the trans-Atlantic slave trade that began in the sixteenth century. Topics include the economic, political, and moral dimensions of the trade, including ways in which slaves were obtained in Africa, their transport to the New World, the slave systems that were established there, and the campaign to end the trade in African slaves. The African slave trade is an excellent introduction to the changing geography, economics, and ideas of the modern world.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): David Northrup

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 3275 Race and Popular Culture after 9/11 Fall 3
Course Description

Using television, film, literature, performance, and popular media, this class considers how ideas about race and racialized groups are shifting in relation to fears about terrorism, security, and the "War on Terror". Special attention will be paid to how African Americans are being repositioned within popular culture in relation to other non-white populations including Arabs, Arab Americans, Mexicans and Latinos. Students will develop a critical vocabulary for talking about popular culture and will be expected to do a final research project that looks at a pop culture artifact in relation to the issues raised by the course.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Cynthia Young

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 3302 Racism: French and American Perspectives Spring 3
Course Description

French visitors have been observing and commenting on race relations in the United States since before the Civil War. During the twentieth century Paris became a magnet attracting disillusioned African-American artists, musicians and writers in search of a home and an opportunity to express their talents. And today the French confront a history of colonialism and struggle to combat racism as they interact with immigrants from former colonies. What is racism? What are the influences that shape attitudes towards race relations? We will explore these issues in the writings of Tocqueville, Beauvoir, Wright, Baldwin, and Fanon, among others.


Instructor(s): Jeff Flagg

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: RLRL3302

Comments:

AADS 3310 Studies of Race, Law, and Resistance Spring/Fall 3
Course Description

This course will examine and analyze protest movements for racial and economic justice from 1896 to 1968 and how these struggles contributed to sweeping reforms in U.S. law and public policy during and beyond this period. This course will examine violence and other resistance, focusing on the legal and extra-legal strategies by disadvantaged ethnic minorities challenging de jure and de facto discrimination based on race, color, national origin, and/or ancestry. This course will be of special interest to students interested in social justice and those considering post-graduate legal studies.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Juan Concepcion

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 3311 Studies in Crime and Social Justice Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Crime and social justice are considered not as distinct, but indivisible constructs produced through specific knowable institutional/personal practices. Course allows students to analyze perspectives on the process through which laws and criminal justice institutions have been/continue to be constructed; situate crime study within a "power reflexive" framework, while being attentive to the operation of race, class, and gender as features of contemporary social relations/institutions; discuss contemporary intellectual and practical efforts challenging existing conceptual and political structures relating to crime and social justice; and imagine/articulate institutions paralleling the vision of social justice developed throughout the course.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Jessica Hedges

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SOCY3310

Comments:

AADS 3312 Witches and Apocalypses in Young Adult Fiction Spring 3
Course Description

Recent young adult fiction seems oddly focused on both the supernatural and the post-apocalyptic. In our quest to understand why, we will trace the genre looking specifically at how supernatural entities might uniquely speak to adolescent readers; how post-9/11 fears have been translated into stories where the protagonist must survive in a post-apocalyptic world or navigate a pre-apocalyptic setting in which he or she must save the world. Finally, we will consider how earlier themes: social pressure, race and class tension, family dysfunction, and addiction find expression in the current strand of young adult fiction.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Cynthia Young

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL3302

Comments:

AADS 3313 Anthropology of Africa Fall 3
Course Description

This course introduces major themes in the study of Africa. Anthropological concepts such as culture, power, and subjectivity will be used to explore themes such as race, gender, colonialism, development, indigence, and belonging. We will primarily read ethnographies (texts based on long-term field research) that seek to build our understanding of the world through close attention to the meanings that emerge from particular places and people. Students will learn the tools to analyze contemporary social issues in a variety of African contexts, to understand current research concerns in Africanist Anthropology, and to analyze anthropological concerns in ways that center Africa.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Noah Tamarkin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 3315 Africa and the World Spring 3
Course Description

This course seeks to provide an introduction to key concepts, theoretical debates and analytical tools in comparative politics with a special focus on Sub-Saharan Africa. It is designed to increase your knowledge and critical thinking skills by examining and comparing a variety of different systems of government on the African continent. Using the comparative method, the course prepares you to answer some important questions about politics, such as: Why are certain countries better governed than others? Why do some states become democracies while others remain authoritarian?, and What is the relationship between a type of political regime and economic development?


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Aberra Tesfay

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 3316 Racism: French and American Perspectives Spring 3
Course Description

French visitors have been observing and commenting on race relations in the United States since before the Civil War. During the twentieth century Paris became a magnet attracting disillusioned African-American artists, musicians and writers in search of a home and an opportunity to express their talents. And today the French confront a history of colonialism and struggle to combat racism as they interact with immigrants from former colonies. What is racism? What are the influences that shape attitudes towards race relations? We will explore these issues in the writings of Tocqueville, Beauvoir, Wright, Baldwin, and Fanon, among others.


Instructor(s): Jeff Flagg

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: RLRL3302

Comments:

AADS 3319 Politics of Race & Ethnicity Fall 3
Course Description

This course analyzes the influence of race and ethnicity in political development. It discusses how political decision, actions, omission are the outcome of racial/ethnic politics. The first part of the course (up to 1994) focuses on how race has influenced politics in the United States, Brazil and South Africa. The second part of this course will analyze the impact of ethnicity in democratic and non-democratic politics, its linkage to identity politics, and its impact on global and diaspora politics.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Abel Djassi Amado

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 3322 Haiti Cherie: Haitian Literature and Culture Spring 3
Course Description

This course will focus on the formation of a Haitian literary tradition, along with the historic and cultural factors that have influenced them. We will consider the major movements and themes, such as the 19th century literary movements, the politics of literature, and the role of the Haitian diaspora. How has Haitian literature developed over the years? How have socioeconomic, historical, and political factors been represented? How have Haitian writers taken on the question of language in their writing? Using a chronological approach to chart a timeline of Haitian literature, we will observe various cultural trends in relation to history.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Regine Jean-Charles

Prerequisites: Two courses from the following: FREN3305, FREN3306, FREN3307, FREN3308, FREN3309

Cross listed with: FREN4473

Comments: Conducted in French

AADS 3324 Populism and Military Rule in Latin America Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the broad dynamics of political change in twentieth century Latin America by focusing on two specific models of governance. It examines Latin American politics from the rise of populism in the 1930s to the widespread collapse of democracy and establishment of military regimes in the 1960s-1970s. Through these patterns, we will consider the causes and consequences of industrialization, nationalization, authoritarianism, democratization, and neo-liberalism. The course will focus primarily on Argentina, Brazil, and Chile. We will consider theoretical approaches to Latin American history to understand both the general processes of change and differences that exist among these countries.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Zachary Morgan

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with: HIST4362

Comments: Fulfills Non-Western Requirement for History Majors; Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement

AADS 3325 Revolutionary Cuba: History and Politics Fall 3
Course Description

This course has as its focus Cuba's foreign and domestic policies since the revolution. Because Cuba is, in Fidel Castro's words, a "Latin African" country, some attention will be focused on the issue of race and the revolution in Cuba. Likewise, the history of Cuba's policies in Africa and the Caribbean will be looked at closely. It is, however, not a traditional course in diplomatic history. It explores the interface between domestic and foreign policy throughout, relating this to the specific case of Cuba since 1959.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Frank Taylor

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with: HIST4341

Comments: Fulfills Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

AADS 3329 The Caribbean During the Cold War, 1962-1989 Spring 3
Course Description

The focus is the Caribbean, a vitally strategic area as attested to most recently by the U.S. invasions of the Dominican Republic in 1965, Grenada in 1983, and Panama in 1989. The efforts of these small states to overcome their vulnerabilities provide a most fascinating subject. Of added interest is the fact that outside of Africa, the Caribbean countries are virtually the only sovereign communities of people of African descent in the world. We will analyze the historical ambiance within which the states of the Commonwealth Caribbean operate and evaluate their attempts at maximizing their independence.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Frank Taylor

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with: HIST4342

Comments: Fulfills the Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

AADS 3331 Afro-Latin America Fall 3
Course Description

The course examines the impact of slavery on the Americas, shifting the focus outside of the United States. We will examine the growth of the modern plantation in the 19th century (especially in Brazil and Cuba), examine the various paths to abolition we see throughout Latin America, and through a series of case studies, examine various forms of African-American identity and community. Additionally, we will look at the comparative abolition of slavery in the U.S. and Cuba as well the role of race in the struggle between Haitians and Dominicans on the island of Hispaniola.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Zachary Morgan

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with: HIST4832

Comments: Fulfills Non-Western requirement for history majors

AADS 3340 Gender and Sexuality in African American History Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the intersections of gender and sexuality as both categories of identity and modes of power in the shaping of the historical experiences of African Americans. Through readings and lecture, we will explore three broad and interconnecting themes: how cultural understandings of race have impacted cultural understandings of gender and sexuality (and vice versa); how dominant cultural notions of gender and sexuality have underpinned relations of power between blacks and whites; and how gender and sexuality have shaped relationships within African American communities.


Instructor(s): Martin Summers

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with: HIST4484

Comments:

AADS 3343 Introduction to Black Philosophy Spring 3
Course Description

This course introduces students to writings by and about persons of African descent. Readings will be drawn from works by G. Yancey, H. McGary, W. Lawson, W.E.B. DuBois, H.L. Gates, C. West, L. Outlaw, and B. Boxill.


Instructor(s): Jorge Garcia

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL3343

Comments:

AADS 3357 Haiti and Globalization Fall 3
Course Description

The first independent Black Republic, Haiti occupies a prominent place in the African diaspora. This course introduces Haitian Studies through art, literature, history, and politics. We will utilize an interdisciplinary approach drawing from historical documents, poetry, novels, and film to obtain a critical perspective on the Haitian past, present and future. We will examine discourses surrounding Haiti and observe how artists and scholars have responded to them. We will provide a critical context for understanding perspectives on religion (vodou, Catholicisim, evangelical Protestantism), politics (USA occupations, Duvlaier dictatorship, Aristide presidencies), society (classism, poverty), and environment (floods of 2008, earthquake of 2010).


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): R&#233gine Michelle Jean-Charles

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 3360 History of Racism Spring 3
Course Description

A broad chronological survey of a topic of major social significance. Themes are drawn from different cultures in order to establish what is distinctive to racism in the modern Euro-American world. Moving beyond white-black polarities in the United States, this course will complicate our understanding of race and racism, categories which themselves must not be taken for granted but instead must first be analyzed before the phenomena they supposedly define can be studied. These problematic categories must then be set in time and place so that we can understand how, when, and where they do or do not emerge.


Instructor(s): Benjamin Braude

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with: HIST4253

Comments:

AADS 3362 South African Struggles, South African Lives Fall 3
Course Description

In South Africa, the struggle often refers to mobilizations against the racist Apartheid regime that was in power from 1948 to 1994. The struggle against Apartheid is just one site through which we will study meanings and practices of struggle in South Africa. We will examine various struggles for independence, livelihoods, rights and justice before, during and after Apartheid. We will pay close attention to the struggles that people engage and enact in their lives, and we will approach discourses and meanings of concepts like culture, belonging, and politics as sites of struggle in and of themselves.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 3363 The History and Literature of South Africa Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL2317 HIST2681

Comments:

AADS 3366 Philosophies of Black Struggle: African Independence and the US Civil Rights Movement Fall 3
Course Description

James H. Meriwether describes an ambivalent relationship between African liberation leaders and the US Civil Rights Movement. Alphonse Elungu claims that an African ideology of political liberation originated in the Americas and led to African political independence. Another critical strain suggests the African independence strengthened US Civil Rights. Finally, before relationships between Africa and its Diaspora were social and political they were religious and intellectual. Looking at the work of prominent thinkers, writers, philosophers and leaders in the Diaspora, we explore the complex relationships between Black Africans and African Americans in their respective struggles for freedom and searches for identity.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Donatien Cicura

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 3373 Slave Societies in the Caribbean and Latin America Fall 3
Course Description

Over 90 percent of slaves imported into the Americas during the Atlantic slave trade were brought to the Caribbean Islands and South America. The Caribbean Islands received 42.2 percent of the total slave imports and South America 49.1 percent. Among the topics covered are the rise and fall of slavery, the economics of slave trading, slave demography, patterns of slave life, slave laws, slave resistance, slave culture, social structure, and the roles of the freed people. The compass of the course embraces a variety of English, French, Portuguese, Spanish, and Dutch speaking countries and a comparative approach.


Instructor(s): Frank Taylor

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with: HIST4343

Comments: Fulfills Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

AADS 3375 African American Theater and Drama Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines how African American playwrights have combined historical narrative, personal recollection, spirituality and religion, popular music, and folk art to create a unique form of American drama that reflects the traumas and triumphs of African Americans. Plays to be studied range from William Wells Brown's autobiographical Escape; or, A Leap for Freedom (1858) to Lorraine Hansbury's inspirational A Raisin in the Sun (1959) to Lydia Diamond's contemporary comedy Stick Fly (2006).


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): John Houchin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: THTR3385

Comments:

AADS 3381 Black and Green: Race and Urban Ecology Fall 3
Course Description

Race has been a controversial topic for the largely White and affluent environmental movement. In this course we will examine how this racial bias has arisen and what many are doing to promote more diverse and equitable strategies for sustainability. Using a historical and sociological perspective we will cover key modes of environmental thought coming from African American, Latino, Asian, and Indigenous communities. Themes include the legacy of slavery and its effect on participation in the environmental movement, the role of racialized modes of thought such as hip hop, and the environmental justice movement.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Mike Cermak

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SOCY3350

Comments:

AADS 3390 Making Popular Culture Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores popular goods, television, movies, music, dance, art, sports, festivals, and holidays from a sociological perspective. What is the difference between popular culture and high culture? Where does popular culture come from and what role does it play in society? What do people do with popular culture? How does popular culture intersect with race, class, and gender? The class will be framed around the theoretical traditions of conflict theory (how popular culture influences inequality) and symbolic interactionism (how people construct and interpret popular culture). Students will analyze a popular culture event of their choice through a field assignment.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Danielle Hedegard and The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SOCY3390

Comments:

AADS 4190 Decolonization and the Cold War in Africa Fall 3
Course Description

After decades of organizing and protest, African colonies began to gain independence from imperial rule in the late 1950s. Newly sovereign nation-states were born into a turbulent Cold War world, which both provided unprecedented opportunities for political experimentation and posed significant threats to young Third World countries. Caught in the middle of geopolitical contests between Western and communist powers, Africans strove to navigate these complex global dynamics while forging nation-building programs and continuing to support ongoing liberation struggles. This course reflects upon this era of political upheaval and transformation, focusing on case studies from across sub-Saharan Africa.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Priya Lal

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with: HIST4190

Comments: Fulfills Non-Western Requirement for History Majors

AADS 4405 American Masculinities Spring 3
Course Description

This course surveys the history of masculinity in the United States from the colonial era to the late twentieth century. It explores how men and women have constructed ideas of manhood; how those ideas have been shaped by other categories of identity such as race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, and region; and how men have performed their identities as gendered beings. This course will examine the ways in which masculinity has been historically constituted in the United States and how men and women of varying backgrounds have affirmed, contested, and/or disrupted these historically-constituted meanings of manhood.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Martin Summers

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with: HIST4459

Comments:

AADS 4414 Race and Philosophy Fall 3
Course Description

This course employs methods of recent Anglophone philosophy to examine such topics as the bases and justification of racial solidarity; whether races are real and, if so, what they are (social constructions? natural categories?) and how they come to exist; racial identity; and the nature, preconditions, loci, subjects, and targets of racism.


Instructor(s): Jorge Garcia

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: PHIL4414

Comments:

AADS 4435 Global Anglophone Literatures: Asia, Africa, and the Middle East Spring 3
Course Description

This course opens a wealth of contemporary literature from the non-Western world mainly Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia that have expanded readers’ imaginations and enriched the English language in a variety of genres. We shall read fiction and non-fiction alongside cultural theory to deepen our understanding of the political, economic, and environmental issues that arise in these lands and the ways in which they impact the daily lives of people as delineated by some of the world’s most acclaimed authors. Readings may include works by Adhaf Souief (Egypt), Hisham Matar (Libya), Leila Aboulela (Sudan), Xiaolu Guo (China), Amitav Ghosh (India), Romesh Gunesekera (Sri Lanka), Mohsin Hamid (Pakistan), Samrat Upadhyay (Nepal), and others.


Instructor(s): Kalpana Seshadri

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL4435

Comments:

AADS 4442 Intercultural Communication Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course studies communication as it relates to society and as it occurs inter-culturally and internationally. In those contexts, questions and issues will be pursued which reveal processes, effects, methods, and critical norms for evaluating interpersonal, group, and mass communication.


Instructor(s): Marilyn Matelski and Michael Serazio

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: COMM4442

Comments: Satisfies one of two writing intensive courses required within the Communication major

AADS 4460 New Orleans: Justice in the City Fall 3
Course Description

This course investigates, analyzes, and grapples with the history, persistent problems, and prospects of New Orleans a decade after Hurricane Katrina.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): M. Shawn Copeland

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 4472 Race, Law, and Media Spring/Fall 3
Course Description

This writing intensive course focuses on the relationship between race, law, and media. We will read seminal texts in critical race theory and cultural studies in order to theorize how concepts such as race, criminality, deviance, property, and originality are articulated in legal contexts, often in ways which make whiteness appear to be natural and right. Then, by way of case studies such as the Scottsboro Boys, the Central Park Five, Korematsu versus United States, Prosecutor versus Charles Taylor, and State versus Zimmerman, we will explore how the media represents race and law.


Instructor(s): Anjali Vats

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: COMM4472

Comments: Satisfies one of two writing intensive courses required within the Communication major

AADS 4481 History of Black Nationalism Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the evolution and diversity of Black Nationalism and nationalist ideologies in the United States from the early nineteenth century through the present. Detailed study of several distinct nationalistic strategies, including emigrationist, separatist, cultural, and accomodationist, and their proponents will allow students to analyze and compare the forces influencing the evolution, proliferation, retrenchment, and resurgence of nationalist constructs at various points in African American history.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Karen Miller

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with: HIST4481

Comments:

AADS 4482 Ghana and the U.S.: Historical and Cultural Connections Fall 3
Course Description

Course examines selected historical and cultural intersections between Ghana, West Africa and the United States. We explore "African" and "American" components of African American identity through course readings, film and lectures that focus on four connected areas: slavery/slave trade, civil rights/independence movements, emigration/immigration, and identity/cultural exchange. Ghana is uniquely situated for such comparative study because of its recurring presence in the unfolding of African American history, including its roles as inspiration to Martin Luther King, home to scholar WEB DuBois, haven to African American emigrants, and producer of the kente cloth many wear


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Karen Miller

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with: HIST4482

Comments:

AADS 4483 African American Life Stories Fall 3
Course Description

A recurring theme in African American life histories is the narration of the moment when the black subject or author first becomes aware of himself/herself as a racial being in a society in which blackness has meaning. This course examines how these kinds of moments shaped individual perspectives of personal and racial identity and uses narratives and autobiographies to analyze how meanings of blackness are shaped by region, class, gender, sexuality, and historical context.


Instructor(s): Karen Miller

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with: HIST4483

Comments:

AADS 4625 Seminar: Toni Morrison Spring 3
Course Description

Through Toni Morrison's oeuvre, readers can explore a variety of North American cultural and historical preoccupations, particularly as interpreted through an African American purview. In this course we will explore thematic and artistic concerns that arise in Morrison's fiction and nonfiction and thus gain insight into the culture of the United States. The following themes shape this course: dominant cultural mores and their impact (The Bluest Eye); legacies of slavery (Beloved); culture as a sustaining force (Song of Solomon); women's responses to patriarchy (Sula); homogenizing impulses in dominant culture (Tar Baby); creation and use of culture (Jazz).


Instructor(s): Rhonda Frederick

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL4625

Comments:

AADS 4900 AADS and Community Action Fall 3
Course Description

This seminar examines themes in the field of African Diaspora Studies and emphasizes discipline-based research methods that compliment the majors of AADS minors (e.g.: Communication, English, History, Political Science, and Sociology). Engaging these themes and methods, students will focus on this seminar's theme: "Community Activism." Engaging this topic from Arts, Humanities, and Social Science perspectives increase students' knowledge of intersectional issues, and make them invaluable assets to CEO sites that serve local communities, conduct research, or are invested in social policy or human services. Students will demonstrate their mastery of these essentials in their critical reflections blogs and final research essay.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Rhonda Frederick

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: Third or Fourth year (under special circumstances, 2nd year students may be considered) AADS Minors or AADS Independent Majors are eligible to enroll in this course.

AADS 4950 Readings and Research Spring/Fall 3
Course Description

Students who wish to pursue a semester of directed readings with individual faculty members under this category must secure the permission of the faculty member and the Director of the African & African Diaspora Studies Program. Lists of faculty members and their fields can be obtained from the Program.


Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 5385 Health and Disease in the African American Experience Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines the historical relationships between race, medicine, and health care from the era of New World slavery to the age of AIDS. In doing so, we will pay particular attention to the role of ideas of racial difference in the production of medical knowledge, the historical persistence of racial disparities in the delivery of health care, and folk and professional healing within the African American community.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Martin Summers

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with: HIST4486

Comments:

AADS 5400 Making Americans Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines the cultural diversity of American literature. It focuses on the themes of self-invention and re-invention in multi-ethnic texts with an emphasis on African American and immigrant writers. Genres and topics include: slave narratives, passing novels and the color line, coming-of-age stories, assimilation and Americanization, Orientalism, blackface performance, whiteness and the Africanist presence, transnationalism, urbanism and regionalism, multiracial and “post-race” identities, and post-9/11 immigrant experiences. Although the course will focus primarily on racial and ethnic diversity in American literature, we will also consider how gender, sexuality, and class intersect with ethno-racial difference.


Instructor(s): Lori Harrison-Kahan

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL4531

Comments:

AADS 5508 Black Modernity Fall 3
Course Description

An interdisciplinary approach will be used to examine the historical, social, and cultural contexts for Ralph Ellison's "Invisible Man". Specifically, bringing historical and cultural analysis to bear on a single work of fiction, this course will survey key themes in African American life from 1899 to 1950 including migration, urbanization, the black modern aesthetic, black radicalism and black nationalism. With W.E.B. DuBois's concept of "double consciousness" in mind, the course explores how the black subject is in many ways both outside of, yet central to, the modern experience.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Davarian Baldwin

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 5509 Black Theology Fall 3
Course Description

Interrogates some of the ways in which biblical teaching and religious doctrine interact with race, simultaneously to impede and to facilitate cultural, social, and existential liberation.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): M. Shawn Copeland

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 5511 Race and Political Science: Gender and In(Security) in Conflict and Post-Conflict Settings Spring 3
Course Description

This course aims to introduce students to the theories of gender and security. It also seeks to foster an understanding of how gender affects men and women's experiences of (in)security during and after conflict and, of how (in)security constitutes gendered norms and practices. The course draws on debates and lessons from across the globe but focuses on conflict and post-conflict settings in Africa.the shifting demographics and the cultural transformation they bring with them.


Instructor(s): Peace Medie

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 5512 History of Black Nationalism Spring 3
Course Description

This course examines the evolution and diversity of Black Nationalism and nationalist ideologies in the United States from the early nineteenth century through the present. Detailed study of several distinct nationalist strategies, including emigrationist, separatist, cultural, and accommodationist, and their proponents will allow students to analyze and compare the forces influencing the evolution, proliferation, retrenchment, and resurgence of nationalist constructs at various points in African-American history.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Karen Miller

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 5513 Capstone: Growing Up Ethnic in America Spring 3
Course Description

In this seminar students will read writing that depicts a variety of experiences but suggest that what constitutes an American identity is far from settled. Ethnic difference has a profound effect on personal and social understandings of what it means to be an American. As we discuss the literature, students will be expected to share their own personal narratives of growing up – stories of race, ethnicity, class, gender, faith, and nationality – and what it means to be American. Some of the writers we will read include: Jhumpa Lahiri, Amy Tan, Louise Erdrich, Chang Rae-Lee,Sherman Alexie, Sandra Cisneros, Junot Diaz, Edwidge Danticat, Mat Johnson and Ta-Nehisi Coates.


Instructor(s): Akua Sarr

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: UNCP5514

Comments:

AADS 5514 American Civil War and Reconstruction Fall 3
Course Description

In this course, we will study how the wrenching changes of the Civil War era created modern America. We will study political and military developments from 1861 to 1865 and will also focus on changes in government, economy, and society in the North, South, and West during and immediately after the war years.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Heather Richardson

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094.

Cross listed with: HIST4420

Comments:

AADS 5515 Race and Capitalism:Blackness in Global Economy from Slavery to Mass Incarceration Spring 3
Course Description

This course explores how violence against black bodies has been an integral component of global economic development from the eighteenth century to the present. Focusing broadly on the African diaspora, we will study the history of capitalism's racial violence as it leverages cultural forms, norms and identities: how it is lived through the uneven social formations of race, gender, nationality, and sexuality, among others. We will critique relationships among capitalist economies, race, and culture in the United States, the Caribbean, Africa, and beyond, particularly as they develop from histories of racial slavery, colonial expansion, ghettoization, mass incarceration, and overseas warfare.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Justin Leroy

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 5516 African Rhythms in Latin American Music Spring 3
Course Description

This course studies the African influence on the music of Latin America and the Caribbean as a reflection of historical, social, religious, cultural, and economic events. Emphasis will be placed on selected music genres in South America. Students will have the opportunity to learn and play traditional rhythms on native percussion instruments.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Leo Blanco

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments: No musical skills are required.

AADS 5517 Geographies of Violence & Resistance in Africa Spring 3
Course Description

From resistance against Shell Oil in Nigeria’s Ogoniland to the revolutionary movement led by Thomas Sankara in Burkina Faso, this course looks at geographies of violence and resistance. Using case studies across West and Central Africa, we examine the routes/roots of protest movements and "nonmovements" against colonial, neo-imperial, and structural forms of violence. Challenging ethnic, religious, and race-based interpretations that naturalize violence in African places, we outline a comprehensive historical and spatial examination of violence, emphasizing that resistance and violence have particular geographies. We become acquainted with debates on the interconnections between violence, space, and development in Human Geography.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Amber Murrey-Ndewa

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 5518 Women Writers of Africa&The African Diaspora Spring 3
Course Description

This course will comparatively look at portrayals of girlhood, womanhood, sisterhood and motherhood in the works of women writers in Africa and the African Diaspora. We will closely examine how issues of identity such as race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class and nationality intersect and create very particular positions for the characters within the texts. We will use the characters' particular positionality to think critically about issues concerning black women. The historical breadth covered by the novels will encourage us to compare women's issues not only in terms of identity construction and geographical location, but across different eras as well.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Siphiwe Ndlovu

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 5533 History of Medicine and Public Health in the African Diaspora Fall 3
Course Description

This course examines the historical relationships between race, medicine, and health care from the era of New World slavery to the age of AIDS. In doing so, we will pay particular attention to the role of ideas of racial difference in the production of medical knowledge, the historical persistence of racial disparities in the delivery of health care, and folk and professional healing within the African American community.


Instructor(s): Martin Summers

Prerequisites: The History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with: HIST4485

Comments:

AADS 5553 The Old South From Colonial Times to 1860 Spring 3
Course Description

The course analyzes the settlement patterns, sectional distinctiveness, political ideology, development of slavery and the plantation system, abolitionism and the slavery defense, and the growth of Southern nationalism; and it evaluates the influence of these factors, particularly the South's commitment to slavery, in shaping Southern society.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Cynthia Lyerly

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 5565 American Immigration I: to 1924 Fall 3
Course Description

This is the first half of a two-semester sequence on American immigration. The first half covers the period up to 1924 and the second half from 1924 to the present. Each half can be taken independently of the other. This semester we focus on the interaction between Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans; voluntary and involuntary migration; the impact of the American Revolution; the onset of mass immigration from Europe; the politics of nativism, slavery, and citizenship in the era of the Civil War; and the onset of federal regulation of immigration in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Kevin Kenny

Prerequisites: History Core

Cross listed with: HIST4491

Comments:

AADS 5566 American Immigration II (From 1865) Fall 3
Course Description

This is the second half of a two-semester lecture course on American immigration. The first half covers the period up to 1865 and the second from 1865 to the present. Each half can be taken independently of the other. This semester we examine the history of Irish, Italian, Jewish, Latino, and Asian Americans since the Civil War, with particular attention to the overseas origins of migration; patterns of settlement and mobility; questions of ethnicity, race, labor, and class; anti-immigrant sentiment; and government policy.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Arissa Oh

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HIST1001 through HIST1094

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 5570 Social Action in America Spring 3
Course Description

This service-learning course examines the history of social action in twentieth-century America. In an effort to understand how systems of power have shaped race, class, and gender relations, fostered inequality, and spurred activism, we will conduct case studies of several liberal and radical social movements including settlement houses, the labor movement, Alinsky-style community organizing, southern civil rights, and the War on Poverty. Students in the class must also participate in a local community service/action project for at least 3 hours per week, the functions and history of which will be the subject of classroom discussion, service reflection, and research.


Instructor(s): Marilynn Johnson

Prerequisites: History Core, Parts I and II

Cross listed with: HIST4476

Comments:

AADS 5596 Black Families and Society Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This course will examine Black families within the United States. This reading and participation intensive seminar will analyze family dynamics from a race, class, and gender perspective and will not assume a uniform Black family experience. Although we will pay careful attention to the historical foundations for many of the contemporary issues now facing families of African descent, we will primarily focus on modern day dynamics and debates within and outside of Black families.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Shawn McGuffey

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SOCY5596

Comments: Cross-listed with AADS5596. To get sociology credit for the major or minor, you must register for SOCY5596.

AADS 5597 Contemporary Race Theory Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

This class will explore how various contemporary writers engage with the question of race, both in the United States and transnationally. We will look at social constructionist theories of race, postmodernism, feminist theory, critical legal studies, and the intersection between contemporary race theory and queer theory.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Zine Magubane

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SOCY5597

Comments: To get sociology credit for the major or minor, you must register for SOCY5597 rather than cross-listed course.

AADS 5598 Politics of Black Sexuality Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

Using Black bodies as a focal point, this course will examine the intersections of race and sexuality in the U.S. on both an inter-personal and national level. Although we will pay careful attention to the historical foundations for many of the contemporary issues now facing people of African descent, we will primarily focus on modern day dynamics and debates within and outside of African-American communities. Topics covered include: poverty and social policy, family and sex education, religion, hip-hop, and public health.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Shawn McGuffey

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SOCY5598

Comments:

AADS 6600 Senior Seminar Spring 4
Course Description

This course explores the discourses of diaspora by taking into account the origins, various meanings, multiple dimensions, cultural iterations, and restrictive limitations of the term. How does "the practice of diaspora" translate in different forms of cultural work such as music, film and literature? How has diaspora shifted in the age of globalization? How can we use diaspora as an analytical tool for reading from a critical perspective? We will consider closely how diaspora is theorized, practiced, and represented in various forms of cultural production. Therefore we will be taking an interdisciplinary approach reading across genre, medium, and disciplines.


Instructor(s): Karen Miller

Prerequisites: AADS1110 Introduction to the African Diaspora

Cross listed with:

Comments:

AADS 6613 Race, Nation, and the Terrorist Subject Fall 3
Course Description

TBD


Instructor(s): Cynthia Young

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL8835

Comments:

AADS 6660 Literature of the Hispanic Caribbean Spring 3
Course Description

This course will examine the literature of the Spanish-speaking Caribbean from the colonial period to the twentieth century. Particular attention will be given to the ways in which writers seek to represent social concerns related to issues of race, gender, criollo culture, and emerging nationalism in the context of aesthetic and political debates. Course materials will explore the phenomenon of transculturation in literature (essay, short story, autobiography, novel, poetry) as well as in film, music, and the visual arts.


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Sarah Beckjord

Prerequisites: Contextos, concurrent enrollment in Contextos, or permission of instructor.
Open to undergraduates with permission of instructor.

Cross listed with: SPAN6660

Comments: Conducted in Spanish
Fulfills the pre-1800 requirement for Hispanic Studies Majors
Elective for Latin American Studies Minors

AADS 7493 Diversity and Cross-Cultural Issues Fall 3
Course Description

The course provides a critical perspective on current issues and problems in American racism, sexism, heterosexism, ablism, and ageism. These issues and problems are studied in the context of the dynamics of social process, historical and anthropological perspectives, and theories of prejudice and social change. Social work's responsibility to contribute to solutions is emphasized. Different models for examining the issues of race, sex, sexual orientation, age, and ability are presented.


Instructor(s): The Department

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: SCWK7723

Comments: Required of all M.S.W. students.

AADS 7751 Race & Cultural Theory Spring 3
Course Description


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Cynthia Young

Prerequisites: None

Cross listed with: ENGL7751

Comments:

AADS 7799 Readings and Research Fall/Spring 3
Course Description

TBD


Schedule: Periodically

Instructor(s): Regine Jean-Charles

Prerequisites: Departmental permission

Cross listed with:

Comments: